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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = PHIL
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 76 of 76
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
PHIL 151 — Philosophical Dimensions of Personal Decisions
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions.

A systematic philosophical study of issues that arise in making decisions about how to lead one's life. Among the questions to be considered are: In what sense, if any, are we able to choose our lives? In what ways, if any, must we be able to justify our lives — to others, to ourselves? What are the sources of meaning, worth, and identity in our lives?

PHIL 152 — Philosophy of Human Nature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions.

A study of philosophical conceptions of human nature and its uniqueness, and of their implications for morality and human knowledge.

PHIL 152 — Philosophy of Human Nature
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions.

A study of philosophical conceptions of human nature and its uniqueness, and of their implications for morality and human knowledge.

PHIL 155 — The Nature of Science
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions.

An examination of the nature and methods of science, especially in relation to the natural sciences. Topics include: observation and evidence, the objectivity of science, causality and explanation, the reality of scientific constructs, the development of scientific theories, and the use of mathematics in science.

PHIL 155 — The Nature of Science
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: Students are strongly advised not to take more than two Philosophy Introductions.

An examination of the nature and methods of science, especially in relation to the natural sciences. Topics include: observation and evidence, the objectivity of science, causality and explanation, the reality of scientific constructs, the development of scientific theories, and the use of mathematics in science.

PHIL 180 — Introductory Logic
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

PHIL 180 is a combination of formal and "informal" logic. It covers diagramming argument structures, fallacy theory, Mill's methods, intensional vs. extensional definitions, syllogistic logic, and propositional logic.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 181 — Philosophical Issues: An Introduction
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Lormand,Eric P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Our discussions will center on the relationship between reason and emotion, their respective roles in determining our choices, actions, and the overall shape of our lives. Other classic philosophical questions having to do with the metaphysical relationship between mind and body, the nature and extent of scientific knowledge will be introduced in relation to this central question. Readings will be drawn from the works of Plato, Descartes, and contemporary philosophers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 005, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

Humans are free. We are capable of free choice and action. When we act freely, nothing makes us do what we do, so we could have acted differently. Thus, if circumstances (like fear, pain, or oppression) compel or determine an act — so that one could not have acted differently — then it was not done freely.

The universe, on the other hand, follows the laws of nature. Causes produce their effects in strict accord with those laws. So every event is determined by its causes to occur precisely as it does, and it could not have occurred differently.

But humans are parts of the universe! So, every human choice and action is an event determined by its causes in accord with the laws of nature. Since it must therefore occur exactly as it does, in no case could one have chosen or acted other than as one did. So humans are not free.

Just a little thinking and we've put ourselves into a terrible bind. That's philosophy. The aim of the class is to get out of the bind, if we can, by re-examining these concepts and assumptions as carefully and rationally as possible. That too is philosophy. We'll read and discuss some of the most important modern work on these subjects by professional philosophers. There will also be reading quizzes, a midterm exam, two short papers, and a final.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 196 — First Year Seminar
Section 006, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This course is designed to provide first-year students with an intensive introduction to philosophy in a seminar format. The content varies, depending on the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 006, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 007, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 201 — Introduction to Logic
Section 008, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 180 or 201.

An introduction to logic at the elementary level. Topics include discussions of such notions as the validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature of argument, and the justification of belief. Basic elements of deductive reasoning are considered, and there is a survey of fundamental principles of modern formal logic. Elements of inductive reasoning may also be discussed.

The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 003, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 004, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 005, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 202 — Introduction to Philosophy
Section 006, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 231, 232, 234, or 297.

This course introduces students to philosophy through an examination of some central philosophical problems. Topics might include some of the following:

    Are minds immaterial spirits, or are minds brains and hence nothing but complex physical objects?
    If human actions are causally determined by heredity and environment, is there any moral responsibility?
    Is abortion, or euthanasia, or suicide, morally permissible?
    Is the nature and extent of our moral obligations determined by our feelings, self-interest, social convention, Divine commands, or something else?
    What are the reasons for preferring one kind of social, political, and economic organization to another?
    Are there good reasons for believing that God exists?
    How do we know that anything exists, other than ourselves?

Some sections focus on major historical figures, e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, and Kant; others focus on writings of twentieth century philosophers.

Requirements usually include a number of short, critical papers. The course is taught in sections of 25 students, which should allow for ample discussion.

PHIL 230 — Introduction to Buddhism
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

In this course, you will form a basic acquaintance with some representative ideas and practices of the Buddhist Tradition in its development of some two thousand five hundred years. We will devote the bulk of the course to exploring the origins and development of Buddhism in India, the land of its birth. In the final few weeks we will make a survey of the transmission and vicissitudes of Buddhism elsewhere, lingering for stops in Tibet, China, Japan, and North America. Throughout this time, you will be asked to use these materials continuously to test your own criteria for defining "religion," and your ideas of how we can have fruitful encounters with the religious traditions of others (and this applies even if you are yourself a practicing Buddhist). Other key themes that you will encounter in the presentation of Buddhism include:

  1. Buddhism and the visual arts and literature;
  2. Buddhism and its troubled relationship with state authority and violence;
  3. the modulating effects of factors like gender, class, and ethnic identity on the experience of Buddhism; and
  4. Buddhism and its acculturation to new cultural spheres.
There will be considerable readings of selected Buddhist primary texts in English. Course requirements include regular attendance, biweekly short response papers and two exams (midterm and final).

PHIL 232 — Problems of Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Proops,Ian N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 234, or 297.

This course is open to students from all units in the University. No previous work in philosophy is assumed. First-term undergraduates are welcome. The course will provide an introduction to some fundamental philosophical problems drawn from a variety of branches of philosophy. A selection from the following topics will be discussed:

1.determinism, free will, and moral responsibility;
2.arguments for and against the existence of God;
3.personal identity;
4.the ethics of belief;
5.egoism, altruism, and the nature of moral obligation; and
6. applied ethics.

The course also seeks to develop, through written work and intensive discussion, skills in critical reasoning, analytical thinking and argumentative writing.

The course has two hours of lecture and two hours of discussion section each week. There will be two required papers and one in-section writing exercise. The sole required text is Reason and Responsibility, by Joel Feinberg and Russ Shafer Landau (13th edition). It will be available toward the end of the summer vacation at Shaman Drum.

The website for the class is available on the Professor's webpage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~iproops/

PHIL 262 — Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Curley,Edwin M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course treats religion philosophically. It examines, critically, the fundamental concepts and doctrines common to such monotheistic religions as Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. It will discuss non-monotheistic religions only in passing.

Among the questions it will consider are:

  • What do we mean when we affirm (or deny) the existence of God?
  • What good reasons are there to believe (or not believe) in God?
  • Is there a conflict between religion and science?
  • Does morality depend on religion?
  • Are there good reasons for us to be tolerant of those whose religious beliefs differ from ours?

PHIL 296 — Honors Introduction to Logic
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 203, 303, or 296.

An introduction to the study of modern formal logic, with attention to its mathematical development and to its philosophical foundations and applications.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 296 — Honors Introduction to Logic
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 203, 303, or 296.

Logic is typically understood as the systematic and rigorous study of inference and argument — the science of figuring out what follows from what, and why. Formal logic does this by thinking about systems of inference in a mathematical way. We will build on this idea. But logicians aren't just in Mathematics and Philosophy departments anymore. Logic has become an important tool across disciplines. So we will set ourselves two goals: understanding the basic tools of formal logic, and understanding how those tools are developed, extended, and deployed to shed light on problems in philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 297 — Honors Introduction to Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234.

A thorough examination of selected philosophical problems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 297 — Honors Introduction to Philosophy
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234.

A thorough examination of selected philosophical problems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 297 — Honors Introduction to Philosophy
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Gibbard,Allan F; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 181, 182, 202, 231, 232, or 234.

A thorough examination of selected philosophical problems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 303 — Introduction to Symbolic Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tappenden,James P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHIL 203, 296 or 414.

Historically, at least two concerns have driven the development of formal systems of logic to make explicit principles of good reasoning and to systematize inquiry in mathematics and the physical sciences. Central to these concerns is the idea that good reasoning is "truth-preserving" reasoning. ("Truth-preserving" reasoning cannot fail to take one from true premises to true conclusions.) One goal we have in the study of logic is to get a grasp on which forms of argument are truth-preserving and which are not. In this course, we study two simple yet powerful systems of formal logic — "sentential" logic, which takes sentences as the basic unit of logical analysis, and "predicate" logic, which takes predicates and terms as the basic units. In the course of learning these systems, we will have the chance to apply formal techniques in analyzing ordinary, garden-variety arguments, and in solving various practical problems. Crucial additional concepts that have to be analyzed is the idea of a mechanical procedure or *algorithm*, and the idea of a formal language. This will require the course to study the abstract idea of a computing machine. After mastering these logics, we'll raise some important questions concerning their power and dependability. In order to answer our questions we will have to develop a "meta-theory" for the systems we've studied. And along the way, we will learn to employ the extremely important tool of mathematical induction. No previous training in logic is required. Frequent homework assignments, two midterm examinations, and a final examination.

PHIL 340 — Mind, Matter, and Machines
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Theories of the human mind, and their relation to models of computation. This introduction to the foundations of cognitive science will read material from Philosophy, Psychology, and Computer Science, especially Artificial Intelligence.

http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/courses/phil340

PHIL 359 — Law and Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Elizabeth S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course analyzes law and legal institutions from the perspective of moral and political philosophy, with particular attention to U.S. civil rights law in historical context.

Topics studied in this course include:

  • methods of legal interpretation,
  • equality and discrimination,
  • democracy and voting rights,
  • property rights and distributive justice,
  • the tension between social control and liberty (including specific liberties, such as free exercise of religion), and
  • the justification for punishing lawbreakers (or for imposing specific punishments, such as the death penalty).

Readings will be drawn:

  • from historical figures (Locke, Hume, Bentham, Mill);
  • from contemporary legal philosophers;
  • from texts in legal history, criminology, or sociology; and
  • from statutes and court decisions.

Requirements include substantial readings, three short papers, a final examination, and class participation.

PHIL 361 — Ethics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Darwall,Stephen Leicester; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This is a course in philosophical ethics. We will explore questions of what is called "normative ethics": What has value? What are our moral obligations? We shall also study philosophical, "metaethical" issues about ethics. Here we shall want to know not just what has value, but what value is. And not just what we are morally obligated to do, but what moral obligation is and where it "comes from." The core of the course will be an examination of three central traditions in ethical philosophy in the West, typified by Aristotle, Immanuel Kant, and John Stuart Mill, followed by a radical critique of these traditions by Friedrich Nietzsche. We will also do a section on metaethics with readings from classical and contemporary sources, including the existentialists. And we shall end the course by considering a recent critique of traditional moral philosophy inspired by the work of the psychologist Carol Gilligan on gender and moral development. Lecture and discussion, with an emphasis on student participation. Two papers of 5-7 pages in length, a midterm, and a final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction.

PHIL 383 — Knowledge and Reality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Egan,Andrew Michael; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

In this course, we will be concerned with issues in epistemology (that's the knowledge part) issues in metaphysics (that's the reality part), and the connections between them (that's the and part). In epistemology: To what extent does the possibility that we could be having subjectively indistinguishable experiences from the ones we're having if we were dreaming, in the Matrix, or brains in vats being systematically deceived by malevolent super-scientists, undermine our ordinary claims to knowledge? Everything would seem just the same to me if I were a handless brain in a vat — so do I really know that I have hands? What does it mean, exactly, to say that we know something, anyway? And why is knowledge the sort of thing that we should care about? In metaphysics, we'll be concerned primarily with issues about causation. It turns out to be surprisingly hard to say just what it is for one event to cause another, and we'll look at some candidate accounts.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy.

PHIL 388 — History of Philosophy: Ancient
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Caston,Victor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Western philosophy from its historical beginning through the Hellenistic period and including the Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Stoicism, and Scepticism.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction. A knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required.

PHIL 399 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

Advisory Prerequisite: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor.

PHIL 401 — Undergraduate Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Railton,Peter A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

PHIL 401 is open to seniors who are declared Honors concentrators in Philosophy, and to others by permission of the instructor. The seminar functions as an intensive workshop designed to help students identify and begin an independent philosophical research project. The seminar will provide advice, discussion, feedback, and support to enable students to enter the Winter Term in a good position to write a successful Honors Thesis. The seminar begins with several weeks of general discussion about research methods and basic methodological questions in philosophy, and then enters a sequence of stages in which students are asked to write a prospectus, a critical literature survey, a proto-chapter, and to give in-class presentations of work in progress.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors concentrators in Philosophy and others by permission of instructor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Curley,Edwin M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A discussion of selected topics of contemporary philosophical interest within a seminar format. Students write papers for presentation and discussion in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The seminar will be dedicated to the presentation, interpretation, and critical discussion of moral realism. The first part of the seminar will introduce, through the reading of selected classical texts, to the main varieties of moral realism, concentrating on the different standards of realism that have been put forward and on the different sorts of items that have been proposed for a realist treatment (objects and properties of value; truth-conditions of moral judgments; moral reasons). The second part will concentrate on whether and how successfully moral realism can address questions like the content of moral thoughts, the justification of moral claims, and moral motivation. The seminar will also discuss the major alternatives to moral realism that have been proposed in the contemporary meta-ethical debate and will attempt to assess, in view of the principal features of moral experience and practice, how far we can go in moral theorizing without an option of realism.

The reading for the seminar will include short selections from the classics of moral philosophy, Aristotle to Kant. It will also include more specialized texts by authors like Blackburn, Brink, Dancy, Harman, Mackie, McDowell, Moore, Parfit, Prichard, Railton, Ross, Smith, Williams, and others. Students will be required to write two papers, under supervision. The first one, 5 to 7 pages, due after midterm, will review, reconstruct, and criticize, one of the papers that will be read in the seminar. The second one, 8 to 10 pages, due at the end of the term, will address more general issues concerning moral realism, as they have emerged from the discussion in the seminar.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A discussion of selected topics of contemporary philosophical interest within a seminar format. Students write papers for presentation and discussion in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 408 — Philosophy and Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Questions in and about economics that are of philosophical interest arise in at least three areas. First, there are questions about the scientific status of economics. E.g., if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding?

Second, there are puzzles arising within economic theory, especially concerning the notion of rationality. E.g., why model economic agents as homo economicus if such a being would be a 'rational fool'? And third, there are matters concerning the relation between economics and normative questions of economic policy. E.g., what would be an optimal savings rate in very long run? Such questions are conceptually challenging and there is no consensus on answers. This course explores a selection of such questions.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

PHIL 414 — Mathematical Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course is an advanced introduction to symbolic logic, intended to provide a foundation for understanding current research in philosophical logic and related areas of cognitive science. The course will concentrate on the theory of logic, and will cover the following topics:

  • The nature of algorithms; some models of computation
  • Proof techniques and proof theory
  • Models and validity
  • Semantic completeness of propositional and quantificational logic
  • The art of formalization
  • Incompleteness and undecidability

Written work will consist of problem sets and midterm and final exams. This is a fast-moving course that assumes some previous familiarity with logic and the ability to understand and construct mathematical proofs. Students who are uncertain about their mathematical background may wish to consult with the instructor before taking this course. More information on the course will be available from the course home page at: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/courses/phil414.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 303 or Grad with a grade of C- or better

PHIL 423 — Problems of Space and Time
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sklar,Lawrence; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Traditional philosophical questions about the nature of time and space have been strikingly influenced in the twentieth century by the results of contemporary physical science. At the same time, the important current physical theories of space and time rest explicitly or implicitly on deep-rooted philosophical assumptions. The purpose of this course is to study the mutual interaction between science and philosophy as illustrated in problems about space and time. Typical topics to be considered include the status of knowledge about the structure of space and time, substantial versus relational theories of space-time, spatio-temporal order and causal order, and the so-called problem of the direction of time. This course can be appreciated by students who have either a background in philosophy — especially logic and philosophy of science, metaphysics, epistemology — or background in physical science or mathematics. An attempt is made in this course to introduce the fundamental ideas of both philosophy and science at a level which can be understood by those without extensive background so students need not be proficient in both science and philosophy to benefit from the course. The primary text is L. Sklar's Space, Time, and Spacetime. There are additional readings from such authors as Reichenbach, Poincaré, Grunbaum, Smart, Wheeler, and others.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHIL,One logic introduction and either one other philosophy course or 12 credits of science.

PHIL 425 — Philosophy of Biology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lormand,Eric P; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

We will try to understand a number of philosophically interesting or puzzling constructs involved in biology, e.g., life, death, functions, unintelligent "design", genetic "codes", organisms, species, environments, fitness, altruism. And we will consider the potential relevance of biological constructs for other areas of philosophy, e.g.,: Can epistemological or ethical norms be based on biological norms? Should life science be reduced to physical science? Should social science be reduced to life science?

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Biology.

PHIL 429 — Ethical Analysis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Railton,Peter A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Questions about the nature and standing of morality arise in both theory and practice. Moreover, in recent years morality has served as a central example in wide philosophical debates about the nature of normativity and the relation of theory to practice. In this course we will critically investigate several of the most influential philosophical conceptions of morality, including historical as well as contemporary writings. Among the questions we will consider:

  • In what sense, if any, is there a need for theory in morality?
  • How are we to understand the meaning of moral terms?
  • Are moral judgments capable of truth and falsity?
  • Does morality require questionable metaphysical assumptions?
  • In what sense, if any, can moral claims be objective?
  • What is the relation of "ought" to "is"?
  • What is the role of motivation or emotion in moral judgment?
Midterm and final examinations; a term paper.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 361 or 366, or Grad with a grade of C- or better

PHIL 442 — Topics in Political Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Elizabeth S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Taking one of the following ideas as a central theme, this course examines fundamental philosophic issues related to human rights, liberty, democracy, justice, or alienation.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 361 or 366 with a grade of C- or better; or graduate standing

PHIL 458 — Philosophy of Kant
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Proops,Ian N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course studies Kant's mature philosophical system, paying close attention to his metaphysics and epistemology. We'll examine Kant's effort to work out the scope and limits of possible human knowledge and his attempt to give a purely moral basis to religious faith. But the bulk of our time will be devoted to the account of human experience and human factual knowledge in the Critique of Pure Reason. There Kant argues that the world of our experience must possess certain very general features if experience is to be possible — for example, that every alteration must have a cause. And he argues that 'behind' the familiar world of our experience is a second, more fundamental world of "Things in themselves" about which we can know next to nothing. Secondary readings from Henry Allison, James van Cleve, Paul Guyer, Michelle Grier and others. A tentative syllabus is available on my web page. But this syllabus, including the required readings, will be subject to revision. So you should hold off purchasing any books until late August, when a revised syllabus will appear. The required materials will be made available at Shaman Drum. There will also be a course pack available from Excel Copy (on South University) toward the end of August.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHIL 389, 461, or 462, or permission of instructor, or concentration advisor.

PHIL 461 — Philosophical Thought in the 17th Century
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Philosophical thought on the European continent in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, including Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 345, 383 or 389, AND PHIL 361 or 366, or Grad with at least a C-

PHIL 466 — Topics in Continental Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An intensive critical study of certain selected thinkers and topics in nineteenth and twentieth century continental philosophy.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of PHIL 371, 375, 385, or 389 or permission of instructor.

PHIL 482 — Philosophy of Mind
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ludlow,Peter; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is a course in the Philosophy of Mind.

Topics will include physicalism and the mind, varieties of functionalism, and the nature of consciousness. We may also consider naturalistic theories of consciousness.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHIL 345 or 383.

PHIL 498 — Senior Honors in Philosophy
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

This course number is to be used for those students who are in the process of writing a philosophy honors thesis. Anyone wishing to write an honors thesis in philosophy should consult the Philosophy Honors Advisor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of department.

PHIL 542 — Topics in Problems of Human Action
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We will evaluate the arguments for and against identifying the will with reason in its practical capacity. To this end, we will consider the conceptual relationships among self-determined behavior, self-endorsed behavior, and behavior that reflects a commitment to an action-guiding principle. We will explore challenges to the thesis that it is not possible to will against one's own "best judgment." We will then turn to features of agency that appear to count against identifying the will with practical reason even if the two are necessarily in harmony. Possible texts include: excerpts from Plato, Hume, Kant, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and O'Shaughnessy; papers by Bratman, Davidson, Frankfurt, Holton, Korsgaard, Mele, Stocker, Velleman, Wallace, and Watson. We may also consider some of the psychology literature (e.g., Daniel Wegner's The Illusion of Conscious Will).

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 572 — Topics in Meta-Ethics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in meta-ethics. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

PHIL 585 — Topics in Aesthetics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walton,Kendall L

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

A course on topics in aesthetics. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

PHIL 596 — Reading Course
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A faculty-directed independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 597 — Proseminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Swanson,Eric Peter; homepage
Instructor: Gibbard,Allan F; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 6

The proseminar provides first-year graduate students with an opportunity to engage as a group with a range of issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 598 — Independent Literature Survey
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An independent literature survey in which a student reviews basic literature in a given area of philosophy and writes an extended bibliographic essay that sets forth a range of major positions within that area, indicates how various philosophers fit within this range of positions, and provides critical commentary on the positions, indicating, for example, the chief advantages and disadvantages of each, resulting in a critical bibliographic essay. Students must seek guidance from a faculty member in selecting a reasonable range of works for study. Students are encouraged to carry out such surveys during the summer months. If the ILS is to commence in the Spring/Summer or Fall, initial guidance should be sought the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, initial guidance should be sought no later than the preceding December. The bibliographic essays will be evaluated by the faculty member and may, if appropriate, be certified for distribution

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 599 — Candidacy Reading Course
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

A faculty-directed candidacy reading course in which a student — having already successfully completed an independent literature survey in the area of his or her projected dissertation — works toward identifying a specific thesis topic and writing a dissertation prospectus, and begins to write material which can be expected to represent some component of the dissertation. If the reading course is to commence in the Fall, students should arrange for faculty direction the preceding April; if it is to commence in the Winter, students should arrange for faculty direction no later than the preceding November. Faculty service in this capacity does not commit the student to asking the faculty member to serve on his or her dissertation committee, nor does it commit the faculty member to agreeing to do so. A student wishing to elect PHIL 599 must submit a proposed plan of study no later than the beginning of the term for which the course is elected. (Students are urged to consult with their advisors and prospective faculty sponsors as early as possible during the planning of their Reading Course). The plan must be accepted by the faculty sponsor of the course within a week of the beginning of the term. A plan will normally not be acceptable if it overlaps significantly with a departmental course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 600 — Advanced Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Independent study program arranged between instructor and student.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PHIL 607 — Seminar in Metaphysics
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar on topics in metaphysics. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 610 — Seminar in History of Philosophy
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will focus on history of philosophy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 615 — Seminar in Philosophy of Language
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar on topics in the philosophy of language. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PHIL 697 — Candidacy Seminar
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Seminar for Philosophy graduate students achieving candidacy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Restricted to Philosophy Candidates and Philosophy Doctoral students nearing Candidacy. Graduate standing.

PHIL 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

PHIL 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Walton,Kendall L

FA 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Academic Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have Teaching Assistant award. Graduate standing.

PHIL 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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