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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = POLSCI
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
POLSCI 101 — Introduction to Political Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course offers an introduction to some of the major — and even some minor — figures in Western political thought, from ancient Greece to our day. Our goal is to understand how the contributions of various thinkers at different times have helped people answer enduring questions about political life:

  • What is justice?

  • Must we obey political authorities?

  • What is human good?

  • What may do in our pursuit of our goals?

The course will combine historical with contemporary readings. It will include computer-facilitated interactive lecturing. A laptop is strongly recommended but not required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for fist and second year students

POLSCI 111 — Introduction to American Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Walton Jr,Hanes; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An introduction to American politics with emphasis on the electoral process, the functioning of political parties, and the decision-making process in the national congress, the presidency, and the federal courts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for fist and second year students

POLSCI 140 — Introduction to Comparative Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Inglehart,Ronald F; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

An introductory survey of the governments and politics of several contemporary societies in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

POLSCI 160 — Introduction to World Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Morrow,James D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of world politics. It focuses on theories used to explain international and domestic politics central to world politics in its full generality. The evidence for such theories lies in patterns of behavior over time, although extensive examples and cases will be presented both to illuminate the concepts of the theories and to help the student see how theories try to explain individual events.

The course begins with an introduction to world politics. The three central concepts of power, preferences, and perceptions are This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of world politics. It focuses on theories used to explain international and domestic politics central to world politics in its full generality. The evidence for such theories lies in patterns of behavior over time, although extensive examples and cases will be presented both to illuminate the concepts of the theories and to help the student see how theories try to explain individual events. The course begins with an introduction to world politics. The three central concepts of power, preferences, and perceptions are explained in detail. The course then uses these three concepts to assess structural, domestic, and strategic theories of war and how states prepare for the possibility of war. After this section on security and conflict, the course turns to analyze cooperation and conflict in the international political economy. Specific issues of trade, monetary affairs, and the environment are discussed next. The course ends by examining questions of values and the state system in world politics.

POLSCI 299 — Introductory Internship in Political Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

POLSCI 299 allows political science concentrators to receive credits for a full-time internship of at least eight weeks or the equivalent (at least 320 hours) in part-time work in an approved job or internship position that enriches the student's academic experience and/or allows the student to explore careers related to his/her academic studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Declared political science concentrator.

POLSCI 300 — Contemporary Political Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Markus,Gregory B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The purpose of this course is to develop your capacities as "leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future." (That phrase is from U-M's official mission statement.) We will examine key political issues such as taxes and spending, poverty, healthcare, and national security. If you are unwilling to take part in respectful yet spirited discussions on controversial topics, this course is NOT for you. Some of the our topics develop as we discuss them, and so we may modify the syllabus as we proceed. Grading is on a no-curve 100-point system. You will write seven 1000-word papers on assigned topics, worth 10 points each. The other 30 points reflects your contribution to learning in your discussion section, including attending and reporting on relevant out-of-class activities.

POLSCI 301 — Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Saxonhouse,Arlene W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course will explore varieties of political thought from its origins in the early distinction between nature and convention in ancient Athens to the emerging problem of political obligation at the end of the sixteenth century in Europe. As we develop an understanding of the various theories and how they build on or reject previous views, we will consider how fundamental assumptions concerning Nature, the basis of knowledge (epistemology), the existence of God, the status of the individual lie at the foundation of any coherent political theory concerned with problems of justice, equality, and the best political regime.

POLSCI 306 — American Political Thought
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Manuel,Anne M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the major early works in American political thought from the colonial period to the Civil War. In particular, we will examine core theoretical concepts such as, democracy, freedom, citizenship, liberty, equality, self-reliance, and conformity. We will explore how the meanings of these terms change over time and from author to author. Throughout the course, we will pay particular attention to the dynamic, evolving, and, at times, conflicting character of the American tradition. We will read texts written during the period, the canon of early American thinkers, and consider their thoughts on the relationship between religion and politics, the nature position on republican governments, popular participation, the danger of factions, and the proper role of political institutions in American politics. Class meetings will consist of lecture and group work assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 310 — American Policy Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rivers,Lynn N

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

An analysis of the decision-making processes of the federal government with emphasis on the congressional and executive branches.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 311 — American Political Processes
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hutchings,Vincent L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course treats American national elections, both presidential and congressional, as institutionalized expressions of public opinion. The central purpose is to gain a better understanding of the democratic process in the US. Specifically, we will examine how much the average citizen knows about politics and how — and how well — they select their political leaders.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 317 — Courts, Politics and Society
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we will study the role of the judiciary in the United States from its origin in 1789 through the present day. Special attention will be given to the concept of judicial federalism as it applies to both the state and federal courts. We will discuss concepts of judicial restraint and ripeness for review as being essential to the judiciary remaining a co-equal branch of government. Additionally, we will consider the main aspects of judicial power and its limitations. In order to better understand the workings of the judiciary, much time will be spent considering court decisions and their political ramifications. In our study of judicial decision-making we will consider the following: fact finding by the courts; precedent and legal reasoning; statutory interpretation; constitutional interpretation and the process of judicial decision-making. All these topics will be explored through readings, lectures and class discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 318 — American Constitutional Politics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

American constitutional law is such a complex subject that it could not be covered in an entire year of study. Therefore, it is my intention, this academic term, to limit the materials discussed in this class to those pertaining to Articles I through VII and portions of the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the United States. Those constitutional materials cited herein pertain to the concepts of separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism and judicial review. A thorough understanding of these topics will enable the student to review and understand all other aspects of the Constitution. We will also spend a great deal of time this academic term discussing interpretations of cases, involving constitutional issues by the judiciary from the trial courts to the Supreme Court of the United States. Additionally, time will be spent examining opinions of these courts, having great political ramifications. Some of the cases to be discussed are:

Marbury v. Madison, 5 U.S. 137 (1803), McCulloch v. Maryland, 17 U.S. 316 (1819), Luther v. Borden, 48 U.S. 1 (1849), Dred Scott v. Sanford, 60 U.S. 393 (1856), Plessy v. Ferguson, 163 U.S. 537 (1896), Coleman v. Miller, 307 U.S. 433 (1939), Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), Brown v Board of Education, 349 U.S. 294 (1955) and Baker v. Carr, 369 U.S. 186 (1962).

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 111.

POLSCI 320 — The American Chief Executive
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Walton Jr,Hanes; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A survey of the development of the office and functions of the chief executive and an analysis of the sources and nature of executive power in American national and state government. Primary attention is given to the presidency.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 325 — Mass Media and Political Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Valentino,Nicholas A

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course focuses on the role and importance of mass media in the political process. The interaction between the press, politicians, and the public during political campaigns receives detailed attention. Topics include: how news is made; campaign strategies; political advertising effects; relations between Congress, the President, and the media; and the role of mass media in political campaigns. These topics are examined through a systematic review of research in both mass communication and political science.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

POLSCI 327 — Politics of the Metropolis
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Markus,Gregory B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

A survey of the major demographic, social, and economic trends in metropolitan areas and an analysis of government responses to these trends. Particular emphasis is placed on formal governmental policies in these areas as well as on the distribution of power and influence in the modern metropolis.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 330 — Psychological Perspectives on Politics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Winter,David G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course examines how psychological factors affect political behavior, and vice versa. After an initial discussion of the underlying dimensions of political and social behavior, and the concept of "gender"as a lens for analysis, we consider the psychological aspects of leadership as one major political phenomenon. Next, we examine some motivational and perceptual mechanisms involved in conflict escalation, war, and peace. Having established the importance of psychological factors, we examine ways of measuring "at a distance" the psychological characteristics of political leaders and groups, neither of whom can be studied directly. The second part of the course examines psychological perspectives on several political processes: socialization (or learning about politics), political decision-making, ideology, political cognition and the mass media, and political participation and commitment. Finally, we consider threats to the political system (e.g., nationalism and ethnic conflict, violence and terrorism), and ways restoring the political system (e.g., the "arts of politics" such as negotiation and mediation, and ways of taming power). An introductory psychology course is a prerequisite, and a course or strong interest in history or political science is recommended.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 339 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

POLSCI 341 — Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Franzese Jr,Robert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course examines the politics of developed democracies: i.e., those where day-to-day political struggle occurs within the boundaries defined by broadly unchallenged commitments to relatively free-market capitalism and relatively liberal democracy. (Empirically, today, least ambiguously, "developed democracies" corresponds to the countries of North America, Western Europe, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and perhaps a few others, but the grouping "developed democracies" is a theoretical and not a geographic one.) This is not a course in current or past events in these countries; i.e., it does not seek to provide a political history of these or any one or subset of these countries. Rather, the course analyzes certain systematic regularities or tendencies evidenced in the politics of developed democracies and proceeds by offering, elaborating, and evaluating possible theoretical (social-scientific) explanations for these patterns in developed-democratic politics. The analysis is positive (i.e., non-normative). The focus is on the interactions of interests and interest structures with political institutions in shaping how democracies work (differently) and, ultimately, in shaping important socio-economic policies and outcomes. Specific topics include socio-economic interest structures and democratic politics and stability; the many effects of various electoral systems; the varying structures of parties and party systems and their implications; alternative visions and designs of democratic governance, majoritarian versus proportional, and their consequences for participation, representation, accountability, and mandates; government formation and dissolution; and policy formation and implementation. Course grades will be based upon short-paper writing, a final examination, and participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 342 — Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Grzymala-Busse,Anna

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

The regime transformations in Eastern Europe meant enormous political, economic, and social changes . This course examines the communist era, the collapse of the communist regimes, and the new challenges of democracy, market reform, and membership in the European Union. Topics include popular uprisings and civil society, democratic reforms, elite competition and corruption, and geopolitical changes.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 347 — Politics and Society in Latin America
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

After an analysis of the common historical background, the course will consider the current characteristics of democratic government in Latin America, its achievements, shortcomings and perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of parties and other institutional factors on the stability and quality of democracy in the region. The cases of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela will be examined closely. No prior knowledge of the region is assumed or required.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 353 — The Arab-Israeli Conflict
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

An analysis of the conflict between Israel and Palestinian nationalism as compounded by competition among regional powers and superpowers. Students simulate the roles of the various protagonists in an open-ended game and then critically analyze their performance in light of reality.

POLSCI 354 — Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most dynamic and complex regions, and is of growing importance on the global stage. This course offers an introduction to the region for advanced undergraduates; it is also an introduction to some of the broader political and economic issues in the developing world.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 357 — Governments and Politics of India and South Asia
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

A study primarily of the government and politics of modern India, with some consideration given also to Pakistan and Sri Lanka (Ceylon), in a regional comparative analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 363 — International Organization and Integration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: von Stein,Jana Kristen

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

An analysis of the growth, decision-making processes, and activities of international organization and of the consequences of international organization for the global political system. Attention is given to various concepts of future world order.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 380 — Environmental Politics and Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rabe,Barry George; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an advanced offering on environmental politics and the environmental policy-making process. The course considers both processes of policy formation and implementation, placing particular emphasis on the development of alternatives to conventional regulatory practices at federal, state, and local levels of government.

Advisory Prerequisite: ENVIRON 210 or POLSCI 111.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 001, REC
Coming to Terms with Germany

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Contemporary topics in political science; content and number of credits varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 002, REC
Comparative Electoral Behavior

FA 2007
Credits: 3

After discussing the findings of the literature in the field of voting behavior for developed and developing countries, the course will look at elections and electoral behavior in several developing countries. Cases of Latin America, Asia and Africa will be considered. The course will examine the long term and short term factors that are associated with the electoral results in these countries, and compare them with the findings for other regions of the world. The nature of parties, party systems, and party identification will be looked at in relation to electoral competition. The course will examine to what extent the dominant approaches in the field of voting behavior and their findings for democracies in developed countries, are useful in explaining electoral results, and party systems in developing countries.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 003, REC
Campaigns and Elections

Instructor: Mebane Jr,Walter R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines campaigns and elections, focusing primarily on national elections in the United States. Topics typically include campaign finance, negative campaigning, the noncompetitiveness of congressional elections, presidential elections, why there are almost but not quite three parties, voter turnout, individual voting decisions, how the votes are counted (or not), and elections and the economy. We examine several theories that may explain some of these phenomena, including in particular theories of rational choice. Course requirements usually include two papers with one optionally being based on original analysis of election survey data.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 390 — Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the "Michigan Journal of Political Science". In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 391 — Introduction to Modeling Political Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/1

This class provides an introduction to modeling people and social systems. We learn to construct, manipulate, and evaluate models of people who vote, work, commit crimes, and attend classes. We cover concepts and ideas from game theory, learning theory, complexity theory, and even biology and physics (at a metaphorical level of course.) Though the topics and techniques covered are wide ranging — we analyze among other things the wisdom of crowds, the spread of ideas, the causes of racial segregation, and the emergence of riots, they aggregate into a deep methodological coherence. The kind of understanding you won't get by reading the newspaper. By the end, students will understand the strengths and uses of various modeling approaches used in the social sciences and be able to use them. This is not a mathematics course, but it does require a willingness to think abstractly, to carefully contemplate lots of charts and figures, and to do a little algebra. And above all, a commitment to never reading the newspaper in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 395 — Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to the geographic area that comprised the Russian Empire, later the Soviet Union, and now the former Soviet Union. This region is often referred to in a shorthand way as "Russia," although geographic designations other than Russia are included and at all periods of history, many people other than ethnic Russians have populated the area.

To understand issues and perspectives on the region a large amount of information from different disciplines and perspectives is introduced. Students differ in their backgrounds and initial interests. The professor, graduate student instructors, and guest lecturers will seek to make the information understandable regardless of the background of an individual student.

At the conclusion of the course, each student should have a wide range of knowledge about the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and Successor States. The student should be able to analyze and compare major trends in academic thought about the region and to be able to present his or her own views about these issues. The experiences in this course will hopefully motivate students to take additional courses about the region and in a variety of disciplines. The knowledge gained in the course should help each student decide whether to choose a minor, a major, or a career in Russian and East European Studies.

POLSCI 397 — Nations and Nationalism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Suny,Ronald G

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course explores the history, politics, and recent literature on the formation of nations and the development of nationalism. Theories of the nation have moved from ideas of their essential, primordial quality through a moment of social construction featuring the processes of modernization to a more cultural, discursive approach emphasizing the role of imagination and invention. These theoretical advances have been developed primarily by historians and literary analysts, but in recent years social science thinking on nationalism has borrowed freely, often critically, from the emerging literature. We will both develop a narrative of the emergence of nations and explore some of the ways in which social science has employed and developed the body of theory on nationalism, looking at paradigms taken from international relations, identity theory, anthropology, and various psychological theories.

Requirements:
1. Undergraduate students are required to attend all the lectures and discussions, complete the assigned reading, and participate in discussions.
2. A mid — term take home examination (6-8 pages, typed, double-spaced).
3. A final take home examination or paper, a short synthetic research paper or "think-piece" (8-10 pages, typed, double-spaced), that uses the readings, lectures, and discussions, as well as any outside reading the student might wish to include. The paper should demonstrate that you have read, understood, and can critically employ the material in the course.
4. Graduate students will write a slightly longer paper (15-20 pages) and will use additional readings.

The course meets for two lectures and one discussion group per week.

Required Readings:
Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origins and Spread of Nationalism (London-New York: Verso, 1991).
Rogers Brubaker, Reframing Nationalism: Nationhood and the National Question in the New Europe (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996).
Geoff Eley and Ronald Grigor Suny, Becoming National: A Reader (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996).
Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1983).
Michael Hechter, Containing Nationalism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).

POLSCI 409 — Twentieth Century Political Thought
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course offers a chronological survey of some central contributions to contemporary political thought. Its premise is that 20th-century political thinkers have offered us different (a) vocabularies to understand modern political world and (b) arguments for why and how we should try to change that world. Beginning with the German sociologist Max Weber and ending with the South African novelist J.M. Coetzee, the course draws from contributions outside political theory proper. The course is writing-intensive.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302

POLSCI 410 — Washington Experience Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Goldenberg,Edie N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

The goal of this course is to prepare participants in the Michigan in Washington Program for a semester in the nation's capital. Students review the basic principles of American national government, both structure and process. The course readings are designed to give students a more "hands-on" understanding of politics in D.C. than other usual courses.

POLSCI 432 — Law and Public Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Krislov,Marvin; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course will focus on politics, the political and electoral process, and the courts. We will examine how and when the American courts intervene in the regulation of politics, and how various constitutional and statutory protections affect the outcomes of political disputes. We will examine some of the key legal and policy issues framing the political landscape: judicial selection, the right to vote, money and politics, reapportionment and vote dilution. We also will look at the role of the political parties, the federal and state judiciary, and the voters, among other significant players. This course will deal with current events in the context of these issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science, including POLSCI 111 or its equivalent.

POLSCI 451 — Jewish Identity, Politics and Culture in the Age of Secularism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Illuminates issues of ethnicity and religion by exploring the ways in which Jews have defined themselves, and consequently, their relations to other groups. We see how Jews have combined flexible self-definitions with the maintenance of characteristics that came to be regarded as defining.

Advisory Prerequisite: JUDAIC 205, POLSCI 350, or any course in modern Jewish history.

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 001, LEC
Law and Social Change

Instructor: Bernstein,Richard Howard

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The paradigm for this course is how the LEGAL PROCESS can impact the POLITICAL PROCESS to bring about SOCIAL CHANGE. We will focus on court rulings that have precipitated change in our society, and conversely, social change that led to changes in the law. The class will include analysis of grass-roots activists working through the courts, with emphasis on their political impact on the legal process. In other words, we will see how a lawsuit, as it moves through the court, may affect the political process. Our discussion of legal activity will range from cases that historically had a strong and lasting social impact to current cases involving significant contemporary issues. One major focus will be the litigation leading to a moratorium on the death penalty in Illinois and the exoneration of death-row inmates wrongly convicted of capital crimes. The course will also examine Congressional, judicial, and political action toward elimination of racial discrimination, disability law, and social change in time of war. There will be guest speakers, including attorneys, plaintiffs, and public officials, who are actively involved in these issues and other cases covered in the class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 002, LEC
Theories of Judicial Review

Instructor: Zeisberg,Mariah A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

One central issue in academic constitutional theory in the twentieth century has concerned the proper scope and legitimacy of judicial review. Although we have accepted judicial review as a matter of historical fact, there is substantial disagreement as to how the practice should or could be justified. This course will provide an introduction to that debate, while also situating those arguments within the context of empirical studies of judicial behavior and the Court's relationship to American politics.

Intended audience: Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students

Course Requirements: Attendance, participation in discussions, 12-15 page paper, midterm and final examination

Class Format: lecture/discussion 3 hours per week

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 003, LEC
Conflict&Diplomacy in Caucasus

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine militarized conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, South Ossetia and Abkhazia) and latent ones (such as Ajara and Javakheti) in the South Caucasus as well as diplomatic efforts at conflict resolution in the last decade. The rise of conflicts and nationalism will be studied in view of factors such as ethnicity, religion, class, historical processes, and of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia in the context of post-Soviet international relations.

Intended audience: Upper-level undergraduates and graduate students

Course Requirements: Attendance, participation in discussions, 12-15 page paper, mid-term and final examination

Class Format: lecture/discussion 3 hours per week

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 489 — Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Markovits,Andrei S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A senior level course taught by faculty on advanced topics in political science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Seniors only

POLSCI 491 — Directed Studies
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term with a supervising faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

POLSCI 493 — Senior Honors Proseminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Honors

Open to senior honors concentrators only. Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a member of the Political Science faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to senior Honors concentrators.

POLSCI 495 — Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory
Section 001, SEM
Advanced Topics in Democratic Theory

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Jennifer F; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We will focus on the concept of democracy.

What do we mean by the term democracy? How democratic is the American political system? What are the elements of American-style democracy that facilitate or resist "exporting" it to other parts of the world? To address these questions, we will examine a wide range of democratic theory, paying particular attention the concept of popular sovereignty, the nature of republican governments, the necessity of popular participation, and the role of the rule of law in American politics. We will also examine historical and contemporary events in order to sharpen our theoretical insights and conclusions. This is a reading and writing intensive course designed for political science majors with a strong background in political theory. Class meetings will focus primarily on discussing the readings. Careful preparation and active participation is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: Senior standing and concentration in Political Science

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 001, SEM
Are Americans Good Citizens?

Instructor: Brader,Ted; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

How well do Americans live up to expectations for citizens in a democracy? We begin by considering a range of perspectives on what democracy demands of citizens. We then review evidence on the actual political behavior of Americans to see how they compare to expectations. Over the course of the academic term, we consider what Americans know about politics, their beliefs and values, their level of civic and political participation, the quality of political discussion, and the manner in which they evaluate policies and political leaders.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 002, SEM
US State Economic Development Policies

Instructor: Jackson,John E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

State governments are increasingly expected to pursue policies that create or maintain jobs and income within their state. In an increasingly global economy where both capital and employment are mobile this may seem to be an impossible task as states have no control over policies most often associated with economic growth, such as the money supply, tariffs, and fiscal policy. Yet, states are being forced to accept the challenge and have responded in some creative and some not-so-creative ways. In this course we examine some of the economic models and empirical studies of regional development, the policies that state's do and might choose based on those models and evidence, and the politics that influence these choices. Readings and discussions will include material from outside the U. S. as well as from the U. S.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Howard,Margaret Marie

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in American government and politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 496 — Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics
Section 004, SEM
A Window into How Washington Works

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Selected topics in American government and politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 497 — Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Section 001, SEM
Jewish Political Tradition: Ideas and Experiences

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

"Classic" Jewish literature (Bible, Talmud) contains no systematic, comprehensive works of political thought, but concepts and values in that literature have informed the political thinking and behavior of Jews for several thousand years. Jews' political experience has been both as a sovereign people and a dispersed minority. This course explores political ideas in Jewish sources and how they have played out under conditions of sovereignty and dispersion. We study Jewish political organization and communal life, political stratagems and ideology, probing the influence of environment, leadership, and inherited and borrowed ideas. We shall place the Jewish political experience in the larger context of minority and diaspora politics. Some comparisons will be made with other ethnic groups.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 498 — Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics
Section 001, SEM
War in World Politics

Instructor: Singer,J David; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is a seminar intended largely for a selected group of political science concentrators, and one of our objectives is to experience a graduate school type seminar in which you begin the transition from consumer of knowledge to producer and consumer both. The literature on war — its origins, etiology, conduct, and consequences — is voluminous. Books and articles in almost every living language covering the history, ethics, exuberance, dread, genetics, culture, technology, etc. abound. While we'll touch on most of these aspects of war in passing, our focus will be primarily on the human effort to account for war between and within territorial states in the past two centuries or so, and to predict it in the decades ahead.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

POLSCI 500 — First Year Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Goldenberg,Edie N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is intended to provide graduate students interested in academic careers with an introduction to our profession. We will alternate between sessions with invited members of our department that focus on major subfields (e.g., political theory, world politics, comparative politics, etc.) and sessions that focus on topics often untouched in traditional graduate programs (e.g., faculty roles, ethics, governance, etc.). This course is highly recommended for first-year PhD students but is also suitable for others who anticipate faculty careers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 514 — The Use of Social Science Computer Programs
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Practical experience in the use of a system of computer programs for social scientists.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 599/equivalent or permission of instructor.

POLSCI 585 — Political Environment of Policy Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lin,Ann Chih; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is about the use of policy analysis within the political system. As future policy analysts, administrators, and advocates, you will need to understand what motivates and constrains your fellow actors in the political system. You will also need to approach your own role in the system critically and reflectively, so that you are aware of the usefulness and the limitations of the questions that you have been trained to ask.

The course examines several key sites of policymaking — agenda setting, legislation, interest group activity, and judicial review — focusing attention, at each step, on political actors, their understanding of their role and their motivations, and their incentives to use or ignore policy analysis. These actors include the executive, legislative, and judicial branches; political parties; advocacy and interest groups; nonprofit and for-profit contractors; and community organizations. The aim is not to create a "how-to" manual for political success. Instead, this course teaches you how to recognize the competing interests and strategic alternatives that surround any issue, and why this recognition is a necessary complement to issue analysis.

Requirements for this course include careful reading of assignments before class sessions, exceptional attendance and participation at seminar discussions, multiple short writing assignments and two longer papers, an oral presentation, and frequent peer critiques. Please note that when a reading assignment is scheduled on more than one day, the entire assignment needs to be read before the first class period devoted to it. Grading and information about the assignments is provided in the assignment guide for the course.

All readings will be on reserve in Foster Library (2nd Fl., Lorch Hall). You are strongly encouraged, however, to purchase a coursepack from Dollar Bill Copying, sold through Ulrich's Bookstore (549 E. University), as well as the following books at Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 S. State St.

Henrik Ibsen, Enemy of the People. (Dover Thrift Edition, 1999 (orig. 1882))
Steven Waldman, The Bill (Viking, 1995)
Kevin Hula, Lobbying Together (Georgetown University Press, 1999)
Jeffrey Berry, The New Liberalism (Brookings Institution Press, 1999)
William Riker, The Art of Political Manipulation (Yale 1986)

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

POLSCI 591 — Advanced Internship in Political Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 6
Other: Expr

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Two courses in Political Science at the 400-level or above and concentration in Political Science; or Graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor.

POLSCI 598 — Mathematics for Political Scientists
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course attempts to equip students with basic mathematical tools necessary for the study of advanced statistical methods, game theory, and other types of formal modeling. Topics include set theory, matrix algebra, differential calculus, optimization and integral calculus.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The level of mathematical sophistication presumed is high school algebra.

POLSCI 599 — Statistical Methods in Political Research I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Jackson,John E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This is the first course in statistics requiring little or no previous exposure to the subject. Topics covered include probability theory, sampling distributions, sampling theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, multivariate regression, and strategies of data analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing; concurrent election of POLSCI 514 is strongly recommended.

POLSCI 602 — Political Thought up to the Early Modern Period
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Saxonhouse,Arlene W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A study of political theory from the ancient Greek authors through the Reformation — from Homer to Luther with Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St Augustine, St Thomas Aquinas, and Machiavelli along the way. Emphasis is on the primary texts with occasional readings in secondary sources.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 611 — Proseminar in American National Government
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Shipan,Charles R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Intended to introduce graduate students to the major theoretical concepts in the study of American politics. Students will have the opportunity to read books and articles from a wide range of topics, including studies of American legislatures, courts, executives, bureaucracies, elections, mass opinion and behavior, and interest groups.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 628 — Comparative Political Parties and Party Systems
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Political parties are the key link between the government and the governed. Even non-democratic governments often attempt to acquire the patina of legitimacy by calling their official organizations "parties". In examining the "supply-side" of electoral politics, this course examines the impact of political institutions and popular pressures on political parties and the influence of political parties on governmental and policy. We examine four different aspects of party politics:  a) the rise and development of political parties, b) their internal life and organizational forms, c) party competition, and d) party governance. This course will also introduce different theoretical approaches to the study of party politics, and examine the methodological questions that arise.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

POLSCI 636 — Program Evaluation I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gerber,Elisabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The central issues addressed by this course are whether and how one ought to try to establish the extent to which public programs are achieving their goals. Are the goals being attained? If not, why not? A great deal of money is actually spent to answer these questions. Is this research worthwhile? Are the results important in the policy process? A critical issue is the quality of evaluation studies that are carried out, so the bulk of the course deals with evaluation theory and methods. Students will learn how to tell whether programs of any kind are having specified impacts upon the world, which turns out to be an extremely difficult question to answer. Policies and programs in a broad range of areas are critiqued in discussion, including health, mental health, corrections, criminal justice, recreation, education, and development. Prerequisites: PUBPOL 529 (Statistics)

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 571 or concurrent enrollment in PUBPOL 633.

POLSCI 638 — Field Training
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE) is an intensive week-long project that involves all students and a team of faculty in the detailed examination of a current policy topic. (PUBPOL 638 is a 1-credit course that MPP students must take twice, during both their first and second winter terms in the program.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 641 — Proseminar in Comparative Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Franzese Jr,Robert J; homepage
Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Proseminar designed to provide the participants with an overview of important subjects and theories in comparative politics. Each week, the participants will discuss the scholarly literature of a major substantive or theoretical area of comparative politics, emphasizing conceptual frameworks, theories, and the development, evaluation, and application of theories.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 656 — Proseminar in Chinese Government and Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar serves as the introductory course to the study of modern Chinese politics for graduate students in political science. It assumes at least one undergraduate level course on Chinese politics or a related discipline (history, sociology, etc). The course has two basic goals. The first is to introduce students to the major themes, debates, and puzzles in the study of Chinese politics. The second is to allow students to grow familiar with some of the methodological challenges of studying politics in China (through evaluation and critique of the text) and then to develop a research proposal of their own that sets out a research question and a research plan for answering that question. The course is designed around engaged and lively debate on the issues; therefore, student participation is absolutely necessary. Each student will have an opportunity to lead the discussion during the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 660 — Proseminar in World Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Morrow,James D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar provides the introduction to the field of World Politics. The course will survey the central topics of recent research in world politics through a reading of papers and research monographs. The subjects will include, but not be limited to, the explanation of international conflict, the study of international institutions, and the role of domestic politics in world politics. The goals of the course are to survey the current research and to develop the ability to design research projects that build on that research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 663 — Proseminar in International Organization and Integration
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: von Stein,Jana Kristen

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Analysis of the role of international institutions in the contemporary political system. Consideration of the historical development of international institutions, their political processes, their activities and their consequences.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 660 or permission of instructor and Graduate standing.

POLSCI 680 — Proseminar in Behavioral Research Methods
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Burns,Nancy E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course offers an introduction to study design, data collection, and measurement in empirical political science. Oral presentations and discussion are a regular part of the course. Requirements include a series of brief papers plus a longer paper due at the end of the term, which usually takes the form of a complete, detailed, and polished research proposal.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 682 — Democratization in Global Perspectives
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Inglehart,Ronald F; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will examine the basic literature and recent findings on democratization, starting with its background in Western advanced industrial societies and then examining its prospects in Eastern Europe, the former Soviet Union, China, Latin America and Africa. We will seek to answer three questions: "What are the essential characteristics of democracy?" "What conditions are conducive to the emergence and survival of democracy?" and "What good is it?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 686 — Proseminar in Public Opinion
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hutchings,Vincent L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is as much about the study of public opinion as about public opinion itself. The course briefly considers the meaning and measurement of the concept and the origins of contemporary research. The course examines a number of critical, classic debates about mass beliefs with implications for the quality of democratic citizenship, including voter rationality, political tolerance, racial attitudes and party identification. The course then review more recent efforts to explain and model opinion formation — economic or identity-driven, self-interested or symbolic, cognitive or emotional, including the impact of the mass media, election campaigns, and the social and political context. Finally the course considers the larger consequences of public opinion, including aggregate and long-term shifts, as well as the responsiveness of political leaders to opinion polls.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 687 — Proseminar in Political Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Brader,Ted; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This seminar evaluates particular theories/methods, and seeks to understand the limitation/possibilities of psychological perspectives on politics. It considers social identities, group processes, personality, political socialization, models of cognition, choice and decision making, the power of symbols, persuasion, attitude change, sources of motivation, emotion and rationality in political reasoning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 688 — Selected Topics in Political Science
Section 001, SEM
Theories of Judicial Review

Instructor: Zeisberg,Mariah A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

One central issue in academic constitutional theory in the twentieth century has concerned the proper scope and legitimacy of judicial review. Although we have accepted judicial review as a matter of historical fact, there is substantial disagreement as to how the practice should or could be justified. This course will provide an introduction to that debate, while also situating those arguments within the context of empirical studies of judicial behavior and the Court's relationship to American politics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 688 — Selected Topics in Political Science
Section 002, SEM
States and Regimes

Instructor: Grzymala-Busse,Anna

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the rise, transformation, and collapse of the state and its structures, under a variety of political regimes. Numerous forces, ranging from ethnic mobilization to economic globalization, have forced the state to change, calling into question the idea of state autonomy. At the same, the state has responded in a variety of ways, rarely as a unitary actor. This seminar will examine these forces, the state response, and the relative failure or success of its efforts. We will also review the dominant theories of the state, and the methodological and analytical issues in the scholarship.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 691 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

A directed reading on a topic of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 702 — Selected Political Theorists
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Intensive analysis of the writings of selected figures in political theory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 730 — Women and Employment Policy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Corcoran,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is in three sections. In the first section we review the literature on sex differences in biology, socialization and legal treatment to assess what these differences are, what causes the differences, and how these differences contribute to or justify sex-based wage and occupation differences. We will pay careful attention to MacKinnon's arguments about sex and the legal system.

In the second section, we examine and evaluate the major economic, sociological and psychological explanation of wage differences and the evidence for these explanations.

In the third section, we will investigate five areas of public policy and employment: comparable worth, affirmative action, sexual harassment, fetal vulnerability, sexual orientation and employment discrimination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 736 — Poverty and Inequality
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Corcoran,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is concerned with analyzing the distribution of economic resources in the United States. It examines the distribution of economic well-being, the sources of inequality, the role of tax-transfer policies in affecting inequality, and options for changing inequality. There are special examinations of welfare reform, homelessness, and intergenerational transmission of poverty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 741 — Seminar in Comparative Politics
Section 001, SEM
Theories on European Intergration: Explanatory and Normative

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course will provide an advanced introduction to central themes, approaches, and issues of historical and contemporary European integration theory. We will analyze the origins and concepts of explanatory theories, such as neo-functionalism, rationalist and constructivist sup nationalism, and liberal intergovernmentalism. We will also discuss their validity in relation to the European Union today. The second part of the course will shift the perspective from explanation to normative concepts. We will explore the new debates on the question of the EU's present and future institutional design, democratic legitimacy and political boundaries, and eventually link the two strands of theoretical discourse.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 787 — Multivariate Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mebane Jr,Walter R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is an extension of POLSCI 699. Topics covered usually include models with random coefficients, including hierarchical regression models and models with variance components; generalized linear models, including models for limited dependent variables and semiparametric models; the identification and estimation of simultaneous equation models; factor analysis and the general analysis of covariance structures (LISREL). Computer exercises are used extensively to illustrate the range of topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: POLSCI 699 or equivalent and Graduate standing.

POLSCI 793 — Methods Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Theory in the Social Science

Instructor: Axelrod,Robert; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Complexity theory is a new interdisciplinary approach to understanding dynamic processes involving the interaction of many actors. A primary methodology of complexity theory is computer simulation of agent-based models . Agent-based modeling involves specifying how individual agents (such as people, nations, or organizations) interact with each other and with their environment. The goal is to discover new principles about the dynamics of complex adaptive systems that are typical of social processes. There is no need to assume rationality. The course will consider a wide variety of applications including residential segregation, revolution, social influence, urban growth, war, alliances, organizational change, elections, and stock markets. Among the issues to be examined across models are: path dependence, sensitivity to initial conditions, emergence of self-organized structure, adaptation to a changing environment, co-evolution, information cascades, and criteria for judging the value of an agent-based. Some, but not much, programming experience is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

POLSCI 891 — Directed Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Directed research on a topic of the student's choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

POLSCI 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

POLSCI 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Goldenberg,Edie N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar is required for all beginning graduate student instructors. It meets once for an extended period before the term starts and then for additional workshops/meetings during the Fall Term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing.

POLSCI 994 — Candidacy Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hicken,Allen D; homepage
Instructor: Grzymala-Busse,Anna

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

A seminar for those working on a dissertation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

POLSCI 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

 
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