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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = PSYCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 140 of 140
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Malley,Brian Edward

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

Psychology is the study of the mind that is our common and unique inheritance as human beings. It is an exciting field, where our understanding of ourselves is constantly examined, challenged, and extended. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with basic psychological perspectives and theories, to consider the application of psychology to daily life, and to increase understanding of oneself and others. Class consists of two hour-long lectures each week and one two-hour discussion section. Assessment will involve three exams, quizzes, and written assignments.

PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 030, LEC

Instructor: Seifert,Colleen M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of psychology. As a discipline, Psychology is concerned with questions that make up the very fabric of our existence. From the mundane (e.g., Why can't I remember the names of people I meet?) to the profound (e.g., How do we know what behavior is "normal"?). There are three major goals for the course:

(1) Introduce you to the ways that psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior. One of the main themes of the course is that different kinds of psychologists (e.g., biological, cognitive, social, clinical, etc.) approach psychology from different, but complementary, perspectives.

(2) Introduce you to the body of knowledge, research findings, and underlying principles that currently exist in the field.

(3) Stimulate you to think about how the material we cover in class applies to your daily life. Psychology offers a unique perspective on many of the questions and social issues that confront us.

PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 060, LEC

Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

An introduction to psychology as a broad survey course which explores the various theoretical bases for the understanding of human behavior. Students will learn about the biological processes of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory as well as examine the theories of personality, psychopathology, cognitive and social development. Practical applications and contemporary topics will also be explored.

PSYCH 111 — Introduction to Psychology
Section 070, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115.

Designed to introduce students to the major topics studied by psychologists including sensation, perception, learning, motivation, physiological and cultural bases of behavior, development, personality, and social psychology.

PSYCH 114 — Honors Introduction to Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Inglehart,Marita Rosch

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 112, or 115.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this class, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the methods used to study these issues are equally numerous. In order to achieve these objectives, we will cover a broad range of topics:

Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four levels of analysis, namely (a) on a biological level (brain, behavioral genetics, and evolutionary psychology), (b) a "basic processes" level (perception, learning, memory, information processing, motivation, emotion), (c) on a level considering the person as a whole (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and (d) on a "social / cultural" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social / cultural context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intra and inter group processes.).

In Part 3, we will study one specific problem, namely stress in college, and how psychologists study this problem on a biological level (stress and health, sleep, eating behavior), on a basic process level, on a person-centered level (are there personal styles that might make coping with stress easier?), and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to stress?).

Required text: Gleitman H., Fridlund AJ, & Reisberg D., Psychology. W.W. Norton Company. 2004, 6th edition. A course pack will be available from Dollar Bill Copying.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors Students

Advisory Prerequisite: Non-honors students must obtain permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Twins and What They Teach Us About Identity, Genes, and Environment

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Throughout time and across cultures twins have been a source of special fascination, and recently as the rate of twining has increased, practical issues regarding twin's development demands greater attention. This seminar will examine the experience and lessons of twinship. We will review research on how being a twin, and how raising twins, affects twin's identity. We will also consider what these data, and the metaphor of twinship found in literature and film, teach us about identity, relationships, good vs. evil, life options, symmetry, and soul mates. The behavior genetics research involving twins to disentangle effects of heredity and environment will also be reviewed in order to gain an understanding of effects of nature and nurture in general.

The seminar will begin with an overview of the context of twining across time and culture. In particular in the variety of rates of twining and in beliefs about twins will be considered. We will then investigate how being conceived and experiencing each developmental milestone with another effects one's sense of self and identity. Finally, we will examine how scientists have utilized the natural variance in genes and environment between identical and fraternal twins, siblings, and nonrelated individuals who have been either raised together or apart to disentangle effects of nature and nurture on development and aging. By the end of the course students should have a better appreciation of the uniqueness of growing up as a twin, how this experience affects one's identity, and how twin development and aging illuminates development and aging in general. In addition, the ways in which both our genes and environment affect our biology, behavior, and thought will be elucidated.

The course involves a heavy workload and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site also contains topic outlines, links to relevant readings and research materials, and places for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will mostly involve student discussion, but will also include instructor lecture, group work, student presentations, and videos. Grades will be based on the number of points accumulated by completing assignments and exams and participating in class and web discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 003, SEM
Law and Psychology

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors, FYSem

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt) as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill) with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues such as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome. Each student will write a weekly commentary as well as a "closing argument" that will be presented to the class for one of the cases under consideration.

(NOTE: Three hour session scheduled on Friday is designed to accommodate occasional showing of movies. Class session is usually less than two hours.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 004, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 005, SEM
Freedom, Identity and Alienation

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors, FYSem

The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the concepts of identity, alienation, and freedom as psychological and philosophical concepts. However, the orientation will be specific and applied to the normal situations and predicaments that college students experience. Questions to be considered: Surviving as an individual in a large and often impersonal university; living up to and/or dealing with the expectations of parents and teachers; questioning authority in the context of the classroom; trading-off career pressures and personal goals in setting educational priorities. Of special importance will be the examination of the sometimes frightening loss of a sense of identity that often accompanies significant alterations in life style, such as that experienced by students in the transition from high school to college, or later, in the transition from college to the "real world."

(NOTE: Three hour session scheduled on Thursday is designed to accommodate occasional showing of movies. Class session is usually less than two hours.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 006, SEM
Gender, Emotion, and the Self

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course will explore how gender influences construction of the self and how we understand our own and others' emotions. Taught from a social justice perspective, this class will explore psychologically, socially and morally complex issues surrounding gender identity, transsexualism, sexual orientation , and relationships. Students will examine their own beliefs and experiences as well as become familiar with basic controversies in this area.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 007, SEM
Understanding Leadership

Instructor: Wierba,Elizabeth E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

What does it mean to be an effective leader? What are the individual characteristics, behavior or circumstances that determine a leader's ability to mobilize others successfully? In this seminar we will explore these questions and others by studying several approaches to understanding leadership in organizational contexts. We will use real and fictional cases to examine leadership, and evaluate our own leadership skills and behaviors in class exercises and discussions

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 008, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM
Doing Unto Others: The Origins of Good and Evil in the Human Mind and Brain

Instructor: Gehring,William J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Why do people hurt each other? When do they choose good over evil? In this course, we will examine how violent, hurtful behavior and caring, empathic behavior both arise from the cognitive and emotional processes of the human brain. We will consider how these biological and psychological factors interact with an individual's social context and environment. Our discussions will include psychological, psychiatric, neurological, genetic, and evolutionary perspectives. Topics will include a wide range of evil and good, from individual acts of aggression and helping behavior to large-scale phenomena such as genocide.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 002, SEM
Learning and Memory

Instructor: Baron,Scott P

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Students will be introduced to the fundamental concepts of learning and memory particularly as they relate to research in non-human animals.Classic texts and original papers will be read and reviewed. In-class exercises will also be employed to aid in students' understanding.Topics will include the history of the laboratory study of learning/memory, Pavlovian, and Skinnerian theories. In addition to class-room lectures and discussion, this class will also emphasize the development of scientific writing skills using both in-class and out-of-class assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 121 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 003, SEM
Relationships Between Humans and Other Animals

Instructor: Smuts,Barbara Boardman

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

This seminar examines interactions and relationships between humans and other animals, especially mammals and birds. We begin by learning how animals such as chimpanzees, baboons, and wolves use sounds, body language, and facial expressions to communicate with each other and how, through such knowledge we, like Dr. Doolittle, can begin to "talk" to the animals. We'll explore real life examples of how scientists engage in mutual communication with wild animals (e.g. Jane Goodall's research on chimps and the instructor's work with baboons). We will also study specific relationships with captive animals, such as those between grizzly bears and their trainers, horses and their riders, and our own experiences with dogs, cats, etc. Through a series of short essays, in-class exercises, and a final paper on a topic of their choice, students will explore their personal relationships with animals as well as their attitudes about societal practices such as factory farming, circuses, zoos, and the use of animals in research experiments. We will also consider the imminent extinction of other species, such as chimpanzees and gorillas, as a result of human activities. Through case studies of successful conservation projects, we will learn how extinctions may be averted. Readings from a variety of sources will be available online; there is no textbook. Videos will be used extensively. We will meet a few animals in class and take a field trip to a local animal sanctuary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS COURSE MUST FILL OUT A PLACEMENT FORM AT WWW.UMICH.EDU/~IGRC (IN ADDITION TO REGULAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURES). DUE TO HIGH DEMAND, STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE MASS MEETING ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS WILL BE WITHDRAWN FROM THE COURSE.

PSYCH 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community. STUDENTS INTERESTED IN THIS COURSE MUST FILL OUT A PLACEMENT FORM AT WWW.UMICH.EDU/~IGRC (IN ADDITION TO REGULAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURES). DUE TO HIGH DEMAND, STUDENTS WHO DO NOT ATTEND THE MASS MEETING ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS WILL BE WITHDRAWN FROM THE COURSE.

PSYCH 200 — Independent Study in Psychological Issues
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Allows students to work closely with a faculty member to study a topic of interest beyond the classroom setting. Students work closely with faculty to design their independent study projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, 120, or 121.

PSYCH 203 — Psychology Honors Seminar: Topics in Social Science
Section 001, SEM
Psychology of Globalization

Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: Honors

This seminar examines a variety of psychological issues that are relevant in the age of globalization. The first half of the course deals with the question of how we might understand cultural diversity in self, cognition, and behavior. Here our focus is on the recent advancement of the field of cultural psychology. In the second half of the course, we will examine more directly some select issues related to globalization including modernization, religion, stereotyping, and terrorism.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors students and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 208 — The Academic Paradox
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Neuman, W Russell

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID

Have you given a lot of thought to why you are spending four years of your life and approximately $200,000 (of somebody's money) to get a piece of paper certifying a degree from the University of Michigan? Maybe you've given it some thought, but probably not a lot. Your folks and your peers in high school expected that you would go to college, so you did. That's usually about it.

Are you utilizing this investment wisely while you're in Ann Arbor? Are you taking the right courses? Since you're not sure what you want to do, or why exactly you're here, how could you know? The good news is that there are some useful and thought-provoking answers to such questions, many of them hidden in the nooks and crannies of liberal arts curriculum itself.

In this course students are challenged to apply the insights they have been learning from their study of history, sociology, psychology, economics and the humanities to their own current role as college student. A central theme concerns how the student role relates to succeeding roles in the institutional complex of modern society. One principal paradox that motivates this course of inquiry is the celebrated disjuncture between the abstract study of literature, sciences, and the arts and the "practical knowledge base" that one would expect draw upon most professional careers. In common parlance the word "merely academic" translates as "mostly irrelevant." But as it turns out, empirically and practically, a liberal arts education represents an excellent preparation for most professional careers t a paradox that invites the student to internalize and make use of some of the central concepts from the liberal arts as valuable resources rather than arcane requirements and rites of passage.

[Please note: this course does not count toward concentration requirements for either American Culture or Communication Studies.]

Key Topical Areas:

  • Cultures: On the Tension Between the Humanities and Sciences
  • Education and Ethics: Is There a Linkage Between the Two?
  • The Evolution of the Modern University
  • The Evolution of the Modern Scholarly Discipline
  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
  • The Meaning of Globalization
  • On Writing Well
  • Grading and Achievement
  • Students and Society
  • Those Who March Grimly on the Career Treadmill
  • Human Capital Theory
  • The Effects of Education
  • The Reproduction of Social Inequalities
  • The Psychology

Course Requirements:

There are no examinations in this class. There are seven writing assignments with an assignment due approximately every two weeks. Four assignments are two-page briefs that summarize and interpret central themes in recent lectures and readings. In addition, two assignments consist of essays that require students to apply what they have learned to their own academic, career and life plans. The first essay is approximately eight pages in length, the second approximately twelve pages. Finally one assignment is a "lives-and-careers" book review of approximately eight pages. Students select a relevant biography of a leader in the fields of Law, Medicine, Business, Academics, Public Service/Government/Non Profits, the Arts, Media and Journalism, and Science and Engineering.

The idea is to link lessons from a concrete example of a life story with the themes of the course concerning education, careers, and the life cycle.

Required texts:

  • Wilson, Edward O. (1998). Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York, Knopf. Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition $10.20
  • Machiavelli, Niccolò ([1513] 1989). The Prince. New York, Prometheus Bantam $4.50
  • Kuhn, Thomas S. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. (1962) University of Chicago Press $9.75 3rd edition
  • Csíkszentmihályi, Mihály (1991). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York, Harper Collins. $10.50

CP= Course Pack (Available at Excel 1117 S. University Avenue; Tel: 996-1500)


PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 001, SEM
Working with Preschool Children

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Students will work with children ages 2-5 in community preschools and daycare centers. These placements offer hands-on experiences with a diverse group of children and the lecture series explores a variety of topics that influence child development. The placement sites vary in terms of the populations they serve, including "at-risk" children, children with specials needs, and children of international families with English as a second language.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 002, SEM
Big Sibs: Community and Opportunity

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 003, SEM
Juvenile and Criminal Justice

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the criminal justice system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult offenders and have a positive impact on their lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 004, SEM
Health,Illness and Society

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 211 — Project Outreach
Section 005, SEM
Exploring Careers

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected from PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and future career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory Psychology course.

PSYCH 230 — Introduction to Biopsychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Baron,Scott P

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology. It introduces the kinds of questions traditionally addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is the study of how psychological processes relate to the brain and to evolution. A major focus is on how brain processes cause psychological events and behavior, and how psychological events are encoded in the brain (physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience). Another focus is on how psychological processes (e.g., perception, cognition) differ across different species, and on how psychological processes have been shaped by evolutionary pressures (comparative or evolutionary psychology). Topics will include: principles of behavioral evolution that have shaped current behavior and physiological processes; the anatomy and operation of brain systems relevant to mind and behavior, and their relation to psychoactive drugs; neural mechanisms of normal action, perception, motivation, learning, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and for one discussion/practicum section.

NOTE: This course is intended primarily for sophomores and second — term first — year students who have ALREADY taken a course in introductory psychology. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

Enforced Prerequisites: (PSYCH 111 or 112 or 114 or 115) or (BIOLOGY 162 or 163 or 171 or 172 or 195).

Advisory Prerequisite: Basic familiarity with biology and chemistry

PSYCH 231 — Brain, Learning, and Memory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maren,Stephen A; homepage
Instructor: Berke,Joshua Damien

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: LifeSci

This course will survey integrative and cellular aspects of neuroscience with a focus on the neural mechanisms of learning and memory. It will include both a lecture and laboratory component. There are three modules, each to be taught by different faculty. The modules will each integrate knowledge of methodology, basic neuroscience, and the application of these to learning and memory. The modules are clinical neuropathology and neuroimaging, animal models of learning and memory, and synaptic and cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. The intent of each module is to present an integrative picture of the organization and function of learning and memory systems in both simple and complex nervous systems. Specific topics will include nonassociative learning (habituation and sensitization) in invertebrates, associative conditioning of motor and emotional responses in vertebrates, genetics of learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and learning, molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory, quantitative and computation models of synaptic plasticity and learning, cognitive neuroimaging of human learning and memory, and clinical neuropathology of learning and memory in humans. The topics of the course will span many levels of biological organization from behavior to genomic regulation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students.

PSYCH 240 — Introduction to Cognitive Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Polk,Thad A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources.

The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises. The textbook for this course is Sternberg, R.J. (2006); Cognitive Psychology (4th Edition), Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, or 116.

PSYCH 250 — Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ward,Lucretia M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255.

This course provides an overview of the milestones of human development from conception to death. We examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of children, adolescents, and adults, and the various factors (e.g., genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development. Our goal is to give you an initial introduction to the main issues, central theories, and dominant research methods in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. We also will discuss the implications of course content for child-rearing, education, and social policy so that you can apply your knowledge to meaningful problems. Requirements include four multiple-choice exams, two papers, and section attendance and participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 270 — Introduction to Psychopathology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chang,Edward C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Abnormal psychology entails the scientific study of aberrant behaviors, broadly defined. However, there is no universal consensus on the definition, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. As we shall quickly see, what is deemed abnormal and how it develops or is treated will partly depend on the particular perspective taken. Hence, a key goal of this course is to guide students toward a broad and critical understanding of 'abnormal behavior' from a number of different perspectives. We will accomplish this by exploring, evaluating, and discussing various strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives for understanding psychology based on the theoretical and empirical literature. Films may be used to illustrate some of the important concepts mentioned in the lectures and in the readings. Your final grade will be based on the total number of points you obtain from regular quizzes and exams. In addition, a paper may be required. Note, it is the student's responsibility to be in attendance for all lecture classes. Quizzes, which are given at the start of class, cannot be made up for any reason, and will be given starting the second lecture class. (Therefore, students who are interested in taking this course should make sure to attend the first lecture class.) Students who are late or who do not attend lectures risk missing quizzes and exams that cannot be made up. Missing lectures, quizzes, exams, and failing to complete a paper, will have a direct impact on your final grade.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 270 — Introduction to Psychopathology
Section 020, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Introduces students to the field of clinical psychology and abnormal and deviant behavior. As such, it has a lifespan coverage, beginning with problems of infancy, early childhood/pre-school, and school-aged children, and continuing through adolescence, adult development and into disturbances of the elderly. It surveys biopsychosocial perspectives with respect to the problems described.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 280 — Introduction to Social Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Social psychology is a scientific area in the discipline of psychology that seeks an understanding of how people feel, think, and behave in social situations. Students are introduced to the theories, research methods, and seminal findings of social psychology. Topics covered include: social judgments and decisions, attitudes, perceptions of others, social influence, attraction, aggression, and group pressure. Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through short papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, small group activities, and weekly discussion sections.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 290 — Introduction to the Psychology of Personality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cortina,Lilia M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course offers a general overview of personality theories and their application to modern problems and research. Examples of topics covered are: stages of personality development; biological and situational influences on personality; personality, gender, and culture; "healthy" and "unhealthy" features of personality; and therapeutic applications of personality theory. The major objective is for students to be able to grasp, articulate, and apply personality theories to the understanding of people in the real world. Requirements include three mid-term exams, weekly reading and writing assignments, and weekly attendance/participation in both lecture and discussion section.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 111 or 112 or 114 or 115

PSYCH 303 — Research Methods in Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This writing-intensive course provides an overview of the how's and why's of research in psychology as a social science, and it covers such topics as ethics, library research, case studies, observations, surveys and questionnaires, laboratory experiments, APA-style writing, and statistics. It consists of a weekly 75-minute lecture on Monday, in which general ideas about research will be presented, and a weekly 75-minute lab in which research projects will be planned and presented.

Prerequisites: A 'gateway' course in psychology as a social science. A basic statistics course (e.g., STAT 350) is required. You should not take this course if you have already taken one of the psychology as a social science lab courses (e.g., organizational, personality, psychopathology, social).

Grades: Final grades are based on three 'objective' quizzes over terms and concepts covered in class and readings (15% each) and written assignments for the lab (70% total). Each written assignment will be weighted more-or-less by its page length. We encourage you to write drafts of any and all assignments prior to the due dates. If you wish to avail yourself of this option, you will need to work out a mutually-agreed timetable with your lab instructor well in advance of the due date. Attendance per se at lab is not graded but is required: A student cannot pass this course without participating in lab activities and exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 001, LAB
Child Care Practicum Pound House

Instructor: Volling,Brenda L

FA 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Practicum in Child Development and Child Care. (2-4 credits). This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. Contact Jasmine Boster, jkboster@umich.edu, (734) 998-8399 at Pound House. **Psych 250 or concurrent enrollment required.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 002, LAB
Michigan Mentorship Program

Instructor: Quart,Ellen J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper. Admission is by application only. Email Dr. Quart (equart@umich.edu) for dates and times of the general informational meetings. Applications are distributed at those meetings.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 305 — Practicum in Psychology
Section 010, LAB
Alcohol and Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, II

Instructor: Zucker,Robert A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

The Division of Substance Abuse (http://www. med. umich. edu/psych/sub/umarc/splash. html) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide a continuing opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involve the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c) a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study. Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7. 5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper. Interested applicants should contact: Kristi Jenkins kristirj@med. umich. edu or call 232-0280.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 306 — Project Outreach Group Leading
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Miller,Jerome

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

A course pack will be required.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 211 and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 307 — Directed Experiences with Children
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Working with Children at U-M Children's Centers. For registration information email Judy Collins, judymc@umich.edu

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 308 — Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Davis,Nancy B

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology and Brain, Behavior, and Cognition concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising. Students are selected through an application and interview process. Applications are available in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall.

Students are required to work 3-4 hours per week as peer advisors in the Undergraduate Office, as well as to attend a weekly, two-hour class on Wednesdays from 4:00-6:00. A required training in peer facilitation and the psychology concentration is scheduled on the first Sunday after classes begin, which is continued in a required extended class period on the second Wednesday after classes begin. Participation in class discussion and willingness to actively engage in providing and receiving feedback on advising work is of primary importance for this course.

Other requirements include weekly readings, short essays, written records of peer advising work, organization and production of Undergraduate Forums on topics of general interest, and an administrative project. The course is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, interactive experiential learning, and supervision of the practicum.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing in the Psychology or Brain, Behavior and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Chesler,Mark

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 311 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 313 — Psychology and Religion
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Malley,Brian Edward

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Psychologists have long been interested in the ideas, emotions, and motivations that drive religious people. Neither a critique nor defense of religion, this class explores what psychologists have learned about religious thought, feeling, and behavior. We will be particularly concerned with what religious thought and behavior implies about the human mind, how religion is similar to and different from other kinds of activities, and the creative ways in which people have understood their experiences. Assessment will involve exams, quizzes, and written assignments.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 317 — Community Research
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Gutierrez,Lorraine M

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course will cover research methodologies useful in understanding communities. These include community needs and asset assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. Through readings, lectures, and discussion, the class will consider what is involved in each of these methods and when each is appropriate. Students will use one of these methodologies to carry out a research project in collaboration with a community organization in Detroit. Results from this project will be communicated through a paper and poster session. Requirements include readings, lectures, a community profile, and a write-up of the research project.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115

PSYCH 322 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 323 — Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or six credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322, and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323.

The field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 326 — Faculty Directed Early Research for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A student may elect a combined maximum of 6 credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 326 and 327.

The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, collects and analyzes data and produces a written report as directed by the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290 with at least a grade of C.

PSYCH 327 — Faculty Directed Early Research for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: A student may elect a combined maximum of 6 credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 326 and 327.

The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, collects and analyzes data and produces a written report as directed by the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290 with at least a grade of C.

PSYCH 328 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 329 — Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent research participation in a Psychology lab and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 331 — Laboratories in Biopsychology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the Biopsychology Program or in the Cognition and Perception Program with his/her on-going research; (2) to introduce students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior) or cognitive science; (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists or cognitive scientists in laboratory research. Grades are based on a student's: (1) performance in an individual faculty member's lab; (2) an oral presentation; and (3) term paper that describes the student's research experience. Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall). Students concentrating in Brain, Behavior and Cognitive Science will receive priority.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. STATS 350 or 425 and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 335 — Introduction to Animal Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bergman,Thore Jon

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course is an introduction to the evolutionary study of Animal Behavior. This class will provide an opportunity for students to learn about behavior from a biological perspective. We will start by reviewing evolution and natural selection. The remainder of the course looks at why animals behave the way they do in nature, focusing on causes of behavior. We will address immediate (or "proximate") causes of behavior including genetic, neural, and hormonal influences on behavior. However, the main emphasis of the course will be on "ultimate" (or long-term) causes of behavior. Thus, we will look at behavior primarily in relation to an animal's fitness or success. Topics covered will include foraging, habitat selection, mating systems, sexual selection, communication, and cognition. Emphasis will also be on learning how scientists study behavioral questions, including how to test adaptive hypotheses. Finally, written assignments will focus on scientific writing, stressing clarity and simplicity.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, BIOLOGY 162, 163, 171, 172, 195 or ANTHRBIO 161.

PSYCH 338 — Primate Social Behavior I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating, and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings.

PSYCH 341 — Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research. The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240 or 345; and STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425

PSYCH 345 — Introduction to Human Neuropsychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Reuter-Lorenz,Patricia A

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 634.

This course surveys current knowledge of the human brain and its role in mental processes, such as perception, attention, thought, language, emotion, and memory. Case studies will be used to learn about the effects of brain surgery, head injury, stroke, and dementing illnesses. Evaluation is based on approximately four exams, participation in discussion sections, and a series of short assignments.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, or 116.

PSYCH 351 — Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Evans,Evelyn Margaret

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture, discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual, group, and class research projects. Students are provided with hands-on research opportunities, conducting observational studies with preschool children, and experimental studies with school-aged children. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement. Course grades will be based on: three quizzes, an article critique, completion of PEERRS modules, one oral and three written research papers and reports. Attendance at both the lecture and lab sections is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 355 — Cognitive Development
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This upper level undergraduate course focuses on cognitive development and aging in adulthood. Theoretical perspectives, methodological issues, and empirical findings and their implications will be considered. We will discuss normal adulthood cognitive losses and gains, as well as the factors that contribute to individual differences in the patterns of change in sensation, attention, memory, communication, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, and wisdom. In addition, we will review current knowledge about pathological cognitive impairment in late life. The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student discussion, but also will include videos, instructor lectures, group work, and student presentations. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 356 — Educational Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Paris,Scott G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course examines major topics relevant to American education from preschool through high school. We will examine topics such as learning and motivation, curriculum and instruction, testing and assessment, reform movements, federal policies, and contemporary issues. A background in education or psychology is helpful but not required. Students will be required to complete several multiple-choice exams, attend and participate in weekly discussion sections, and write a term paper and several short papers. Lectures, videos, discussion, and independent projects will be used in the course to promote learning.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 359 — Psychology of Aging
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Perlmutter,Marion

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

As average life expectancy increases, questions about aging are becoming more important for individuals, as well as for societies. For example, as the number of years we can each expect to live increases, our life plans should be reconsidered, and as the number and proportion of older adults in our population increases, our societal evaluation of the needs and potentials of its citizenry should be reassessed.

This course examines current knowledge about constancies and changes in biology, behavior, and thought in adulthood. We will learn about typical adult aging patterns, explore the variability, causes, and plasticity of these patterns, and consider the individual and societal implications of them. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the usual and possible patterns of development and aging in adulthood. They should have a new appreciation of the changes they are likely to experience as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain an understanding of the needs and potentials of older persons in our society.

Attitudes, theory, research, and practices relevant to adulthood will be examined. The course will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S., including discussions of attitudes about the old, the demographics of past, present, and future older populations, and conceptual issues relevant to theory and research on development and aging. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be considered include physical capacities, health, health care, death and dying, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, wisdom, personality, self-concept, emotions, stress and coping, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. Throughout the course issues of gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity in aging will be considered.

The course involves a heavy workload and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site also contains topic outlines, links to relevant readings and research materials, and places for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will mostly involve student discussion, but will also include instructor lecture, group work, student presentations, and videos. Grades will be based on the number of points accumulated by completing assignments and exams and participating in class and web discussions.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 371 — Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Graham-Bermann,Sandra A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on psychopathology. Lectures will cover research design, current studies in clinical psychology, methods of assessing psychiatric symptoms and disorders, and research tools for evaluating psychotherapy outcomes. Lab sessions will encourage students to pursue an area of interest while learning how to design assessments, collect and analyze data, and report findings in a written report that meets APA guidelines. Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270

PSYCH 371 — Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology
Section 010, LAB
Alcohol and Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, I

Instructor: Zucker,Robert A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is the first term of a two-term practicum sequence (continuing for a second term is optional).The two-term sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. The Substance Abuse Section (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/index.htm)and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide an opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include: a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involve the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families; other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants. Students should have an interest in social sciences or health sciences; ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper. Students should have a strong interest in learning about research in communities. Fluency in Spanish is desirable, but not required. A car is not required, but is helpful. Candidates must be interviewed before they can register. Interested applicants should contact: Kristi Jenkins kristirj@med.umich.edu or call 232-0280.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270

PSYCH 381 — Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. Students are introduced to different research methods and concepts, learn to collect and analyze survey data, and conduct an original, experimental research project. In this project (topic varies), students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation, and knowledge of research methodology.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,PSYCH 280.

PSYCH 384 — Behavior and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: De Young,Raymond K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course deals with two central themes:

1. First, environmental problems are people problems. To promote environmental stewardship we must understand how we think, what we care about, what motivates us, and the conditions under which we behave more reasonably.

2. Second, our behavior closely interacts with the environments we find ourselves in. To understand why we act as we do, it is useful to understand the demands environments place upon, and the opportunities they afford, human cognition.

The course explores a model of human nature which includes:

• How people come to know and understand environments

• Which types of environments humans prefer

• How humans cope with non-preferred environments

• The role that mental fatigue and restoration have in everyday functioning

The course:

• Presents evidence of the strong connection between human health/well- being and the environment

• Discusses what human information processing has to say about:

o Design (e.g., architecture, landscapes, planning, urban settings,institutions)

o Effective communication (e.g., teaching in general, communicating about the environment)

o Program implementation (e.g., behavior change in general, promoting environmentally sustainable lifestyles)

• Explores strategies for better managing our time and choosing settings in which we function more effectively

Students taking the course often have no previous experience in the psychology of human-environment interaction. The course is useful to any field of study dealing with human behavior (e.g., environmental studies; education and communication; health education and behavior; conservation psychology; resource policy, planning, and management; organizational and institutional studies; landscape architecture and urban planning; green and sustainable business)

PSYCH 393 — Political Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Winter,David G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course examines how psychological factors affect political behavior, and vice versa. After an initial discussion of the underlying dimensions of political and social behavior, and the concept of "gender"as a lens for analysis, we consider the psychological aspects of leadership as one major political phenomenon. Next, we examine some motivational and perceptual mechanisms involved in conflict escalation, war, and peace. Having established the importance of psychological factors, we examine ways of measuring "at a distance" the psychological characteristics of political leaders and groups, neither of whom can be studied directly. The second part of the course examines psychological perspectives on several political processes: socialization (or learning about politics), political decision-making, ideology, political cognition and the mass media, and political participation and commitment. Finally, we consider threats to the political system (e.g., nationalism and ethnic conflict, violence and terrorism), and ways restoring the political system (e.g., the "arts of politics" such as negotiation and mediation, and ways of taming power). An introductory psychology course is a prerequisite, and a course or strong interest in history or political science is recommended.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology. A prior course or interest in History or Political Science is useful, though not required.

PSYCH 401 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM
Positive Psychology

Instructor: Peterson,Christopher M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Positive psychology calls for as much focus on strength as on weakness, as much interest in building the best things in life as in repairing the worst, and as much attention to fulfilling the lives of healthy people as to healing the wounds of the distressed. The concern of psychology with human problems is understandable. It will not and should not be abandoned. Positive psychologists are "merely" saying that the psychology of the past sixty years is incomplete. But as simple as this proposal sounds, it demands a sea change in perspective.

Psychologists interested in promoting human potential need to start with different assumptions and to pose different questions from their peers who assume a disease model. This seminar will concern itself with the basics of positive psychology.

Requirements: attendance and participation in weekly seminar; one-page, single-spaced, 12 point font reaction paper per topic; readings and out-of-class exercises; seminar presentation (plus annotated bibliography).

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 401 — Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 002, SEM
Psychology and Consciousness

Instructor: Mann,Richard D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the evolution of human consciousness, as a collective development of increasing awareness and as an individual process moving through stages of increasing subtlety and scope. We will explore the uses of artistic expression, personal narrative, and abstract conceptualization. The work of Ken Wilber, Robert Kegan, Jenny Wade, Don Beck and others present the integral approach to theory, but the primary task of the course is to find uniquely personal, meaningful, and expressive ways to exemplify the many stages and stages of consciousness. Understanding the various means for seeking personal and collective transformation and the numerous obstacles to such development will be a major goal of our work together.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 404 — Field Practicum
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 12
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 405 — Field Practicum in a University Setting
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 5
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 411 — Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Robinson,Amorie Alexia

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the analysis of group work and facilitation using a multicultural perspective/context. Attention will be given throughout the course to the influence of the intersections between gender, race, attractional orientation, and other identities that can affect group process and facilitation. Theory, research, and cultural, personal, and life experiences of individuals and groups will be explored for the purposes of developing a fuller understanding and appreciation of varying populations that group facilitators may encounter. This course is designed as an experiential process in which what is learned is also experienced and using these experiences for the foundation for learning the concepts and principles presented. Upon completion of this course, you are expected to have built skills for effective analysis of and participation in group work in a multicultural context.

Through experiential learning and theoretical analysis, we will examine the impact and consequences of social norms, practices, inequities, personal experiences, and psychosocial stressors of those who have been historically stigmatized in American society such as women of color, gay men/lesbians, etc., in order to better understand and appreciate the psychological and emotional struggles they might bring with them into the group process. How best to effectively work with groups regardless of their composition is a goal of this course for each student. Focus will be on the experience of short term groups that are generally formed out of the need for support, education, and consciousness-raising.

This course is designed as a training course for students intending to facilitate small groups through WOMENSTD 420 (Group Facilitation in Women's Studies). It may also be used as supplementary training for other types of facilitation experiences (i.e., Intergroup Relations and Conflict, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center, Project Community, or Lesbian Gay Bi Affairs Office). As a student in WOMENSTD 419, you are encouraged to apply to participate as a facilitator in WOMENSTD 420 which is a direct application of the WOMENSTD 419 curriculum.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or Psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended.

PSYCH 418 — Psychology and Spiritual Development
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mann,Richard D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are:

  • the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living;
  • times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and
  • the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Hillesum, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of two short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115, and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 420 — Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a natural science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on undergraduate Studies and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 421 — Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 422 — Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on undergraduate Studies. STATS 350 or 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 302, 331, 341, or 342.

PSYCH 423 — Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323.

Advisory Prerequisite: Proposal required. Approval of the instructor and Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies. STATS 350 or 425 and one of the following: PSYCH 302, 303, 331, 341, 342, 351, 361, 371, 381, 383, or 391.

PSYCH 424 — Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Reqs: BS

The primary focus in Senior Honors I is the development of a research plan in collaboration with the Honors advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the Honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Advisory Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Psychology Honors Program, STATS 350 or 425, and prior research experience

PSYCH 425 — Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Other: Honors

The primary focus of this course is the development and execution of a social science research project in collaboration with the Honors mentor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Psychology Honors Program, STATS 350 or 425, and prior research experience

PSYCH 426 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS
Other: Honors

Primary focus is the implementation of an Honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 424 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

PSYCH 427 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

The primary focus of this course is the writing of an honors research thesis on the honors project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 425 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

PSYCH 437 — Current Topics in Biopsychology
Section 001, SEM
Current Topics in Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

In this course, we will examine emerging trends and findings in the field of social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience, that is, the study of the relationship between the brain and cognition, affect, and social behavior. Topics will include the role of hemispheric differences in emotion and motivation, mirror neurons and social behavior, the cerebral basis of love and sex, and brain substrates supporting conscious and unconscious forms of motivation. Students are required, on a weekly basis, to read original papers from the field of social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience and take turns moderating the discussion of the assigned topics.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230, 240, or 345

PSYCH 438 — Hormones and Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Beehner,Jacinta Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

In this course, we will examine how hormones can produce changes in behavior, but also how behavioral interactions can alter hormones. We will primarily discuss hormone-behavior interactions in mammalian systems with an emphasis on humans and non-human primates. Throughout the course, we will explore the hormonal influences on sex determination, sexual behavior, parental behavior, dominance and aggression, responses to stressful stimuli, immune function and homeostasis, biological rhythms, learning and memory, maturation, ageing and senescence, and several behaviors relevant to humans such as motivation and mood. The course will be taught as a mixture of lecture, discussion, and student presentations (the last few weeks of class). Grades will be assigned on the basis of (1) two in-class exams, (2) grasp of and thoughts on the assigned readings through written comments in log books, and (3) a poster presentation and critique. Students are expected to have a solid background in Biopsychology (PSYCH 330) or Animal Behavior (PSYCH 335).

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 230 or 240

PSYCH 442 — Perception, Science, and Reality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. Since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do, the course is a broadly based course that examines the study of perception from a number of different perspectives: Cognitive psychology and information processing; philosophy of mind and phenomenology; history of psychology and philosophy of science. Particular topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation. The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade. Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu. Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

PSYCH 445 — Psychology of Language
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boland,Julie E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The sentence "She saw her duck" has several different interpretations. What factors determine which meaning of "duck" we think of? How does this influence the structure of the sentence? Do people ever produce ambiguous sentences like this? This course is designed to familiarize students with experimental research on the cognitive processes that underlie language comprehension and production in normal adults. The focus of the course is on word recognition, syntactic and semantic analysis, and discourse-level processing; language acquisition and speech perception will not be covered. Topics will include lexical and structural ambiguity resolution, models of parsing and sentence understanding, the role of discourse-level information, the planning and production of sentences, and the role of prosody/intonation. This course will be taught at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and graduate students studying linguistics, psychology or cognitive science.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240.

PSYCH 449 — Decision Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yates,J Frank

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Consider the following: Should I take PSYCH 449 or HISTART 477? I'm not really good at chemistry and things like that. My grades in those courses stink. So should I give up my dream of becoming a doctor? Other companies are making tons of money selling sport utility vehicles. But they seem to have the market locked up. Besides, I have bad feelings about the pollution those things cause. Should we enter the SUV market anyway? My client, Mr. Thomas, thinks that Consolidated is responsible for his injuries and thus he wants to sue them. Should I advise that he go through with that plan? Floyd and I have been going together for several years, and now he wants to get married. Should I give in and marry him, despite my misgivings? As alderman for the fifth ward, should I vote for this legislation that would change the zoning rules for the city? Questions like these illustrate the kinds of decision problems people confront all the time, in their personal and professional lives. They provide the ultimate focus of PSYCH 449, "Decision Processes." Specifically, my primary aims in this course are to help the student do two things: (a) achieve an understanding of how people — individually and collectively — actually solve decision problems; and (b) develop an understanding of how people — including the student him — or herself — could decide better than they would be inclined to decide naturally. Should you elect PSYCH 449? One consideration you should take into account is whether the aims described above fit with your interests. That is, do the aims excite you? Another consideration pertains to your future plans. PSYCH 449 would be good preparation if your plans include either: scholarship (e.g., in graduate school and thereafter) on basic processes in cognitive psychology, social psychology, organizational psychology, or related areas, e.g., political science, economics, marketing or professional practice (either immediately after college or after professional school) in areas where decision making is critical, e.g., business, law, health care, counseling, operations engineering. How is PSYCH 449 organized? The entire class meets twice a week, in 1-* hour "lecture" sessions. And on Fridays, each student attends either of two 1-hour discussion sessions. PSYCH 449 is built around what I call the "cardinal decision issue perspective." This is a way of thinking about decision problems which focuses on things like what decisions are, what it ought to mean to say that a decision is "good" or "bad," and the kinds of questions that must be answered for virtually any decision problem that arises. The specific topics we will address are organized according to the categories distinguished in the cardinal issue perspective. One of my major goals is to have you develop a deep appreciation for that perspective since it can help you think through the problems you will face as a student of decision making and as a decision maker. Our treatment of a given topic typically proceeds as follows: First, students do the reading for the given topic. Then, in the "lectures," the key questions surrounding the topic are illustrated through demonstrations or exercises in which all students participate actively. As the instructor, I offer a class-interactive presentation in which I introduce essential ideas not covered in the readings and integrate all we have seen on the topic, seeking to provide an integrated picture that makes sense to the student. The Friday discussion sessions are devoted primarily to active discussions of question lists provided for the readings and to tasks related to students' team projects. The requirements of the course include: attendance and active participation in class, exercises, a midterm and a final examination, a term project.

Advisory Prerequisite: STATS 350 or 425

PSYCH 457 — Current Topics in Developmental Psychology
Section 001, SEM
Understanding Development through Children's Literature

Instructor: Schreier,Shelly Gail-Zeff

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will have two primary goals. The first goal will be to explore the ways in which children's literature supports and promotes children's development in cognitive, social and emotional ways. Second, the class will help students critically evaluate and analyze children's books with regard to the messages they provide. We will look at the evolution of children's books over the last several decades and the ways in which they correspond to our understanding of psychological theory and the contemporary challenges faced by children. Students will discuss the ways in which books encourage children's ability to categorize, build concepts, enhance language skills and come to understand themselves and the broader social world. Additional books will cover topics ranging from divorce, war, siblings, chronic illness, dyslexia and childhood fears.Readings for the course will be a combination of children's literature and journal articles on child development and literature. Class format with consist of a brief lecture, followed by discussion of assigned readings. Students will be responsible for preparing a presentation about one of their favorite children's books for the class, as well as completing several short response papers.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250.

PSYCH 457 — Current Topics in Developmental Psychology
Section 002, SEM
Psychological Perspectives on Chinese Language and Thought

Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar will introduce students to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons that have been made about Chinese and Chinese people in the Western psychological literature. It will include brief discussions of Chinese languages and cultures and how they differ from English and other Asian and European languages and cultures. It will then proceed to examine hypotheses about the psychological implications and effects of these cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons. Topics will include spoken language acquisition, literacy and learning to read and write, how language use shapes everyday perceptions, concepts of "learning" and the model minority, dating and relationships, and the ways in which emotions are discussed and interpreted in everyday life. Students are expected to participate actively in the seminar and have some background in at least one of Chinese language, Chinese cultural studies, linguistics, philosophy of mind, or contemporary psychological methods and research.Weekly discussions and reaction papers on the readings and issues, a formal presentation of at least one issue, and a final integrative project which will be integrated into the course website will be required.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250.

PSYCH 473 — Developmental Disturbances of Childhood
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cain,Albert C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 270

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 477 — Current Topics in Clinical Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Nagata,Donna Kiyo

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Psychotherapy is one of the most commonly used methods to address a host of behavioral, emotional, and existential problems. Current projections estimate that one third of all U.S. citizens will seek psychotherapy at some point in their lives. But what do we really know about psychotherapy? This seminar will provide a guided tour through the scientific literature on psychotherapy. We will begin with a historical overview of the field including a review of the major systems of psychotherapy (psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and humanistic). We will then devote some time to developing critical skills for reading the scientific literature. These skills will be nurtured throughout the semester as we move through the major research on psychotherapy "outcome" and "process." Outcome research traditionally asks the question, "Does psychotherapy work?" We will explore the field's current position on that question and demonstrate that it leads naturally to the process question, "How does psychotherapy work?" We will discuss the current literature on this question and gain some "hands-on" experience with psychotherapy process measures. Course readings will be supplemented with videotapes and transcript material from actual psychotherapies.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270.

PSYCH 477 — Current Topics in Clinical Psychology
Section 002, LEC
Gender and Sexual Identity in Current Theory and Cinema

Instructor: Hansell,James H

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the psychology of gender and sexual identity through the medium of popular cinema. We will begin with theoretical readings that will provide a context for our analysis of various films dealing with gendered aspects of identity, coming of age issues for males and females, and the psychodynamics of gender and sexual identity development. Students will be expected to write on these topics.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 270.

PSYCH 487 — Current Topics in Social Psychology
Section 001, SEM
Intelligence and the Social Brain

Instructor: Ybarra,Oscar

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Ask 20 people what intelligence is and you are likely to get 20 different definitions. Nevertheless, in all of these definitions there is bound to be a common theme, and that theme in all likelihood will deal with a person's capacity to adapt to the environment. Although the environments humans have populated are quite diverse, one feature the human mind had to be sensitive to was navigating a web of social relations. The course will provide a different perspective on intelligence by placing it in the broader context of what it means to be human — to have and maintain social relations with others. The ability to have social interactions and social relations is predicated on distinct social cognitive processes. Such a perspective runs counter to the prevailing and usually decontextualized views of intelligence and the recommendations given to people as to what they can do to maintain their cognitive health. Students who sign up for this course are expected to have a background in psychology and preferably to have taken a course in social and or cognitive psychology. The readings for the course will be a combination of scientific articles and book chapters on the subject matter. The course is seminar format with the expectation that students will participate actively and on occasion help to lead discussion. At times, part of each class session will be devoted to performing class activities to reinforce concepts from class. Student evaluation will be based on mini exams, execution of discussion topic, and general participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 280.

PSYCH 487 — Current Topics in Social Psychology
Section 002, SEM
Self

Instructor: Crocker,Jennifer K

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will provide an overview of the social psychology of the self, with a special emphasis on self-esteem, and its consequences for learning and mastery, relationships, self-regulation, and mental and physical health. Students will learn about the self through a combination of reading and discussion of research, and exploring the role of self-esteem in their own lives, using experiential exercises to explore the nature of each student's self-esteem. Introduction to psychology (PSYCH 111) and social or personality psychology are required. Grades will be based on participation in discussion, papers, and completion of weekly exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 280.

PSYCH 488 — Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

All societies construe some appearances, behaviors, and ways of thinking as typical, acceptable, normal, while others are seen as different, unacceptable, and abnormal. However, which aspects of human experience are thought of as conventional, which deviant, varies tremendously in time and space. What is considered deviant in a society and why, as well as how deviance is responded to, is often linked to the particular interests of some groups at the expense of others. Deviance is, then, political. This course is a sociological investigation of the politics of deviance that seeks to cultivate a critical, reflexive, sociological perspective on deviance and social life. We begin with study of the creation of deviant categories and the ways such categories can be used to express and bolster group interests. We then consider the ramifications of such processes for individuals, namely how people "become" deviant and manage associated stigma. Next our attention turns to forms of deviance construed as illness or disorders. Specific topics of study include problem drinking and "drug" use in the U.S., non-normative sexuality and gender, mental disorder/mental illness, disorders of childhood (ADHD, shortness, and gender identity disorder), and commercialized sex. Throughout the course emphasis is directed to the relationship of deviant behavior to conventional values and institutions, modes of social control, and social spheres of power and privilege including class, gender, race, and sexual orientation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory Sociology or introductory Psychology as a social science.

PSYCH 493 — Psychological Perspectives on Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Culture and Immigration

Instructor: Mahalingam,Ramaswami

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

Immigrants face a unique predicament. They are exposed to dual world-views, cultural practices and beliefs. This seminar will provide an interdisciplinary theoretical framework to understand how immigrant experience is influenced by the intersections of race, ethnicity, class and gender. The course will appeal to the fields of cultural psychology, sociology, women's studies and refugee studies. Attendance and class participation is mandatory. Each student has to do a research project. The seminar meets twice a week. Requirements: Any one of the following methods classes — Psych 303, 331, 341, 351, 361, 371, 381, or 391.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and one of: PSYCH 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290

PSYCH 497 — Current Topics in Personality Psychology
Section 001, SEM
Psychology of Sexual Aggression

Instructor: Zurbriggen,Eileen L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to examine current psychological theory and research relating to the causes and consequences of rape and other forms of sexual aggression. It is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists. The course is organized topically. We begin by reading and thinking about the social construction of masculinity and femininity and how these might contribute to sexual aggression. We then explore the role of the media in creating and enforcing these cultural constructions. The bulk of the course is devoted to an examination of psychological processes related to victimization and perpetration. We then discuss legal issues related to rape and sexual assault and violence prevention. We conclude the course by discussing alternative visions of sexuality — ones not based in dominance and submission.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 290.

PSYCH 498 — Gender and the Individual
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mahalingam,Ramaswami

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Examines how gender shapes and is shaped by individual women and men. We draw on psychological theories, feminist theories, and the empirical research literature to examine how gender operates for women and men. The course considers ways in which gender is constructed socially; examines particular domains in which gender is experienced and performed; and examines sources of gender in biology, lifespan development, and socialization.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, 115, or a WOMENSTD course.

PSYCH 530 — Advanced Topics in Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology
Section 001, SEM
Comparative Animal Cognition

Instructor: Bergman,Thore Jon

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This seminar focuses on the cognitive abilities of animals from an evolutionary perspective, addressing questions such as:

  • Are some animals "smarter" than others, and if so, why?
  • How and why do cognitive abilities evolve?
  • What sorts of cognitive abilities are favored by different ecological and social tasks?
  • Are the cognitive abilities of animals specific to certain tasks or does it make sense to talk about generalized mental abilities like intelligence?

The course will begin with a brief review of evolutionary concepts and evolutionary comparative methods and then move on to specific topics relating to animal cognition. Topics covered will include:

  • spatial cognition,
  • numeric cognition,
  • foraging,
  • learning,
  • memory,
  • sexual selection and cognition,
  • ecological and social complexity hypotheses,
  • comparative studies of brain size,
  • communication and language,
  • eavesdropping,
  • intentions and theory of mind,
  • deception, and
  • behavioral flexibility.

This is a rapidly growing field, and the readings will emphasize current research from the primary literature. We will also use chapters from S. Shettleworth's Cognition, Evolution, and Behavior (Oxford University Press, 1998) as background for some topics. The reading load will be fairly heavy and grades will be based in part on participation in discussions relating to the readings. Students will also be expected to lead the discussion at least once during the academic term.

Written assignments will include several short essays and a 10-15 page research paper.

The course is open to undergraduates and graduate students. Undergraduate students must have had a prior course in animal behavior and all students must get permission from the instructor to enroll.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH,PSYCH 335, 338/438

PSYCH 533 — Sleep: Neurobiology, Medicine, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lydic,Ralph; homepage
Instructor: Baghdoyan,Helen A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The objective of this course is to give students the most up-to-date information on the biological, personal, and societal relevance of sleep. Personal relevance is emphasized by the fact that the single best predictor of daytime performance is the quality of the previous night's sleep. The brain actively generates sleep, and the first third of the course will overview the neurobiological basis of sleep cycle control. Sleep will be used as a vehicle for teaching basic neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological principles. This information will provide a cellular-level understanding of how sleep deprivation, jet lag, and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine alter sleep and wakefulness. It is now clear that sleep significantly alters physiology. The second third of the class will cover sleep-dependent changes in physiology and sleep disorders medicine. Particular emphasis will be place on disorders of excessive sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep-dependent changes in autonomic control. Chronic sleep deprivation impairs immune function and promotes obesity. Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4 and 6 a.m., and the second portion of the class will highlight the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine. The societal relevance of the sleep will be considered in the final portion of the class. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented society, operator-error by one individual can have a disastrous negative impact on the public health and safety. Fatigue-related performance errors contributed to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant failures and to the Exxon Valdez Alaskan oil spill. The personal relevance of fatigue-related performance errors will be considered by reviewing the recent data showing that in the U.S. more people die from medical mistakes each year than from highway accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. Fulfillment of course objectives will be quantified by pre- versus post-class informational self-evaluation. In-class arousal levels will be facilitated by seminar participation.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 222, MCDB 422, or PSYCH 230; and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 606 — Positive Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Peterson,Christopher M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Positive psychology calls for as much focus on strength as on weakness, as much interest in building the best things in life as in repairing the worst, and as much attention to fulfilling the lives of healthy people as to healing the wounds of the distressed. The concern of psychology with human problems is understandable. It will not and should not be abandoned. Positive psychologists are "merely" saying that the psychology of the past sixty years is incomplete. But as simple as this proposal sounds, it demands a sea change in perspective. Psychologists interested in promoting human potential need to start with different assumptions and to pose different questions from their peers who assume a disease model. This seminar will concern itself with the basics of positive psychology and then move to topics of special interest to seminar participants. For example, students interested in schools might focus on character education; those interested in therapy might take a look at life coaching; those interested in medicine might explore wellness promotion; those interested in the workplace might look at ethics; and so on.

Requirements: attendance and participation in weekly seminar; one-page, single-spaced, 12 point font reaction paper per topic; and one-hour seminar presentation (plus annotated bibliography).

PSYCH 613 — Advanced Statistical Methods, I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lewis,Richard L

FA 2007
Credits: 4

First semester of a two semester sequence covering the general linear model and multivariate statistics.

Advisory Prerequisite: One previous course in Statistics. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 619 — Supervised Research I
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

The intent of this requirement is that each student, early in his or her graduate career, undertake a research project roughly the equivalent in scope to a Master's thesis. This individual instruction course requires enrollment under a faculty section number. The First Year 619 Research Project, after written, must be evaluated by two readers. Students can obtain an override from the Graduate Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 630 — Topics in Primatology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course will include discussion of topics related to current problems in the study of primate behavior. Topics span the breadth of questions concerning the causation, function, development and evolution of primate behavior.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 653 — Personality Program Orientation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course serves multiple purposes for first-year personality students: 1) Introduction to our program; 2) Arena in which to discuss PSYCH 619 plans; 3) Introduction to the specific theoretical and empirical approaches to personality psychology as represented at Michigan; 4) Overview of the field of personality more generally.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 654 — Classic and Modern Personality Theories
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Winter,David G

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar, we will read and discuss some of the major theories, classic and modern, which have influenced the psychology of personality in relation to social contexts: psychoanalysis, the "classic" personality theories of Murray (on motives) and Allport (on traits), Kelly's cognitive theory of personal constructs, theories focused on the "self" (Rogers on self-concept), Erikson's psycho-social theory, Lewin's concept of behavior as a function of person and environment, social structural and cultural theories of personality, and three more recent perspectives: feminist conceptions of personality, post-modernism, and chaos theory/complexity theory. For each theory or theorist, we will read some basic selections and then some modern research articles that draw on (or relate to) that theory. We will be focusing on the following issues, among others:

  1. What explicit or implicit assumptions does the theory make about human nature and the nature and effects of contexts?
  2. How is the theory related to the other theories?
  3. What are the main elements or concepts that the theory uses to describe normal personality and individual differences-in general, as well as in particular contexts?
  4. How could the theory contribute to contemporary research on personality and social contexts (e.g., suggesting new variables or topics of study, new methods, etc.)?
  5. How could contemporary research contribute to the further development of the theory?

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 673 — Clinical Assessment of the Child
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lord,Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is one of two courses, each with a lab section, designed to introduce graduate students in clinical psychology to methods and theory of psychological assessment. The course will work from case-based material to integrate familiarity with common evidence-based measures of psychological functioning, basic issues in practice in conducing assessments with children and families, ethical issues in assessment and psychometric theory. This course is limited to clinical or developmental students or permission of instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 675 — Multicultural Issues in Clinical Practice
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Nagata,Donna Kiyo

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the influences of ethnicity, culture, sexual orientation, and disability in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on the issues related to the assessment and treatment of individuals from African American, Asian American, American Indian, Latino, and multicultural backgrounds.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 676 — Clinical Assessment Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Lord,Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This lab accompanies Clinical Assessment PSYCH 673. Students will work in teams to observe and carry out several assessments of children or adolescents. They will have opportunities to practice administration of individually administered cognitive and diagnostic measures). A major focus is the intensively supervised clinical assessment of actual patients. Each student completes one such assessment and participates in the analysis of 3-4 others completed by group members. Provides experiences that count toward the aggregation of practicum hours. This course is limited to clinical and developmental students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 673. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 678 — Topics in Clinical Psychology: Ethics and Professional Issues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Deldin,Patricia J

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Topics in Clinical Psychology is a two term course designed to introduce first-year clinical psychology graduate students to the profession of clinical psychology. Clinical psychology is unique in its attempt to seamlessly blend the values of scientist and practitioner. The content of this course reflects the gravitational pull of these two poles of our field. In the second term, students will have the opportunity to spend an intimate 90 minutes with a psychologist whose work bears on clinical research or clinical practice. Time will also be devoted to administrative matters relevant to the clinical program. This course is specifically designed for UM clinical psychology graduate students and is not appropriate for students from other areas or other departments.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 681 — Survey of Social Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Schwarz,Norbert W

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This three-term sequence addresses basic professional issues of scientific conduct and responsibility. Enrollment is limited to the first year cohort of the social psychology area and joint program students admitted to social psychology. The first term provides a general orientation to graduate level research in social psychology and focuses on issues like literature searches, the development of research ideas, IRB procedures, the use of the subject pool, and the nature of the publication process. At the end of the first term, students present an extended abstract of their first year research project (PSYCH 619). The second term provides an overview of current faculty research projects. In addition, students regularly discuss progress on their PSYCH 619 projects with the cohort. During the third term (fall of the second year), students make a more formal presentation of their PSYCH 619 findings in class, in preparation for their presentation at the social psychology brown bag. Throughout, issues of scientific responsibility are addressed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 682 — Advanced Social Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a graduate level introduction to the field of social psychology. The course starts with a general introduction to the field. We consider how the field has conceptualized two of its primary concepts — person or self and context or situation. We also examine evolutionary underpinnings of human social behavior. We will then turn to several select topics including dissonance, social cognition and attitudes, stereotype and prejudice, culture and cognition, self-esteem and honor, and health and well-being. We will read both classic and contemporary, cutting-edge papers on each topic. Throughout the course a strong emphasis is given to the power of social situations that are comprised of multi-level realities including personal, interpersonal, societal, and cultural.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 685 — Social Psychological Theories
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is for students who are planning to take the preliminary exam in social psychology during the spring-summer term. It covers the central issues of social psychology based on textbooks and primary sources. Enrollment is limited to students taking the prelim exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 682; Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 706 — Tutorial Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 719 — Supervised Research II
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 5

This is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 719, students must use the individual section number of a staff member. Overrides can be obtained in the Psychology Graduate Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 731 — Advanced Seminar and Practicum in Physiological Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Becker, Jill
Instructor: Lee, Theresa ; homepage
Instructor: Smuts,Barbara Boardman

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is an introductory course for entering Biopsychology graduate students. It serves to orient students to the major sub-disciplines of the field, their methods and key research questions. To meet this goal, the course is divided into 3 modules, taught by different faculty expert in that discipline: Comparative/Evolutionary approaches, Developmental/Life Span approaches, and Brain/Behavior mechanisms. Each module will be self-contained with assigned readings and written assignments. Format will include lectures familiarizing students with the key components of the field and discussion of lecture material and assigned readings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs.

PSYCH 756 — The Development of Language and Communication Skills
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shatz,Marilyn J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

One of the most remarkable feats of childhood is the child's ability to learn a first language. This course will examine how children accomplish this task. We will focus on a wide range of empirical studies and theoretical analyses examining typical and atypical language development, with special focus on word meanings and syntax. Other topics include infant speech perception, pragmatics, language disorders, and language and thought. The format is a mixture of lecture and discussion. Students will be expected to contribute to class discussion, write a term paper, and make a presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 757 — Social Development
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eccles,Jacquelynne S

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on the factors that play a role in the social development across the life span using a transactional ecological framework. The transactional perspective will permit interpreting the relative importance of what the individual brings to the situation, the experience that the environment provides, and how each is affected by the other. The ecological perspective permits an analysis of the social environment into subsystems that influence individuals including family, school, labor market, peer group, gender, ethnicity, culture, and economic status.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Psychology or approved joint programs and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 759 — Proseminar in Developmental Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Antonucci,Toni C

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course reviews contemporary viewpoints in developmental psychology as well as ethical and methodological issues of particular concern to developmental psychologists. In addition, faculty present and discuss their current research. The course is a two-term course. Students enroll for 3 credits in the Fall, and 0 credits in the Winter, but receive grades at the end of the Winter. The course is intended for first year graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: The course is intended for first year Graduate students in the developmental area; other students interested in the course should seek permission of instructor. Student must register for both Fall and Winter semesters to receive a grade.

PSYCH 779 — Practicum on Ethics
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Pole,Nnamdi

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

The goal of this seminar is to provide students with an opportunity to reflect and learn from their clinical practicum experience within a supportive academic context. Discussing issues, as they arise for students in their clinical sites, will be the primary emphasis of this seminar. As such, this seminar will be specifically tailored to the enrolled students and to the needs and questions that arise for them in the course of their practicum experience. In addition, special attention will be devoted to discussing issues of gender, race, ethnicity, social class, and sexual orientation as they arise in clinical settings. Discussions in this seminar will cover an expansive range of topics and may include such things as telephone contacts and first sessions with clients, issues of confidentiality, ethical questions, the application of clinical theory to practice, professional identity issues, record keeping, report writing, and licensing requirements.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to applicants for the PhD specializing in clinical psychology. Permission of practicum supervisor required

PSYCH 786 — Research Design in Social Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Oyserman,Daphna R

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to research design and procedure in social psychology, emphasizing, but not restricted to, the experimental method.

It covers the planning and conduct of research, not the analysis of data. Topics include: getting an idea and turning it into a researchable question, testing alternative hypotheses, reliability and validity, creating independent variables, designing measures, the context of the study, alternatives to experiments, research ethics, and preparing research findings for an audience.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to approved applicants for the Ph.D. in Social Psychology; others by permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Cognitive Neuroscience

Instructor: Weissman,Daniel Howard

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar, participants will read and critically evaluate current articles from the emerging field of cognitive neuroscience. Each week, a different student will lead the discussion of a paper of interest, which will focus on any of a diverse range of topics including (but not limited to) attention, working memory, executive control, social cognition, emotion, object representation, reward, number processing, learning and memory, judgment and decision-making, and the development of mental abilities over the lifespan. Leading the weekly discussion will involve creating a PowerPoint presentation, which highlights the current study within the context of the issues and background literature that motivated it. To further encourage critical thinking and creative and meaningful group discussions, students will write a short review of the paper each week, which briefly summarizes the authors' main findings, thoughtfully discusses the major strengths and weaknesses of the study, and identifies issues of particular importance that should be discussed in class. The overall goal of the seminar will be to sharpen our ability to read, interpret, and think critically about current cognitive neuroscience research as well as to increase our knowledge of the existing canon of studies and the various methods that are used to investigate brain-behavior relationships.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Keating,Daniel P

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Using an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the role of cultural, social (e.g., globalization, immigration) and ecological factors in shaping our beliefs about gender. This course reviews major theoretical approaches to the cultural psychological study of gender. The readings focus on culture — specific beliefs about various dimensions of gender and consequences of such beliefs, such as domestic violence, female infanticide and gender discrimination. Examples are drawn from various cultures across the world. The course is designed to emphasize student in class participation including small group discussions. Students are expected to actively engage in class discussion of course readings. The final grade is based on two reflection papers, class participation and a final paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 003, SEM
The Meta-Analytic Review

Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A research review is conceptualized as a scientific inquiry involving five stages that parallel those of primary research. The five stages are:

  1. problem formulation,
  2. data collection,
  3. data evaluation,
  4. analysis and interpretation, and
  5. public presentation.

Hands on experience in conducting a research review including the use of meta-analytic procedures to analyze the data.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Decision Consortium

Instructor: Preston,Stephanie D

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the history of attempts to develop knowledge about sexuality using survey methods and statistical analyses. Psychologist Lewis Terman's attempt to discredit Alfred Kinsey's surveys in the late 1940s will serve as a touchpoint for discussing the history of how questions about the morality of sexual practices became bound up with questions about their frequency, the deployment of statistical methods to answer nature/nurture questions about sexual difference, and modernist faith in scientific methods to render lawful the terrain of morality, belief, embodiment, and human relationship

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Current topics in social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience

Instructor: Schultheiss,Oliver C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In this course, we will examine emerging trends and findings in the field of social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience, that is, the study of the relationship between the brain and cognition, affect, and social behavior. Topics will include the role of hemispheric differences in emotion and motivation, mirror neurons and social behavior, the cerebral basis of love and sex, and brain substrates supporting conscious and unconscious forms of motivation. Students are required, on a weekly basis, to read original papers from the field of social, cognitive, and affective neuroscience and take turns moderating the discussion of the assigned topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 006, SEM
Sexuality and Social Justice

Instructor: Zurbriggen,Eileen L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an advanced seminar focusing on the study of sexuality from a social justice perspective. The primary theoretical and methodological framework is social psychological; however, the course also includes readings from sociology, anthropology, gender studies, feminist studies, public heath, philosophy, political science, and other disciplines. The course is not designed to be an overview of all topics related to sexuality and social justice. Rather, we will focus in greater depth on a smaller subset of topics that highlight the importance of power (especially gendered power) in understanding the intersections between sexuality and social justice. The course is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in the field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 007, SEM
Intelligence

Instructor: Nisbett,Richard E

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This course is taught in conjunction with the joint Research Center for Group Dynamics/Culture and Cognition seminar.

  • What is intelligence?
  • How do you measure it?
  • How well can it predict behavior of various kinds?
  • To what degree is intelligence inherited?
  • How modifiable is intelligence by various methods?
  • What kinds of ethnic group differences are there in intelligence?

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 808 — Special Seminar
Section 008, SEM
Hormones & Animal Social Behavior

Instructor: Beehner,Jacinta Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar on special topics in psychology. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 819 — Supervised Research III
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

This course is an individual instruction course. When enrolling for PSYCH 819, students must use an individual section number of a faculty member. Overrides can be obtained in the Psychology Graduate Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 861 — Proseminar in Education and Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Cortina,Kai Schnabel; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Seminar discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning, motivation, and psycho-educational assessment. A major focus of the course is on research methods and helping students initiate and work on their first year research projects.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 862 — Proseminar in Education and Psychology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Blumenfeld,Phyllis C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This second term of the proseminar is a continuation of first semester discussions of current topics in educational psychology with emphasis on classroom learning; motivation; and psychoeducational assessment. A major focus is placed on research methods and helping students initiate and complete their first year research projects. A required core course in Education for CPEP students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 877 — Psychopathology through the Lifespan I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Olson,Sheryl L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This 3-credit seminar offers an advanced introduction to the field of child and adolescent psychopathology. We will review contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding the phenomenology, diagnosis, etiology, developmental course, and prevention of major behavior disorders in childhood and adolescence. Core emphases include:

  1. Conceptual understanding — This fascinating field has been densely researched and the pace of knowledge growth is very rapid. Therefore, a key objective is to develop a vocabulary of conceptual tools that allow one to think critically about the nature of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence;
  2. Developmental systems framework — The significance of children's symptoms cannot be understood apart from the developmental and social contexts in which they occur; thus, we will emphasize complex theoretical approaches that integrate biological, psychological, and social influences as they unfold in developmental space and time (e.g., developmental psychopathology models; models based on general systems theories);
  3. Integration of clinical- and research-based knowledge — The importance of integrating research and clinical thinking is strongly emphasized, e.g., using clinical phenomenology to enrich one's understanding of research issues (first person accounts, case studies), and using research knowledge to inform our ability to treat or prevent childhood disorders; and
  4. Child gender — The overwhelming significance of gender in the development and expression of psychopathology.
  5. Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 958 — Special Seminar in Personality and Development
Section 002, SEM
Human Development and Schooling

Instructor: Cortina,Kai Schnabel; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course addresses fundamental issues of human development in educational contexts, both in and out of school settings, and examines theories and studies from psychology and education. The course deals primarily with students in K-12 emphasizing the preschool years and the transition into elementary school. The main goal of the course is to provide students with knowledge about developmental issues in the context of educational settings. The course will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on critical discussions of assigned readings. During the first hour of each class, students will present information and lead the discussion on a specific top of their own choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 978 — Special Seminar in Clinical Psychology
Section 370, SEM
Clinical Psychology Practicum in Child Trauma

Instructor: Graham-Bermann,Sandra A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide students who already have a good working knowledge of psychopathology in general and the DSM in particular, with specific diagnostic skills. Current issues in psychiatric diagnosis will be discussed and particular attention will be devoted to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Clinical syndromes and interviewing techniques will be illustrated using videotapes and extensive diagnostic practice will be provided. The aim of the course is to provide students with the skills needed to make reliable diagnostic assessments for research and clinical purposes, using the SCID.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 5

How is culture implicated in mental processes and structures of the self? How are these processes and structures of the self involved in producing, maintaining, and changing culture? This course seeks to answer these core questions of cultural psychology by critically reviewing several broad issues that are actively debated in the current literature including 1) cultural perspectives to the study of human mind, 2) culture and cognition, 3) culture and agency, 4) culture and personality, and 5) bio-cultural co-evolution. Students are encouraged to bring their own cultural knowledge and heritage to bear on discussions in class or term papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Lewis,Richard L

FA 2007
Credits: 4

First semester of a two semester sequence covering the general linear model and multivariate statistics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 988 — Advanced Seminars in Social Psychology
Section 003, SEM
Cultural Psychology

Instructor: Nisbett,Richard E

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 5

This course will explore how culture influences thought and behavior.

  • To what extent are our identities and ways of thinking and behaving products of our cultural environments?
  • How do conceptions of morality and gender and proper forms of social relations differ across cultures?
  • What is human nature? How changeable is it?
  • How changeable are cultures?
  • Are the world's cultures fated to become more similar or more different?
  • How can we study culture and the ways we are socialized to become one kind of person or another?

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to candidate status. Obtain an override from the Psychology Graduate Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

PSYCH 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Candidacy enrollment. Open only to those students formally admitted to Candidacy status. Obtain an override from the Psychology Graduate Office.

 
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