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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = PUBPOL
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 13 of 13
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
PUBPOL 201 — Systematic Thinking About the Problems of the Day
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Courant,Paul N; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The main idea that we want to get across is implicit in the title: Systematic thinking — largely from the social sciences, but with the application of scientific methods and knowledge more generally — can make a difference in the way that we approach and solve current problems.

This will be a sophomore level course, offered for four credit hours. The class will consist of three hours of lecture and one section review each week. For each topic, there will be at least two faculty members, teaching a module together. Between 3 and 6 of these topics will be covered: vaccines and drugs for diseases that are more prevalent in developing countries; the Kyoto accords and policy related to global warming; No Child Left Behind and other national education policy issues; national health insurance; AIDS (national and international); intellectual property issues (such as the case involving Google); electoral college reform; affordability of higher education; globalization, trade and US workers; and stem cell research.

Paul Courant served as Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of Michigan from 2002-2005. He is currently Professor of Economics and Public Policy and Faculty Associate in the Institute for Social Research.

Advisory Prerequisite: One additional introductory social science course

PUBPOL 519 — Sustainable Energy Systems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Keoleian,Gregory A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Assessment of the current energy system that encompasses resource extraction, conversion processes and end-uses. Responses to current challenges such as declining fossil fuels and climate change are explored: unconventional fossil fuels, carbon sequestration, emerging technologies (e.g., renewable sources: biomass, wind, and photovoltaics; fuel cells) and end-use efficiency and conservation. Sustainability is examined by studying global and regional environmental impacts, economics, energy efficiency, consumption patterns and energy policy.

Text requirement: Course Pack.

Advisory Prerequisite: RC,Senior standing; college-level course in Math or Economics or physical science.

PUBPOL 541 — International Trade Policy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Deardorff,Alan V; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the policy issues of international trade, including trade in both goods and services and also international flows of direct investment and migration. It builds on microeconomic theory, first to examine the basic theories of international trade and factor movements, including the classic Ricardian theory of competitive advantages, the neoclassical factor proportions theory, and the New Trade Theories that incorporate increasing returns to scale, imperfect competition, and product differentiation. These models are then used to examine the major policies and institutions that constrain and influence international trade and factor movements. Special attention is given to the WTO, to various elements of U.S. trade policy, and to the growing number of regional arrangements such as the European Union and NAFTA. Empirical evidence and applications of the theories are addressed, including their applicability for less developed and emerging economies. Although the major emphasis of the course is on the microeconomics of international transactions, a portion of the course will also put this into macroeconomic context. Topics here include the role and determination of exchange rates in the world economy, as well as how international movements of financial capital interact with trade and exchange rates in determining the balance of trade and the vulnerability of a country's macroeconomic variables to events abroad. This course presumes a prior knowledge of intermediate economics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course presumes a prior knowledge of intermediate economics.

PUBPOL 571 — Applied Econometrics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ranchhod,Vimal

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to econometric methods and their use in policy analysis. Most of the course focuses on multiple regression analysis, beginning with ordinary least squares estimation, and then considers the implications and treatment of serial correlation, heteroskedasticity, specification error, and measurement error. The course also provides an introduction to simultaneous equations models, time series analysis, models for binary dependent variables, and methods for longitudinal analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,Graduate standing.

PUBPOL 585 — Political Environment of Policy Analysis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lin,Ann Chih; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is about the use of policy analysis within the political system. As future policy analysts, administrators, and advocates, you will need to understand what motivates and constrains your fellow actors in the political system. You will also need to approach your own role in the system critically and reflectively, so that you are aware of the usefulness and the limitations of the questions that you have been trained to ask.

The course examines several key sites of policymaking — agenda setting, legislation, interest group activity, and judicial review — focusing attention, at each step, on political actors, their understanding of their role and their motivations, and their incentives to use or ignore policy analysis. These actors include the executive, legislative, and judicial branches; political parties; advocacy and interest groups; nonprofit and for-profit contractors; and community organizations. The aim is not to create a "how-to" manual for political success. Instead, this course teaches you how to recognize the competing interests and strategic alternatives that surround any issue, and why this recognition is a necessary complement to issue analysis.

Requirements for this course include careful reading of assignments before class sessions, exceptional attendance and participation at seminar discussions, multiple short writing assignments and two longer papers, an oral presentation, and frequent peer critiques. Please note that when a reading assignment is scheduled on more than one day, the entire assignment needs to be read before the first class period devoted to it. Grading and information about the assignments is provided in the assignment guide for the course.

All readings will be on reserve in Foster Library (2nd Fl., Lorch Hall). You are strongly encouraged, however, to purchase a coursepack from Dollar Bill Copying, sold through Ulrich's Bookstore (549 E. University), as well as the following books at Shaman Drum Bookstore, 313 S. State St.

Henrik Ibsen, Enemy of the People. (Dover Thrift Edition, 1999 (orig. 1882))
Steven Waldman, The Bill (Viking, 1995)
Kevin Hula, Lobbying Together (Georgetown University Press, 1999)
Jeffrey Berry, The New Liberalism (Brookings Institution Press, 1999)
William Riker, The Art of Political Manipulation (Yale 1986)

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 636 — Program Evaluation I
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gerber,Elisabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The central issues addressed by this course are whether and how one ought to try to establish the extent to which public programs are achieving their goals. Are the goals being attained? If not, why not? A great deal of money is actually spent to answer these questions. Is this research worthwhile? Are the results important in the policy process? A critical issue is the quality of evaluation studies that are carried out, so the bulk of the course deals with evaluation theory and methods. Students will learn how to tell whether programs of any kind are having specified impacts upon the world, which turns out to be an extremely difficult question to answer. Policies and programs in a broad range of areas are critiqued in discussion, including health, mental health, corrections, criminal justice, recreation, education, and development. Prerequisites: PUBPOL 529 (Statistics)

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 571 or concurrent enrollment in PUBPOL 633.

PUBPOL 638 — Field Training
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

Integrated Policy Exercise (IPE) is an intensive week-long project that involves all students and a team of faculty in the detailed examination of a current policy topic. (PUBPOL 638 is a 1-credit course that MPP students must take twice, during both their first and second winter terms in the program.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PUBPOL 730 — Women and Employment Policy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Corcoran,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is in three sections. In the first section we review the literature on sex differences in biology, socialization and legal treatment to assess what these differences are, what causes the differences, and how these differences contribute to or justify sex-based wage and occupation differences. We will pay careful attention to MacKinnon's arguments about sex and the legal system.

In the second section, we examine and evaluate the major economic, sociological and psychological explanation of wage differences and the evidence for these explanations.

In the third section, we will investigate five areas of public policy and employment: comparable worth, affirmative action, sexual harassment, fetal vulnerability, sexual orientation and employment discrimination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PUBPOL 736 — Poverty and Inequality
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Corcoran,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is concerned with analyzing the distribution of economic resources in the United States. It examines the distribution of economic well-being, the sources of inequality, the role of tax-transfer policies in affecting inequality, and options for changing inequality. There are special examinations of welfare reform, homelessness, and intergenerational transmission of poverty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PUBPOL 747 — Topics in International Economic Policy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Stern,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is taught as two separate half-term seminars. Students may take one or both miniseminars. Recent topics have included crisis management in the Asian financial and foreign exchange markets and issues of economic and monetary unification in the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON/ SPP 540

PUBPOL 747 — Topics in International Economic Policy
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Stern,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2

This course is taught as two separate half-term seminars. Students may take one or both miniseminars. Recent topics have included crisis management in the Asian financial and foreign exchange markets and issues of economic and monetary unification in the European Union.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON,ECON/ SPP 540

PUBPOL 751 — Special Topics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Theme

This part of the course introduces students to continuity and change in China's foreign policy, focusing on the reform era. We begin with theoretical and analytical debates about making sense of contemporary Chinese foreign policy, move on to scrutinizing domestic-international linkages in China's relations with the rest of the world, and end with review of outstanding issues in China's foreign policy choices in the Asia Pacific, Central and Southeast Asia.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 751 — Special Topics
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Theme

China's reform and opening-up has been a great event in the world in the past more than two decades. Since 1978, China has experienced a profound and overall economic reform and the economy has transformed from the Soviet style planned economic system to the socialist market economic system. Along with the reform and opening-up, China has produced the world's highest economic growth rates in the past 25 years. This course will explain the progress of the reform and the growth of economy of China and help students understand the policies of development and reform of China's economy. The course will also make an in-depth analysis on China's current economic policies as well as the implications of these policies for the economy of U.S. and world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

 
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