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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = QR/1
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 205 of 205
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
COMM 211 — Evaluating Information
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Traugott,Michael W

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/1

This course teaches the fundamental thinking skills necessary for critical evaluation of research-based arguments, especially those based on quantitative information. Such skills are required for one to be a competent mass communicator of information, a critical consumer of information relayed by the mass media, or an intelligent scholar of media processes and effects. The course introduces generic logical and statistical concepts through analysis and discussion of specific cases drawn from reporting in the mass media (e.g., health and business news, public opinion polls), research on media effects (e.g., the impact of media violence), and audience research reported in the mass media (e.g., audience research). Students' logical and quantitative reasoning skills are improved through a variety of "hands-on" exercises and projects (many involving computerized spreadsheet programs). The course is introductory in nature, and no prior statistical expertise is required. COMM 111 strongly recommended.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

ECON 401 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

A systematic study of the role of the price system in organizing economic activity and an evaluation of its effectiveness. Analytical tools are developed and applied to the activities of the household, the firm, and to their interactions in the market under varying degrees of competition.

The Midterm Exams for this class are held in the evenings (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thursday Oct 4 and Thursday November 8.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 115, 116, 121, 156, 175, 176, 185, 186, 215, 295, or 296; with C or better

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102

ECON 402 — Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies.

ECON 402 is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s), written exercises, and final exam. ECON 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in Economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before ECON 402.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102, and MATH 115. It is strongly recommended that students take ECON 401 before 402.

ECON 404 — Statistics for Economists
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sedo,Stanley Anthony; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 405 or STATS 265, 311, 350, 400, 405, or 412.

This course is designed to equip students to read empirical literature in economics and other social sciences. Topics include tabular and regression analysis and emphasize multiple regression.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101 and 102 and MATH 115

ECON 405 — Introduction to Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Davis,Lucas William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect STATS 405/ECON 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

This course is designed for economics concentrators but is sufficiently general to serve non-economics concentrators as well. The emphasis is on understanding rather than on "cookbook" applications. Students are expected to know basic algebra and basic calculus. Since the course emphasizes the foundations of statistical inference, it is recommended that after finishing the course students elect ECON 406 or a similar course in the Statistics department to gain experience with applications and computational methods.

This course is designed for quantitatively oriented students who are comfortable with abstract concepts and mathematical techniques. Students who prefer a broader, less rigorous approach to statistics should elect ECON 404. Evaluation of students in the course is based on examinations and homework assignments. There are three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion per week. ECON 405 is a prerequisite for ECON 406 (Econometrics).

Principles of statistical inference, including: probability, experimental and theoretic derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116. Jrs/Srs may elect 405 concurrently with ECON 101 or 102. No credit granted if completed or enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 007, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 008, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 009, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 011, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 012, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 013, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 014, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 015, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 017, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 018, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 019, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 021, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 022, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 023, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 024, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 025, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 026, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 027, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 028, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 029, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 030, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 031, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 032, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 170, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 171, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 172, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 173, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 174, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 105 — Data, Functions, and Graphs
Section 175, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Students with credit for MATH 103 can elect MATH 105 for only 2 credits. No credit granted to those who have completed any Mathematics course numbered 110 or higher. A maximum of four credits may be earned in MATH 101, 103, 105, and 110.

Background and Goals: MATH 105 serves both as a preparatory class to the calculus sequences and as a terminal course for students who need only this level of mathematics. Students who successfully complete MATH 105 are fully prepared for MATH 115.

Content: This is a course on analyzing data by means of functions and graphs. The emphasis is on mathematical modeling of real-world applications. The functions used are linear, quadratic, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric. Algebra skills are assessed during the term by periodic testing. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 110 (Pre-Calculus (Self-Paced)) is a condensed half-term version of the same material offered as a self-study course through the Math Lab.

Subsequent Courses: The course prepares students for MATH 115.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 006, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 007, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 009, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 010, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 011, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 012, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 013, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 014, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 015, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 016, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 017, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 018, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 019, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 021, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 022, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 023, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 024, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 025, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 026, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 027, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 028, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 029, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 030, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 031, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 032, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 033, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 034, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 035, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 036, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 037, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 038, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 039, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 040, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 041, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 042, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 043, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 044, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 045, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 046, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 047, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 049, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 051, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 052, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 053, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 054, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 055, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 056, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 057, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 058, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 059, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 060, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 062, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 064, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 065, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 066, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 170, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 115 — Calculus I
Section 171, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof. All sections are given a uniform midterm and final exam.

Content: The course presents the concepts of calculus from three points of view: geometric (graphs); numerical (tables); and algebraic (formulas). Students will develop their reading, writing and questioning skills. Topics include functions and graphs, derivatives and their applications to real-life problems in various fields, and definite integrals. The classroom atmosphere is interactive and cooperative and homework is done in groups.

Alternatives: MATH 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I ) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers some of the same material. Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) is a non-calculus alternative for students with a good command of first-semester calculus. MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I) is a much more intensive and rigorous course. A student whose preparation is insufficient for MATH 115 should take MATH 105 (Data, Functions and Graphs).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 116 (Calculus II) is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II).

Advisory Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 006, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 007, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 008, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 009, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 010, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 011, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 012, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 013, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 014, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 016, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 017, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 018, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 019, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 021, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 022, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 023, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 024, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 027, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 028, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 029, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 030, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 031, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 035, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 116 — Calculus II
Section 036, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

See MATH 115 for a general description of the sequence MATH 115-116-215.

Topics include the indefinite integral, techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. MATH 186 is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers much of the same material. MATH 215 is the natural sequel. A student who has done very well in this course could enter the Honors sequence at this point by taking MATH 285.

Text: Calculus, 3rd Edition, Hughes-Hallet/Gleason, Wiley Publishing. TI-83 Graphing Calculator, Texas Instruments.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115.

MATH 128 — Explorations in Number Theory
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200- (or higher) level mathematics course (except for MATH 385 and 485)

Designed for non-science concentrators and students with no intended concentration who want to learn how to think mathematically without having to take calculus first. Students are introduced to the ideas of Number Theory through lectures and experimentation by using software to investigate numerical phenomena, and to make conjectures that they try to prove.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school mathematics through at least Analytic Geometry. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 006, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 156 — Applied Honors Calculus II
Section 007, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, and 186

Background and Goals: The sequence MATH 156-255-256 is an Honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g., equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: MATH 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations).

Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Score of 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam.

MATH 174 — Plane Geometry: An Introduction to Proofs
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors, FYSem

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200-level or higher Mathematics course.

This course introduces students to rigorous mathematical thinking, and writing proofs using plane geometry.

Background and Goals: The course will be very interactive, eliciting suggestions towards proof from the students so that all the problems are eventually solved by a joint effort between the students and the instructor. The format has worked well in the past for honors courses. To enhance the visualization, we plan to develop software for two-dimensional geometric constructions. This software will be able to produce multi-color pictures if geometric configurations. In the long run, such software will save us time in creating problem sets, handouts and perhaps slides. Additional topics may be added depending on the interest and abilities of the students.

Content: A good text for the course is already available: the classic "Geometry Revisited" by Coxter and Greitzer, which contains a wonderful exposition of the material and has suitable exercises. As a precursor to the mathematics, the course will use familiar games such as the old game Mastermind where player A has a code which player B has to use. Students will pair off and play the game, with the important additional feature that the guesser must write down what(s) he knows and can deduce after each guess, and therefore motivate his/her next guess. This should help set the mood and instill the idea of analyzing the facts at hand and making logical deductions. After this the course will develop some basic theorems of Euclidean geometry. An example of such a theorem is that the angle bisectors (or medians, or altitudes, or perpendicular bisectors) of a triangle are concurrent. These results are fairly straightforward but exemplify the spirit of the course by providing a good introduction to rigorous proofs, Then we move to some more difficult but beautiful theorems from geometry such as Ceva's theorem, the Euler line, the nine-point circle theorem, Ptolemy's theorem and Morley's theorem.

Alternatives: none

Subsequent Courses: none

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Honors Advisor

MATH 175 — An Introduction to Cryptology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Petersen,Thomas Kyle

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: FYSem, Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed a 200-level or higher Mathematics course.

Introduces students to the science of constructing and attacking secret codes. An important goal is to present the mathematical tools — from combinatorics, number theory, and probability — that underlie cryptologic methods.

Background and Goals: This course is an alternative to MATH 185 as an entry to the Honors sequence. Students are expected to have previous experience with the basic concepts and techniques of first-semester calculus. The course stresses discovery as a vehicle for learning. Students will be required to experiment throughout the course on a range of problems and will participate each semester in a group project. Grades will be based on homework and projects with a strong emphasis on homework. Personal computers will be a valuable experimental tool in this course and students will be asked to learn to program in either BASIC, PASCAL or FORTRAN.

Content: This course gives a historical introduction to Cryptology and introduces a number of mathematical ideas and results involved in the development and analysis of secret codes. The course begins with the study of permutation-based codes: substitutional ciphers, transpositional codes, and more complex polyalphabetic substitutions. The mathematical subjects treated in this section include enumeration, modular arithmetic and some elementary statistics. The subject then moves to bit stream encryption methods. These include block cipher schemes such as the Data Encryption Standard. The mathematical concepts introduced here are recurrence relations and some more advanced statistical results. The final part of the course is devoted to public key encryption, including Diffie-Hellman key exchange, RSA and Knapsack codes. The mathematical tools come from elementary number theory.

Alternatives: MATH 115 (Calculus I), MATH 185 (Honors Calculus I), or MATH 295 (Honors Mathematics I).

Subsequent Courses: MATH 176 (Dynamical Systems and Calculus), MATH 186 (Honors Calculus II), or MATH 116 (Calculus II).

Advisory Prerequisite: PER.DEPT.

MATH 185 — Honors Calculus I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is not appropriate for students who have received scores of 4 on the AB, or 4 or 5 on the BC, Advanced Placement exam (those students should elect Math 156 or Math 295). It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics covered include functions and graphs, limits, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications, definite and indefinite integrals and applications. Other topics will be included at the discretion of the instructor. Alternatives: Math 115 (Calculus I) is a somewhat less theoretical course which covers much of the same material. Math 295 (Honors Mathematics I) gives a much more theoretical treatment of much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II) is the natural sequel.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 185 — Honors Calculus I
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is not appropriate for students who have received scores of 4 on the AB, or 4 or 5 on the BC, Advanced Placement exam (those students should elect Math 156 or Math 295). It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics covered include functions and graphs, limits, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications, definite and indefinite integrals and applications. Other topics will be included at the discretion of the instructor. Alternatives: Math 115 (Calculus I) is a somewhat less theoretical course which covers much of the same material. Math 295 (Honors Mathematics I) gives a much more theoretical treatment of much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II) is the natural sequel.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 185 — Honors Calculus I
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one course from among MATH 115, and 185.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to calculus at the honors level. It is not appropriate for students who have received scores of 4 on the AB, or 4 or 5 on the BC, Advanced Placement exam (those students should elect Math 156 or Math 295). It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics covered include functions and graphs, limits, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic and trigonometric functions and applications, definite and indefinite integrals and applications. Other topics will be included at the discretion of the instructor. Alternatives: Math 115 (Calculus I) is a somewhat less theoretical course which covers much of the same material. Math 295 (Honors Mathematics I) gives a much more theoretical treatment of much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 186 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. II) is the natural sequel.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 214 — Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: An introduction to matrices and linear algebra. This course covers the basics needed to understand a wide variety of applications that use the ideas of linear algebra, from linear programming to mathematical economics. The emphasis is on concepts and problem solving. The course is designed as an alternative to Math 216 for students who need more linear algebra and less differential equations background than provided in 216.

Content: An introduction to the main concepts of linear algebra… matrix operations, echelon form, solution of systems of linear equations, Euclidean vector spaces, linear combinations, independence and spans of sets of vectors in Euclidean space, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, similarity theory. There are applications to discrete Markov processes, linear programming, and solutions of linear differential equations with constant coefficients.

Alternatives: Math 419 (Linear Spaces and Matrix Theory) has a somewhat more theoretical emphasis. Math 217 is a more theoretical course which covers much of the material of Math 214 at a deeper level. Math 513 (Intro. to Linear Algebra) is a honors version of this course. Mathematics majors are required to take Math 217 or Math 513.

Subsequent Courses: Math 420 (Matrix algebra II), Linear programming (Math 561), Mathematical Modeling (Math 462), Math 571 (Numer. method. For Sci).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115 and 116. Most students take only one course from among MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 214 — Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: An introduction to matrices and linear algebra. This course covers the basics needed to understand a wide variety of applications that use the ideas of linear algebra, from linear programming to mathematical economics. The emphasis is on concepts and problem solving. The course is designed as an alternative to Math 216 for students who need more linear algebra and less differential equations background than provided in 216.

Content: An introduction to the main concepts of linear algebra… matrix operations, echelon form, solution of systems of linear equations, Euclidean vector spaces, linear combinations, independence and spans of sets of vectors in Euclidean space, eigenvectors and eigenvalues, similarity theory. There are applications to discrete Markov processes, linear programming, and solutions of linear differential equations with constant coefficients.

Alternatives: Math 419 (Linear Spaces and Matrix Theory) has a somewhat more theoretical emphasis. Math 217 is a more theoretical course which covers much of the material of Math 214 at a deeper level. Math 513 (Intro. to Linear Algebra) is a honors version of this course. Mathematics majors are required to take Math 217 or Math 513.

Subsequent Courses: Math 420 (Matrix algebra II), Linear programming (Math 561), Mathematical Modeling (Math 462), Math 571 (Numer. method. For Sci).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115 and 116. Most students take only one course from among MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 010, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 030, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 040, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 050, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 060, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 070, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 080, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 215 — Calculus III
Section 090, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 115-116-215 is the standard complete introduction to the concepts and methods of calculus. It is taken by the majority of students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields. The emphasis is on concepts and solving problems rather than theory and proof.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. There is a weekly computer lab using MAPLE.

Alternatives: Math 285 (Honors Calculus III) is a somewhat more theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calculus III) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: For students intending to major in mathematics or who have some interest in the theory of mathematics as well as its applications, the appropriate sequel is Math 217 (Linear Algebra). Students who intend to take only one further mathematics course and need differential equations should take Math 216 (Intro. to Differential Equations).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 010, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 020, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 030, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 040, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 050, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 216 — Introduction to Differential Equations
Section 060, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or MATH 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316.

Content: MATH 216 is a basic course on differential equations, intended for engineers and other scientists who need to apply the techniques in their work. The lectures are accompanied by a computer lab and recitation section where students have the opportunity to discuss problems and work through computer experiments to further develop their understanding of the concepts of the class. Topics covered include some material on complex numbers and matrix algebra, first and second order linear and non-linear systems with applications, introductory numerical methods, and elementary Laplace transform techniques.

Alternatives: MATH 286 (Honors Differential Equations) covers much of the same material in the honors sequence. The sequence MATH 217 (Linear Algebra)-MATH 316 (Differential Equations) covers all of this material and substantially more at greater depth and with greater emphasis on the theory. MATH 256 (Applied Honors Calculus IV) is also an alternative.

Subsequent Courses: MATH 404 (Intermediate Diff. Eq.) covers further material on differential equations. MATH 217 (Linear Algebra) and MATH 417 (Matrix Algebra I) cover further material on linear algebra. MATH 371 ((ENGR 303) Numerical Methods) and MATH 471 (Intro. To Numerical Methods) cover additional material on numerical methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, 119, 156, 176, 186, or 296.

MATH 217 — Linear Algebra
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved.

Content: The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics.

Alternatives: MATH 214, 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. MATH 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way.

Subsequent Courses: The intended course to follow MATH 217 is MATH 316 (Differential Equations). MATH 217 is also prerequisite for MATH 312 (Applied Modern Algebra), MATH 412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, 255, or 285. Most students take only one course from MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 217 — Linear Algebra
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved.

Content: The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics.

Alternatives: MATH 214, 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. MATH 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way.

Subsequent Courses: The intended course to follow MATH 217 is MATH 316 (Differential Equations). MATH 217 is also prerequisite for MATH 312 (Applied Modern Algebra), MATH 412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, 255, or 285. Most students take only one course from MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 217 — Linear Algebra
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved.

Content: The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics.

Alternatives: MATH 214, 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. MATH 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way.

Subsequent Courses: The intended course to follow MATH 217 is MATH 316 (Differential Equations). MATH 217 is also prerequisite for MATH 312 (Applied Modern Algebra), MATH 412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, 255, or 285. Most students take only one course from MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 217 — Linear Algebra
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved.

Content: The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics.

Alternatives: MATH 214, 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. MATH 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way.

Subsequent Courses: The intended course to follow MATH 217 is MATH 316 (Differential Equations). MATH 217 is also prerequisite for MATH 312 (Applied Modern Algebra), MATH 412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, 255, or 285. Most students take only one course from MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 217 — Linear Algebra
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 214, 217, 417, or 419. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 513.

Background and Goals: For a student who has completed the calculus sequence, there are two sequences which deal with linear algebra and differential equations, MATH 216-417 (or 419) and MATH 217-316. The sequence MATH 216-417 emphasizes problem-solving and applications and is intended for students of Engineering and the sciences. Math majors and other students who have some interest in the theory of mathematics should elect the sequence MATH 217-316. These courses are explicitly designed to introduce the student to both the concepts and applications of their subjects and to the methods by which the results are proved.

Content: The topics covered include: systems of linear equations; matrix algebra; vectors, vector spaces, and subspaces; geometry of Rn; linear dependence, bases, and dimension; linear transformations; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; diagonalization; inner products. Throughout there will be emphasis on the concepts, logic, and methods of theoretical mathematics.

Alternatives: MATH 214, 417 and 419 cover similar material with more emphasis on computation and applications and less emphasis on proofs. MATH 513 covers more in a much more sophisticated way.

Subsequent Courses: The intended course to follow MATH 217 is MATH 316 (Differential Equations). MATH 217 is also prerequisite for MATH 312 (Applied Modern Algebra), MATH 412 (Introduction to Modern Algebra) and all more advanced courses in mathematics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, 255, or 285. Most students take only one course from MATH 214, 217, 417, 419, and 513.

MATH 256 — Applied Honors Calculus IV
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: The sequence 156-255-256 is an honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g. equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or Math 286 (Honors Differential Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 255.

MATH 256 — Applied Honors Calculus IV
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 216, 256, 286, or 316.

Background and Goals: The sequence 156-255-256 is an honors calculus sequence intended for engineering and science majors who scored 4 or 5 on the AB or BC Advanced Placement calculus exam. Applications will be stressed, but some theory will also be included.

Content: Topics include linear algebra, matrices, systems of differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, qualitative theory of dynamical systems (e.g. equilibria, phase space, stability, bifurcations), nonlinear equations, numerical methods. MAPLE will be used throughout.

Alternatives: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations) or Math 286 (Honors Differential Subsequent Courses: Many upper-level courses

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 255.

MATH 285 — Honors Calculus III
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to the calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation, maximum-minimum problems; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; curl, divergence, and gradient; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor.

Alternatives: Math 215 (Calculus III) is a less theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calc. III) is an applications-oriented honors course which covers much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations), Math 286 (Honors Differential Equations) or Math 217 (Linear Algebra).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 176 or 186, or permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 285 — Honors Calculus III
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to the calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation, maximum-minimum problems; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; curl, divergence, and gradient; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor.

Alternatives: Math 215 (Calculus III) is a less theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calc. III) is an applications-oriented honors course which covers much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations), Math 286 (Honors Differential Equations) or Math 217 (Linear Algebra).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 176 or 186, or permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 285 — Honors Calculus III
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to the calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation, maximum-minimum problems; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; curl, divergence, and gradient; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor.

Alternatives: Math 215 (Calculus III) is a less theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calc. III) is an applications-oriented honors course which covers much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations), Math 286 (Honors Differential Equations) or Math 217 (Linear Algebra).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 176 or 186, or permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 285 — Honors Calculus III
Section 004, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit can be earned for only one of MATH 215, 255, or 285.

Background and Goals: The sequence Math 185-186-285-286 is an introduction to the calculus at the honors level. It is taken by students intending to major in mathematics, science, or engineering as well as students heading for many other fields who want a somewhat more theoretical approach. Although much attention is paid to concepts and solving problems, the underlying theory and proofs of important results are also included. This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors Program.

Content: Topics include vector algebra and vector functions; analytic geometry of planes, surfaces, and solids; functions of several variables and partial differentiation, maximum-minimum problems; line, surface, and volume integrals and applications; vector fields and integration; curl, divergence, and gradient; Green's Theorem and Stokes' Theorem. Additional topics may be added at the discretion of the instructor.

Alternatives: Math 215 (Calculus III) is a less theoretical course which covers the same material. Math 255 (Applied Honors Calc. III) is an applications-oriented honors course which covers much of the same material.

Subsequent Courses: Math 216 (Intro. To Differential Equations), Math 286 (Honors Differential Equations) or Math 217 (Linear Algebra).

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 176 or 186, or permission of the Honors advisor.

MATH 295 — Honors Mathematics I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in MATH 185.

Background and Goals: Math 295-296-395-396 is the most theoretical and demanding honors calculus sequence. The emphasis is on concepts, problem solving, as well as the underlying theory and proofs of important results. It provides an excellent background for advanced courses in mathematics. The expected background is high school trigonometry and algebra (previous calculus not required, but helpful). This sequence is not restricted to students enrolled in the LSA Honors program. Math 295 and 296 may be substituted for any Math 451 requirement. Math 296 and 395 may be substituted for any Math 513 requirement.

Content: Real functions, limits, continuous functions, limits of sequences, complex numbers, derivatives, indefinite integrals and applications, some linear algebra.

Alternatives: Math 156 (Applied Honors Calc II), Math 175 (Combinatorics and Calculus) and Math 185 (Honors Anal. Geom. and Calc. I) are alternative honors courses.

Subsequent Courses: Math 296 (Honors Mathematics II)

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior knowledge of first year calculus and permission of the Honors advisor.

PHIL 296 — Honors Introduction to Logic
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 203, 303, or 296.

An introduction to the study of modern formal logic, with attention to its mathematical development and to its philosophical foundations and applications.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 296 — Honors Introduction to Logic
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for only one of PHIL 203, 303, or 296.

Logic is typically understood as the systematic and rigorous study of inference and argument — the science of figuring out what follows from what, and why. Formal logic does this by thinking about systems of inference in a mathematical way. We will build on this idea. But logicians aren't just in Mathematics and Philosophy departments anymore. Logic has become an important tool across disciplines. So we will set ourselves two goals: understanding the basic tools of formal logic, and understanding how those tools are developed, extended, and deployed to shed light on problems in philosophy, linguistics, and computer science.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students or permission of instructor.

PHIL 414 — Mathematical Logic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thomason,Richmond H; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course is an advanced introduction to symbolic logic, intended to provide a foundation for understanding current research in philosophical logic and related areas of cognitive science. The course will concentrate on the theory of logic, and will cover the following topics:

  • The nature of algorithms; some models of computation
  • Proof techniques and proof theory
  • Models and validity
  • Semantic completeness of propositional and quantificational logic
  • The art of formalization
  • Incompleteness and undecidability

Written work will consist of problem sets and midterm and final exams. This is a fast-moving course that assumes some previous familiarity with logic and the ability to understand and construct mathematical proofs. Students who are uncertain about their mathematical background may wish to consult with the instructor before taking this course. More information on the course will be available from the course home page at: http://www.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/courses/phil414.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHIL 303 or Grad with a grade of C- or better

PHYSICS 107 — 20th-Century Concepts of Space, Time, and Matter
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

The course is intended to acquaint students with some of the most important conceptual developments in physics in the 20th century.

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

PHYSICS 125 — General Physics: Mechanics and Sound
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 135, 140 or 160.

PHYSICS 125 is the first of a two-term sequence offered primarily for students concentrating in architecture, pharmacy, or natural resources, and for preprofessional students preparing for medicine, dentistry or related health sciences. PHYSICS 125 and 126 are an appropriate sequence for any student wanting a quantitative introduction to the basic principles of physics but without the mathematical sophistication of PHYSICS 140 and 240. Strong emphasis is placed on problem solving, and skills in rudimentary algebra and trigonometry are assumed. While a high school level background in physics is not assumed, it is helpful. Topics covered during the first term include vectors, one- and two-dimensional motion, Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, rotational motion, momentum, energy, pressure in fluids, oscillations, and waves. The course is based on three one-hour examinations, class performance and a final examination. PHYSICS 125 students elect PHYSICS 127 (lab).

Advisory Prerequisite: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. PHYSICS 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 125 — General Physics: Mechanics and Sound
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 135, 140 or 160.

PHYSICS 125 is the first of a two-term sequence offered primarily for students concentrating in architecture, pharmacy, or natural resources, and for preprofessional students preparing for medicine, dentistry or related health sciences. PHYSICS 125 and 126 are an appropriate sequence for any student wanting a quantitative introduction to the basic principles of physics but without the mathematical sophistication of PHYSICS 140 and 240. Strong emphasis is placed on problem solving, and skills in rudimentary algebra and trigonometry are assumed. While a high school level background in physics is not assumed, it is helpful. Topics covered during the first term include vectors, one- and two-dimensional motion, Newton's laws of motion, gravitation, rotational motion, momentum, energy, pressure in fluids, oscillations, and waves. The course is based on three one-hour examinations, class performance and a final examination. PHYSICS 125 students elect PHYSICS 127 (lab).

Advisory Prerequisite: Two and one-half years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry. PHYSICS 125 and 127 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 126 — General Physics: Electricity and Light
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 235, 240 or 260.

PHYSICS 126 is a continuation of Physics 125 and covers electricity and magnetism, the nature of light, and briefly introduces atomic and nuclear phenomena. PHYSICS 126 students elect PHYSICS 128 (lab).

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 125. PHYSICS 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 126 — General Physics: Electricity and Light
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 235, 240 or 260.

PHYSICS 126 is a continuation of Physics 125 and covers electricity and magnetism, the nature of light, and briefly introduces atomic and nuclear phenomena. PHYSICS 126 students elect PHYSICS 128 (lab).

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 125. PHYSICS 126 and 128 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 135 — Physics for the Life Sciences I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McKay,Timothy A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted for those who have completed or are enrolled in Physics 125, 140 or 160.

This course is the first of a two-course introduction to physics from the perspective of life sciences. It introduces may of the physical processes which govern the workings of life, and teaches students how to analyze the physical circumstances of life in a quantitative way.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, 175, 185, or 195. Concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 141

PHYSICS 135 — Physics for the Life Sciences I
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted for those who have completed or are enrolled in Physics 125, 140 or 160.

This course is the first of a two-course introduction to physics from the perspective of life sciences. It introduces may of the physical processes which govern the workings of life, and teaches students how to analyze the physical circumstances of life in a quantitative way.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, 175, 185, or 195. Concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 141

PHYSICS 140 — General Physics I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125, 135 or 160.

PHYSICS 140 offers introduction to mechanics, the physics of motion. Topics include: linear motion, vectors, projectiles, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, planetary motion, fluid statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound.

Student performance is evaluated using a combination of homework assignments, lecture and discussion section activities, three evening midterm examinations and a final examination.

Required Book: University Physics Vol. 1 with Mastering Physics, eleventh edition, Addison Wesley, 2004.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115. PHYSICS 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 140 — General Physics I
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125, 135 or 160.

PHYSICS 140 offers introduction to mechanics, the physics of motion. Topics include: linear motion, vectors, projectiles, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, planetary motion, fluid statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound.

Student performance is evaluated using a combination of homework assignments, lecture and discussion section activities, three evening midterm examinations and a final examination.

Required Book: University Physics Vol. 1 with Mastering Physics, eleventh edition, Addison Wesley, 2004.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115. PHYSICS 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 140 — General Physics I
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125, 135 or 160.

PHYSICS 140 offers introduction to mechanics, the physics of motion. Topics include: linear motion, vectors, projectiles, relative velocity and acceleration, Newton's laws, particle dynamics, work and energy, linear momentum, torque, angular momentum, gravitation, planetary motion, fluid statics and dynamics, simple harmonic motion, waves and sound.

Student performance is evaluated using a combination of homework assignments, lecture and discussion section activities, three evening midterm examinations and a final examination.

Required Book: University Physics Vol. 1 with Mastering Physics, eleventh edition, Addison Wesley, 2004.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115. PHYSICS 140 and 141 are normally elected concurrently.

PHYSICS 160 — Honors Physics I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 125, 135 or 140.

A rigorous introduction to particle mechanics and the motion of extended objects. Particular topics include vectors, one and two dimensional motion, conservation laws, linear and rotational dynamics, gravitation, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115. Students should elect PHYSICS 141 concurrently.

PHYSICS 240 — General Physics II
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 126, 235 or 260.

The course format consists of two lectures and two discussions each week. This is the second of a two-term sequence in general physics for scientists and engineers. The following topics are covered: electricity and magnetism: charge, Coulomb's law, electric fields, Gauss' law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, EMF and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart law, Amperes law, Faraday's Law of Induction, and simple AC circuits.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 140 or 160; and MATH 116. PHYSICS 240 and 241 are elected concurrently

PHYSICS 240 — General Physics II
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 126, 235 or 260.

The course format consists of two lectures and two discussions each week. This is the second of a two-term sequence in general physics for scientists and engineers. The following topics are covered: electricity and magnetism: charge, Coulomb's law, electric fields, Gauss' law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, EMF and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart law, Amperes law, Faraday's Law of Induction, and simple AC circuits.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 140 or 160; and MATH 116. PHYSICS 240 and 241 are elected concurrently

PHYSICS 240 — General Physics II
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 126, 235 or 260.

The course format consists of two lectures and two discussions each week. This is the second of a two-term sequence in general physics for scientists and engineers. The following topics are covered: electricity and magnetism: charge, Coulomb's law, electric fields, Gauss' law, electric potential, capacitors and dielectrics, current and resistance, EMF and circuits, magnetic fields, Biot-Savart law, Amperes law, Faraday's Law of Induction, and simple AC circuits.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 140 or 160; and MATH 116. PHYSICS 240 and 241 are elected concurrently

PHYSICS 260 — Honors Physics II
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 126, 235 or 240.

A rigorous introduction to the theory of electromagnetic phenomena. Topics include electric and magnetic fields and potentials, DC and AC circuits, inductance and Maxwell's equations.

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS 140 or 160; and MATH 116. Students should elect PHYSICS 241 concurrently.

PHYSICS 288 — Physics of Music
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 489.

The various connections between physics and music are explored: (1) The physics of musical sounds: vibrations, resonance, overtones, and musical scales; (2) The physics of the musical instruments: strings, winds, brass, percussion; (3) The physics of hearing, auditorium acoustics, and sound reproduction; (4) The depiction of physical events in music; (5) Analogies between the structure of music and the structure of physics. No previous expertise in either physics or music is required; lectures and demonstration experiments constitute the backbone of the course.

PHYSICS 401 — Intermediate Mechanics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, QR/1

; motion under gravity, planetary motion; free and forced, damped and undamped harmonic oscillators; the conservation laws of mechanics; inertial and accelerated frames of reference, fictitious forces; rigid body mechanics; coupled oscillators.

Required text: Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems, Stephen Thornton and Jerry Marion, 5th edition (2004)

Other Sources for the Interested Student: (on course reserve in the Science Library)

Mechanics, Symon, third edition (1971)

Theoretical Mechanics of Particles and Continua, Fetter & Walecka (1980) Classical Mechanics, Goldstein, second edition (1980)

Grading:
Course grades will be based on homework (30%), the two in-class exams (20% each) and the final exam (30%).

Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 340 and MATH 216 or 256 or 286 or 316 or Graduate Standing.

PHYSICS 489 — Physics of Music
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: QR/1

This course includes all material covered in PHYSICS 288 and, in addition, a theoretical or experimental project in which student works independently.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 391 — Introduction to Modeling Political Processes
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clark,William Robert; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/1

This class provides an introduction to modeling people and social systems. We learn to construct, manipulate, and evaluate models of people who vote, work, commit crimes, and attend classes. We cover concepts and ideas from game theory, learning theory, complexity theory, and even biology and physics (at a metaphorical level of course.) Though the topics and techniques covered are wide ranging — we analyze among other things the wisdom of crowds, the spread of ideas, the causes of racial segregation, and the emergence of riots, they aggregate into a deep methodological coherence. The kind of understanding you won't get by reading the newspaper. By the end, students will understand the strengths and uses of various modeling approaches used in the social sciences and be able to use them. This is not a mathematics course, but it does require a willingness to think abstractly, to carefully contemplate lots of charts and figures, and to do a little algebra. And above all, a commitment to never reading the newspaper in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

SOC 210 — Elementary Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Harding,David James

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405.

In this course we will study the basic concepts and techniques of quantitative data analysis. We will also learn some statistical computing skills using SPSS software. While there will be an emphasis on statistical techniques as they are used by social scientists, the course will provide the foundation needed for any kind of statistical analysis. We will not use math beyond basic algebra, and you do not need previous statistical computing experience. Furthermore, you need not be a "math — oriented" person to do well in this course. Students who apply good study skills — consistently attending class and section meetings, reading assigned texts, and doing all assigned work on time — can expect to do well in the course. Grades will be based on in — class exams, homework assignments, and a few statistical computing assignments. Because statistical analysis of any type involves step — by — step procedures and the presentation of results in standardized ways, some emphasis will be placed upon your general ability to perform analyses and present results as instructed. Therefore, a small portion of your score on assigned work will be determined by its form and presentation. If you come to class regularly, keep up with the coursework, and perform your work in a manner consistent with written instructions, you will learn basic statistics and earn a good grade along the way.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year.

SOC 310 — Introduction to Research Methods
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Barber,Jennifer S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

This course will introduce you to a range of basic research methods used by sociologists, including surveys, experiments, unstructured interviews, focus groups, diaries/calendar methods, observation, and archival/historical methods. The course also addresses causality and reasoning in social science research and exposes students to important methodological issues in the field.

Enforced Prerequisites: One introductory course in Sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, 105, 195, 202, 300, or 401); or completion of one social science course in Economics, Anthropology, Political Science, Psychology or other Sociology course.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397.

STATS 100 — Introduction to Statistical Reasoning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Venable Jr,Thomas Calvin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 210, STATS 265, 350, 400, 405 or 412, IOE 265, or ECON 404 or 405, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

Provides an overview of the field of statistics, including methods of summarizing and analyzing data, statistical reasoning for learning from observations (experimental or sample), and techniques for dealing with uncertainties in drawing conclusions from collected data. Emphasis is on presenting underlying concepts rather than covering a variety of different methodologies. Course evaluation is based on a combination of in class quizzes, homework, an evening midterm examination, a final examination, and GSI input. The course format includes lectures and a discussion section (one hour per week).

STATS 100 — Introduction to Statistical Reasoning
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Venable Jr,Thomas Calvin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, MSA, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 210, STATS 265, 350, 400, 405 or 412, IOE 265, or ECON 404 or 405, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

Provides an overview of the field of statistics, including methods of summarizing and analyzing data, statistical reasoning for learning from observations (experimental or sample), and techniques for dealing with uncertainties in drawing conclusions from collected data. Emphasis is on presenting underlying concepts rather than covering a variety of different methodologies. Course evaluation is based on a combination of in class quizzes, homework, an evening midterm examination, a final examination, and GSI input. The course format includes lectures and a discussion section (one hour per week).

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

In this course students are introduced to the concepts and applications of statistical methods and data analysis. STATS 350 has no prerequisite and has been elected by students whose mathematics background includes only high school algebra. Examples of applications are drawn from virtually all academic areas and some attention is given to statistical process control methods. The course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week). The laboratory section deals with the computational aspects of the course and provides a forum for review of lecture material. For this purpose, students are introduced to the use of a statistical analysis-computer package. Course evaluation is based on a combination of semester examinations, a final examination, weekly homework, and lab participation.

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

A one term course in applied statistical methodology from an analysis-of-data viewpoint. Frequency distributions; measures of location; mean, median, mode; measures of dispersion; variance; graphic presentation; elementary probability; populations and samples; sampling distributions; one sample univariate inference problems, and two sample problems; categorical data; regression and correlation; and analysis of variance. Use of computers in data analysis.

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Venable Jr,Thomas Calvin

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

In this course students are introduced to the concepts and applications of statistical methods and data analysis. STATS 350 has no prerequisite and has been elected by students whose mathematics background includes only high school algebra. Examples of applications are drawn from virtually all academic areas and some attention is given to statistical process control methods. The course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week). The laboratory section deals with the computational aspects of the course and provides a forum for review of lecture material. For this purpose, students are introduced to the use of a statistical analysis-computer package. Course evaluation is based on a combination of semester examinations, a final examination, weekly homework, and lab participation.

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Gunderson,Brenda K

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

In this course students are introduced to the concepts and applications of statistical methods and data analysis. STATS 350 has no prerequisite and has been elected by students whose mathematics background includes only high school algebra. Examples of applications are drawn from virtually all academic areas and some attention is given to statistical process control methods. The course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week). The laboratory section deals with the computational aspects of the course and provides a forum for review of lecture material. For this purpose, students are introduced to the use of a statistical analysis-computer package. Course evaluation is based on a combination of semester examinations, a final examination, weekly homework, and lab participation.

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 005, LEC

Instructor: Gunderson,Brenda K

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

In this course students are introduced to the concepts and applications of statistical methods and data analysis. STATS 350 has no prerequisite and has been elected by students whose mathematics background includes only high school algebra. Examples of applications are drawn from virtually all academic areas and some attention is given to statistical process control methods. The course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week). The laboratory section deals with the computational aspects of the course and provides a forum for review of lecture material. For this purpose, students are introduced to the use of a statistical analysis-computer package. Course evaluation is based on a combination of semester examinations, a final examination, weekly homework, and lab participation.

STATS 350 — Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis
Section 006, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or IOE 265 or STATS 265, 400, 405, or 412, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

In this course students are introduced to the concepts and applications of statistical methods and data analysis. STATS 350 has no prerequisite and has been elected by students whose mathematics background includes only high school algebra. Examples of applications are drawn from virtually all academic areas and some attention is given to statistical process control methods. The course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week). The laboratory section deals with the computational aspects of the course and provides a forum for review of lecture material. For this purpose, students are introduced to the use of a statistical analysis-computer package. Course evaluation is based on a combination of semester examinations, a final examination, weekly homework, and lab participation.

STATS 400 — Applied Statistical Methods
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hansen,Bendek B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 404 or 405, or STATS 265, 350, 405, or 412, or IOE 265, or NRE 438 (or ENVIRON 438).

Statistics and the scientific method; observational study versus designed experiment; visualization; introduction to probability; statistical inference; confidence intervals; one-sample tests of hypothesis; two-sample problems; analysis of variance (ANOVA); blocked designs; tests for association and independence (chi-square tests); regression and correlation; and non-parametric tests. Course format includes lectures (3 hours per week) and a laboratory (1.5 hours per week).

Advisory Prerequisite: High School Algebra.

STATS 401 — Applied Statistical Methods II
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 413.

Statistics 401 is an intermediate course in applied statistics, covering a range of topics in modeling and analysis of data including: review of simple linear regression, two-sample problems, one-way analysis of variance; multiple linear regression, diagnostics and model selection; two-way analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, and other selected topics. The only prerequisites are STATS 350 (or 400) and MATH 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: STATS,MATH 115, and STATS 350 or 400 or 405, or ECON 405, or NRE 438. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 413

STATS 405 — Introduction to Statistics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Davis,Lucas William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, QR/1

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect STATS 405/ECON 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

This course is designed for economics concentrators but is sufficiently general to serve non-economics concentrators as well. The emphasis is on understanding rather than on "cookbook" applications. Students are expected to know basic algebra and basic calculus. Since the course emphasizes the foundations of statistical inference, it is recommended that after finishing the course students elect ECON 406 or a similar course in the Statistics department to gain experience with applications and computational methods.

This course is designed for quantitatively oriented students who are comfortable with abstract concepts and mathematical techniques. Students who prefer a broader, less rigorous approach to statistics should elect ECON 404. Evaluation of students in the course is based on examinations and homework assignments. There are three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion per week. ECON 405 is a prerequisite for ECON 406 (Econometrics).

Principles of statistical inference, including: probability, experimental and theoretic derivation of sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, estimation, and simple regression.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116. Jrs/Srs may elect 405 concurrently with ECON 101 or 102. No credit granted if completed or enrolled in IOE 265, STATS 265, 400, or 412. Students with credit for ECON 404 can only elect 405 for 2 credits and must have permission of instructor.

 
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