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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = QR/2
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 31 of 31
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage
Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111 or 115.

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 008, LEC

Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage
Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111 or 115.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. Lecture topics include sun, planets, earth-moon system, comets, and asteroids, including information obtained from recent space probes; telescopes; time and the seasons; and the origin of the solar system and of life. Discussion sections feature planetarium visits, observing sessions with telescopes, demonstrations of astronomical phenomena, and student-inspired topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew
Instructor: Gnedin,Oleg Y

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 008, LEC

Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew
Instructor: Gnedin,Oleg Y

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 160 — Introduction to Astrophysics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Aller,Hugh D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 112, 120, or 130

This course is an introductory course in astrophysics, intended for science students who have a background in mathematics (MATH 115 level) and physics (prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140). The lectures will cover selected topics in modern astronomy (loosely following the text book), and the accompanying laboratory is aimed at giving students practical experience in observational techniques.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 or 160.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 100, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann
Instructor: Perrine,Trilisa M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 500, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

The intensive lecture section (Section 400) is intended for those students who would benefit from a smaller lecture section (maximum 100 students) and more lectures so that the pace is slower and there is more feedback. Placement by LS&A testing or permission of the Chemistry Department (1500 Chemistry) is needed for enrollment in this section.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 600, LEC

Instructor: Banaszak Holl,Mark M; homepage
Instructor: Gottfried,Amy C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science particularly chemistry as their concentration, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130.600 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry in an experimental manner, integrating traditional lecture with hands on laboratory methods in a studio classroom. The topics will include the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, the nature of chemical equilibria, and electrochemistry. Students will be introduced to science as a discipline, as well as the process of chemical research. The integrated CHEM 130.600 studio section will give students an opportunity to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do within a highly collaborative setting. Emphasis in the studio classroom will be on drawing a direct connection between concepts and observed scientific phenomenon. The integrated CHEM 130.600 and 125.600 will meet in a large lecture hall one time each week for two hours for instruction led by a faculty member, once a week for two hours in a small discussion section led by faculty and graduate student instructors, and twice a week for two hours each time in a laboratory led by a graduate student instructor.

Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help. Course grades will be determined from in class discussion, homework, writing assignments (including lab reports), three two-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination including both written and hands-on portions.

TEXT: Chemistry: The Molecular Science, 2nd edition, by Moore.

Exams: October 3, October 31 & December 5 from 8-10PM

Students enrolled in CHEM 130.600 are also required to enroll in section CHEM 125.600. Overrides by recommendation of advisor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gerson,Janet

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Wed Oct 10, Wed Nov 7, and Tues Dec 11.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Malone,Paula A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Wed Oct 10, Wed Nov 7, and Tues Dec 11.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 101 — Principles of Economics I
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Sedo,Stanley Anthony; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 examines the microeconomics of capitalism — the behavior of households and businesses, the generation of prices and outputs in markets, and applications to public policy. Specific topics in ECON 101 include: supply and demand; the differences between competition and monopoly; environmental problems and policies; labor markets; and international trade. ECON 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics — the second part (ECON 102, for which ECON 101 is a prerequisite) examines macroeconomics. Prerequisites for ECON 101: high school algebra and geometry and a willingness to use them.

Midterm exams for this class are given in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Mon Oct 8, Mon Nov 5, and Mon Dec 10.

Textbooks:

  • Taylor's Principles of Microeconomics
  • Miller's Economics of Public Issues

Advisory Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 100, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 100) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 101-111) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

The midterm exams for this class are in the evening (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thurs Oct 11 and Thurs Nov 15.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ECON 102 — Principles of Economics II
Section 200, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/2

ECON 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics.

In ECON 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. Major topics include the determinants of aggregate output, employment and unemployment, inflation, the balance of international trade, and economic growth. The course format consists of three hours of lecture per week (Section 200) by the professor and a one and a half hour section meeting (Sections 201-211) led each week by a graduate student instructor. The section meetings are limited to 35 students. Contact Undergraduate Office, Dept. of Economics, 240 Lorch Hall.

The midterm exams for this class are given in the evenings (outside regular class time) from 8-10 PM on Thurs Oct 11 and Thurs Nov 15.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Advisory Prerequisite: ECON 101

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course expores the oceans of Earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

While GEOSCI 222.001 students are encouraged to take the lab, GEOSCI 223, it is not required.

ENVIRON 232 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Owen,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2
Other: GateSci

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the oceans. Contents include: a brief history of ocean exploration; origins of the Earth, the oceans and life; the theory of plate tectonics; how ocean sediments serve as the Earth's history book; the composition of seawater and its influence on life and climate; waves, tides and currents; the life of the oceans and how it depends upon the marine environment; and the resources of the ocean. The course format consists of lectures and readings from an assigned textbook. The course grade will be based on three one-hour exams and a two-hour final exam.

Section 002 is a Gateway Science Course, designed especially for students considering an academic major or minor in one of the sciences. All students signing up for GEOSCI 222.002 must also take GEOSCI 223 Lab (any section).

NOTE: GEOSCI 222.001 is not a Gateway science course and does not require the GEOSCI 223 lab.

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 233 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

ENVIRON 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course expores the oceans of Earth, their circulation, biology, chemistry, geology of the sea floor, and marine resources. Emphasis is on understanding the oceans as a single ecosystem.

While GEOSCI 222.001 students are encouraged to take the lab, GEOSCI 223, it is not required.

GEOSCI 222 — Introductory Oceanography
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Owen,Robert M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2
Other: GateSci

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AOSS 203.

This course introduces students to the scientific study of the oceans. Contents include: a brief history of ocean exploration; origins of the Earth, the oceans and life; the theory of plate tectonics; how ocean sediments serve as the Earth's history book; the composition of seawater and its influence on life and climate; waves, tides and currents; the life of the oceans and how it depends upon the marine environment; and the resources of the ocean. The course format consists of lectures and readings from an assigned textbook. The course grade will be based on three one-hour exams and a two-hour final exam.

Section 002 is a Gateway Science Course, designed especially for students considering an academic major or minor in one of the sciences. All students signing up for GEOSCI 222.002 must also take GEOSCI 223 Lab (any section).

NOTE: GEOSCI 222.001 is not a Gateway science course and does not require the GEOSCI 223 lab.

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 223 — Introductory Oceanography, Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Laboratory course to be elected concurrently with GEOSCI 222. One two-hour lab each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GEOSCI 222/ENVIRON 232

GEOSCI 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

SOC 430 — Introduction to Population Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Barbara A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 530.

A basic introduction to the study of demographic behavior and measurement of demographic behavior. A survey of the current state of knowledge concerning trends and differentials in fertility, mortality, nuptiality, and migration. Illustrations are drawn from the United States and a variety of developed and underdeveloped countries.

 
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