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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = RCHUMS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 43 of 43
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RCHUMS 218 — The Hero as Outsider, Outcast or Outlaw
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course we try to define the human need for heroes and the (changing) character of heroism by examining the eccentric hero that mainstream society attempts to suppress, dismiss, ignore, or condemn because it regards him or her as perverse, subversive, vicious, or beyond the pale of tolerance: the saint, criminal, psychotic, visionary, egoist, pervert or monster. Some of the works we may read or see are Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses; St. Exupery's Night Flight; E. Baine's A Lesson Before Dying; J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night; F. Dostoyevsky's Notes from the Underground; Bertolt Brecht's Galileo; Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy. Students will also attend film screenings in addition to scheduled class meetings.

RCHUMS 220 — Narration
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 221 — The Writing of Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly. RC students have priority for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 236 — The Art of the Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course examines the dramatic and psychological effects of the elements and techniques used in film making and television, and some of the salient developments in film's artistic and technological history. This course provides students with the basic tools and methods for film appreciation and study. Students write five two — page exercises, a seven-page analysis of a current movie, and a final exam.

SAC 236 is a pre-requisite course for SAC concentrators, therefore, we have instituted a policy of a rolling enrollment as of this academic term, Fall 2006. While there will only be a limited number of spots open for seniors, juniors, and sophomores, the majority of the spots will continue to open throughout the course of the summer for incoming freshman ONLY. At the end of the summer, the final remaining spots will open for all class levels.

RCHUMS 250 — Chamber Music
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Ervamaa,Katri Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

All students interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two credit hours at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is required for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for section 001; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit will be enrolled for section 002 as well. For one credit hour, students must participate in one ensemble; for two credit hours, in two or more ensembles.
Additionally, students must participate in class activities, which may include master classes, in-class performances, run-out concerts etc. Responsibilities include 3-4 hours of weekly practice and one weekly rehearsal/coaching per credit; attendance, punctuality and commitment are mandatory and will be strictly enforced. The end-of-the-year performance is required for all ensembles.
Course may be used to fulfill the RC Arts Practicum Requirement.
This is not a mini-course! Students are advised to sign up early in order to facilitate a timely audition and ensemble assignment.

RCHUMS 250 — Chamber Music
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Ervamaa,Katri Maria

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in one ensemble; for two hours of credit, students must participate in two or more ensembles. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal and coaching for two credits), six studio classes and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar and voice. This is a full-term class! Sign up early, as the ensembles fill quickly.

RCHUMS 251 — Topics in Music
Section 001, SEM
Introduction to African American Music

Instructor: Flaig,Vera Helga

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Since the inauguaration of the World Music recording industry, West African Music has entered the global market place at a steadily increasing rate. There has also been a growing interest , within the West, in playing African drums and learning African dance.Today the djembe drum of West Africa is a common fixture in not only folk ensembles, but also within American popular music. In this course we will study the music of Francophone West Africa both in its original context and its more globalized manifestations.

RCHUMS 252 — Topics in Musical Expression
Section 001, LAB
Improvisation

Instructor: Kirschenmann,Mark Steven

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

This course will utilize improvisation (not genre-specific) as the catalyst for creating and performing music. Because improvisation is a performance-based medium, the prospective student must be reasonably comfortable performing on an instrument or voice. Everyone will be expected to improvise during each class and in a variety of settings including solo, chamber and large-group work. The instructor will lead the class in various scenarios, structures and forms designed to stimulate creative and listening skills. Throughout the term, students will also work on self-directed solo and group projects. We will listen to recorded works during every meeting, and several listening exams will be given throughout the term. The final exam will include a concert of improvised music in the East Quad Auditorium. Three concert reports will also be required. Students must provide their own instruments, which may be acoustic, electric, found and/or vocal. Those using electric instruments will need to provide their own amplification. Laptops and turntables are welcome.

RCHUMS 252 — Topics in Musical Expression
Section 002, LAB
Afro-Cuban Drumming

Instructor: Gould,Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

Come and experience hands-on the drumming of Cuba. The class will learn the basics of conga playing, clave and other percussion instruments associated with Afro-Cuban music. The class will learn and play a variety of styles of Cuban music that will culminate in a small concert at the Residential College. Each student is expected to practice daily using a practice conga supplied by the instructor. The class is taught by Dr. Michael Gould, Assistant Professor of Music, Jazz and Contemporary Improvisation. Lab Fee $50.

RCHUMS 253 — Choral Ensemble
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: CE

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

RCHUMS 260 — Art of Dance
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Genné,Beth

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth and twentieth century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film. Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris. Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet.

Books:

  • Dance as a Theater Art. Cohen, Selma Jeanne, ed.
  • Time and the Dancing Image. Jowitt, Deborah
  • Ballet and Modern Dance. Au, Susan

Course pack available at Accu-Copy

RCHUMS 275 — The Western Mind in Revolution: Six Interpretations of the Human Condition
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Peters,Frederick G

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course will treat six major reinterpretations of the human condition from the 16th to the 20th centuries generated by intellectual revolutions in astronomy (Copernicus: the heliocentric theory) theology (Luther: the Reformation), biology (Darwin: evolution of the species), sociology (Marx: Communism), psychology (Freud: psychoanalysis), and physics (Einstein: the theory of relativity).

All six reinterpretations initiated a profound revaluation of Western concept of the self as well as a reassessment of the nature and function of his/her political and social institutions. Since each of these revolutions arose in direct opposition to some of the most central and firmly accepted doctrines of their respective ages, we will study:

  1. how each thinker perceived the particular "truth" he sought to communicate;
  2. the problems entailed in expressing and communicating these truths; and
  3. the traumatic nature of the psychological upheaval caused by these cataclysmic transitions from the past to the future — both on the personal and cultural level.

If the function of humanistic education is to enable the individual to see where he/she stands in today's maelstrom of conflicting intellectual and cultural currents, it is first necessary to see where others have stood and what positions were abandoned. The emphasis of this course will not be upon truths finally revealed or upon problems forever abandoned, but rather upon certain quite definite perspectives that, arising out of specific historical contexts, at once solved a few often technical problems within a specialized discipline while unexpectedly creating many new ones for Western culture as a whole.

Texts:

  • Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Bodies (1543);
  • Luther, Appeal to the Christian Nobility of the German Nation (1520), Of the Liberty of a Christian Man (1520);
  • Darwin, The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859);
  • Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts (1844), Das Kapital (1867, 1885, 1894);
  • Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality (1905); and
  • Einstein, Relativity, the Special and the General Theory: A Popular Exposition (1921).

RCHUMS 280 — Introduction to Drama and Theatre
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Westlake,Jane; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

The course aims to introduce students to the power and variety of theatre, and to help them understand the processes which go toward making a production. Five to seven plays will be subjects of special study, chosen to cover a wide range of style and content, but interest will not be confined to these. Each student will attend two lectures weekly, plays a two-hour meeting in section each week; the latter will be used for questions, discussions, exploration of texts, and other exercises. Students will be required to attend two or more theatre performances, chosen from those available in Ann Arbor. Three papers are required plus a final examination.

Required Texts: available at the Shaman Drum and on reserve at the Shapiro:

  • The Essential Theatre, Oscar Brockett
  • Waiting for Godot, Samuel Beckett
  • The Piano Lesson, August Wilson
  • The Heidi Chronicles, Wendy Wasserstein
  • Dream on Monkey Mountain, Derek Walcott

Online:

  • Oedipus Rex, Sophocles
  • Romeo and Juliet, William Shakespeare
  • and other online readings as assigned

Course Objectives

  1. To determine what "theatre" and "drama" have meant at different times in history and what they mean now, and to do so by examining landmark plays in their theatrical and social contexts.
  2. To gain a fundamental understanding of how each of the theatre's constituent arts (acting, directing, design, playwriting, architecture) contributes to the making of a theatrical whole.
  3. To develop a sense of how theatre is a discipline without clear boundaries and how other practices intersect with and shape theatrical performance.

RCHUMS 282 — Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text
Section 001, SEM
Image of the American Family

Instructor: Mendeloff,Katherine

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: CE

This text-based performance course will focus on one of the central themes in American Drama — the relationship of the family. In doing so we will not only look at some of the major plays of the century by writers like Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, and Eugene O'Neill, but we will also go on to look at more contemporary playwrights and more current issues in American playwriting — the perspectives of women writers, African American, Asian and Hispanic writers, writers from the Gay and Lesbian community. The emphasis will be on the exploration of these texts through extensive scene study. No prerequisite is required but previous acting experience is recommended.

RCHUMS 291 — The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Nineteenth Century
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Genné,Beth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

The nineteenth century was marked not only by revolutionary changes in society but by artistic revolution. By the beginning of the twentieth century the conventions of style and subject matter of virtually every major art form — painting, music, dance, and literature — had been radically altered and the role of the artist in society had been radically redefined. This interdisciplinary course will examine some of these changes and offer an introduction to major movements in European art and cultural history of the nineteenth century — Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Symbolism — by analyzing and comparing representative works of literature, dance, music, and the visual arts. Among possible works studied will be paintings by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Van Gogh, novels by Zola, Brontë, and Flaubert, music of Berlioz and Debussy, and ballets of Perrot and Bournonville.

We'll be asking some of the following kinds of questions: What is the revolution of style and subject matter brought about by Romantic art? How do Coralli and Perrot's ballet Giselle and the Symphonie Fantastique of Berlioz reflect these changes and the new attitude of the artist towards himself and his art? Can we find similar aims in certain realist novels of Zola and the realist painting of Courbet and Manet? Can we compare the revolution in the structure and subject matter of painting brought about by the Impressionist and Symbolist painters to the revolution in form brought to music by Debussy? What can we learn about the evolving view of women's place in society by comparing the portrayal of women in paintings by Berthe Morisot and Edouard Manet and the portrayal of women in literature by Ibsen and Edith Wharton? These and other questions will be considered by Beth Genné and class.

RCHUMS 310 — Medieval Sources of Modern Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sowers,Cynthia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

"The Dark Ages" conjures up lurid images of barbarians wearing horned helmets roaming a cultural landscape of generalized savagery and superstition. This course will attempt to discover a more complex, less stereotyped perspective on a fascinating period of Western European history. We will begin with the encounter between pagans and Christians in the field not only of religious belief, but also of philosophy and the arts. We will ask questions about the status of the body and its representations, about the role of intellectual life in the midst of political intrigue, and most importantly about the way in which a new history of origins and endings was framed by means of new narratives of purpose, pattern, choice, and engagement. How did Christians use paganism as a grounding and source for a new philosophy? How did barbarians use Christianity in order to represent and perhaps even to invent their own history? The course is interdisciplinary in nature, and will include a study of selected examples of the visual arts to enrich and deepen our understanding of the period.

Works studied will include: Plato, Phaedo; The Sayings of the Desert Fathers; The Life of Mary the Egyptian; St. Augustine, Confessions; Gregory of Tours, History of the Franks; Beowulf.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

RCHUMS 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Thomas,Laura C

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 325 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: 320/221&P.I.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Thomas,Laura C

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 326 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 333 — Art and Culture
Section 001, SEM
Race, Identity, and Western Art Music

Instructor: André,Naomi A
Instructor: Siegfried,Susan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a wide range of art forms with special emphasis in the visual arts, music and literature. We will meet as a seminar once a week for a combination of lecture and discussion. Classes will be supplemented with required attendance at performances and museums in the Ann Arbor and Detroit area.

Our goal throughout the term is to develop a critical appreciation of the arts and skills in writing about the arts. We will think about how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class and ethnicity and consider how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present. Writing assignments will include reports on performance and arts events as well as critical analyses. For those who are interested, there will be some opportunities for creative projects.

This course has a Lab Fee of $100.00.

RCHUMS 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

RCHUMS 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

RCHUMS 387 — Renaissance Drama
Section 001, LEC
Renaissance Comedy and the Commedia dell'arte

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

FA 2007
Credits: 4

An introduction to the COMMEDIA DELL'ARTE, the masked, improvised comedy of the Italian Renaissance. Students will experiment with the principal "masks" (Pantalone, Arlecchino, il Capitano, etc.), a period scenario, and the creation of comic "business" (Lazzi). This practical theatre workshop will be supplemented by a study of literary comedies: Machiavelli's La Mandragola, Bibbiena's Comedy of Calandro, the farces of Ruzzante, Goldoni's Servant of Two Masters, etc.

The first month of the academic term will be devoted to a commedia-style adaptation of Grazzini's classic Beffa (tale of trickery), "The Story of Doctor Manente" (in D.H. Lawrence's translation) in which Lorenzo the Magnificent engineers the "death" and return, months later, of one of his more annoying parasites. This original theatre-piece is intended for performance at the RC's 40th Anniversary celebrations. (See minicourse RCHUMS 485 for more detail).

Texts:

  • The Italian Comedy — Pierre Duchartre (Dover).

  • Commedia dell'arte: An Actor's Handbook — John Rudlin (Routledge).

  • Five Comedies of the Italian Renaissance trans. Laura Giannetti & Guido Ruggiero (Johns Hopkins).

    Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 390 — Special Period and Place Drama
Section 001, SEM
Modern Irish Drama and Film

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: WorldLit

A survey of 20th century Irish Drama beginning with the pioneering works of the "Irish Dramatic Movement" (Yeats, Synge and Lady Gregory) in the first years of the century, through the works of O'Casey in the 20s and beyond to the second flourishing of Irish drama in the 60s onward with such figures as Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, and Tom Murphy to Martin McDonagh and a host of other new playwrights of the 1990s. Some recent important Irish films will also be included. This course will be equally divided between lecture/discussion (with attention paid to Irish mythology, folklore, history, politics) and practical work on scenes (with workshops in verse-speaking, grotesque comedy, Irish accents, etc.). Midterm exam, individual research into playwright not covered in syllabus, an End-of-Term show presenting very recent work(s) from such exciting new playwrights as Marina Carr, Conor McPherson, or Mark O'Rowe.

Texts:

  • Irish Drama, 1900-1980 — ed.s Coilin D. Owens & Joan N. Radner (CUA Press).
  • The Complete Plays — J. M. Synge (Vintage)
  • A Reader's Guide to Modern Irish Drama — Sanford Sternlicht (Syracuse).

    Advisory Prerequisite: RCHUMS 280 and permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Thomas,Laura C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Thomas,Laura C

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 426 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

RCHUMS 485 — Special Drama Topics
Section 001, SEM
Commedia dell'arte Performance Project

Instructor: Walsh,Martin W

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 2
Other: WorldLit

This minicourse will be devoted to producing a COMMEDIA DELL'ARTE-style theatre piece for the RC's 40th Anniversary in October. We will be adapting Antonfrancesco Grazzini's "Story of Doctor Manente" in D.H. Lawrence's translation. The longest novella in Grazzini's LA CENE (c. 1538), "The Story of Doctor Manente" chronicles an elaborate Beffa or practical joke, performed by Lorenzo de'Medici upon one of his more annoying parasites. By means of a convenient plague victim, Lorenzo engineers the "death" of Doctor Manente who is spirited out of Florence by mysterious masked figures and kept in a well-provisioned "solitary confinement." Months later when he returns to town, Manente finds his friends amazed, his wife remarried, and his affairs in such chaos that even the Signoria has to intervene. A hilarious trial complete with bogus relics and a crazed prophet from the hills (could this be Lorenzo in disguise?) completes the Magnifico's comical revenge.
The minicourse will "meet with" HUMS 387 for the first half of the semester. Actors, designers, mask-makers, researchers welcome.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor.

 
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