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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = RCSSCI
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 7 of 7
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RCSSCI 220 — Political Economy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The course explores human society from an interdisciplinary social scientific perspective anchored in political economic analysis. The primary focus is on modern capitalism, especially as it has developed in the United States. A wide range of social analyses is examined with an emphasis on contemporary contributions. Historical and theoretical points are considered in close relation to current affairs and to potential feasible alternatives to prevailing policies and institutions. Students are encouraged to explore their own interests and ideas as well as to develop their capacities for insightful social analysis. Written work consists of a take-home midterm, a final examination, and a term paper. The course provides extensive opportunities for discussion.

RCSSCI 290 — Social Science Basic Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar is designed for students at the sophomore level or above who are seriously considering a Social Science major in the Residential College. The seminar is a requirement in the Social Science program; its purpose is to prepare students to pursue a concentration in Social Science in the RC.

Seminar sessions will introduce students to the RC Social Science faculty and upper-level Social Science majors, and discussion will center on how to turn general interests into problems that can be investigated systematically. Early on, students will begin working on their own with guidance from faculty and upper-level students whose interests complement theirs in order to complete the principal goal of the seminar: designing a coherent, individualized program of study for the Social Science major.

RCSSCI 301 — Social Science Theory I: From Social Contract to Oedipus Complex
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Moscovici,Claudia

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course examines models of the individual, society, the role of religion, the nature of the state and the goals of education as they developed in Europe during the Enlightenment and the nineteenth-century. We will study the canonical texts of social theory — works by Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Mill, Weber, Durkheim, Freud and Nietzsche — in their historical context in order to understand some of the major social, intellectual and economic transformations of modern European societies. The course also emphasizes training in writing. Each essay assignment includes a pre-write, or a rough draft of the thesis paragraph, on which the students work together with the instructor. The essays are evaluated according to the following main criteria: 1. clear and specific thesis statement that promises an original argument; 2. supported argumentation (not just valid observations or assertions); 3. clear and simple expression of ideas; 4. polished style

Advisory Prerequisite: At least one 200-level social science course.

RCSSCI 330 — Urban and Community Studies I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course is designed to help students develop historical perspectives and analytical frameworks that will guide them as they study and work in urban communities. Focusing on the collective experience of African Americans in the second half of the twentieth century, we will conduct an interdisciplinary investigation into the processes of community formation and social change impacting contemporary urban life. Course texts therefore include historical studies, urban sociology, social work, autobiography, ethnography, community studies, and film. We will begin with a review of the various meanings and uses of the idea of "community," moving next to a brief consideration of the historical development of American cities. Then we will explore the processes of African American migration and urbanization, including the exploration of specific urban areas and their dynamics of community formation. Finally, we will examine case studies of community organizing, leading us to consider broad questions concerning our understanding of contemporary urban communities, the challenges they face, and the prospects for engaged social action. Our guiding concern throughout the semester will be the relationship between universities and their surrounding communities — including the historical expressions, contemporary realities, and future prospects of this relationship.

RCSSCI 354 — Nonviolence in Action
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, ID

This course focuses on powerful, nonviolent strategies that have been used successfully by people all over the world to respond to global and local conflicts. Through readings, videos, frequent reading-journal assignments and several longer papers, small group discussions, guest speakers, and student-initiated community action projects, students attempt to define central terms such as violence, war, terrorism, justice, nonviolence, and peace. They look at current US aggressive interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq; the Israel/Palestine conflict; and UN peacekeeping efforts such as Rwanda and Bosnia. They become acquainted with various philosophies of nonviolence (found in Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, "just war" theory; secular pacifism and political activism). They examine case studies of strategic nonviolent action (Poland, South Africa, India, Chile, the Chicano Farm Workers Movement, and the US Civil Rights Movement, as well as current anti-war and anti-globalization protests). They examine their own and others' assumptions about "human nature," and learn to respond orally and in writing to arguments justifying war and aggression. Although the purpose of the course is to pose alternatives to the use of aggression in solving human problems, students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about when and where the use of violence might be justified. Student-designed community projects might involve facilitating discussion groups about nonviolent methods in a high school or middle school, writing and performing skits in classrooms or public spaces that raise questions about peace and war; producing and distributing a journal or zine containing essays, interviews, and poetry; or creating and exhibiting art that engages viewers in critical thinking about some of the concepts in the course. Five books; coursepack; and frequent short papers comprising about 60 pages of writing (including drafts).

RCSSCI 360 — Social Science Junior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Religion and Politics in Detroit

Instructor: Dillard,Angela Denise

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Throughout the 20th century, Detroit has been home to the Nation of Islam, the Catholic Worker Movement and to African-American Baptist churches heavily engaged in civil rights work. The city has also hosted an array of controversial religious figures such as Father Charles Coughlin, the famous "Radio Priest of the 1930s who had to be silenced by the Catholic church for his pro-fascist views; Reverend J. Frank Norris, one of the founders of modern American fundamentalism, and to the Reverend Albert B. Cleage, who developed a "political theology" based on a Black Christ as a Black revolutionary.

Drawing on these figures and others, this course explores the dynamics of religion and politics in Detroit from the early decades of the 20th century to the late 1960s. Beginning with the migration of waves of southern migrants (both Black and white) to northern industrial centers such as Detroit, we will consider the role of churches in providing for the material and spiritual welfare of their congregants as well as their role in political campaigns and religious-inflected social movements. Throughout, churches and other religious institutions are depicted as highly contested spaces in which and through which ministers, congregants, community activists and other interested parties waged political and ideological battles for control. We will also pay close attention to the ways that ideology influenced theological debates about the nature of sin and salvation and how it helped to shape political perspectives on liberalism, progressive radicalism, conservatism and patently reactionary causes.

All seminar participants are required to make use of the archival holding of the Bentley Historical Library (housed at the University of Michigan), which include the papers of the Reverend C.L. Franklin, a key figure in the city's civil rights movement; the political reactionary Gerald L.K. Smith, the papers of Second Baptist Church, among other sources. All seminar participants are expected to complete a substantial research/analytical paper or independent project by the end of the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

RCSSCI 360 — Social Science Junior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Connecting Time, Space, and Minds: The Cultural Meanings of the Railroads in the Nineteenth Century

Instructor: Grosse,Pascal Alexander

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The subject matter varies from term to term depending on the interests and expertise of the faculty involved.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

 
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