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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = RE
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 274 — Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

AAPTIS 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

AMCULT 100 — Rethinking American Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Daligga,Catherine Elizabeth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

What is an American? Who decides, and on what basis? Why does it matter? This course will consider various answers proposed to these deceptively simple questions from the early days of the American republic to the present. Through critical readings of literature, law, journalism, memoir, music, film, and popular culture from different eras that address the subject of Americanness, we will explore the central elements affecting the ongoing transformation of American identity (or identities). We will see that changing concepts of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality and class have in turn shaped American cultural identity as imagined and enacted. Our overall objective will be to deepen our understanding of why this has been and still remains a matter with far-reaching political, economic, social, and personal implications.

AMCULT 103 — First Year Seminar in American Studies
Section 002, SEM
Interracial America

Instructor: Briones,Matthew M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the interaction between different racial groups in the U.S. from the 19th century to our present moment. Conventionally, such studies focus solely on the relationship between African Americans and whites, relying on the hackneyed Black-white paradigm of U.S. race relations. This seminar explodes that dichotomy, searching for a broader historical model, which includes yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white.

  • In other words, how did African Americans respond to the internment of Japanese Americans?
  • What made desegregation cases like Mendez v. Westminster important precedents in the run-up to Brown v. Board of Education?
  • What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews?
  • What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the Civil Rights Movement?
  • What is the relationship among Black Power, Yellow Power, the American Indian Movement, and Chicano Power, if any?

We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups," and whether conflict or confluence dominates their interaction. If conflict, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluence, what roles have these groups played in collectively striving for a multiracial democracy?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

AMCULT 210 — Introduction to Ethnic Studies
Section 001, REC
Introduction to Arab American Studies.

Instructor: Naber,Nadine C

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS

Students will explore questions such as:

  • What are the historical circumstances that have shaped Arab immigration to the U.S.?
  • Where do Arab Americans "fit" within the U.S. racial classification system?
  • What is anti-Arab racism? How has it shifted throughout Arab-American history?
  • What is the significance of gender and sexuality to anti-Arab racism?
  • How did September 11th impact Arab-American communities?
  • What are the cultural forms that Arab immigrants have inherited from their homelands and reproduced in the U.S.? In what ways are these cultural forms gendered?
  • What is the relationship between socioeconomic class and cultural identity among Arab Americans?
  • How have Arab Americans used the arts for cultural and political expression?
  • What is the significance of religious affiliation to Arab-American identity formation?
  • How has U.S. foreign policy impacted Arab-American histories and experiences?

This course explores questions such as these in an interdisciplinary context, focusing on anthropological, historical, literary, and visual materials.

Method of evaluation: Weekly assignments — 40%. A two-page (typed, double spaced) response paper is due every two weeks that summarizes the main argument in the reading and offers the student's critical analysis of the reading. At the end of the paper, two questions for class discussion must be included. Active discussion in class — 10%. Students must demonstrate that they have engaged in the readings; participate in group exercises; and meet with the instructor at least one time during office hours. Midterm essay based on required visit to Arab-American National Museum — 20%. Final group project — 30%. Students will receive an individual and a group grade.

AMCULT 213 — Introduction to Latino Studies — Humanities
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cotera,Maria E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

Born in the wake of struggles for social justice and educational equity of the 1960s, Latina/o Studies is a critical practice as variegated as the group it seeks to represent. Latina/o Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Puerto-Rican, Chicano, Cubano, Caribbean, Central-American, and Latin-American communities in the U.S. Latina/o Studies deploys the disciplines of history, literary studies, anthropology, sociology, political science, media studies, and law among others in its exploration of the lives and histories of these communities. Latina/o Studies offers a rubric for understanding not only the interconnections among these diverse communities but also the differences that sometimes divide them. This course will introduce students to the many practices of Latina/o Studies, by giving them the opportunity to meet and learn more about scholars engaged in this field of study. The class will consist of a series of lectures and projects designed in conjunction with scholars, activists, and cultural practitioners working in different areas of Latina/o Studies at the University of Michigan and beyond.

AMCULT 214 — Introduction to Asian/Pacific American Studies
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Akutsu,Phillip D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID, RE

This course examines the long history and diverse experiences of Asian Americans in the United States. Starting with their immigration in mass numbers in the mid-1800s, Asian Americans have made major contributions to U.S. history, culture, and society. Despite this fact, Asian Americans are still viewed as "foreigners" in the U.S. This course will review the Asian-American experience from the mid-19th century to the present and analyze course topics such as anti-Asian immigration and legislation; the "model minority" stereotype and achievement; community activism and political movements; ethnic identity formation and acculturation; pan-ethnic, interracial and multiracial communities and relations; popular culture and mass media representation; and, emotional health, help-seeking, and service delivery.

AMCULT 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course provides an introduction to the feminist scholarship about women and gender. We explore how women's lives differ across social categories such as race, class, sexual orientation, and age, with an emphasis on women in the United States today. Readings are drawn from both the humanities and social sciences to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within Women's Studies. A variety of topics are covered, including: violence against women; women and work; reproductive justice. The course grade is based on short written assignments, a group project, exams, and participation in discussion.

AMCULT 313 — Cuba and its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. A weekly two hour film screening is required Mondays 4-6pm or 6-8pm in 238A WH.

AMCULT 342 — History of the Family in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

"Parents first embody love and power, and each of their actions conveys to the child, quite independently of their overt intentions, the injunctions and constraints by means of which society attempts to organize experience. If reproducing culture were simply a matter of formal instruction and discipline, it could be left to the schools. But it also requires that culture be embedded in personality. Socialization makes the individual want to do what he has to do; and the family is the agency to which society entrusts this complex and delicate task."

— Christopher Lasch, Haven in a Heartless World

The world we live in — its divisions and conflicts, its widening gap between rich and poor, its seemingly inexplicable outbursts of violence — is shaped far less by what we celebrate and mythologize than by the painful events we try to forget."

— Adam Hochschild, King Leopold's Ghost

This course aims to give a perspective on the contemporary American family by studying the development of this important institution in the past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, economic strategies, work patterns and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity and class as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state and how these factors have affected family life in America. We will want to ask ourselves how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Course work will consist of readings, lectures and discussion, and the viewing of 4 movies as appointed times outside of class. There will be a 10 page historical paper required of each student on some aspect of the history of your own family by using the historical perspective gained in this course to evaluate and analyze historical changes in your own family over time. An alternative topic is provided by the instructor if this subject proves impossible to do. Two essay exams will be given, a take-home midterm and take-home final. Students are invited to visit the instructor as well as the GSIs during office hours to discuss reading, class lectures, or other topics of interest.

AMCULT 464 — Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rosen,Hannah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

In the mid-19th century, contests over slavery, race, freedom, and equality divided the United States in a bloody Civil War and shaped one of the most revolutionary eras in U.S. history, Reconstruction. The Civil War and its outcome — slave emancipation, the dismantling of social hierarchies, and the loss of political power among traditional elites — created new political possibilities and challenged previous notions of who was an "American" and a "citizen," who had the right to vote, and what it meant to be "Black" or "white" and an "honorable" man or woman.

This course focuses on cultural and political change from 1830 to 1896, tracing the contests leading to the Civil War and the transformations ushered in by emancipation and resulting, ultimately, in legal racial segregation. It analyzes the interaction of race, gender, class, and citizenship in contests over slavery, voting rights, labor, family, and sexuality. It also considers the role that memories of the Civil War play in politics and culture in the U.S. today. We will explore these questions through both lecture and discussion, through readings in secondary and primary sources, and through films and student presentations.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Shryock,Andrew J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts and methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and a short paper.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 026, LEC

Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically.

Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the arts; and medicine. Required readings come from one introductory text, a case studies book and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Three multiple choice exams each cover one-third of the course. The third exam is given on the last day of class. There will be several quizzes and short writing assignments due in section.

ANTHRCUL 202 — Ethnic Diversity in Japan
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Robertson,Jennifer E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course begins with an overview of popular and anthropological ideas and theories about human diversity. Japanese ideas of "race" and "ethnicity" are analyzed comparatively. We then explore the history and cultures of Japanese ethnic groups and minorities. Among the groups we will focus on are the ("aboriginal") Ainu, resident Koreans, migrant workers (of Japanese ancestry) from South America, so-called "international marriages" and children of mixed parentage, Burakumin ("outcastes"), "sexual minorities" (i.e., gays, lesbians, bisexuals), and others. Anthropological readings are augmented by novels and short stories, comics, videos, and films.

ANTHRCUL 314 — Cuba and its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. A weekly two hour film screening is required Mondays 4-6pm or 6-8pm in 238A WH.

ANTHRCUL 319 — Latin American Society and Culture
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Frye,David L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines the cultures and societies of contemporary Latin America, a vast and varied region with more than twenty countries spread over one and a half continents that have developed over more than 500 years of history. We will cultivate an awareness of the particularities of local ways of life while searching for shared themes and histories that in some ways unite the many societies of this vast region. Topics covered include: race, ethnicity, and national identity; indigenous rights and citizenship; religion and religious change; gender issues; class and economic development; and immigrant communities within Latin America. As a student, you will be expected to keep up with reading and writing assignments and to participate actively in lectures and discussion sections. By the end of this course you should have a grasp of the various countries and regions that make up Latin America; the most important social divisions within those regions; and the nature of current developments in Latin American societies. This is an introductory course on the region, with no prerequisites other than a desire to learn new things. Grades will be based on participation, essays, and exams.

ANTHRCUL 346 — Latin America: The Colonial Period
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, and on the emergence of a durable colonial system. We will use primary sources such as the transcripts of court cases as well as secondary works, and look at culture as well as the dynamics of social change. There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and several reaction papers. There are two lectures per week and a discussion section. Students who wish to complete an extra hour's credit may opt for a somewhat longer discussion section held in Spanish.

ANTHRCUL 370 — Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course we examine the interplay between language and ideological processes, particularly as they function below the level of conscious awareness. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogenous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle American mainstream. This ideology is one of many social practices on which people depend without close analysis of underlying assumptions. In this class, we will look into those assumptions linguistic and social and about the arguments used to uphold them. We will examine the way in which these behaviors are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, business community, and the judicial system, all of which promote standard language ideology and underwrite assimilatory and often discriminatory practices, the goal of which is to suppress perfectly functional language variation intimately linked to homeland, race, ethnicity, ability (e.g., as it relates to the use of signed rather than spoken languages), or gender. We will look at issues of language choice and accent as legal issues in the courts, including battles about hate speech. This course should be of interest to those concerned with non-mainstream language varieties as a cultural resource and asset, historical heritage, and potential complication in supre-cultural communication. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210

ANTHRCUL 447 — Culture, Racism, and Human Nature
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require. The course looks at human Biophobia — the denial, defiance, and defilement of our animal kinship. This biophobia and denial gives humans an inferiority complex that is only assuaged by classism, racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, sectarianism, ageism, nationalism, disableism, speciesism, and power (CRESSANDS-POWER). The present stockpile of human weapons, the rage of international terrorism, and the oppression that CRESSANDS-POWER creates requires a new human revolution — THE ECOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. In that revolution the human body and the Earth will have such value that we can develop a new human-global community and end the human plague that CRESSANDS-POWER has brought upon our species.

ARMENIAN 274 — Armenia: Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores various aspects of the Christian Armenian identity, from the earliest times to the 1990s, against a historical and political background, with a greater emphasis on the more modern times. It highlights the formation of the Armenian self-image; its principal features (political, religious, cultural); and its historical evolution in a multi-religious and multinational region that has undergone territorial and cultural transformation.

ASIAN 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

ASIAN 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 103 — First Year Social Science Seminar
Section 006, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 104 — First Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Interracial America

Instructor: Briones,Matthew M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: FYSem

This course will examine the interaction between different racial groups in the U.S. from the 19th century to our present moment. Conventionally, such studies focus solely on the relationship between African Americans and whites, relying on the hackneyed Black-white paradigm of U.S. race relations. This seminar explodes that dichotomy, searching for a broader historical model, which includes yellow, brown, red, and ethnic white.

  • In other words, how did African Americans respond to the internment of Japanese Americans?
  • What made desegregation cases like Mendez v. Westminster important precedents in the run-up to Brown v. Board of Education?
  • What is a "model minority," and why did Asians inherit the mantle from Jews?
  • What is a "protest minority," and why were Blacks and Jews labeled as such during the Civil Rights Movement?
  • What is the relationship among Black Power, Yellow Power, the American Indian Movement, and Chicano Power, if any?

We will critically interrogate the history of contact that exists between and among these diverse "groups," and whether conflict or confluence dominates their interaction. If conflict, what factors have prevented meaningful alliances? If confluence, what roles have these groups played in collectively striving for a multiracial democracy?"

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CAAS 111 — Introduction to Africa and Its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Whatley,Warren C; homepage
Instructor: Means Coleman,Robin Renee

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

CAAS 111 is a team-taught course that introduces students to the study of Africa and its Diaspora in the Americas, the West Indies, South America, and Europe. This course takes a multimedia, interdisciplinary approach to a range of historical, literary, artistic, religious, economic, and political questions crucial to the understanding of the experiences of people of African descent. Using maps, films, the visual arts, music, important historical texts, and short stories, the course will focus on four major themes:

  1. migration and the middle passage;
  2. slavery and resistance;
  3. segregation and freedom movements; and
  4. the arts and global Black consciousness.

This course is appropriate for both concentrators and non-concentrators. Concentrators should complete this course by the sophomore year.

Requirements The course will meet in a lecture and audio/film format twice a week, with one discussion section per week.

  1. Class and section attendance is an important part of the course. Students will be responsible for the assigned readings and for taking part in section discussions. (25%)
  2. A map quiz, sections (5%)
  3. A midterm in-class exam (short answer and identification questions) (25%)
  4. A 5-page essay (10%)
  5. A final exam (50% multiple choice, 50% short answer) (35%)

The essay and exams will be based on lectures, discussion sections, films, and readings.

Required texts:

  • Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali, D. T. Niane, ed.
  • The Classic Slave Narratives, Henry Louis Gates, ed.
  • Africanisms in American Culture, Joseph E. Holloway, ed.
  • The Origins of American Slavery, Betty Wood
  • Classical Black Nationalism, Wilson J. Moses, ed.

Books are available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore (313 South State St., 662-7407). The books are also on reserve, along with journal articles, at Course Reserves (Shapiro Library) and the CAAS Library (5511 Haven Hall). A course pack of additional required readings will be available for purchase at Kolossus (310 East Washington, 994-5400).

CAAS 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chen,Anthony S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course examines the central tensions underlying race and ethnic relations. Our focus is primarily on intergroup relations in America, though we will devote some attention to ethnic conflict beyond the borders of the United States. For more than sixty years, sociologists have preoccupied themselves with the study of intergroup relations, assimilation, and racial and ethnic conflict. Indeed these issues have grown more complex and nuanced as the United States becomes more racially and ethnically diverse. Our goal is to develop an appreciation for the social forces that facilitate or impede intergroup relations. We will devote attention to: (1) theoretical debates in the conceptualization and analysis of race and ethnicity (2) developing an historical understanding of the social and political meaning of race and ethnicity (3) understanding how various racial and ethnic groups construct and use their social identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

EDUC 118 — Introduction to Education: Schooling and Multicultural Society
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Moje,Elizabeth B

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

In this elective course, we will use written texts, discussions, and experiential learning to explore critical issues of schooling in today's world:

  • How students learn
  • Literacy in the information age
  • Education in a diverse society
  • Facilitating student achievement

We will also visit local classrooms to work with elementary, middle, and high school students and teachers

ENGLISH 319 — Literature and Social Change
Section 001, LEC
Rhetorical Activism & U.S. Civil Rights Movements

Instructor: Portnoy,Alisse Suzanne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU

The signers of the United States Constitution recognized the power of rhetorical activism when they declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women spent eight decades using the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. The persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr. changed this nation's consciousness as well as the experience of civil rights for all of its citizens. And although the United States did not ratify the Equal Rights Amendment, people like Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan forever altered the expectations and opportunities for women and men. How did these ordinary people accomplish extraordinary things by speaking up and speaking out? More broadly, how does our language define, sustain, reform, and even revolutionize the worlds in which we live? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from several U.S. civil rights movements: the antislavery, early woman's rights, women's liberation, 1960/70s black freedom, and gay rights movements. Work for this course includes readings (hard copy and online), exams, and quizzes.

ENVIRON 222 — Introduction to Environmental Justice
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Bryant Jr,Bunyan I; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS

This course will explore the environmental concerns of people of color and will specifically focus on the connections between environmental insults and communities of color and communities of low-income. We will grapple with questions such as:

  • To what extent do people of color and low-income communities bear a disproportionate share of environmental pollutants?
  • To what extent are they exposed to environmental conditions that threaten their health?

We will discuss and define environmental racism and environmental justice in this course as well as discuss and define race, white privilege, internalized oppression and non-violence. To understand the above concepts more fully we will review the current research literature in the field as well as place the concepts into the analytical frameworks of culture and the social structure of accumulation. We will also apply the analytical construct of resource mobilization and social movement theory to help us understand people and their struggle to protect themselves and their communities against environmental harm. Although the course focuses on domestic issues, some attention is given to the international perspective.

To maximize our understanding as we explore the above questions and topics, several pedagogical techniques will be used such as lectures, videotapes, case studies, guided interactive group discussion, outside speakers, and UM Lessons, which is a computer designed (guided) interactive study program. Two examinations will be required — a midterm and a final as well as one paper.

If you cannot attend a class or a discussion group, please let the Graduate Student Instructor know in advance.

For more information regarding the course contact me by e-mail at: bbryant@ulmich.edu or slashley@umich.edu. For more information on past work of students consult the web page address below. http://www.umich.edu/~snre492/cases.html

HISTORY 207 — Southeast Asian Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Lieberman,Victor B

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: WorldLit

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Moslem, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since World War II, the so-called Second Indo-China War (c.1960-1975). Until very recently it boasted the world's fastest growing regional economy.

HISTORY 207 offers an introduction to Southeast Asian history — the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the struggle for independence, and the development of an interdependent region.

The following paperback books can be purchased at Shaman Drum, 313 South State:

  • David Steinberg et al., In Search of Southeast Asia
  • Milton Osborne, Southeast Asia: an Introductory History
  • George Orwell, Burmese Days
  • Clark Neher and Ross Marlay, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia
  • Thierry Zephyr, Khmer: The Lost Empire of Cambodia

In addition, you will need a course pack which is also available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

HISTORY 210 — Early Middle Ages, 300-1100
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

The course covers the period when the first true 'Europe' was born. It covers the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the western Mediterranean, and the development of successor states in northwestern Europe, like the 'barbarian' monarchies, and the multiethnic empires of Charlemagne and the Ottonians up to 1000. Main themes are the development of new kinds of community among European people (Christian monasticism, feudalism, ethnic solidarity), new economic systems, and relations with the earliest Islamic states and with the Byzantine empire.

HISTORY 240 — The World Since 1492
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

Interested in knowing how the current world system emerged? Want to know more about other possibilities that existed in the past — and that may appear in the future? How about understanding the roots of fundamental human identities, political systems, and economic patterns? Unlike most history courses, which focus narrowly on a particular period and area, this class offers students a rare chance to think big — to seek broad patterns and connections that extend across space and through time. We will explore the last 500 years of world history, highlighting major trends and transnational developments. "The World Since 1492" stresses wider patterns characterizing human societies in different parts of the world and considers encounters and exchanges within, between, and among different societies and cultures around the globe.

There are no prerequisites, intended for all undergraduates.

HISTORY 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

HISTORY 347 — Latin America: The Colonial Period
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Mumford,Jeremy Ravi

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

This course examines Latin America from the initial encounters between Europeans and Native Americans to the early nineteenth-century wars of independence. It focuses on interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans, and on the emergence of a durable colonial system. We will use primary sources such as the transcripts of court cases as well as secondary works, and look at culture as well as the dynamics of social change. There will be a midterm exam, a final exam, and several reaction papers. There are two lectures per week and a discussion section. Students who wish to complete an extra hour's credit may opt for a somewhat longer discussion section held in Spanish.

HISTORY 368 — History of the Family in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

"Parents first embody love and power, and each of their actions conveys to the child, quite independently of their overt intentions, the injunctions and constraints by means of which society attempts to organize experience. If reproducing culture were simply a matter of formal instruction and discipline, it could be left to the schools. But it also requires that culture be embedded in personality. Socialization makes the individual want to do what he has to do; and the family is the agency to which society entrusts this complex and delicate task."

— Christopher Lasch, Haven in a Heartless World

The world we live in — its divisions and conflicts, its widening gap between rich and poor, its seemingly inexplicable outbursts of violence — is shaped far less by what we celebrate and mythologize than by the painful events we try to forget."

— Adam Hochschild, King Leopold's Ghost

This course aims to give a perspective on the contemporary American family by studying the development of this important institution in the past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, economic strategies, work patterns and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity and class as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state and how these factors have affected family life in America. We will want to ask ourselves how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Course work will consist of readings, lectures and discussion, and the viewing of 4 movies as appointed times outside of class. There will be a 10 page historical paper required of each student on some aspect of the history of your own family by using the historical perspective gained in this course to evaluate and analyze historical changes in your own family over time. An alternative topic is provided by the instructor if this subject proves impossible to do. Two essay exams will be given, a take-home midterm and take-home final. Students are invited to visit the instructor as well as the GSIs during office hours to discuss reading, class lectures, or other topics of interest.

HISTORY 386 — The Holocaust
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course examines the destruction of European Jewry (1933-1945), its causes and effects. Major themes include the resurgence of political and racial anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century, European Jewry in the period before World War II, the rise of the Nazis to power and the response of European society and European Jewry, the "final solution," and the literature of the Holocaust.

HISTORY 464 — Race, Culture, and Politics in the Era of Civil War and Reconstruction
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rosen,Hannah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

In the mid-19th century, contests over slavery, race, freedom, and equality divided the United States in a bloody Civil War and shaped one of the most revolutionary eras in U.S. history, Reconstruction. The Civil War and its outcome — slave emancipation, the dismantling of social hierarchies, and the loss of political power among traditional elites — created new political possibilities and challenged previous notions of who was an "American" and a "citizen," who had the right to vote, and what it meant to be "Black" or "white" and an "honorable" man or woman.

This course focuses on cultural and political change from 1830 to 1896, tracing the contests leading to the Civil War and the transformations ushered in by emancipation and resulting, ultimately, in legal racial segregation. It analyzes the interaction of race, gender, class, and citizenship in contests over slavery, voting rights, labor, family, and sexuality. It also considers the role that memories of the Civil War play in politics and culture in the U.S. today. We will explore these questions through both lecture and discussion, through readings in secondary and primary sources, and through films and student presentations.

JUDAIC 386 — The Holocaust
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE

This course examines the destruction of European Jewry (1933-1945), its causes and effects. Major themes include the resurgence of political and racial anti-Semitism in the nineteenth century, European Jewry in the period before World War II, the rise of the Nazis to power and the response of European society and European Jewry, the "final solution," and the literature of the Holocaust.

LING 370 — Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course we examine the interplay between language and ideological processes, particularly as they function below the level of conscious awareness. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogenous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle American mainstream. This ideology is one of many social practices on which people depend without close analysis of underlying assumptions. In this class, we will look into those assumptions linguistic and social and about the arguments used to uphold them. We will examine the way in which these behaviors are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, business community, and the judicial system, all of which promote standard language ideology and underwrite assimilatory and often discriminatory practices, the goal of which is to suppress perfectly functional language variation intimately linked to homeland, race, ethnicity, ability (e.g., as it relates to the use of signed rather than spoken languages), or gender. We will look at issues of language choice and accent as legal issues in the courts, including battles about hate speech. This course should be of interest to those concerned with non-mainstream language varieties as a cultural resource and asset, historical heritage, and potential complication in supre-cultural communication. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210

MEMS 210 — Early Middle Ages, 300-1100
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Squatriti,Paolo

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

The course covers the period when the first true 'Europe' was born. It covers the disintegration of the Roman Empire in the western Mediterranean, and the development of successor states in northwestern Europe, like the 'barbarian' monarchies, and the multiethnic empires of Charlemagne and the Ottonians up to 1000. Main themes are the development of new kinds of community among European people (Christian monasticism, feudalism, ethnic solidarity), new economic systems, and relations with the earliest Islamic states and with the Byzantine empire.

MENAS 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

NURS 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bailey,Joanne Motino; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course, we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and sociocultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risk for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors which influence the physical and psychological well-being of women.

PHIL 359 — Law and Philosophy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Elizabeth S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course analyzes law and legal institutions from the perspective of moral and political philosophy, with particular attention to U.S. civil rights law in historical context.

Topics studied in this course include:

  • methods of legal interpretation,
  • equality and discrimination,
  • democracy and voting rights,
  • property rights and distributive justice,
  • the tension between social control and liberty (including specific liberties, such as free exercise of religion), and
  • the justification for punishing lawbreakers (or for imposing specific punishments, such as the death penalty).

Readings will be drawn:

  • from historical figures (Locke, Hume, Bentham, Mill);
  • from contemporary legal philosophers;
  • from texts in legal history, criminology, or sociology; and
  • from statutes and court decisions.

Requirements include substantial readings, three short papers, a final examination, and class participation.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 004, SEM
Justice For All? Difference & Oppression in U.S. Society

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do issues of race, intergroup relations, and social group identity impact possibilities for building community in a democratic society? Students will explore issues of civic engagement and community building in a democratic society, taking into account issues of power and celebration, conflict and coalition, differences and common ground. This course is part of a larger program called FIGS (First-year Interest GroupS).

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 120 — First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science
Section 008, SEM
I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race & Racism

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . . I, too, sing America?" Topics include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What psychological theories address how individuals and groups might benefit most from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination, e.g. racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism? (meets with CAAS 103.005)

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 310 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

PSYCH 493 — Psychological Perspectives on Culture and Ethnicity
Section 001, LEC
Culture and Immigration

Instructor: Mahalingam,Ramaswami

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

Immigrants face a unique predicament. They are exposed to dual world-views, cultural practices and beliefs. This seminar will provide an interdisciplinary theoretical framework to understand how immigrant experience is influenced by the intersections of race, ethnicity, class and gender. The course will appeal to the fields of cultural psychology, sociology, women's studies and refugee studies. Attendance and class participation is mandatory. Each student has to do a research project. The seminar meets twice a week. Requirements: Any one of the following methods classes — Psych 303, 331, 341, 351, 361, 371, 381, or 391.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115 and one of: PSYCH 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290

RCHUMS 333 — Art and Culture
Section 001, SEM
Race, Identity, and Western Art Music

Instructor: André,Naomi A
Instructor: Siegfried,Susan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a wide range of art forms with special emphasis in the visual arts, music and literature. We will meet as a seminar once a week for a combination of lecture and discussion. Classes will be supplemented with required attendance at performances and museums in the Ann Arbor and Detroit area.

Our goal throughout the term is to develop a critical appreciation of the arts and skills in writing about the arts. We will think about how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class and ethnicity and consider how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present. Writing assignments will include reports on performance and arts events as well as critical analyses. For those who are interested, there will be some opportunities for creative projects.

This course has a Lab Fee of $100.00.

REES 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

SLAVIC 225 — Arts and Cultures of Central Europe
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage
Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage
Instructor: Carpenter,Bogdana; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

The course is an introduction to the rich cultures of the peoples of Central Europe (Croats, Czechs, Hungarians, Jews, Poles, Serbs, and Slovaks) seen against the background of two world wars, communism and its recent disintegration. Culturally vibrant, Central Europe reveals the tragic destiny of twentieth-century civilization which gave rise to two totalitarian systems: fascism and communism. The course will outline the ethnic complexities of the region, with special attention to Jewish culture and its tragic destruction during the Holocaust. The traumatic effects of the war and of ideological coercion on the civilian population will be documented by contemporary films. The course will examine the fate of culture under totalitarianism and study subterfuges used by novelists, dramatists, and artists to circumvent political control and censorship. Students will read works by Kafka, Milosz, Kundera, and Havel; see movies by Kadar, Wajda, and Kieslowski; become acquainted with Czech and Polish avant-garde art and music and the unique cultural atmosphere of Central European cities: Vienna, Prague, Budapest, and Warsaw.

SOC 105 — First Year Seminar in Sociology
Section 001, SEM
Transforming America: Immigrants Then and Now

Instructor: Pedraza,Silvia

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common yet truest statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, Cubans, Koreans, and Japanese. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves: the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and Eastern Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the South to the North of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by two World Wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort will be to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SOC 105 — First Year Seminar in Sociology
Section 002, SEM
Diversity,Democracy,Community

Instructor: Schoem,David

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, SS
Other: FYSem

How do we develop the practice of civic engagement along with the skills of boundary-crossing in order to build a strong democracy comprised of people with perspectives and viewpoints that differ from our own? This seminar explores a wide range of issues on social identity and intergroup relations, notions of community, and everyday politics and democracy. It examines the possibilities for building community across race, gender, and class as students explore their own racial and social group identities.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SOC 303 — Race and Ethnic Relations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Chen,Anthony S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course examines the central tensions underlying race and ethnic relations. Our focus is primarily on intergroup relations in America, though we will devote some attention to ethnic conflict beyond the borders of the United States. For more than sixty years, sociologists have preoccupied themselves with the study of intergroup relations, assimilation, and racial and ethnic conflict. Indeed these issues have grown more complex and nuanced as the United States becomes more racially and ethnically diverse. Our goal is to develop an appreciation for the social forces that facilitate or impede intergroup relations. We will devote attention to: (1) theoretical debates in the conceptualization and analysis of race and ethnicity (2) developing an historical understanding of the social and political meaning of race and ethnicity (3) understanding how various racial and ethnic groups construct and use their social identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: An introductory course in Sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended.

SOC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

SOC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

SOC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

WOMENSTD 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bailey,Joanne Motino; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course, we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and sociocultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risk for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors which influence the physical and psychological well-being of women.

WOMENSTD 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course provides an introduction to the feminist scholarship about women and gender. We explore how women's lives differ across social categories such as race, class, sexual orientation, and age, with an emphasis on women in the United States today. Readings are drawn from both the humanities and social sciences to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within Women's Studies. A variety of topics are covered, including: violence against women; women and work; reproductive justice. The course grade is based on short written assignments, a group project, exams, and participation in discussion.

WOMENSTD 360 — History of the Family in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

"Parents first embody love and power, and each of their actions conveys to the child, quite independently of their overt intentions, the injunctions and constraints by means of which society attempts to organize experience. If reproducing culture were simply a matter of formal instruction and discipline, it could be left to the schools. But it also requires that culture be embedded in personality. Socialization makes the individual want to do what he has to do; and the family is the agency to which society entrusts this complex and delicate task."

— Christopher Lasch, Haven in a Heartless World

The world we live in — its divisions and conflicts, its widening gap between rich and poor, its seemingly inexplicable outbursts of violence — is shaped far less by what we celebrate and mythologize than by the painful events we try to forget."

— Adam Hochschild, King Leopold's Ghost

This course aims to give a perspective on the contemporary American family by studying the development of this important institution in the past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, economic strategies, work patterns and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity and class as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state and how these factors have affected family life in America. We will want to ask ourselves how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Course work will consist of readings, lectures and discussion, and the viewing of 4 movies as appointed times outside of class. There will be a 10 page historical paper required of each student on some aspect of the history of your own family by using the historical perspective gained in this course to evaluate and analyze historical changes in your own family over time. An alternative topic is provided by the instructor if this subject proves impossible to do. Two essay exams will be given, a take-home midterm and take-home final. Students are invited to visit the instructor as well as the GSIs during office hours to discuss reading, class lectures, or other topics of interest.

 
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