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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = REES
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 8 of 8
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
REES 289 — From Genghis Khan to the Taliban: Modern Central Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

More than 500 years ago, the Silk Road famously connected traders from all over the world, linking the major cities of China and Southeast Asia with those of Europe and Africa. Vast wealth traveled this route, wending across the mountains and steppes of Central Asia, creating rich and sophisticated towns along the way. Bukhara and Samarkand became two of the world's greatest cities, enviable centers of learning and culture. How did Central Asia go from being the most cosmopolitan place on earth to an area now seen as one of the most isolated, remote places in the world? How did a region where a dizzying array of cultures had long intermingled and coexisted peacefully become a place associated (at least in Western eyes) with intolerance and terrorism? This course tries to answer such questions by providing an overview of modern Central Asian history. Using both lecture and discussion, it focuses on the colonial and post-colonial periods of the last 300 years: especially in Russian and Soviet Central Asia, but also the neighboring areas dominated by Britain and China (Afghanistan, Pakistan, Xinjiang). It offers a strong emphasis on the links and connections across these political borders, which were at first largely artificial and porous but which became crucially important and shaped local communities in deeply divergent ways. It also emphasizes social and cultural history, as a complement and counterweight to the usual political frameworks and classic grand narratives of khans, revolutions, and wars. Three themes structure the course: the fragmented, changing character of regional identities; the complexities of popular attitudes towards, and relations with, various forms of state power; and the differences between — and the complicated economic, environmental, political, artistic, and cultural legacies of — the major imperial systems (Russian, British, Chinese). Students will be evaluated on their class contributions as well as written work (short essays and class exercises) and two exams.

REES 301 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study, under the guidance of a faculty member, of a specialized topic in Russian, Soviet, or East European studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

REES 395 — Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to the geographic area that comprised the Russian Empire, later the Soviet Union, and now the former Soviet Union. This region is often referred to in a shorthand way as "Russia," although geographic designations other than Russia are included and at all periods of history, many people other than ethnic Russians have populated the area.

To understand issues and perspectives on the region a large amount of information from different disciplines and perspectives is introduced. Students differ in their backgrounds and initial interests. The professor, graduate student instructors, and guest lecturers will seek to make the information understandable regardless of the background of an individual student.

At the conclusion of the course, each student should have a wide range of knowledge about the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and Successor States. The student should be able to analyze and compare major trends in academic thought about the region and to be able to present his or her own views about these issues. The experiences in this course will hopefully motivate students to take additional courses about the region and in a variety of disciplines. The knowledge gained in the course should help each student decide whether to choose a minor, a major, or a career in Russian and East European Studies.

REES 402 — Honors Workshop, Junior
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Honors

Methods workshop highly recommended for juniors of the REES honors program. It is not available for general enrollment. Must be admitted by REES honors advisor. Students who do not take it and want to write an honors thesis their senior year must have a thesis proposal approved by both an individual advisor and the REES honor advisor before the start of the fall term of their senior year.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors student and junior standing, and permission of REES advisor.

REES 403 — Honors Colloquium, Senior
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors

The course is required of all senior Honors concentrators in REES and is open only to them. Must be admitted by REES Honors advisor.

Advisory Prerequisite: REES 402 or a thesis prospectus accepted (prior to start of fall term of senior year) by REES Honors advisor and an individual thesis advisor. permission of instructor.

REES 410 — Polish Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Westwalewicz,Piotr Antoni; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Short course devoted to some aspect of Polish culture, political culture, music, literature, art history.

REES 695 — Colloquium on Russian, Soviet, and Post-Soviet Studies
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Kennedy,Michael D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Speakers who combine disciplinary or professional work on the region will discuss with the class a combination of professional and contextual expertise. Each student will prepare a research or project proposal in their area which will be discussed.

This seminar is for graduate students who work on the former Soviet Union or Eastern Europe from any perspective and in any historical period. The purpose of this course is (1) to introduce students to a range of scholars and practitioners who work on Eastern European and/or the former Soviet Union, (2) to reflect on the relevance of area studies and context-specific knowledge in various disciplines and fields of professional work, and, (3) to enhance students' ability to engage the interdisciplinary audience likely to review applications for fellowships and subsequent employment.

Speakers who combine disciplinary or professional work on the region will discuss with the class a combination of professional and contextual expertise. Each student will prepare a research or project proposal in their area which will be discussed.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

REES 801 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
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