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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = RUSSIAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 29 of 29
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
RUSSIAN 101 — First-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 111.

In this course, the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, RUSSIAN 103.

Textbook: Nachalo I.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 101.

RUSSIAN 101 — First-Year Russian
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 111.

In this course, the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, RUSSIAN 103.

Textbook: Nachalo I.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 101.

RUSSIAN 102 — First-Year Russian, Continued
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103, 111, or 112.

In this course, the sequel to RUSSIAN 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Nachalo II.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 102.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 101

RUSSIAN 103 — Intensive First-Year Russian
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Alina Udalchenko

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 101, 102, 111, or 112.

This course covers in one term what is ordinarily covered in two terms of RUSSIAN 101 and 102 and carries eight credits. Students are expected to complete approximately 16-20 hours of homework per week and attend four hours of co-curricular activities (Russian Table/Russian Tea).

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking, listening, writing, and reading. Both vocabulary and grammatical structures are presented in a situational context. Abundant cultural material is introduced throughout the course. Upon the completion of this course, the student can understand simple written texts or short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! (Volume 1) by Davidson, Gor, and Lekic, Kendall/Hunt, 1996. PAK: textbook, workbook, video- and audio-tapes.
  2. Russian Stage One: Live from Moscow! (Volume 2) by Davidson, Gor, Lekic, Kendall/Hunt, 1996. PAK: textbook, workbook, video- and audio-tapes.
  3. Course pack at Dollar Bill.

Recommended, but not required:

  1. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! Volume I CD-ROM, 1998. Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-4520-8.
  2. Russian Stage One: Live From Moscow! Volume II CD-ROM, 1998. Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-4678-6.
  3. The Russian Reference Grammar: Core Grammar in Functional Context by J. Watzke, J. Sweigert, Jr., Kendall/Hunt 1997, ISBN 0-7872-4467-8.
  4. Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

RUSSIAN 121 — Applied Russian I
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit not granted to students who have taken RUSSIAN 521 or 522.

This course is designed to introduce students of all majors to the wonders of Russian written language interpretation in areas of practical need. Students work on development of a professional vocabulary from fields such as business, law, science, politics, and art.

Class Format:3 hours weekly in recitation format.

RUSSIAN 201 — Second-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (RUSSIAN 101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 102 or 103/RCLANG 193

RUSSIAN 201 — Second-Year Russian
Section 002, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course reviews and expands grammatical concepts first covered during the First-Year Russian (RUSSIAN 101 and 102) courses, focusing on verbal aspect, declension, and the verbs of placement. The course also emphasizes speaking and listening skills. Students are expected to complete 9-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan and workbook; cost is $73.00 and covers two terms.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 102 or 103/RCLANG 193

RUSSIAN 202 — Second-Year Russian, Continued
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture, and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 201

RUSSIAN 225 — Russian for Heritage Speakers
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Lang Req

Improvement of oral and written language skills of heritage speakers, emphasizing correct and diversified use of language and addressing individual grammatical difficulties. Readings from major authors and screening of film adaptations of Russian literature. Discussion of various cultural topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker.

RUSSIAN 231 — Russian Culture and Society: An Introduction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Interdisciplinary course spanning many periods and areas of Russian culture, from medieval times to the present day, covering art, music, literature, architecture, popular culture, and cinema.

RUSSIAN 301 — Third-Year Russian
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303 or 325.

The course provides concentrated training in the speaking, aural comprehension, and writing of Russian.

Enforced Prerequisites: RUSSIAN 202, 225, or 203/RCLANG 293

Advisory Prerequisite: Satisfactory scores on a proficiency test

RUSSIAN 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

RUSSIAN 355 — Supervised Reading of Russian Literature
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credits elected, but must correspond to writing expectations of upper-level department courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. CHRM.

RUSSIAN 401 — Fourth-Year Russian
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Makin,Alina Udalchenko

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403.

Systematic review of Russian grammar combined with continued work on speaking, reading, and writing through inquiry into Russian attitudes toward such issues as the changing political and social system, the environment, gender roles in society, justice and the law, prestige and success, among others. Assignments include film and TV viewing for comprehension development, compositions, and oral reports.

Advisory Prerequisite: 302,303/EQ.

RUSSIAN 449 — Twentieth-Century Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This historical survey of Russian literature from 1890 to 1921 covers the final achievements of realism in the later works of Tolstoy and Chekhov, the art of symbolism, the post-symbolist currents in poetry and prose, and the major literary events of the first post-revolutionary years both in the USSR and in exile. The required reading includes English translations of representative poems by Soloviev, Briusov, Balmont, Merezhkovsky, Hippius, Sologub, Blok, Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Annensky, Kuzmin, Khodasevich, Gumilev, Akhmatova, Mandelstam, Khlebnikov, Maiakovsky, Pasternak, Tsvetaeva, Esenin, and Kliuev.

RUSSIAN 451 — Introduction to Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The course provides fourth-year students with insight into the main trends of nineteenth and twentieth century Russian prose and develops a facility in reading Russian literary texts rapidly and with thorough comprehension. Lectures and readings in Russian.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 302 or 303.

RUSSIAN 463 — Chekhov
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

RUSSIAN 464 — Tolstoy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course will cover some of the major works written by Leo Tolstoy throughout his long and extremely productive artistic life — from the 1850s through the beginning of the twentieth century. We will examine his masterpieces in connection with the religious, political, and social phenomena that shaped Russian intellectual life of that period. At the same time we will learn how Tolstoy's writing changed the Russian intellectual landscape. This course will emphasize the main existential problems Tolstoy was deeply interested in, as well as his extraordinary views on literature and fine arts. We also will focus on Tolstoy's artistic devices and narrative means. The course will alternate lectures with discussions of assigned readings. All readings are in English translation. It is designed both for those with general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Tolstoy. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Evaluation of students' work will be based on essay, final test, and class participation.

RUSSIAN 478 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature I: The Russian Years
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ronen,Omry; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a first part of a historical as well as theoretical introduction to Nabokov's intellectually challenging literary art as a unique phenomenon of Russo-American cultural synthesis. Readings during fall term include Russian short stories and novels (King-Queen-Knave, Glory, The Eye, Despair, The Gift, Invitation to a Beheading, and the unfinished Solus Rex), plays (The Grand-dad and The Waltz Invention), selected poetry, and Nabokov's first English novel The Real Life of Sebastian Knight. The students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. There will be a midterm paper (consisting of a critical report on selected items of secondary reading) and a final take-home exam: a selection of essay topics, and some specific questions and i.d's. Independent research papers of high quality instead of a final take-home are encouraged, as are lively contributions to class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Russian not required

RUSSIAN 491 — Senior Honors Course
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of RUSSIAN 491 and 492.

The first half of the two-term Honors course. Honors students, working in consultation with the Honors advisor and a thesis supervisor conduct research on an area of literary or linguistic studies. By the end of RUSSIAN 491 the students should have a detailed bibliography and a prospectus for a thesis. Regular meetings with the advisor are expected. Studies continue with RUSSIAN 492.

Advisory Prerequisite: Approval of departmental Honors Committee and permission of instructor.

RUSSIAN 501 — Fifth-Year Russian I: Contemporary Issues
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This advanced language course is designed for students wishing to achieve high-level proficiency in spoken and written Russian. Drawing on diverse instructional materials about sociocultural, political, and/or economic issues in contemporary Russian, this course is accessible to students in range of disciplinary and professional degree programs. Bi-weekly grammar tests, final grammar test, and final oral presentation.

Advisory Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 402 or 403.

RUSSIAN 510 — Language Teaching Pedagogy Lab
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Rogovyk,Svitlana; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This course, destined for GSI's teaching in the Russian language program, investigates strategies to present points of grammar and to strengthen communicative skills among undergraduates; studies testing techniques appropriate for proficiency-based teaching; and broadens knowledge in existing theories of second-language acquisition. Grades are based on oral presentations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

RUSSIAN 521 — Applied Russian I
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 121

This course is designed for students in science and/or engineering with no previous knowledge of Russian. Work consists of reading and translation of a wide variety of scientific texts, with special emphasis on communication in a scientific environment.

RUSSIAN 552 — Russian Literature of the Eighteenth Century
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course offers a survey of eighteenth-century literature from the Baroque to Sentimentalism and (pre)Romanticism in its broad historical, social, and cultural context. Period literature will be considered in relation to comparable European developments. The course will include a discussion of common narratives of eighteenth-century culture such as secularization, westernization, Enlightenment, and the emancipation of literature. Special focus on the development of Russian poetry/poetics and the evolving philosophy of verbal art.

RUSSIAN 651 — Supervised Reading of Russian Literature
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Individual study, reading, or projects in Russian literature under the supervision of a project director.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of the chair of department.

RUSSIAN 855 — Seminar on Chekhov
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Makin,Michael; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A detailed examination of the literary career of Anton Chekhov: his prose and drama are analyzed and assessed in the context of the literary, social, and political currents of his time, and as masterpieces of Russian literature. An informal lecture course, with contributions and discussion from students encouraged. This course should appeal to anyone interested in short story or in modern drama. It is taught in English, and all readings may be done in English. Two papers, three one-hour, in-class examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

RUSSIAN 857 — Seminar on Tolstoy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maiorova,Olga E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will cover some of the major works written by Leo Tolstoy throughout his long and extremely productive artistic life — from the 1850s through the beginning of the twentieth century. We will examine his masterpieces in connection with the religious, political, and social phenomena that shaped Russian intellectual life of that period. At the same time, we will learn how Tolstoy's writing changed the Russian intellectual landscape. This course will emphasize the main existential problems Tolstoy was deeply interested in, as well as his extraordinary views on literature and fine arts. We will also focus on Tolstoy's artistic devices and narrative means.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

RUSSIAN 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

RUSSIAN 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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