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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = SAC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 48 of 48
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SAC 236 — The Art of the Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cohen,Hubert I

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course examines the dramatic and psychological effects of the elements and techniques used in film making and television, and some of the salient developments in film's artistic and technological history. This course provides students with the basic tools and methods for film appreciation and study. Students write five two — page exercises, a seven-page analysis of a current movie, and a final exam.

SAC 236 is a pre-requisite course for SAC concentrators, therefore, we have instituted a policy of a rolling enrollment as of this academic term, Fall 2006. While there will only be a limited number of spots open for seniors, juniors, and sophomores, the majority of the spots will continue to open throughout the course of the summer for incoming freshman ONLY. At the end of the summer, the final remaining spots will open for all class levels.

SAC 272 — Classical Film Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Saks,Lucia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Film has attracted the attention of many observers who, throughout the twentieth century, sought to understand the medium beyond its commercial value. This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts and intellectual preoccupations of these philosophically-minded commentators from the first half of the twentieth century whose work constitutes what is now known as "classical film theory." Attention will be given to major theorists and theorist/filmmakers such as Hugo Munsterberg, Sergei Eisenstein, Rudolf Arnheim, Andre Bazin, and others. We will engage with their writings and seek to understand how they theorized the existing function and future possibilities of film as an art form, as a medium often regarded as having a special link to "reality," as a phenomenon of mass culture, and as a technology implicated in the cultural and industrial changes associated with modernity. Emphasis will be given to the application of these ideas to films that appeared during the period in which these theorists wrote.

SAC 272 — Classical Film Theory
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Saks,Lucia A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the major positions and concepts in film theory that dominated discussions of cinema as a unique medium, a narrative practice, an aesthetic, social and psychological experience and a cultural phenomenon during its first fifty years Through close readings of film theory and criticism we will encounter different ways of theorizing what makes the cinema unique as a medium and its effect on the spectator, the text, the perception of the world, politics and the other arts. Film theory is multi-disciplinary and draws on many other scholarly fields generating a variety of conceptual paradigms. In classical film theory concepts were drawn and then modified from theories of perception, aesthetics, technology, spectatorship, Marxism, and above all realism and formalism or naturalism. This course seeks to expose students to these paradigms so that they can use them in their own analytic and conceptual thinking about the cinema.

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course will provide students with a basic introduction to hands-on production in film, video, and television. Pre-Production, Production, and Post-Production (from basic script form to directing to editing) are all covered, and the differences as well as the similarities of these three related media are explored.

Please note that the first class is located at the Argus Building which is located at 400 South 4th Street (Not 4th Avenue.)

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This course will provide students with a basic introduction to hands-on production in film, video, and television. Pre-Production, Production, and Post-Production (from basic script form to directing to editing) are all covered, and the differences as well as the similarities of these three related media are explored.

Please note that the first class is located at the Argus Building which is located at 400 South 4th Street (Not 4th Avenue.)

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

SAC 290 is a hands-on survey course in media production introducing television, digital video, and film. Students gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. Students master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 290 — Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

FV 290 is a fast-paced, hands-on survey course in media production introducing multi-camera television, digital video, and 16mm film. Students will work in crews to complete short projects and, in the process, gain first-hand experience in strategies and techniques of scripting and pre-production, production, and post-production. The aim of the course is to master a basic understanding of the aesthetics and processes of film, video, and television production. Similarities and differences of the various media/approaches will be examined.

Please be aware that shooting and editing the two single-camera projects will require substantial time commitment outside of regular class time. If you have a heavy class-load and/or work schedule, or have extracurricular commitments that require a great deal of time this would not be a good term for you to take this course.

Grades for the course will be determined based on TV studio directing and crew, single camera video project (including pre-production work, production paper), film project (including pre-production work, production paper), generative assignments (storyboard, script marking, and observing composition), in-class early mid-term "quiz," and participation/collegial attitude.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 with a minimum grade of at least a C-

SAC 300 — Filmmaking I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is an introductory 16mm motion picture production course. This laboratory — workshop course is designed to give students a solid understanding of how standard film production techniques are used to effectively communicate ideas; with emphasis upon Narrative/ Dramatic production. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, and post — production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development is the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to Film Studies. Students work in teams of 4s to produce two MOS films (with post sound) as well as participating in two in-class dramatic film productions. Evaluation: participation, production assignments, midterm exam, two films.

Text: Coursepack, and Cinematography by Kris Malkiewicz

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 300 — Filmmaking I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is an introductory 16mm motion picture production course. This laboratory — workshop course is designed to give students a solid understanding of how standard film production techniques are used to effectively communicate ideas; with emphasis upon Narrative/ Dramatic production. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, and post — production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development is the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to Film Studies. Students work in teams of 4s to produce two MOS films (with post sound) as well as participating in two in-class dramatic film productions. Evaluation: participation, production assignments, mid-term exam, two films.

Text: Coursepack, and Cinematography by Kris Malkiewicz.

PRE-REQ

Film/Video 290 and 236 or permission of instructor. Lab Fee required.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 301 — Video Making I
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Building on previous video experience, this course continues to explore single camera video production and aesthetics and focuses on video as a creative form through examination of historical and contemporary video art works. Students will work independently or in small groups on short projects that provide hands-on experience with digital cameras and non-linear digital editing.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 302 — Television Studio I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Sarris,Terri L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is designed to introduce students to the terminology, aesthetics, and methods of multi-camera television studio production. Students will learn the techniques of multi-camera production, including scripting, directing, and practical operation of studio equipment and will gain hands-on experience in all studio crew positions. Students will be assigned a series of directing exercises with increasing complexity and will learn to direct various types of studio productions.

Evaluation is based on completion of these studio projects, participation in studio and class critiques, short diagnostic quizzes, and one short paper. The goal of this course is to teach students to analyze the relationship between technique and content in the shaping of television programs.

The course will meet in LS&A Television Studio, located at 400 Fourth Street. Students should plan their schedules to allow for travel time.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID 290 or SAC 290 and SAC or FILMVID Concentrator

SAC 306 — Digital Animation I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McNamara,Christopher E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to animation and digital media production techniques and practices. Using 2D imaging, compositing and editing software students work individually or in small groups to plan and create short time-based works and engage in exercises and projects that explore the aesthetic and technological potentials of the new and emerging digital media.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 290. Students should have basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop, and digital video.

SAC 306 — Digital Animation I
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: McNamara,Christopher E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to animation and digital media production techniques and practices. Using 2D imaging, compositing and editing software students work individually or in small groups to plan and create short time-based works and engage in exercises and projects that explore the aesthetic and technological potentials of the new and emerging digital media.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 290. Students should have basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop, and digital video.

SAC 309 — The Screenplay as Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fanucchi,Victor T

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Focuses on developing an appreciation of great film screenplays as dramatic literature and an understanding of what characterizes them as such. Reading progress from screen play adaptations and their source materials to original screenplays, covering a broad range of themes and genres.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 310 — Screenwriting
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lawson,Terry J

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written 'concept,' then into a 'treatment,' 'step outline,' and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this 'workshop' approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 310 — Screenwriting
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Shere,Daniel Adam

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 311 — Screenwriting for Television
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Loeser,Elaine M

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The students will write an episode of an existing one-hour television show selected by the instructor. The course covers the entire process of writing for television, from learning the structure and voice of the show, pitching stories for it, writing an extensive outline (or beat sheet) for the episode, and finally writing an authentic script in the proper format. The students are the 'writer's room' for all scripts in process.

Requirements: At least two teleplays, and work at rewriting at least one of these. The class will read the teleplays and view multiple episodes of the shows being written by members of the class. Students will read and discuss each other's work. Students can expect to write the equivalent of ten pages a week.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 290, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 320 — Documentary Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Nornes, Abé Mark

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Critical, historical and theoretical studies of topics in non-fiction film. Examination of principles, methods, and styles of representation. The ethics of the documentary. Written reports required.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 230 or 236

SAC 330 — Major Directors
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 331 — Film Genres and Types
Section 001, LEC
The Animated Film

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Representative films, about half by Allen, spanning the careers of these contrasting yet complementary American masters. Emphasis on their cinematic "languages" and dramatic themes — the relationship between what they say and how they say it — and the nature of their comedy. One film per week; three lecture hours; mandatory small discussion groups. Course may be repeated if content differs from previous election.

No prerequisites, but the course is not "An Introduction to the movies." The course's reading, Giannetti's Understanding Movies, will give beginners a solid foundation. Alternate text for seasoned veterans. Purchase of a pass admits you to all screenings, all at the Michigan Theater. Rigorous writing with high standards for analytical/critical prose. Two 2-page papers; one 5-page paper; final exam. Those who insist that "media" takes a singular verb flunk.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 236 or SAC 236

SAC 353 — Film History, 1960-Present
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Examines the development of cinema during a period characterized by significant changes in film form and style as well as by important industrial and technological developments. Attention is paid to the international dimensions of these changes as well as to specific national and institutional contexts for them.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 355 — Television History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is designed to expand your knowledge of American television, from the 1940s to the present. While television programs will be surveyed in terms of genre (sitcoms, dramas, etc.), this course also endeavors to examine them as cultural artifacts and industrial products that reflect and refract issues of class, consumerism, gender, desire, race, and national identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 366 — Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course addresses the role of film and television as popular media. It emphasizes the acquisition and use of analytical skills relevant to the given topic and serves as an introduction to cultural studies. Students are taught to read and analyze specific popular films, genres, or figures; at the same time, the course introduces broader issues in cultural studies, such as definitions of popular/mass culture and the 'culture industry', the role of intertextuality, reception or globalization in popular culture, and the function of gender and sexuality in popular culture. Topics may include: James Bond as Popular Hero; Serials in Film and TV; Popular Cinema Beyond Hollywood; Cult Films/Cult Shows.

SAC 366 — Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Abel,Richard

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course addresses the role of film and television as popular media. It emphasizes the acquisition and use of analytical skills relevant to the given topic and serves as an introduction to cultural studies. Students are taught to read and analyze specific popular films, genres, or figures; at the same time, the course introduces broader issues in cultural studies, such as definitions of popular/mass culture and the 'culture industry', the role of intertextuality, reception or globalization in popular culture, and the function of gender and sexuality in popular culture. Topics may include: James Bond as Popular Hero; Serials in Film and TV; Popular Cinema Beyond Hollywood; Cult Films/Cult Shows.

SAC 366 — Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture
Section 005, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course addresses the role of film and television as popular media. It emphasizes the acquisition and use of analytical skills relevant to the given topic and serves as an introduction to cultural studies. Students are taught to read and analyze specific popular films, genres, or figures; at the same time, the course introduces broader issues in cultural studies, such as definitions of popular/mass culture and the 'culture industry', the role of intertextuality, reception or globalization in popular culture, and the function of gender and sexuality in popular culture. Topics may include: James Bond as Popular Hero; Serials in Film and TV; Popular Cinema Beyond Hollywood; Cult Films/Cult Shows.

SAC 368 — Topics in Digital Media Studies
Section 001, LEC
Virtuality and Digital Identity

Instructor: Murphy,Sheila C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Explores topics relevant to film and video studies and emerging entertainment, communications, and computer technologies. Courses methodologically use critical theory, industry studies, media and culture studies to digital media representations and experiences. Topics include but are not limited to digital media theory, video games, and virtuality and identity.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 367.

SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 400 — Filmmaking II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rayher,Robert W

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, and post — production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development is the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to Film Studies. You will have access to a high — end (SR II) 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in team of 5s to produce a substantial sync-sound final project as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theatre and Drama students). Evaluation: participation, production assignments, final project.

Text: Coursepack and book(s).

PRE-REQ

Film/Video 300 or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee required.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 300, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only.

SAC 401 — Video Making II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course covers various production strategies and concerns: building rhythm and structure, creative use of sound and its relationship to image, realizing non-linear narrative, experimental use of lighting, conceiving and distributing video in ways other than single-channel, and sociopolitical issues around representation. It aims to help students realize their own voices in independent videomaking within the historical context of Video Art. Non-linear editing with digital effects and various computer editing software including Final Cut Pro will be covered. Evaluation is based on projects, reading and writing assignment, and class participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 301, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 410 — Screenwriting II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Burnstein,James S

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 310, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 310 and FILMVID/SAC concentrators

SAC 422 — Topics in Avant-Garde Film
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kybartas,Stashu

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Historical and theoretical studies of topics in avant-garde film and video. The class examines the cultural contexts of the films as well as their formal innovations.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236

SAC 427 — Screenwriting III
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Burnstein,James S

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An advanced screenwriting course that provides individual and small group instruction to select students who have completed basic (FILMVID 310) and intermediate (FILMVID 410) screenwriting. Students will write a final draft of a revised original screenplay and a first draft of a new screenplay.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 310 & 410

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 310 and 410. Limited to students whose work is judged as showing outstanding potential in writing for the screen.

SAC 441 — National Cinemas
Section 001, LEC
German Cinema

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course offers a survey of French Cinema from the Lumières in the 1890s and the Pathe-Freres' brief world dominance in the 1900s through a variety of commercial and artistic renewals (in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1960s) to the embattled period of the 1980s and 1990s. Several weeks at the beginning of the course will be synchronized with a special series of 1920s French films restored by the Cinémathèque Française and shown at the Michigan Theater.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 or 360

SAC 441 — National Cinemas
Section 003, LEC
Russian Cinema

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 or 360

SAC 455 — Topics in Film Studies
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Studies in various film topics: e.g., silent film, women and film, German Expressionism, Latin-American film.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236

SAC 480 — Internship
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Expr

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

SAC 485 — The Global Screen
Section 001, LEC
Interrogating the National/Transnational in Cinema

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Explores the impact of global trade and cultural exchange on audiovisual media during different periods in media history.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing; FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236.

SAC 489 — Senior Screenwriting Tutorial
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is one of the options for the capstone experience required of Dramatic Writing concentrators who choose the screenwriting sequence. Students write a screenplay as a thesis under the supervision of a faculty member.

Enforced Prerequisites: FILMVID/SAC 410, FILMVID/SAC concentrators only

SAC 490 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Candidates for honors work independently with a faculty member in the Program on a thesis or on a film or video project during their senior year.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC Concentrators only.

SAC 499 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Does not count toward concentration requirements. Must be approved by the department in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SAC 500 — Directed Study in Screen Arts and Cultures
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SAC 600 — Introduction to Screen Cultures: Research and Materials
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

An introduction to the critical vocabulary, scholarly concerns, and research/writing methodologies of film, television, and digital media studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 414 and Graduate standing.

SAC 601 — Seminar in Theories of Film or Electronic/Digital Media
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This intensive examination of the films of Alfred Hitchcock will have three primary points of focus (1) the formal/rhetorical qualities of "silent"- and sound-era films directed by Alfred Hitchcock, especially as they contribute to the subversion of classical Hollywood norms; (b) the attention paid to Hitchcock over the last twenty years by feminist and queer theorists, and (c) the various critical debates that have emerged around the notion of a "Hitchcockian textual system" in relation to auteurist assertions of Hitchcock's filmic authorship represented by film scholars such as William Rothman and Robin Wood.

Readings include articles and chapters by Laura Mulvey, Robin Wood, Mary Ann Doane, Rhona J. Berenstein, John Fletcher, Tania Modleski, Robert Corber, Sabrina Barton, Raymond Bellour, Linda Williams, Lee Edelman, and William Rothman, among others. A tentative list of films includes: The Lodger, Blackmail, The 39 Steps, Rebecca, Shadow of a Doubt, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, Marnie, and Frenzy. Some source literary materials, especially those authored by women, such as novels by Daphne DuMaurier and Marie Bellow Lowndes will also be consulted.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID 350 and 360, and Graduate standing.

SAC 620 — Seminar in Film or Electronic/Digital Media and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Murphy,Sheila C

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Post-War America in Film & Television Studies focuses on the examination of film and television histories in the Post War America. By examining media histories that analyze and chronicle the industrial and aesthetic changes during the first decade of the Cold War, this seminar endeavors to assess what was included and what was excluded in these studies and the ways in which they reveal ideological discontinuities and marked popular cultural shifts in the period. In addition, this seminar endeavors to facilitate the critique of how these histories deal with — or fail to deal with — mediated constructions of the family, consumerism, domesticity, gender, race, ethnicity and class, all of which were implicated in the "apparent" national consensus that characterized the era following WWII. Part historiography, part social history, this course is designed to call into question, not only how these particular film and television histories are in conversation with each other and the social and political history of the era they chronicle but how, as products of the era in which they were produced, they speak to trends in the academic and popular discourse of their day.

SAC 622 — Seminar in Transnational Film or Electronic/Digital Media
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Benamou,Catherine L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

There is a growing worldwide interest in media that visualize experience of global diasporas. Films and television programs about migrant populations force one to rethink the notion of "national cinema" and local versus global. This seminar explores how experience of migration, dislocation, or exile are represented in world cinema and media.

SAC 700 — Directed Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Each student will carry out a research project in screen cultures that represents the culmination of her or his graduate work. Based on individual reading and screening lists, this written project normally will serve as a preliminary stage of the student's dissertation.

Advisory Prerequisite: SAC 600 and 601, permission of advisor and SAC Graduate Committee

 
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