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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = SI
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 7 of 7
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SI 110 — Introduction to Information Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frost,Robert L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

Course Objectives

The vaunted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, Net games, and dotcoms. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize those lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information. At the School of Information, we take pride in our tradition, inherited from librarianship, of "user-centeredness" and public access. For this reason, not only will you, the "user" of this course, be given unusual attention, but intellectually, we will approach information technology from the perspective of end-users and their concerns.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-shrinking and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones?), to the practical (what are the basic architectures of computing and networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to understand the politics, economics, and culture of the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of more traditional disciplines.

During the run of this course, we will be systematically eliciting your feedback and analysis. These evaluation procedures are not, however, merely to make "guinea pigs" of you; rather, a key part of our assessments will use leading-edge electronic and information tools, and your ability to use those tools well will also be a key part of the agenda.

SI 561 — Natural Language Processing
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This introduction to computational linguistics stresses the processing of written language with supplementary discussion of topics related to spoken language. The course is based on the textbook, Speech and Natural Language Processing (Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Prentice Hall, 1999). Course covers finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context -free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and machine translation.

Additional requirements for doctoral students include:

  • Read six research papers from a list provided by the instructor
  • Write a one-page reaction to each paper
  • Submit a research project at the end of the semester which will be developed under the instructor's direct guidance. What distinguishes a research project from a regular project is that the former addresses an open research problem to which no optimal solution is currently known. The final report on that project will be in the form of a conference paper and will have to be of such a quality to be submitted to a first-tier conference or workshop in NLP or IR. The final project will be evaluated using a realistic benchmark.

SI 580 — Introduction to Archival Administration
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wallace,David A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Provides an understanding of why societies, cultures, organizations, and individuals create and keep records. Presents cornerstone terminology, concepts, and practices used in records management and archival administration. Examines the evolution of methods and technologies used to create, store, organize, and preserve records and the ways in which organizations and individuals use archives and records for ongoing operations, accountability, research, litigation, and organizational memory. Participants become familiar with the legal, policy, and ethical issues surrounding records and archives administration and become conversant with the structure, organization, and literatures of the archival and records management professions.     

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SI 586 — Mus Bibliogr
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Reynolds,Charles A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Uses and evaluates sources of information in music, including research methods, theory and practice in modern editions of music, and bibliographic descriptions of scores and recordings.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

SI 637 — Research Seminar on Archives and Institutions of Social Memory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hedstrom,Margaret L; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Thematic focus of this research seminar is collective memory and the role of archives as "memory institutions." Students examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection, creation and collection of oral history, and interpretation and display of documentary evidence. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past, including comparisons between archives and other memory institutions, such as museums.

Advisory Prerequisite: HISTORY 600; Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

SI 737 — Special Problems in Archives Administration
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Thematic focus of this research seminar is collective memory and the role of archives as "memory institutions." In the seminar, students examine the role of archives and archivists in shaping memory through appraisal and selection, creation and collection of oral history, and interpretation and display of documentary evidence. Most of the readings place archives in the context of a broader literature on memory and interpretation of the past, including comparisons between archives and other memory institutions, such as museums.

Advisory Prerequisite: DOCT.STD.

SI 761 — Natural Language Processing
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This introduction to computational linguistics stresses the processing of written language with supplementary discussion of topics related to spoken language. The course is based on the textbook, Speech and Natural Language Processing (Daniel Jurafsky and James H. Martin, Prentice Hall, 1999). Course covers finite state automata and finite state techniques for processing words, language models, tagging corpora for part-of-speech, context -free grammars, parsing techniques, unification grammars and unification-based parsing, probabilistic parsing, semantics, discourse modeling, word sense disambiguation and information retrieval, natural language generation, and machine translation.

Additional requirements for doctoral students include:

  • Read six research papers from a list provided by the instructor
  • Write a one-page reaction to each paper
  • Submit a research project at the end of the semester which will be developed under the instructor's direct guidance. What distinguishes a research project from a regular project is that the former addresses an open research problem to which no optimal solution is currently known. The final report on that project will be in the form of a conference paper and will have to be of such a quality to be submitted to a first-tier conference or workshop in NLP or IR. The final project will be evaluated using a realistic benchmark.

Advisory Prerequisite: doctoral standing

 
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