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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = SLAVIC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 8 of 8
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Krutikov,Mikhail

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 151 — First Year Seminar
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem

Designed to introduce entering students to aspects of culture in Eastern Europe, Russia and Eurasia by analyzing the complex processes which define "culture" and "ethnicity" in the areas where "West meets East." Topics vary according to the interests of the instructors. Whatever their subject matter, first-year seminars emphasize critical thinking through class discussions and thorough practice in introductory composition.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

SLAVIC 225 — Arts and Cultures of Central Europe
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage
Instructor: Toman,Jindrich; homepage
Instructor: Carpenter,Bogdana; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE, HU
Other: WorldLit

The course is an introduction to the rich cultures of the peoples of Central Europe (Croats, Czechs, Hungarians, Jews, Poles, Serbs, and Slovaks) seen against the background of two world wars, communism and its recent disintegration. Culturally vibrant, Central Europe reveals the tragic destiny of twentieth-century civilization which gave rise to two totalitarian systems: fascism and communism. The course will outline the ethnic complexities of the region, with special attention to Jewish culture and its tragic destruction during the Holocaust. The traumatic effects of the war and of ideological coercion on the civilian population will be documented by contemporary films. The course will examine the fate of culture under totalitarianism and study subterfuges used by novelists, dramatists, and artists to circumvent political control and censorship. Students will read works by Kafka, Milosz, Kundera, and Havel; see movies by Kadar, Wajda, and Kieslowski; become acquainted with Czech and Polish avant-garde art and music and the unique cultural atmosphere of Central European cities: Vienna, Prague, Budapest, and Warsaw.

SLAVIC 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

SLAVIC 395 — Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rosenberg,William G

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to the geographic area that comprised the Russian Empire, later the Soviet Union, and now the former Soviet Union. This region is often referred to in a shorthand way as "Russia," although geographic designations other than Russia are included and at all periods of history, many people other than ethnic Russians have populated the area.

To understand issues and perspectives on the region a large amount of information from different disciplines and perspectives is introduced. Students differ in their backgrounds and initial interests. The professor, graduate student instructors, and guest lecturers will seek to make the information understandable regardless of the background of an individual student.

At the conclusion of the course, each student should have a wide range of knowledge about the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and Successor States. The student should be able to analyze and compare major trends in academic thought about the region and to be able to present his or her own views about these issues. The experiences in this course will hopefully motivate students to take additional courses about the region and in a variety of disciplines. The knowledge gained in the course should help each student decide whether to choose a minor, a major, or a career in Russian and East European Studies.

SLAVIC 490 — Issues in the Cultures of Eastern Europe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Westwalewicz,Piotr Antoni; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Can art change the world?
Can art change people's minds?
Why are totalitarian governments afraid of counterculture?

This course examines both the tradition of counterculture in Poland in the context of European avant-garde and the relationship between artistic expression and socio-political atmosphere in the 1980s and 1990s. Some of the most prominent artists of the 20th century will be studied and discussed: Zbigniew Libera, Władysław Hasior, Stanisław Witkiewicz, Tadeusz Kantor, Zofia Kulik, etc.

The material will be investigated from the perspective of the most contemporary attempts to question and subvert the existing notions about the place art and artist in academia and society.

SLAVIC 661 — Directed Reading in Slavic Linguistics
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Individual study, reading, or projects in Russian and Slavic linguistics under the supervision of a project director.

Advisory Prerequisite: SLAVIC 483 and permission of instructor. Graduate standing.

 
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