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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = THEME_SEM
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRCUL 402 — Chinese Society and Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mueggler,Erik A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The twentieth century was a time of enormous change in mainland China: two revolutions, civil war, famine, cultural upheaval, and many episodes of massive economic, social, and political restructuring.

  • What was life like in the twentieth century for farmers, urban people, men and women, and ethnic and cultural minorities?
  • What are their lives like today?
  • What were experiences of sex, food, work, religion, and family life, and how have these experiences been transformed?

In the last five years, a new anthropological literature on China has begun to probe these questions in rich detail. We explore this literature in this seminar to build an understanding of daily life for China's diverse populations through the twentieth century and today. We also examine questions of method: how best can we study and understand the historical transformations of daily life? Students will participate actively in class, lead a class discussion, and write one short review paper and one research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ASIAN 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

ASIAN 260 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

ASIAN 325 — Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is no doubt the backbone of the Zen tradition, this course will highlight the fact that Zen has a number of different faces, including a radical antinomian side that challenged the role of meditation (and all forms of mediation). This course will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan, with the first part providing an overview of the historical development of Zen and situating it within the Buddhist tradition that it emerged out of. The second part of the course will challenge and critically evaluate much of what is presented in the first half by exploring some less well known facets of Zen practice that on first glance appear to run counter to what the Zen tradition says about itself. We will explore the role of language in Zen from the enigmatic and abstruse use of koans to questions about why a tradition which took pride in "not being dependent on words" nonetheless produced a voluminous textual record. We will study both the crazy antics of inspired Zen monks and the structured life of Zen monastics and their rituals. Consideration will also be given to why a seemingly iconoclastic tradition like Zen also has a long tradition of venerating its masters, including some that were mummified. Why, we will ask, was Zen appealing to the Japanese warrior class and what has been its role in modern nationalistic movements in Japan? This course is designed to be as much an ongoing critical reflection on the history of the study of Zen as it is about Zen history.

ASIAN 354 — Rebellion and Revolution in China Through Two Centuries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will explore rebellions and revolutions in China, from the White Lotus rebellion in the late 18th century through social protests during the last decades of the 20th century. Although the subject matter will be arranged chronologically, different time periods will be used to highlight different themese in the Chinese "revolutionary tradition." The course will draw on selected readings from secondary sources, as well as fiction and translated primary sources. The course should enable students to identify and explain the significance and relevance of major figures, terms, events and institutions in Chinese political and social history from 1790 to 2000 by using supporting evidence from course readings. Students will acquire a nuanced and critical understanding of how the transformation in China in the 19th and 20th centuries has been characterized by both continuity and rupture.

Intended audience: Sophomore and upperclass students with little or no prior knowledge of China.

Course Requirements: No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required. Grades based on class participation (10%), one short paper (30%), one midterm exam (20%), and one final exam (40%). Paper topics should be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Class Format: 3 hours each week in lecture format.

Advisory Prerequisite: At least one course in HISTORY or Asian Studies

ASIAN 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

ASIAN 365 — Science in Premodern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics before the 14th century. In addition to examining the content of what many scholars construe as Chinese science and natural philosophy, this course will examine two themes at length. The first is how one should define science. Is science, as older scholars assumed, a timeless, cross-cultural phenomenon that emerged exclusively in 17th and 18th-century Europe? Or is science socially and culturally contingent? Is there, in other words, more than one effective way to represent and predict natural phenomenon? The second theme involves the "Needham thesis," which argues that China, despite early advances in natural philosophy and proto-science, failed to develop "modern science" because of the adoption of Confucianism as state orthodoxy in the early 14th century. In addition to reading the monumental works of Joseph Needham (1900-1995) and others, students will be asked to evaluate the Needham thesis by examining the primary sources Needham et al. drew upon to make their arguments. Readings will focus equally on primary and secondary sources in English. In addition to weekly "response" paragraphs, students will give oral presentations and write two 6 to 8-page papers critically treating the secondary literature by examining the primary sources from which scholars have drawn conclusions about some aspect of Chinese science and natural philosophy. No knowledge of Chinese language or China is required, and the course is open to all.

ASIAN 428 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 003, SEM
Chinese Popular Religion

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The religious landscape of contemporary China is filled with surprises around every corner, from the dramatic revival of all forms of religious practice in the past few years to the appearance of small shrines in restaurants and the religious veneration of Mao. While these practices are clearly related to the social and economic changes brought by modernity, they should not be dismissed as aberrant "commercialized" practices that depart from "pure" traditional religious movements like Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. Popular practices have long been intertwined with those "official" religions and have been actively supported and propagated in modern Chinese religious institutions. This course will trace the historical development of Chinese religions (including their doctrinal positions) in relationship to popular movements — from early folk religion through the recent resurgence of "religion" in modern China. Some of the main themes that will be covered in this course include: the yearly festival calendar, veneration of ancestors, exorcism and spirit possession, beliefs in ghosts and fantastic demons, conceptions of religious time and space, pilgrimage, religion and healing, the effects of modernity on new religious movements, and religion and the modern Chinese state. This course provides a critical survey of these main themes in the history of Chinese popular religion. The primary aim of this course is to reconsider the nature of the Chinese religious landscape and look closely at the religious characteristics of what Chinese people do, even if those practices do not fall neatly within the accepted categories of what the "state" has determined as "orthodox" religion.

ASIAN 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 534 — Seminar in Chinese Drama
Section 001, SEM
Traditional Chinese Theater in the Modern World

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Theater was the mass media of its day in China, and even though it has had to compete with a variety of new media over time, it has retained its cultural importance. Various attempts have been made to harness the power of Chinese theater to achieve social goals, culminating in the Model Revolutionary Operas of the Cultural Revolution. Beginning with an introduction to traditional Chinese theater as a system produced and consumed in ways alien to our present day conceptions of theater, in this seminar we will then see that what is now thought of as "classical Chinese theater" is really a product of the early 20th century, and represents a response, among other things, to the new need to have a "national theater" that could be shown with pride to Westerners. We will look at various attempts to modernize Chinese theater through the incorporation of new ideologies and technologies, a process that continues unabated today. The class is open to anyone who has completed three years of modern Chinese at the college level or has an equivalent competency in Chinese. Please contact the instructor for details.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 410. Graduate standing.

ASIANLAN 101 — First Year Chinese I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Tao,Hilda Hsi-Huei

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for ASIANLAN 104.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the 4 tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters. 374 characters will be introduced in this course. Students are required to perform skits in front of the class almost every week. A written quiz or test will be given every Tuesday and Thursday. This is a 5 credit course. Students have class one hour per day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken every day.

NOTE: If students register for Monday and Wednesday lectures, then they have to register for the Tuesday, Thursday and Friday recitations. If students register for the Tuesday and Thursday lectures, then they have to register for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday recitations.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Native or near native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Textbooks: (1) Integrated Chinese (Level One, Part I) — Textbook, Workbook, Character Workbook (all in Traditional Character Edition); (2)

Getting Around in Chinese — Chinese Skits for Beginners.

No visitors are allowed.

ASIANLAN 101 — First Year Chinese I
Section 101, LEC

Instructor: Tao,Hilda Hsi-Huei

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for ASIANLAN 104.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the 4 tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters. 374 characters will be introduced in this course. Students are required to perform skits in front of the class almost every week. A written quiz or test will be given every Tuesday and Thursday. This is a 5 credit course. Students have class one hour per day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken every day.

NOTE: If students register for Monday and Wednesday lectures, then they have to register for the Tuesday, Thursday and Friday recitations. If students register for the Tuesday and Thursday lectures, then they have to register for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday recitations.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Native or near native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Textbooks: (1) Integrated Chinese (Level One, Part I) — Textbook, Workbook, Character Workbook (all in Traditional Character Edition); (2)

Getting Around in Chinese — Chinese Skits for Beginners.

No visitors are allowed.

ASIANLAN 101 — First Year Chinese I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Yang,Dongyan

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for ASIANLAN 104.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the 4 tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters. 374 characters will be introduced in this course. Students are required to perform skits in front of the class almost every week. A written quiz or test will be given every Tuesday and Thursday. This is a 5 credit course. Students have class one hour per day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken every day.

NOTE: If students register for Monday and Wednesday lectures, then they have to register for the Tuesday, Thursday and Friday recitations. If students register for the Tuesday and Thursday lectures, then they have to register for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday recitations.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Native or near native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Textbooks: (1) Integrated Chinese (Level One, Part I) — Textbook, Workbook, Character Workbook (all in Traditional Character Edition); (2)

Getting Around in Chinese — Chinese Skits for Beginners.

No visitors are allowed.

ASIANLAN 101 — First Year Chinese I
Section 201, LEC

Instructor: Yang,Dongyan

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for ASIANLAN 104.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the 4 tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters. 374 characters will be introduced in this course. Students are required to perform skits in front of the class almost every week. A written quiz or test will be given every Tuesday and Thursday. This is a 5 credit course. Students have class one hour per day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken every day.

NOTE: If students register for Monday and Wednesday lectures, then they have to register for the Tuesday, Thursday and Friday recitations. If students register for the Tuesday and Thursday lectures, then they have to register for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday recitations.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Native or near native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Textbooks: (1) Integrated Chinese (Level One, Part I) — Textbook, Workbook, Character Workbook (all in Traditional Character Edition); (2)

Getting Around in Chinese — Chinese Skits for Beginners.

No visitors are allowed.

ASIANLAN 101 — First Year Chinese I
Section 301, LEC

Instructor: Tao,Hilda Hsi-Huei

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 103.

ASIANLAN 101 is an introductory course for students who do not understand or speak any Chinese. (If you speak Chinese, this is not the right course for you. Take the placement exam in the fall for ASIANLAN 104.) In this course, students are expected to achieve control of the sound system (especially the 4 tones), basic sentence patterns, aural comprehension, daily conversations and writing characters. 374 characters will be introduced in this course. Students are required to perform skits in front of the class almost every week. A written quiz or test will be given every Tuesday and Thursday. This is a 5 credit course. Students have class one hour per day. Tuesdays and Thursdays are lectures; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays are recitations. Students are required to register for both a lecture section and a recitation section. Attendance is taken every day.

NOTE: If students register for Monday and Wednesday lectures, then they have to register for the Tuesday, Thursday and Friday recitations. If students register for the Tuesday and Thursday lectures, then they have to register for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday recitations.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Native or near native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Textbooks: (1) Integrated Chinese (Level One, Part I) — Textbook, Workbook, Character Workbook (all in Traditional Character Edition); (2)

Getting Around in Chinese — Chinese Skits for Beginners.

No visitors are allowed.

ASIANLAN 104 — Reading & Writing Chinese I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gu,Karen

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 101, 102, 103.

This course, to be taught in Chinese, is designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. It serves as equivalence for ASIANLAN 101-102. Students meet four hours per week with a focus on reading and writing. Coursework will be graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, daily quizzes, periodic tests, and homework assignments. Students must have the permission of the instructor in order to register for this course. Most students will receive this permission via a placement test, which is held on the Friday before fall classes begin. For test information, please refer to http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ASIANLAN 104 — Reading & Writing Chinese I
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Gu,Karen

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 101, 102, 103.

This course, to be taught in Chinese, is designed for students with native or near-native speaking ability in Chinese, but little or no reading and writing ability. It serves as equivalence for ASIANLAN 101-102. Students meet four hours per week with a focus on reading and writing. Coursework will be graded on the basis of daily classroom performance, daily quizzes, periodic tests, and homework assignments. Students must have the permission of the instructor in order to register for this course. Most students will receive this permission via a placement test, which is held on the Friday before fall classes begin. For test information, please refer to http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/chinese/.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ASIANLAN 201 — Second Year Chinese I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Grande,Laura Ann Smith

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 203.

Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

Students electing ASIANLAN 201 should have mastered the language material in Integrated Chinese Level 1. The goals of ASIANLAN 201 are to help students: (a) improve their spoken and aural proficiency; (b) achieve a solid reading level with the roughly 500 new vocabulary entries introduced over ten lessons; and (c) learn to express themselves clearly in writing on a variety of covered topics using learned grammar patterns and vocabulary. These goals are approached through grammar and reading-writing lectures, classroom drills, listening and speaking activities, and written quizzes and tests. An underlying theme of the course is that, insofar as language is a systematic reflection of culture, understanding the link between language and culture can make the language easier — and more fascinating — to learn. The text for the course is Integrated Chinese Level II (Cheng & Tsui Co., 1997).

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 102 or 103

Advisory Prerequisite: Native or near-native speakers of Chinese are not eligible for this course.

ASIANLAN 205 — Mandarin Pronunciation
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Theme

This course, designed as a supplement to core Chinese courses and offered both Fall and Winter terms, gives students at varying proficiency levels the opportunity to fine-tune their production of standard Chinese consonants, vowels, and tones. By learning principles of Mandarin syllable structure and articulation, students will learn how to recognize and correct their own pronunciation/tone errors. Rigorous in-class drills and regular mini-quizzes, as well as several oral assignments (recordings submitted on-line), will build students' competence from word- to phrase- to discourse-level accuracy. A semester-initial assessment will identify each student's needs (so that the course can be customized accordingly) while a semester-final evaluation will assess each student's progress. Knowledge of Pinyin Romanization is presumed.

Note: This is strictly a pronunciation course; students aiming to improve their overall proficiency should consider core courses or, to strengthen conversational fluency, ASIANLAN 305 and ASIANLAN 306. Native speakers of Cantonese with advanced literacy should opt for ASIANLAN 307 (which targets pronunciation problems unique to Cantonese speakers and presumes no knowledge of Pinyin) or ASIANLAN 308 (which focuses on Mandarin conversational fluency).

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 101

ASIANLAN 301 — Third Year Chinese I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Liu,Wei

FA 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Theme

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASIANLAN 303 or 304.

This course, designed for students who have completed two years of Chinese study, is the start of a transition from narrative style to written style. It continues with a balanced requirement in all the four basic skills — listening, speaking, reading and writing. The class meets five hours per week. The textbook, A New Chinese Course Book II, covers 12 aspects of contemporary Chinese society and culture, and enhances cultural awareness in terms of language training. Student work is evaluated on the basis of daily attendance, exercises, homework, oral and writing tests, and term project. The class is conducted mainly in Chinese. Native or near-native speakers of Chinese who want to improve their reading and writing skills should take ASIANLAN 304, Reading and Writing Chinese III.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 202 or 203

ASIANLAN 304 — Reading and Writing Chinese III
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Liu,Wei

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course is designed for students of Chinese with native or near-native oral performance. The emphasis of training is in reading and writing although oral activities remain part of the course requirement. The textbook, China Scene: An Advanced Chinese Multimedia Course, carries authentic articles reflecting various aspects of life in contemporary China. Students will be exposed to advanced-level language structures, expressive styles, and cultural knowledge relevant to selected topics. It is expected that, assisted by web searches for up-to-date information as well as classroom discussions, students will build their vocabulary and sentence patterns from each lesson, and learn to recognize and use a variety of linguistic registers in both their oral and writing practice. For many of the students who have completed ASIANLAN 104 and 204, a more appropriate course will be ASIANLAN 301.

Advisory Pre-requisite: Permission of Instructor

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 204

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 204. Conducted solely in Chinese.

ASIANLAN 305 — Advanced Spoken Chinese I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gu,Karen

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Theme

This course, designed as a spoken supplement to post-second-year Chinese core courses, is intended to help non-native-speaking students strengthen their oral/aural competence. Students will have two hours a week to talk, talk, and talk. Class sessions are structured around semi-weekly themes, with one day devoted to theme introduction/discussion, and two days devoted to student presentations and question/answer exchanges. Evaluation is based on oral assignments (recordings submitted online), presentations, and in-class participation. Native or near-native speakers of Mandarin cannot earn credit for this course.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 202 or 203

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 202 or 203

ASIANLAN 401 — Fourth Year Chinese I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Chen,Qinghai

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course, the first part of the fourth-year Chinese language core course, is intended to help students with three years of Chinese studies to further develop their language ability in modern Chinese. All aspects of the language — listening, speaking, reading and writing — are emphasized by way of carefully selected texts and meticulously developed exercises in the textbook Advanced Chinese: Intention, Strategy, and Communication. Through various forms of language practice, students are expected not only to read original materials with less reliance on a dictionary and at a faster speed, but also to improve their productive skills, oral and written, at the discourse and rhetorical levels. Another objective of the course is to enhance students' cultural awareness. Classes are conducted in Chinese. Assessment will be based on attendance, participation, homework, tests, and exams. Native speaking Chinese students interested in improving their comprehensive foundation in the language can also benefit from this course. Non-native speaking students in this course are encouraged (but not required) to take ASIANLAN 305, Advanced Spoken Chinese I, simultaneously.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 302, 303, or 304

ASIANLAN 404 — Reading and Writing Chinese IV
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

This course is designed for native-speaking Chinese students who have acquired a relatively high level of language competence (typically through years of regular education in a Chinese speaking country or area) and want to further improve their abilities in modern Chinese. It may also be taken as the continuation of ASIANLAN 304, Reading and Writing Chinese III. Requirements include both accuracy and speed in reading and writing in a variety of subjects and genres as well as an individually designed term project. Emphasis is placed on actual language use rather than linguistic knowledge. Instruction and discussion are conducted in Chinese. Assessment is based on attendance, participation, and quality of work. Non-native speaking students with exceptional comprehensive Chinese proficiency may also be accepted into this course.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 304

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIAN,ASIANLAN 304 or equivalent

ASIANLAN 405 — Chinese for Professions I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Mao,Fengjun

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The course focuses on language study with regard to China's fast-changing economic situation and business environment. Through intensive practice in listening, speaking, reading and writing in business contexts, students will not only acquire vocabulary, phrases and sentence patterns commonly used in contemporary Chinese business communications, but also become familiar with China's current business practices and trends. Materials cover 25 topics in seven units, namely, open door policy, development of finance, marketing, management, foreign trade, pillar industries, and hot topics. Activities and assignments around these topics are designed to facilitate actual language use in the real business world as well as further studies for this special purpose. Classes are conducted in Chinese. This course is intended to form a series with ASIANLAN 406, Chinese for the Professions II, which is task-based and computer-oriented with an emphasis on "learning by doing," usually offered in the winter academic term.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 302, 303, or 304

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 302, 303, or 304 or equivalent

ASIANLAN 409 — Literary Chinese I
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme

For more than three thousand years, down to the early 20th century, the vast majority of Chinese texts were written in Literary Chinese (wenyan). For a considerable period of history, Literary Chinese also served as the international written language for the countries of East Asia. Wenyan literature is an important part of the cultural heritage of all humankind.

Although after the May Fourth Movement (Wu-si yundong) of the early twentieth century, baihua or colloquial-style language replaced wenyan as the literary norm, wenyan expressions and constructions are still frequently encountered in written and even spoken Chinese, and it is difficult to go far beyond the basic level in modern Chinese without some knowledge of wenyan. The purpose of the course sequence 'Literary Chinese I — II' (ASIANLAN 409-410) is to help students gain access to this heritage.

In Literary Chinese I, our goal is to build a foundation in the grammatical structures, basic vocabulary, and rhetorical patterns of Literary Chinese, all of which are significantly different from those of modern Chinese. Completion of second-year Chinese (ASIANLAN 202 or 203) or the equivalent is a prerequisite for the course. Both English and Chinese may be used in class, and the use of Chinese is encouraged; generally, oral translations may be done into either English or modern Chinese. Some written assignments will require Chinese-English translation, however.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIANLAN 202 or 203

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 202 or 203

CCS 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HISTART 386 — Painting and Poetry in China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

Many Chinese paintings can be "read" as visual poetry. Every image resonates with centuries of poetic writing, where each poem addresses human issues of interest to most of us even today: poverty, childhood, the loss of loved ones, individual against the establishment, family fights, unrequited love, injustice......Each of these topics was addressed in both the painting and the poetry of China. Helping students to appreciate the human drama underlying such paintings and poems is one goal of this course. As a pedagogical aid, we will read a fair amount of modern American poetry, especially by authors who refer to or admire the Chinese tradition, including Wendell Berry, Hayden Carruth and Gary Snyder. At another level, the relationship of pictures to texts is a more general art historical problem that has occupied some of the finest minds in both Europe and China. The problem continues to generate new and insightful writings by contemporary students of these cultural traditions, and so we will sample some Chinese critical literature on painting and poetry as well more contemporary approaches to word/image issues. By the end of the course students should have a store of analytical methods for relating pictures and texts generally, but will also understand a good deal about how to read a Chinese painting. There will be a midterm, a final, and a short paper (roughly 7 pages). There is no prerequisite. No cost for materials. III. 3

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing and a course in archaeology.

HISTART 694 — Special Studies in the Art of China
Section 001, SEM
Imitation, Reference, and Citation in Chinese Painting

Instructor: Powers,Martin J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 3
Other: Theme

The subject of this course is the impact of historical consciousness on the production and interpretation of painting. The class is not principally about the imitation of exemplary styles (as in Classicism), although we will devote some time to that. The thrust of our reading will deal with the self-conscious use of art historical citation, especially in matters of style. Those of us involved in the seminar will share a common project with two goals: (1) to distinguish and identify fundamentally different kinds of art historical citation; (2) to develop a non-parochial vocabulary for discussing art historical citation across different historiographical traditions. Your papers will serve as case studies examining specific kinds of citation, while we will work in class to find a vocabulary adequate to the task. Your paper may employ materials from China, Japan, or early modern and modern Europe, but your final paper will need to incorporate comparative material from the Chinese tradition, seeing as most of our reading will deal with that tradition. By the end of the course we should have a working "taxonomy" of rhetorically distinct uses of citation in art. We should also be able to detach historical issues concerning citation from the particular cultural substrates in which they may appear. Each student will be responsible for a brief presentation (comments) on one of the assigned readings, but each student will read all the readings for the week. Apart from participation in class, students will deliver a brief research report in the fifth week, followed by a more formal presentation in the 12th or 13th week. That paper will be discussed in class, and after revision will constitute the final paper. No cost for materials.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

HISTORY 204 — East Asia: Early Transformations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

Survey of the history of China, Korea, and Japan, from mythical times to 1600. The course emphasizes the historical interactions and transformations that have made East Asia a coherent cultural region: exchanges of objects and ideas, technology and writing, monks and merchants, artists and scholars.

HISTORY 252 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

HISTORY 339 — Science in Premodern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brown,Miranda D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme

This course is intended as an introduction to the basic problems and issues in Chinese medicine, astronomy, chemistry, and mathematics before the 14th century. In addition to examining the content of what many scholars construe as Chinese science and natural philosophy, this course will examine two themes at length. The first is how one should define science. Is science, as older scholars assumed, a timeless, cross-cultural phenomenon that emerged exclusively in 17th and 18th-century Europe? Or is science socially and culturally contingent? Is there, in other words, more than one effective way to represent and predict natural phenomenon? The second theme involves the "Needham thesis," which argues that China, despite early advances in natural philosophy and proto-science, failed to develop "modern science" because of the adoption of Confucianism as state orthodoxy in the early 14th century. In addition to reading the monumental works of Joseph Needham (1900-1995) and others, students will be asked to evaluate the Needham thesis by examining the primary sources Needham et al. drew upon to make their arguments. Readings will focus equally on primary and secondary sources in English. In addition to weekly "response" paragraphs, students will give oral presentations and write two 6 to 8-page papers critically treating the secondary literature by examining the primary sources from which scholars have drawn conclusions about some aspect of Chinese science and natural philosophy. No knowledge of Chinese language or China is required, and the course is open to all.

HISTORY 354 — Rebellion and Revolution in China Through Two Centuries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course will explore rebellions and revolutions in China, from the White Lotus rebellion in the late 18th century through social protests during the last decades of the 20th century. Although the subject matter will be arranged chronologically, different time periods will be used to highlight different themese in the Chinese "revolutionary tradition." The course will draw on selected readings from secondary sources, as well as fiction and translated primary sources. The course should enable students to identify and explain the significance and relevance of major figures, terms, events and institutions in Chinese political and social history from 1790 to 2000 by using supporting evidence from course readings. Students will acquire a nuanced and critical understanding of how the transformation in China in the 19th and 20th centuries has been characterized by both continuity and rupture.

Intended audience: Sophomore and upperclass students with little or no prior knowledge of China.

Course Requirements: No prior knowledge of China or Chinese is required. Grades based on class participation (10%), one short paper (30%), one midterm exam (20%), and one final exam (40%). Paper topics should be chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Class Format: 3 hours each week in lecture format.

Advisory Prerequisite: At least one course in HISTORY or Asian Studies

HISTORY 392 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in Asian and African History on an experimental, one-time basis.

HISTORY 472 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC
Treaty Ports and Semi-Colonialism in East Asia

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Following China's defeat in the Opium war 1939-42, the Sino-British treaty of Nanjing opened five coastal cities for foreign trade and foreign residents. These "treaty ports," as they were called at the time, grew dramatically in number and a number of treaty ports were also opened in Japan and Korea. While the treaty ports were only a relatively brief episode in Japanese and Korean history, the Chinese treaty ports would remain China's primary contact zone with the West for a century.

The treaty ports have left a complex and contentious legacy in China. On one hand, the treaty ports in many ways defined the urban experience and most of the ports developed into islands of prosperity which stood in sharp contrast to China's vast hinterland. On the other hand, the treaty ports were bastions of foreign privilege and influence and many of the open ports gave birth to China's first nationalist movements.

This course will explore the treaty ports by reading both "classical" and more recent scholarship as well as selected primary sources in English. While the primary focus will be on China, Japanese and Korean treaty ports will also be discussed where applicable. The course will be both thematically and chronologically organized, and it will cover the years 1790-1950.

Grades will be based on participation, on short paper, a midterm and a final exam.

HISTORY 549 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

HISTORY 592 — Topics in Asian History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in Asian History.

HISTORY 698 — Topics in History
Section 005, REC
Pre-Modern China

Instructor: de Pee,Christian

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Survey of current scholarship on Middle-Period China (eighth through fourteenth centuries), with prominent articles and monographs on topics such as economy, politics, local elites, gender and the family, religion, philosophy, and art.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

HMP 677 — Health Care Organization: An International Perspective
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Liang,Jersey

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

The American pursuit in making its health care system more equitable, effective, and efficient has largely been based on domestic health services research and policy analysis. Although the health care system in each nation is somewhat unique to its culture and history, the issues each faces tare remarkably similar. Nations can learn a lot from one another in meeting these challenges. This course examines health care systems in approximately eight developed and developing nations (e.g., United States, Germany, Japan, Canada, United Kingdom, China, Mexico, and Kenya). In particular, comparisons will be made across these nations in the following areas:

  1. population health,
  2. health care financing and control,
  3. health professionals and their patients,
  4. health care organization, and
  5. health system performance and reform strategies.

Understanding how health care is delivered around the world will lead to a better appreciation of the relative merits and limitations of various systems, and will yield many useful insights in management and policy decision making. At the completion of this course, students will be expected to:

  1. Describe the global burden of disease and health disparities,
  2. Understand how health care is organized and financed in selected developed nations,
  3. Learn the strengths and weaknesses of these systems,
  4. Know the recent health care reforms enacted in these countries and their results, and
  5. Apply the knowledge of international systems to the analysis of current issues in health policy and management.

The course will be taught by a combination of lectures, in-class exercises, roundtable discussion, and site visits. Effective interventions in health care and related management and policy issues will be emphasized.

Advisory Prerequisite: HMP or Global Health IC

POLSCI 339 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

POLSCI 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POLSCI 656 — Proseminar in Chinese Government and Politics
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar serves as the introductory course to the study of modern Chinese politics for graduate students in political science. It assumes at least one undergraduate level course on Chinese politics or a related discipline (history, sociology, etc). The course has two basic goals. The first is to introduce students to the major themes, debates, and puzzles in the study of Chinese politics. The second is to allow students to grow familiar with some of the methodological challenges of studying politics in China (through evaluation and critique of the text) and then to develop a research proposal of their own that sets out a research question and a research plan for answering that question. The course is designed around engaged and lively debate on the issues; therefore, student participation is absolutely necessary. Each student will have an opportunity to lead the discussion during the academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

PSYCH 457 — Current Topics in Developmental Psychology
Section 002, SEM
Psychological Perspectives on Chinese Language and Thought

Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar will introduce students to cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons that have been made about Chinese and Chinese people in the Western psychological literature. It will include brief discussions of Chinese languages and cultures and how they differ from English and other Asian and European languages and cultures. It will then proceed to examine hypotheses about the psychological implications and effects of these cross-linguistic and cross-cultural comparisons. Topics will include spoken language acquisition, literacy and learning to read and write, how language use shapes everyday perceptions, concepts of "learning" and the model minority, dating and relationships, and the ways in which emotions are discussed and interpreted in everyday life. Students are expected to participate actively in the seminar and have some background in at least one of Chinese language, Chinese cultural studies, linguistics, philosophy of mind, or contemporary psychological methods and research.Weekly discussions and reaction papers on the readings and issues, a formal presentation of at least one issue, and a final integrative project which will be integrated into the course website will be required.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250.

PUBPOL 751 — Special Topics
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Theme

This part of the course introduces students to continuity and change in China's foreign policy, focusing on the reform era. We begin with theoretical and analytical debates about making sense of contemporary Chinese foreign policy, move on to scrutinizing domestic-international linkages in China's relations with the rest of the world, and end with review of outstanding issues in China's foreign policy choices in the Asia Pacific, Central and Southeast Asia.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

PUBPOL 751 — Special Topics
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1.5
Other: Theme

China's reform and opening-up has been a great event in the world in the past more than two decades. Since 1978, China has experienced a profound and overall economic reform and the economy has transformed from the Soviet style planned economic system to the socialist market economic system. Along with the reform and opening-up, China has produced the world's highest economic growth rates in the past 25 years. This course will explain the progress of the reform and the growth of economy of China and help students understand the policies of development and reform of China's economy. The course will also make an in-depth analysis on China's current economic policies as well as the implications of these policies for the economy of U.S. and world.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 362 — Writer and Society in Modern China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

The rise of China has impacted contemporary world politics and economy in significant ways. How did it all happen? What can we learn from it? This course introduces a special angle of interpretation suggested by Chinese writers and intellectuals themselves. We will examine the role and self-conception of the writer in relation to the changing historical context of modern China, through the study of influential works of narrative fiction, performing arts and film, criticism, and literary theory (all in English translation). We will be focusing on the relationship between arts and politics, the intellectual and the people, and the artistic, the sexual, and the political aspects of Modern Chinese intellectual life. Our goal is to develop critical reading skills and to gain a deep knowledge of modern Chinese identity formation so as to better understand our own position in the contemporary world.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese is required.

RELIGION 323 — Zen: History, Culture, and Critique
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Robson,James

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: Theme, WorldLit

This course provides an introduction to the religious history, philosophy and practices of Zen Buddhism. Zen is the Japanese pronunciation of the Chinese word Chan, which is itself a transcription of the Sanskrit word dhyâna, meaning meditation. While meditation is no doubt the backbone of the Zen tradition, this course will highlight the fact that Zen has a number of different faces, including a radical antinomian side that challenged the role of meditation (and all forms of mediation). This course will examine the rich diversity of the Zen tradition as it developed in China, Korea, and Japan, with the first part providing an overview of the historical development of Zen and situating it within the Buddhist tradition that it emerged out of. The second part of the course will challenge and critically evaluate much of what is presented in the first half by exploring some less well known facets of Zen practice that on first glance appear to run counter to what the Zen tradition says about itself. We will explore the role of language in Zen from the enigmatic and abstruse use of koans to questions about why a tradition which took pride in "not being dependent on words" nonetheless produced a voluminous textual record. We will study both the crazy antics of inspired Zen monks and the structured life of Zen monastics and their rituals. Consideration will also be given to why a seemingly iconoclastic tradition like Zen also has a long tradition of venerating its masters, including some that were mummified. Why, we will ask, was Zen appealing to the Japanese warrior class and what has been its role in modern nationalistic movements in Japan? This course is designed to be as much an ongoing critical reflection on the history of the study of Zen as it is about Zen history.

SOC 426 — China's Evolution Under Communism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Theme, WorldLit

An analysis of China's remarkable evolution to develop an understanding of the present system's capacity to deal with the major challenges that confront it in the political, economic, social, environmental, and security arenas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

SOC 428 — Contemporary China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lee,Ching Kwan

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

An introduction to the social institutions of Communist China, their origins, and the nature of social change in China since 1949.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 100, 195, or 300.

SOC 527 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,James
Instructor: Tardif,Twila Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

SOC 528 — Selected Topics in the Analysis of Chinese Society
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lee,Ching Kwan

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

A seminar on selected aspects of social change in China in the modern period. Research papers will involve attempts to utilize sociological theories or organizations and social change in analyzing change in China prior to and after 1949.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 428 or permission of instructor and Graduate standing.

 
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