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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = UC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 82 of 82
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
UC 102 — The Student in the University
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Woods,Wendy Ann

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Provides students with the opportunity to critically review their role in the university. It allows students to consider the expectations of their experience at the university within a framework of theoretical perspectives. It is hoped that students will develop a broad understanding of what their university experience can include and how they can shape it to realize their academic potential and intellectual development. The course focus is on the transition from high school to college, role of liberal arts, critical thinking, intergroup relations, and social change.

Advisory Prerequisite: Michigan Community Scholars Program participant.

UC 104 — Introduction to Research
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Research is the search for new knowledge, and there are numerous methods researchers use to seek new knowledge and/or find solutions to pressing societal, medical, or other problems. Research methods can range from direct observations to intricate laboratory experiments manipulating a set of variables. This course will provide you with an introduction to the primary research methods used in different fields. The major methods we will cover are: (1) field or observational research; (2) survey research; (3) experimental design; (4) clinical research; (5) participatory action research; and (6) archival research. Throughout the academic term, we will bring in faculty researchers who employ different types of research methods and engage you in activities to learn about these various research methods. In addition, we will visit research sites on and off campus. By the end of the term, you should have a good understanding of a wide array of research methods and the strengths and weaknesses of these methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: Participant in UROP-in-Residence Program.

UC 105 — Perspectives on Health and Health Care
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: O'Grady,Michelle H

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ID

Perspectives on Health and Health Care is the required core course for members of the Health Sciences Scholars Program. UC 105 and 106 together provide a contextual examination of professional roles and disciplines within health science and care, the science informing those roles, and the issues challenging professionals. These issues include the balance of "nature and nurture," health and the environment, technology and ethics, the allocation of resources, the relationship between personal autonomy and health, and the nature of human relationships within the system of health care. Practitioners from many disciplines within the health sciences will present case studies illustrating these themes. This content provides a foundation for professional involvement in health care and science by encouraging an informed consideration of the complexity of health, developing challenges, and the spectrum of health professions.

Students will examine the major themes of the course by exploring the following questions: What are the relative contributions to human health and illness from genetics, behavior, and the environment? Should scientists develop, and practitioners utilize, technologic innovations knowing that this research and the use of the technologies will engender ethical dilemmas? At what point does our desire to provide the best possible health care to all persons conflict with the limits of our resources and other needs of society? What are the rights and responsibilities of individuals with regard to maintaining their own health, and how might these clash with the corresponding rights and responsibilities of health care providers and society? How do the norms and values of different health disciplines relate to the need to provide coordinated, collegial, evidence-based health care? How do these issues play out in students' consideration of their future professional lives?

Advisory Prerequisite: Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program.

UC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

UC 122 — Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gurin,Patricia Y

FA 2007
Credits: 2

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

UC 150 — First-Year Humanities Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Music in Our Lives

Instructor: Nagel,Louis B

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course, students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, and harmony. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Human Sexuality, Gender Issues

Instructor: Mayes,Frances L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectives including historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual throughout their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality.

Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including:

  • choice of sexual partners and behaviors
  • the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making
  • sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and
  • the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias.

The course requires access to the Internet and uses a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a semester project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Medicine&the Media

Instructor: Hobbs,Raymond

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

We study the development of medicine as a science and how the perception of it has been changed through the media. Students explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The House of God, The Intern Blues, The Double Helix and movies and television series such as the Story of Louis Pasteur, The Hospital, Medic, Ben Casey, Marcus Welby, M.D., ER, and Saint Elsewhere, as well as more recent offerings such as John Q, House, and Grey's Anatomy. Much of the course focuses on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Schools, Community, Power

Instructor: Galura,Joseph A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This is a service-learning course that integrates traditional coursework with personal reflection and community involvement. The goal of the course is to explore the dynamics of formal and informal education in urban settings. This course will help university students to understand the effects of social history and culture on the social identity of young children and how community members, especially elders, help to create and support positive roles for young children within this community. Students work closely with members of the community and program staff to document cultural beliefs and practices that help to shape social identity and social expectations within the community.

As a requirement for the course, students complete five hours of service each week in the Detroit public school system to develop practical service-learning models. Assisting educators in implementing these developed programs will give students the opportunity to put into practice the theory of service-learning.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Science and Practice of Dentistry

Instructor: Taichman,Russell S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

Students will examine the development of dentistry from its origins to its present status as a scientifically-driven health care discipline. Students will evaluate critically how science has influenced the development of dentistry as a discipline for the past century and explore how emerging scientific disciplines are likely to change the practice of dentistry in the next millennium.

Please attend every session if possible. If you are unable to attend a class, please email me beforehand. This is not a lecture course with a final written exam. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, ask questions, and offer opinions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 151 — First-Year Social Science Seminar
Section 008, SEM
Becoming a Doctor: More Than Science

Instructor: Rosenthal,Marilynn M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

There will be two texts, group projects in the form of "Journal Clubs," and an individual book review in both written and oral form. Journal Clubs are an important part of the continuing education of medical professionals. Journal clubs meet regularly to discuss current studies on subjects of mutual interest. The class will divide into JCs to explore various aspects of medical school. This project would accomplish several goals: help you build your group participation skills, develop web skills and increase your practical, current knowledge of medical schools. In addition, this project will introduce you to a wide range of information sources. The Clubs can decide specific topics, such as: how medical schools differ; the admissions process; trends in medical education; what undergraduate majors are possible; patterns in specialty choice; getting a residency; and staying balanced in medical school. Each Journal Club will make a group presentation to the seminar. Each student will choose an individual book that is an autobiography of a medical student or a physician. (Other kinds of book are possible.) The student will make a presentation to the seminar, discussing the themes of the book and what insights it provides, as well as submit a review of the book covering these topics.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 154 — First-Year Interdisciplinary Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Burdi,Alphonse R

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID
Other: FYSem

Indeed this is the age of scientific discovery! With each passing day, knowledge in the life sciences is increasing exponentially in many areas, including stem cell biology, patterns of birth defects, and the phenomena of aging, dying and death. This new information, while important to human health, surfaces the complex and intertwining issues of ethics and values that will be of special consideration in this seminar. Each of the daily learning modules and projects in this seminar is designed to expand our current thinking about the intersect between world of scientific discovery and its impact on human health and society.

Biological Perspectives. The plan of the human body can serve as a keystone as we probe the interplay of genes, cells, morphogenesis, and the environment in which we live. A myriad of biological advances could be considered, but three exciting topics especially jump out:

  1. Birth defects and population patterns
  2. Phenomena of aging, dying, and death
  3. Immensely provocative "stem cells"

This last topic alone opens up a world of biological concepts and principles that can influence our understanding of how the human body — your human body — is shaped prior to birth and throughout life. Thus, "life inside the box."

Ethical and Societal Perspectives. However stimulating "life inside the box" may be, that is not the whole story! In the excitement of so many dramatic scientific advances over the last ten years, efforts to understand the ethical implications have not kept pace. It is vital that researchers and clinicians be aware of and sensitive to the legal, cultural, and societal issues spawned by their work. What principles and policies should be in place to guide further research and application of such discoveries? Answering this question focuses our attention on those environmental events occurring outside biology laboratories and outside our own human bodies, i.e., "life outside the box."

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

UC 163 — Biotechnology and Human Values
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Schmedlen,Rachael Hope
Instructor: Adam,Miriam E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: LifeSci

Biotechnology combines the engineering principles of analysis, design, and optimization with the tools of cellular and molecular biology. It impacts nearly every aspect of our daily lives, from the food we eat to the medicine we take. The primary purpose of this course is to teach a basic vocabulary in biotechnology and expose students to the breadth of biotechnology and its impact on our daily lives. Topics will cover a broad range of applications in genetics, molecular diagnostics, molecular imaging, and clinical devices. A key additional component will be to investigate human values issues, such as ethical questions and cost effectiveness, arising from these technologies. Teamwork in the lab and through an independent project is emphasized. Report writing and presentations are required throughout the term, culminating with a final report and public presentation.

Welcome! This course brings together students in the life sciences and engineering to explore basic issues facing biotechnologists. In addition to introducing basic sciences, this course will explore some of the dominant trends in biotechnology, not only in terms of their scientific and technological impact, but also in terms of their implications for human values. Our objective is to provide you with the real life challenge of designing a solution for a client and allow you to experience the complex dynamics that govern the design process in the interdisciplinary field of Biotechnology.

The Lab
Unique to this course are two hands-on labs: DNA analysis and molecular imaging. These labs will allow you to assess the efficacy and feasibility of existing technologies, as well as explore their suitability for a spectrum of social, political, and economic realities.

The Project
As another unique opportunity of this course, you will conduct an investigative study for a real client, the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Your project will consist of designing a test capable of detecting hereditary disease before the onset of symptoms. You will be assigned to a project team, which, in turn, will be assigned to a client physician. Your team will collaborate with the physician to determine how the prognosis of a target disease could benefit from genetic testing. This will require research into the genetics of the target disease, the disease process, treatments, and evaluation of the potential impact of early detection for the individual patient, health care management, and society at large. Given the needs of the patient and physicians, you will draw on your research and lab experiences to determine the most useful and appropriate methods for pre-symptom testing. This will require a quantitative, as well as qualitative, evaluation of your proposed technology and its effect on disease outcome, health care delivery, and patient quality of life.

Course Organization and Resources
This course is conducted by a multi-disciplinary team of instructors led by Professor Matthew O'Donnell. Your time in the classroom will be divided into biweekly lectures, a weekly lab and a weekly discussion section. In addition, each team will meet periodically with instructors in scheduled workshops held during evening hours. Deliverables will consist of technical assignments, lab reports, oral presentations, and a final formal oral presentation and report for our clients and other interested parties.

In this course, we rely heavily on independent study, instructor-student interaction, and on-line resources. Topics addressed include microbiology, gene sequencing and expression, testing technology, statistics, ethics, legal issues, team management, technical communications, problem-solving strategies, and the design process. We conduct on-line discussions and provide a wealth of resources via our course website.

This course is highly challenging and demanding, and our expectations are high. However, students who take the challenge seriously have the opportunity to experience that sense of achievement that comes from meeting and even exceeding their own expectations. For students interested in pursuing a degree in cellular and molecular biology, biotechnology, or biomedical engineering, this course is a must. Join us. We look forward to another high-powered semester.

Advisory Prerequisite: First-year students only.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 001, LEC
Research Methods in the Digital Library — Natural Sciences

Instructor: Yocum,Patricia Bury

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit, hands-on course will help students lay a solid foundation for success in all current and future academic research. With an emphasis on the wealth of digital resources now available, the material focuses on information discovery and management skills, expands knowledge of scholarly sources, and promotes critical thinking. Specific topics include resource availability, source selection, search strategies, content evaluation, referencing, and academic integrity. Taught by University librarians, the interactive learning format allows students to learn via database searches, group discussion, and case studies. Students will work both on their own and collaboratively on reports, reading assignments, and projects.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 002, LEC
Research Methods in the Digital Library — Social Sciences

Instructor: Peters,Amanda R

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit, hands-on course will help students lay a solid foundation for success in all current and future academic research. With an emphasis on the wealth of digital resources now available, the material focuses on information discovery and management skills, expands knowledge of scholarly sources, and promotes critical thinking. Specific topics include resource availability, source selection, search strategies, content evaluation, referencing, and academic integrity. Taught by University librarians, the interactive learning format allows students to learn via database searches, group discussion, and case studies. Students will work both on their own and collaboratively on reports, reading assignments, and projects.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 003, LEC
Research Methods in the Digital Library — Humanities

Instructor: Gaither,Renoir Whitney

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit, hands-on course will help students lay a solid foundation for success in all current and future academic research. With an emphasis on the wealth of digital resources now available, the material focuses on information discovery and management skills, expands knowledge of scholarly sources, and promotes critical thinking. Specific topics include resource availability, source selection, search strategies, content evaluation, referencing, and academic integrity. Taught by University librarians, the interactive learning format allows students to learn via database searches, group discussion, and case studies. Students will work both on their own and collaboratively on reports, reading assignments, and projects.

UC 170 — UC Topics MiniCourse
Section 004, LEC
World, Community, and Self: Building Skills and Knowledge for Intercultural Competence

Instructor: Bessette,Jeanine

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This introductory course is designed to encourage students in exploring issues of social justice and social identity within the context of engaged citizenship. In a participatory, educational manner, second-year students will examine themselves and others as they continue to navigate the University of Michigan campus and the rich diversity offered here. They will learn skills such as how to communicate with others, how to manage and engage in healthy conflict, how to explore values and opinions different than their own, and how to look beyond the United States for learning opportunities. Being in community and being an engaged citizen is not a given in our society. Through this class, students will gain more understanding of the richness of issues such as race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, and religion, as well as a better appreciation of the power and privilege in our society. Students are looking for opportunities to discuss and learn with people from diverse backgrounds — this course will give them the chance to do that.

Minicourse meets 1-5:30 pm on the following Fridays: September 28 and October 5, 19 and 26.

Course Outcomes and Goals:

  • Provide a safe, inclusive space for students to explore their own thinking, histories, and beliefs around the concepts of social identity and social justice.
  • Give students an opportunity to explore their role as citizens in a global context through personal reflection, experiential learning, and selected pedagogy.
  • Introduce identity development models as a way for students to understand their own social development and that of other individuals.
  • Encourage students to have honest conversations with others about the impact of social identities in individual, institutional, and structural systems.
  • Consider how power, privilege, and oppression have an effect on how individuals are viewed in society.
  • Explore values and beliefs in countries other than the United States and to understand the differences and similarities in the context of social justice.

Course Requirements:

  1. Full attendance at course meetings.
  2. A project to be completed outside of class that allows students to explore one of the following issues: social justice and public policy, social justice and the global impact, or another related topic determined by the student relating. The end result will be a paper of no less than 10 pages or a creative representation of the experience.
  3. Reading assignments.

UC 200 — The Academic Paradox
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Neuman, W Russell

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID

Have you given a lot of thought to why you are spending four years of your life and approximately $200,000 (of somebody's money) to get a piece of paper certifying a degree from the University of Michigan? Maybe you've given it some thought, but probably not a lot. Your folks and your peers in high school expected that you would go to college, so you did. That's usually about it.

Are you utilizing this investment wisely while you're in Ann Arbor? Are you taking the right courses? Since you're not sure what you want to do, or why exactly you're here, how could you know? The good news is that there are some useful and thought-provoking answers to such questions, many of them hidden in the nooks and crannies of liberal arts curriculum itself.

In this course students are challenged to apply the insights they have been learning from their study of history, sociology, psychology, economics and the humanities to their own current role as college student. A central theme concerns how the student role relates to succeeding roles in the institutional complex of modern society. One principal paradox that motivates this course of inquiry is the celebrated disjuncture between the abstract study of literature, sciences, and the arts and the "practical knowledge base" that one would expect draw upon most professional careers. In common parlance the word "merely academic" translates as "mostly irrelevant." But as it turns out, empirically and practically, a liberal arts education represents an excellent preparation for most professional careers t a paradox that invites the student to internalize and make use of some of the central concepts from the liberal arts as valuable resources rather than arcane requirements and rites of passage.

[Please note: this course does not count toward concentration requirements for either American Culture or Communication Studies.]

Key Topical Areas:

  • Cultures: On the Tension Between the Humanities and Sciences
  • Education and Ethics: Is There a Linkage Between the Two?
  • The Evolution of the Modern University
  • The Evolution of the Modern Scholarly Discipline
  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
  • The Meaning of Globalization
  • On Writing Well
  • Grading and Achievement
  • Students and Society
  • Those Who March Grimly on the Career Treadmill
  • Human Capital Theory
  • The Effects of Education
  • The Reproduction of Social Inequalities
  • The Psychology

Course Requirements:

There are no examinations in this class. There are seven writing assignments with an assignment due approximately every two weeks. Four assignments are two-page briefs that summarize and interpret central themes in recent lectures and readings. In addition, two assignments consist of essays that require students to apply what they have learned to their own academic, career and life plans. The first essay is approximately eight pages in length, the second approximately twelve pages. Finally one assignment is a "lives-and-careers" book review of approximately eight pages. Students select a relevant biography of a leader in the fields of Law, Medicine, Business, Academics, Public Service/Government/Non Profits, the Arts, Media and Journalism, and Science and Engineering.

The idea is to link lessons from a concrete example of a life story with the themes of the course concerning education, careers, and the life cycle.

Required texts:

  • Wilson, Edward O. (1998). Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge. New York, Knopf. Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition $10.20
  • Machiavelli, Niccolò ([1513] 1989). The Prince. New York, Prometheus Bantam $4.50
  • Kuhn, Thomas S. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. (1962) University of Chicago Press $9.75 3rd edition
  • Csíkszentmihályi, Mihály (1991). Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience. New York, Harper Collins. $10.50

CP= Course Pack (Available at Excel 1117 S. University Avenue; Tel: 996-1500)


UC 201 — U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Goebel,Douglas J

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This course traces the development of aviation from the 18th century — a time of balloons and dirigibles — to the present, and examines how technology has affected the growth and development of air power. In addition, this course traces the use and development of air power through World War I and World War II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

Advisory Prerequisite: A S 102/P.I.

UC 201 — U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Goebel,Douglas J

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This course traces the development of aviation from the 18th century — a time of balloons and dirigibles — to the present, and examines how technology has affected the growth and development of air power. In addition, this course traces the use and development of air power through World War I and World War II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

Advisory Prerequisite: A S 102/P.I.

UC 201 — U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power
Section 003, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Examines the development of aviation from the 18th century, from balloons and dirigibles, to the present, and how technology has effected growth and development of air power; traces use and development of air power through WW's I and II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

Advisory Prerequisite: A S 102/P.I.

UC 203 — Innovative Tactical Leadership
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Aziz,Jawhar

FA 2007
Credits: 1

The focus of this course is to develop the students' basic understanding of military leadership. The course focuses on current military leadership theory and its organizational application. It includes discussions of leadership styles, principles of leadership, human behavior, principles of motivation, ethics, counseling, communications and the military problem solving process. It also incorporates leadership assessment training and discussions of how leadership influences the achievement of organizational goals.

UC 203 — Innovative Tactical Leadership
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Aziz,Jawhar

FA 2007
Credits: 1

The focus of this course is to develop the students' basic understanding of military leadership. The course focuses on current military leadership theory and its organizational application. It includes discussions of leadership styles, principles of leadership, human behavior, principles of motivation, ethics, counseling, communications and the military problem solving process. It also incorporates leadership assessment training and discussions of how leadership influences the achievement of organizational goals.

UC 205 — Leadership and Management
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brigger,Clark Victor

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is specifically designed to teach introductory-level leadership and management concepts and applications to sophomore-level university students. The course starts with a basic overview of leadership and management, and then moves into basic skills including professional reading, writing, briefings, problem solving, team building, situational leadership, morality, ethics, and communications. After the basic skills are covered, the curriculum explores leader-subordinate and peer relationships, while taking an in-depth look at professional and unprofessional relationships. The course emphasized ethics in leadership and management and explores subjects in power and influence, counseling, supervision, accountability, responsibility, and core values.

Advisory Prerequisite: 101,102 OR PI

UC 205 — Leadership and Management
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Brigger,Clark Victor

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is specifically designed to teach introductory-level leadership and management concepts and applications to sophomore-level university students. The course starts with a basic overview of leadership and management, and then moves into basic skills including professional reading, writing, briefings, problem solving, team building, situational leadership, morality, ethics, and communications. After the basic skills are covered, the curriculum explores leader-subordinate and peer relationships, while taking an in-depth look at professional and unprofessional relationships. The course emphasized ethics in leadership and management and explores subjects in power and influence, counseling, supervision, accountability, responsibility, and core values.

Advisory Prerequisite: 101,102 OR PI

UC 210 — Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Zorn,Frances B

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course is intended for students considering a career in a health profession and designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. A number of health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 21st century: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs; and the effects on the uninsured (43 million plus people) and the underinsured. We discuss issues related to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films.

A course pack containing the syllabus and W;T (yes, that is spelled correctly) by Margaret Edson are the text materials required. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and writing assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor or a CSP counselor at CSP, G 155 Angell, to receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Rd, Ann Arbor. Dorset Rd. is about a mile from campus; a map will be available at CSP. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term. Students who will have conflicts with the Thursday evening meeting should not enroll in the class, for the work we do on Thursday evenings is essential to the successful completion of the course work and is not available in a text book.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

UC 261 — Brain, Learning, and Memory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Maren,Stephen A; homepage
Instructor: Berke,Joshua Damien

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: LifeSci

This course will survey integrative and cellular aspects of neuroscience with a focus on the neural mechanisms of learning and memory. It will include both a lecture and laboratory component. There are three modules, each to be taught by different faculty. The modules will each integrate knowledge of methodology, basic neuroscience, and the application of these to learning and memory. The modules are clinical neuropathology and neuroimaging, animal models of learning and memory, and synaptic and cellular mechanisms of learning and memory. The intent of each module is to present an integrative picture of the organization and function of learning and memory systems in both simple and complex nervous systems. Specific topics will include nonassociative learning (habituation and sensitization) in invertebrates, associative conditioning of motor and emotional responses in vertebrates, genetics of learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and learning, molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory, quantitative and computation models of synaptic plasticity and learning, cognitive neuroimaging of human learning and memory, and clinical neuropathology of learning and memory in humans. The topics of the course will span many levels of biological organization from behavior to genomic regulation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students.

UC 275 — Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Miller,Andrew T

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Global Intercultural Experience for Undergraduates (GIEU) is an interdisciplinary experiential introduction to intercultural learning that prepares diverse undergraduate students from various colleges for field experience interactions, and then helps students bring these experiences back to campus in socially and academically productive ways. It is a series of concentrated seminars of orientation, debriefing, and symposium.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 006, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 007, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 008, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 009, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 010, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 011, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 012, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 013, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 014, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 015, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 016, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 017, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 018, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 019, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 020, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 021, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 022, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 023, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 024, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 025, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 026, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 027, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 028, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 029, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 030, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 031, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 032, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 033, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 034, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 035, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 036, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 037, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 280 — Undergraduate Research
Section 038, REC

Instructor: Megginson,Robert E
Instructor: Gregerman,Sandra R

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UC 280, 281, ENGR 280, MOVESCI 280, SPTMGMTC 280, and PHYSED 280).

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP-sponsored activities, including bi-monthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: First or second year standing.

UC 301 — Leading Small Organizations I
Section 003, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Series of practical opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments and encouragement, and lead again in situations of increasing complexity. Uses small unit tactics and opportunities to plan and conduct training for lower division students both to develop such skills and as vehicles for practicing leading. Two hours and a required leadership lab, plus required participation in three one-hour sessions for physical fitness. Participation in one weekend exercise is also required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Army OEP chair.

UC 309 — Air Force Leadership and Management
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hackworth,Carolyn Marie

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concepts, principles, and techniques of leadership are presented within the framework of behavioral theories. Emphasis on the leader, group, situation, and their interaction as dynamic factors in an organizational environment. Historical overview of managerial development throughout recorded history with emphasis on the social and physical setting in which the manager operates. The curriculum includes effective communications, decision making, planning, and strategic management.

Advisory Prerequisite: AERO 202/P.I.

UC 309 — Air Force Leadership and Management
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Hackworth,Carolyn Marie

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concepts, principles, and techniques of leadership are presented within the framework of behavioral theories. Emphasis on the leader, group, situation, and their interaction as dynamic factors in an organizational environment. Historical overview of managerial development throughout recorded history with emphasis on the social and physical setting in which the manager operates. The curriculum includes effective communications, decision making, planning, and strategic management.

Advisory Prerequisite: AERO 202/P.I.

UC 309 — Air Force Leadership and Management
Section 003, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concepts, principles, and techniques of leadership are presented within the framework of behavioral theories. Emphasis on the leader, group, situation, and their interaction as dynamic factors in an organizational environment. Historical overview of managerial development throughout recorded history with emphasis on the social and physical setting in which the manager operates. The curriculum includes effective communications, decision making, planning, and strategic management.

Advisory Prerequisite: AERO 202/P.I.

UC 309 — Air Force Leadership and Management
Section 5, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The concepts, principles, and techniques of leadership are presented within the framework of behavioral theories. Emphasis on the leader, group, situation, and their interaction as dynamic factors in an organizational environment. Historical overview of managerial development throughout recorded history with emphasis on the social and physical setting in which the manager operates. The curriculum includes effective communications, decision making, planning, and strategic management.

Advisory Prerequisite: AERO 202/P.I.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 320 — Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Behling,Charles F

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. The topics of this course include social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments; basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural setting. There is a weekend retreat that is required for this course.

There is an application process to be admitted to this course. Please go to www.igr.umich.edu for application materials and for more information.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. At least junior standing and PSYCH 122 or SOC 122.

UC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Maxwell,Kelly E

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

UC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Chesler,Mark

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

UC 321 — Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Pak,Daniel D

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Expr

This practicum follows PSYCH 310 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Go to www.igr.umich.edu/ for more information about the course. Permission of instructor is required for admittance into this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and permission of instructor.

UC 390 — Disciplinary Study in a Second Language
Section 001, REC

FA 2007
Credits: 1

Language Across the Curriculum program — an initiative undertaken by the College to increase the range of opportunities to employ their second-language skills in a variety of disciplinary contexts. A section taught in a second language and counting towards certification in "advanced second-language competence" may be added to any LS&A course. An additional hour meeting in a classroom setting and associated out-of-class work, both involving a language other than English.

Advisory Prerequisite: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor.

UC 401 — Leadership and Management
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Hilton,Robert Lance

FA 2007
Credits: 2

Plan, conduct, and evaluate activities of the ROTC cadet organization. Articulate goals and put plans into action to attain them. Assess organizational cohesion and develop strategies to improve it. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. Learn/apply various Army policies and programs in this effort. Two hours and a required leadership lab, plus required participation in three sessions for physical fitness. Participation in one weekend exercise is also required.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER.PROG.CHM.

UC 410 — Amphibious Warfare
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zelek,Timothy Ryan

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Exploration of the history, development, and techniques of amphibious operations to enable the student to acquire a general background in amphibious operations.

UC 415 — Inside Washington, D.C.
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Howard,Margaret Marie

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Expr

"Inside Washington, D.C." is a one-credit course restricted to participants in the Michigan in Washington (MIW) undergraduate internship program. Students attend eight speeches, discussions, panels, or presentations on the history, politics, society, economics, and culture of Washington, and its role as the nation's capital. Speakers include government officials, leaders of corporations and non-profit organizations, scientists, journalists, museum curators, musicians, and artists.

UC 500 — Biomedical Engineering Seminar
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar features various bioengineering-related speakers.

 
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