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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Reqs = ULWR
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AMCULT 313 — Cuba and its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. A weekly two hour film screening is required Mondays 4-6pm or 6-8pm in 238A WH.

AMCULT 345 — American Politics and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Meisler,Richard A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

We will look closely at social issues in contemporary America and the manner in which they are treated in the political arena. The basic goal is to understand the relationships between politics — the distribution and exercise of power — and the experiences of people living in our society.

A central goal of this course is for students to improve their writing. We will take considerable time, both in and out of class, to work to achieve this goal. Written work is expected to be excellent in both form and content. Grammar, style, structure, spelling, and proofreading are important.

The methods of teaching and learning in this course will include discussions, lectures, short and long written assignments, films, and presentations by students and guest speakers. They will also include extensive use of computer-based communications.

Online quizzes will be given to ensure that out-of-class assignments are completed before the assigned materials are discussed in class or needed as background for class activities.

Attendance at the first class of the semester is mandatory. When overrides are issued to students on the wait list, preference will be given to seniors and concentrators in American Culture. No overrides will be given after the first day of classes.

ANTHRARC 385 — The Archaeology of Early Humans
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Speth,John D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course introduces students to the many exciting new discoveries in the archaeology of our earliest human ancestors, tracing what we know of human cultural and biological evolution from the first appearance of upright, small-brained, tool-making humans, 2.0 to 2.5 million years ago, to the appearance of fully modern humans in the last 30,000 to 40,000 years. The course is divided into two segments. The first briefly surveys the techniques and methods used by archaeologists to find ancient archaeological sites, and how they go about studying the fossil human remains, animal bones, and stone tools from these sites to learn about ancient lifeways. This section also looks at how studies of living primates in the wild, especially chimpanzees, as well as modern hunter-gatherers, such as the Bushmen and Australian Aborigines, can help us to interpret the distant past. The second segment of the course turns to the actual archaeological record, looking at some of the most important finds from Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this segment, the course follows the accelerating developmental trajectory of our ancestors from the simplest tool-makers, who lacked any sign of art or religion, to humans much like ourselves, who began to bury their dead with clear displays of ritual and who adorned the walls of their caves and their own bodies with art. The course is oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators in anthropology.

Requirements include three in-class hourly exams and a series of brief essays on specific topics covered in lecture and readings. Sections will involve both discussion and hands-on projects with archaeological artifacts and human fossils.

Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 368 — Primate Social Behavior I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating, and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings.

ANTHRCUL 314 — Cuba and its Diaspora
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Behar,Ruth

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and the construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. A weekly two hour film screening is required Mondays 4-6pm or 6-8pm in 238A WH.

ANTHRCUL 330 — Culture, Thought, and Meaning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, HU

This course is an intensive, upper-division introduction to Cultural Anthropology and Cultural Studies. Concentrators and non-concentrators are welcome; the course is closed to Freshmen. The course introduces students to the closely interrelated concepts of "culture," "thought" and "meaning" as they are used in anthropology. Despite its centrality to the discipline of anthropology, "culture" has proved to be a highly inconsistent concept over time. This course traces the consequences of different concepts of culture from the early nineteenth century through the present and their relation to thought and meaning. It is organized around debates in anthropology about structure, interpretation, cognition, metaphor, practice, personhood, gender, the body, and place. Students have the opportunity to explore cultural difference by reading widely about other cultures, from the Trobriand Islands to the Caribbean, and to apply what they learn to their own cultural circumstances.

ANTHRCUL 375 — Talking and Telling
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course introduces students to systematic thinking about the structure and function of conversation and narrative from the perspective of anthropology, sociology and linguistics. We will think about such topics as what makes something a conversation, how conversations are organized, what role speaker characteristics play in talk (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, social rank, culture), the family as an interactional unit, talk in institutions, types of talk (e.g., gossip, interviews), the differences between conversation and narrative, and the role of narratives in ritual, identity construction, and public life. Methodologically the course is aimed at developing students into careful observers who study face to face interactions and narrative. To this end students are taught how to gather oral language data, transcribe it, formulate research questions, and conduct analyses. After an initial independent project, students will work in teams with their collective data to explore other questions collaboratively.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, anthropology, or a related field.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 001, SEM
Theories of the Post Colonial

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Over the last two decades, postcolonial theory has had a significant impact on how literary critics, anthropologists, and historians (among others) analyze colonial relationships and the political and cultural legacies of colonialism. This course introduces students to some of the key concepts, methods, and debates in the field of postcolonial studies and explores their relevance to Asian Studies.

Topics include: Orientalism and its critiques, anti-colonial nationalisms, nation and gender, subalternity and representation, colonial and postcolonial modernity, globalization and diaspora, the political and intellectual stakes and contexts of postcolonial studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

ASTRO 429 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bernstein,Rebecca A; homepage
Instructor: Bregman,Joel N; homepage
Instructor: Gnedin,Oleg Y

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR, BS

Student-faculty discussion of selected problems in two or three currently active areas. This is also the Astronomy Department's senior writing course. Attendance at weekly department colloquia is required.

Course Description:

In this section of AY 429, we will discuss and apply techniques for writing clearly and concisely. Clear thinking becomes clear writing, and scientific discussion of a few recent articles will be an important part of this class.

Grading Policies:

Grading will be based on classroom participation and writing assignments. This will include in-class writing and peer-editing work. The final grading will be done according to the following table:

Assignment Percentage
Writing Assignments 60%
Participation 40%

Homework Policies:

Late homework is accepted, but suffers a 2-letter-grade penalty for each day late. While you may work in groups, each essay set should reflect your own understanding and be in your own words.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Astronomy concentrators. ASTRO 402 and 404.

CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Ward,Stephen M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Despite their relatively small size, the neighboring nations of Haiti and Cuba have played disproportionately large roles in shaping world history. Each was the site of one of the world's most dramatic revolutions, variously inspiring, terrifying, and transforming the ideas of people around the globe. Indeed both the Haitian revolution (1791-1804) and the Cuban revolution (1959) embodied radical egalitarian dreams, probably the most radical in the history of the Americas, for eliminating class and race hierarchies. The Haitian revolution helped forge modern notions of freedom and equality and inaugurated a century-long process of abolition that dismantled the age-old institution of slavery around the world. And the 1959 Cuban revolution ended the island's capitalist economy and sought therein to eliminate racism. In the process of becoming the first and only socialist country in the Americas, Cuba also handed the U.S. one of its most embarrassing military defeats (at the Bay of Pigs in 1961). This course will treat the histories of Haiti and Cuba with a focus on their revolutions, their relations with the United States, and their overall significance within world history. In addition to examining these thematic concerns, the class will guide participants through completion of individual research papers, providing a collective workshop in which to develop one's research, bibliographic, and writing skills as well as one's ideas.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CAAS 495 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Taylor,Dorceta E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Movement has been a central theme in African American history and culture. In this senior seminar, we will explore the meanings of travel — both domestic and international — in Black life and thought by investigating the visual and performing arts, sport, military service, politics, and literature.

Given LSA's year long emphasis on citizenship, we will also examine how travel extends, emboldens, and complicates African American understandings and experiences of citizenship. Students will concentrate on honing writing skills while also developing competencies in visual and cultural analysis. To this end, students will produce several brief essays, one longer paper, and at least one graphic assignment that maps African American travel.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CLCIV 464 — The Ancient Epic
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Scodel,Ruth S

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

Epic was the most ambitious, grand, culturally prized form of literature in antiquity. This course will look at ancient epics individually and at epic as a genre. The central questions will be why epic was once so important, but is no longer possible-and why, when we can no longer imagine writing epics, we still read them and can be deeply moved by them. (The instructor uses the Iliad as a guide to life; she realizes that this is odd, but hopes students will come to see how this could happen). The focus will be on the most canonical classical epics: Iliad, Odyssey, Apolloniu's Argonautica, Vergil's Aeneid, and Lucan's Pharsalia. We will consider performance, characterization, narrative method, ideology, and relation to the tradition. Each student will also choose a selection from another ancient or modern epic to read for comparison. For one paper, students will read secondary literature, but otherwise the emphasis will be on the poems themselves. The writing component will try to develop the ability to write in various formats and with varying amounts of opportunity for revision, since so much real-world writing is done under pressure. So besides two relatively short formal papers that will be revised and resubmitted, there will be in-class writing and short assignments meant to be done quickly.

COMM 351 — Understanding Media Industries
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines research and scholarship focused on existing media institutions, their genesis and current lines of development, institutional arrangements, organization and operation, economic structure, and characteristic communications "output." Course topics may include: the history of media systems; media and government, including legal, regulatory and free-expression issues; media economics; international media systems; technologies; media organizational routines; and the values and behavior of media professionals. The course investigates the ways in which institutional, economic, and organizational arrangements affect professional behavior and media content, with attention to media system changes over time and in comparative contexts.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 361 — The Media and Public Affairs
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Neuman, W Russell

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines general phenomena involved with the creation, dissemination, and reception of mediated information. Course topics may include: information processing, including message encoding and decoding; media priming and framing of evaluations and decisions; influences of message structure and communication modalities on processing; media use and reception, including interpretive processes; information flow and control, focusing on influences of communication networks, message diffusion, and information gate-keeping; and communicative processes of learning, persuasion and social influence. The emphasis is on the development and testing of general theories explaining how mediated communication works, even though research examined will center on particular cases (e.g., studies of priming in political communication).

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 371 — Media, Culture, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Scannell,Gerald Patrick

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course explores social and cultural approaches to the study of mass communication. Course topics studied may include: communication and social identity, including race, ethnicity and gender; media's role in defining and reflecting culture; the equity of community, state, and worldwide information systems, including debates over the "new world communication order," post-colonialism, and globalization; media audiences as interpretive communities; media and social movements; and the role of media in altering and maintaining political and social order. Research on mass communication is examined in connection with broader questions about the relations between cultural systems and social formations, and about the dynamics of social and cultural change and contestation. May not be repeated for credit.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 381 — Mass Media and the Individual: Uses and Impact
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Greenwood,Dara N

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course critically evaluates research and scholarship focused on the impact of mass communication in a variety of substantive domains including the impact of media on knowledge, social values, and behavior. Policy applications of media effects research and the use of mass communication in public information campaigns are also reviewed. Media impact is treated both in theoretical and applied terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: social values; educational development; political behavior; violence and aggressive behavior; consumer behavior; and public opinion. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

ECON 408 — Philosophy and Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Questions in and about economics that are of philosophical interest arise in at least three areas. First, there are questions about the scientific status of economics. E.g., if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding?

Second, there are puzzles arising within economic theory, especially concerning the notion of rationality. E.g., why model economic agents as homo economicus if such a being would be a 'rational fool'? And third, there are matters concerning the relation between economics and normative questions of economic policy. E.g., what would be an optimal savings rate in very long run? Such questions are conceptually challenging and there is no consensus on answers. This course explores a selection of such questions.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a C- or better

ECON 466 — Economics of Population
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lam,David A; homepage
Instructor: Bailey,Martha J

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course uses an economic perspective to analyze the dramatic changes in fertility, mortality, marriage, and household structure in recent decades in both industrialized and developing countries. The course includes a computer lab component built around statistical analysis of household survey data. Students will use the statistical package Stata to analyze demographic and economic change in South Africa, Brazil, the United States, and other countries, applying recent innovations in the application of microeconomic theory and econometrics to the analysis of demographic behavior, labor markets, poverty, and inequality. Topics include: economics of fertility and marriage; economic and demographic analysis of population growth; intergenerational transmission of income inequality; impact of changing age structure on social security systems. Coursework includes: computer-based problem sets and writing exercises; a paper based on computer analysis of household survey data; written midterm and final examinations. Given the emphasis on statistical analysis in the course, ECON 404 or 405 are strongly recommended.

Enforced Prerequisites: ECON 401 with a grade of at least C-; or Graduate standing

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 001, SEM
The Demon, The Dwarf, and The Divided Self

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during summer break.The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 002, SEM
The Demon, The Dwarf, and The Divided Self

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Literature often attempts to transform "strangers" into "'friends" for us. "Works of fiction," Professor Paul Coates tells us, exist in a space between the Double and the Other." To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense an attempt to transform what is unfamiliar into something we can understand, something that becomes like "us," something that can become a Literary Double. In this writing seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how and why authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How does John Irving, in A Prayer for Owen Meany, create a hero for us out a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative? Or how does Katherine Dunn in Geek Love create a father, who, out of "love," produces a family of freaks, freaks who we actually become intrigued by. Moreover, these texts encourage us to find ways in which we recognize some of Ourselves imbedded in the most unlikely character images? Pretty much all semester we will be reading works that help us make meaning and connections out of the implications of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. And we will consistently be aware of that "space," between the text and ourselves, between the characters and our own identities. We want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." The work of the semester is to write and revise exploratory, analytical essays, the subject of which will be determined by each individual student. I intend to send out an exact syllabus to those enrolled in the class during summer break.The readings will be selected from a group of contemporary authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 003, SEM
Life Stories

Instructor: Meier,Joyce A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course engages students in the practice of writing life-stories. Students read a range of autobiographical essays while developing their own versions of the form; smaller assignments culminate in a larger personal essay due by the course end. In addition, students facilitate life-writing exercises with a group of fifth-graders in a Detroit school; involving five trips total, from the 4th through the 9th week of the term, the school visits take place on Fridays (students choose either a morning or afternoon session; either way, the course requires a Friday time commitment). In class and in writing, students reflect deeply on this community work and their life-writing experiences, and comment on parallel essays by writers such as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How might differences in race, gender, ability, and sexual preference inform life-stories? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? How do writers shape the material of their lives into essay form? Course grade is based on a writer's journal; three (4-page) analytical papers; three (4-page) personal writings; and the larger 10-page personal essay due by the course end; the final paper may be drawn from prior personal writing; it also goes through multiple drafts and is peer-reviewed by the class at large. Course readings are drawn from a list that may include Writing True: The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction (Sondra Perl/Mimi Schwartz) and The Truth of the Matter: Art and Craft in Creative Nonfiction (Dinty W. Moore), as well as a supplementary course packet (total estimated cost books/packet — $80).

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I taught during my first dozen years here, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take.

Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Much like the ENGLISH225 courses I taught during my first dozen years here, this course will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take.

Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 006, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 007, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 008, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 009, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 010, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 011, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A review of the fundamentals of composition with further practice in writing expository prose. Materials are drawn in part from the student's fields of interest.

ENGLISH 325 — Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition
Section 012, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Literature & the Law

Instructor: Bauland,Peter M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.


Book cost: under $100 for new copies and course pack; less for used.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Reading in Place

Instructor: Herrmann,Anne C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course will consider what it means to be a reader and what it means to read in particular places, with an emphasis on texts, both fictional and non-fictional, written in the 20th century. Questions to be addressed are: how are readers represented? What does it mean to go in search of an author? How does what we read mediate our relationship to where we live? How does where we live determine what we are allowed to read? The first part of the course will look at places where characters read, from the room, to the house, to the city, to the landscape and how this matters in the telling of a story. The second part will examine how readers think about where they live, from London to Tehran to Istanbul and how this influences their relationship to authors.

Texts include:

  • Woolf's A Room of One's Own and Jacob's Room,
  • Cather's The Professor's House,
  • Kincaid's Lucy and
  • Patricia Williams Open House, as well as
  • Schlink's The Reader,
  • Bartlett's Who Was That Man?,
  • Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, and
  • Pamuk's Istanbul,.

Class requirements include briefs essays, a seminar paper written in several stages, and a reflection on the writing you will have done for the class. Cost: $120

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Intergenerational Memory in U.S. Literature

Instructor: Miller,Joshua L

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

In this course, our focus will be on the illuminating process of storytelling that transmits the experience of traumatic events to later generations. These novels, films, and musical works show that private, individual memories are often re-experienced by the storyteller's descendents in unexpected ways. In such works, individuals who have been told of crimes committed against their ancestors co-memorate, experience, and reproduce the violence of these events in their own lives. We'll examine the ways that writers, directors, musicians, and artists turn private memories into public documents — novels, films, songs, images — in order to demonstrate the lingering effects of ancestral memories on present-day lives. These stories raise important questions about art and the process of producing collective memory. What are the impulses and objectives of intergenerational stories? How do these artists come to terms with the burden of responsibility that such stories produce? What sort of creative methods of artistic expression do the inheritors of these memories invent in order to live up to this legacy of responsibility? How might intergenerational stories be viewed as foundational to identity?

We'll read texts featuring characters that seek to understand how their identities have been shaped — consciously and unconsciously — by inherited memories that they experience as their own. We'll also read and discuss theoretical approaches to memory issues. The readings may include novels, short stories, and poems by William Faulkner, Kate Chopin, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Gayl Jones, Leslie Marmon Silko, Kara Walker, and Art Spiegelman, as well as films and jazz/blues recordings. Film screenings will be scheduled outside of class meetings; film and musical materials will also be available at the Film and Video Library and on reserve.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Medical Visions/Medical Performances

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

This course will investigate medical imagery in visual art, performance art and poetry. We will read a number of theoretical texts that address the cultural placement of medical discourses and imagery, and also analyze popular representations such as CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and surgery programs. The emphasis in this course is on close textual reading skills, and on creative methodologies: you will engage in art- and performance-making yourself, and a course exhibit will be part of our journey together. Your assessment can include creative work, and we will set up individual assessment structures taking your working preferences into account.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 417 — Senior Seminar
Section 005, SEM
American Literary Regionalism: Local Stories, National Literature, Global Connections

Instructor: Howard,June M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: May not be repeated for credit.

How much does place matter — in writing and reading literature, and more generally in culture and society? Everything that exists has to be somewhere. What vocabulary lets us talk precisely about that fact — should we make a distinction between place and space, for example? In our modern world, what are the connections and tensions between the regional and the national, the local and the global?

This class will examine "local color" writing, a popular and critically admired form in American literature from roughly 1870 to 1920, and also look at some recent fictions in which place plays a crucial role. Ways of imagining gender, race, class, nationality, politics, spirituality, nature all become visible through these works' representations of land, community, and mobility. We will ask what it meant that representations of the rural became intensely interesting to readers in the urbanizing United States of the late nineteenth century, what place local color fiction had in the literary system of its period, and what it means that regionalism has revived in the globalizing world of the early twenty-first century. Throughout, we will explore broad questions about the nature and significance of place and literature.

Authors to be read include Hamlin Garland, Mary Wilkins Freeman, Charles Chesnutt, Edith Wharton, and Fae Myenne Ng. Many of these writers are relatively little known today, but they are extremely rewarding to read. There will also be some secondary readings, and instructor will present perspectives from several disciplines. Students' responsibilities will be to read, contribute to our conversations, make an individual or collaborative oral presentation, and write several substantial papers (sometimes in several drafts).

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrator in English.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 001, SEM
Subject and Subjectivity

Instructor: Back,Lillian L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Upper level students who are interested in the writing of non-fiction, creative, prose should join us. We will want to uncover, in our discussions, how we go through a continuing process of creating and recreating ourselves. Primarily, we will obtain a focus in our discussions by immersing ourselves in "other" people's point of view. The literature we read will present a diverse group of writers. Although the final syllabus has not been made, selections will most likely include the following writers: M. Atwood, M. Cunningham, L. Erdrich, M. Chabon, Valerie Martin and other great books that surprise me this summer.

Requirements include: a continuing writing process with a final result of approximately twenty pages of polished prose and a weekly short response to fellow students' writing. You will determine the subject of your writing, but the form of the paper will be a critical analysis that is careful to consider both the emotional and intellectual responses of your reader.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 002, SEM
Persuasive Writing

Instructor: Portnoy,Alisse Suzanne; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The signers of the United States Constitution declared our freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in the United States. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. These were ordinary people doing extraordinary things with language.

What about you? Do you aspire to extraordinary things, or do you simply hope to land a great job or appeal a parking ticket? Either way, you'll need to use persuasive writing. This semester, we will increase our awareness of, respect for, and facility with persuasive writing. But our enthusiasm for and understanding of argumentative writing can grow only if we care about what we're doing (and even have some fun), so usually you will choose your own topics as we play with, analyze, and practice argumentative writing. To guide us in these challenging but rewarding enterprises, we'll use a textbook, Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students, and a handbook. We'll write almost daily, in the form of short exercises (hard copy and online), rhetorical analyses, and longer essays; plan on lots of informal writing and three formal essays of 4-8 pages each.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 425 — Advanced Essay Writing
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Rubadeau,John W

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open only to seniors and Graduate students.

ENGLISH 492 — Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Parrish,Susan Scott

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Students develop the prospectus and first draft of their honors thesis during this course taken during the Fall term of their senior year with the final thesis submitted in March.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor.

ENGLISH 492 — Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Sanok,Catherine

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

Students develop the prospectus and first draft of their honors thesis during this course taken during the Fall Term of the Senior year wit the final thesis submitted in march.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor.

ENVIRON 320 — Environmental Journalism: Reporting About Science, Policy, and Public Health
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Askari,Emilia Shirin
Instructor: Halpert,Julie L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course aims to give students an introduction to the world of mass media, with a strong emphasis on reporting about the environment and public health. Students learn from two prize-winning journalists who have more than 40 years combined experience covering the environment and public health for media outlets such as The New York Times, Newsweek, The Detroit Free Press and National Public Radio. Each week, the course focuses on a different topic in the news related to the environment and public health including urban sprawl, climate change, environmental justice, garbage, the Great Lakes, cancer and food-borne illnesses including Mad Cow Disease. Students hear from a range of speakers on the topic of the day, learning not only about the subject itself but also about the process of journalism. Guest speakers are chosen to represent many points of view. They range from corporate executives to environmental activists, scientists, government officials and journalists. During the fall 2004 semester, speakers included SNRE Dean Rosina Bierbaum; Donele Wilkins, Executive Director of Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice; State Senator Liz Brater; Mike Johnson of the Michigan Manufacturers' Association; Joann Muller, Detroit Bureau Chief for Forbes magazine; Lester Graham of National Public Radio's Great Lakes Radio Consortium; and 60 Minutes producer Alden Bourne, among many others. Along the way, instructors lecture and steer discussions about media ethics, interviewing skills, freedom-of- information laws, the Internet as a source of information, government databases and many other journalism-related topics. In-class exercises include writing the lead (first few paragraphs) of a story about one of the guest speakers and recording picking out the good quotes from recorded student-to-student interviews. In-class critiques of student writing also point out the most successful writing techniques. The course has two field trips that show first-hand how journalism is practiced. In recent years, they have been to the Environmental Protection Agency's Mobile Sources Lab in Ann Arbor and to the Carleton Farms landfill in Sumpter Township, (this is the controversial landfill that receives trash from Toronto). All class activities are designed to give students a broad understanding of how the mass media operates while also sharing tips on how students can participate in the mass media — either as full-time journalists or occasional dabblers in public discussions.

Course Requirements: 25 percent in-class participation; 20 percent 1000-word profile of person in environmental/public health field; 20 percent short assignments including list of story ideas, letter to the editor, 200-word story on local government issue; 35 percent final assignment, a 2000-word magazine article on environmental/public health issue. Multiple drafts are required for each writing assignment.

Intended Audience: Concentrators in any field of study are welcome, but students should be aware that all the stories written and read in this class focus on environment and/or public health and related policies. Class Format: Seminar format once per week for 3 hours

Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of First-Year Writing Requirement

ENVIRON 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

FRENCH 467 — Twentieth-Century Novel
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Clej,Alina M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course proposes an intensive survey of some of the most influential novels of the modern and contemporary period, in France, and the Francophone world. These readings will also provide an insight into the social and political contexts in which they were produced, as well as the opportunity to study new aesthetic formulas, which marked the literary history of the period. Readings will include:

  • Proust, Du Côté de chez Swann,
  • Aragon, Le Paysan de Paris,
  • Céline, Voyage au bout de la nuit,
  • Sarraute, Tropismes, Camus, La Peste,
  • Duras, Le Vice-Consul,
  • Perec, Les Choses,
  • Djebar, L'Amour, la fantasia,
  • Ben Jelloun, L'Enfant de sable,
  • Condé, Traversée de la Mangrove.

Evaluation will be based on several research papers, and class participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: Three courses in FRENCH numbered 300 or above

GEOSCI 380 — Mineral Resources, Economics, and the Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kesler,Stephen E; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS, QR/2

GEOSCI 380 deals with mineral resource-related problems in a complex society. The course discusses the origin, distribution, and remaining supplies of oil, coal, uranium, copper, gold, diamonds, potash, sulfur, gravel, water, soil, and other important mineral resources in terms of the economic, engineering, political, and environmental factors that govern their recovery, processing, and use. Topics discussed in GEOSCI 380 include ore-forming processes, mineral exploration methods, mineral land access, strip mining, nuclear power, recycling, smelting methods, money and gold, mercury poisoning, and taxation vs. corporate profit. Three lectures and one discussion per week. Evaluation by means of quizzes, exercises, and a final exam.

Required text: A course pack is required, but no textbook.

No previous background in geology is necessary for this course.

Advisory Prerequisite: No previous courses in Geology or other sciences are required.

GERMAN 302 — German, Politics, History, and Society
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course will look at the problems and politics of contemporary Germany through the prism of history. By analyzing previous political regimes which governed Germany just in the 20th century — absolute monarchy, unstable liberal democracy, totalitarian fascism, stable liberal democracy, bureaucratic communism — the course will shed light on the vicissitudes of the "German Question" and its importance for European politics as a whole. The course is taught in English.

Intended audience:Open to undergraduates interested in German Studies, Political Sciences, and European Area Studies.

Course Requirements:Students will be required to give a brief oral presentation on a topic from the syllabus; write short analyses of selected, representative works; and prepare a final essay on a topic to be arranged with the instructor. One exam on basic concepts covered in the course.

Class Format:Seminar , meets three hours per week

GERMAN 425 — Advanced German
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Federhofer,Karl-Georg

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting, and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425.

Advisory Prerequisite: GERMAN 325, 326 or permission of instructor

HISTORY 391 — Topics in European History
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course is meant to examine an aspect, to be designated in the section title, of Topics in European History on an experimental, one-time basis.

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Masuzawa,Tomoko

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Intensive examination of historical problems of limited scope either as delimited historical events (e.g., the French Revolution) as single analytical themes developed over time (e.g., urbanization in America), or as problems in the philosophy of history (e.g., objectivity, determinism). Classes of twenty students or less are designed to exploit an educational setting unlike that of the large lecture course. Major stress on critical reading and class discussion.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 002, SEM
Health and Medicine in US Culture Since 1875

Instructor: Pernick,Martin S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Unprecedented technical advances and dramatic cultural changes transformed the health of Americans and the healing professions since 1875. This course examines how gender, race, ethnicity, economics, politics, and changing cultural meanings of disease and science combined with scientific innovations to alter medicine, health, and society.

Class is discussion format, with occasional short lectures. Students are expected to read and discuss thoughtfully about 150 pages per week, drawn from often divergent sources. A 15-page paper based on original historical research, a weekly journal, and two 5-page book review papers are required.

Required purchases cost about $35 but additional required reading available on reserve may be purchased for about $175. Overrides for non-history concentrators will be allocated the first day. Anyone absent from the first class without advance permission may not take the course.

Required Readings:
Starr, Social Transformations of American Medicine
DeKriuf, Microbe Hunters
Tomes, Gospel of Germs
Brandt, No Magic Bullet
Pernick, The Black Stork
Course pack from Dollar Bill

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 003, SEM
Global Nuclear Proliferation

Instructor: Hecht,Gabrielle

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course presents global perspectives on the history of nuclear weapons, focusing on the political, cultural, environmental, health, and technological factors involved in their development and spread since the end of World War II. We consider the aftermath of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, the unfolding of the Cold War, and the multiple reasons states pursue nuclear weapons development. We also explore uranium production and atomic testing, the emergence of international treaties and organization, and the question of whether nuclear weapons can be "uninvented." We conclude with a brief consideration of other forms of radioactive weaponry, including depleted uranium munitions and "dirty bombs." Every week students are expected to read 150-200 pages, write a 2-page response, and be well prepared for extensive class discussion. There are also two term papers, at least one of which involves two drafts. No final exam. Expected cost for course materials: $150.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 004, SEM
Dreams and Visions in the History of Medieval and Early Modern Europe and America

Instructor: MacDonald,Michael P

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This colloquium will explore the history of dreams and visions in Western Europe and America from ancient times to about 1900, when Freud published his famous Interpretation of Dreams. It will concentrate on the medieval and early modern periods, with looks backwards and forwards, for these were the eras when visionary experiences were most greatly valued and ultimately devalued.

Ancient religions and philosophy posited three causes for dreams and visions: they might be sent by supernatural beings; they might originate in the mind of the dreamer or visionary himself or herself; or they might be caused by natural but hidden forces described by Neoplatonist philosophers. Throughout late antiquity and the Middle Ages theologians and philosophers devised typologies of dreams and their significance. Both learned scholars and lay people believed that some dreams had prophetic or predictive significance. Ways to identify "true" and "false" dreams and visions were also invented, as were means to tell whether dreams were supernatural or natural or if supernatural from God or from the Devil. For centuries, debate raged over the causes and frequency of divine dreams and visions, but until the 1700s the possibility of genuinely prophetic dreams and visions was widely acknowledged. And sometimes dreams and visions had a powerful influence on individuals, religious sects and even nations. In the eighteenth century, however, psychological explanations for visions and dreams came to prevail, largely because of the religious and political conflicts of the seventeenth century and the reaction to them. Visions and especially dreams were devalued and assumed the place that they have in our modern culture, as symptoms of mental illness or psychological phenomena significant only for the individual. (A viewpoint rejected, incidentally, by many cultures throughout the world today.)

In this class we shall discuss this history, reading historical works on ancient, medieval and early modern visions and dreams. We shall examine some original sources from the eras we study, such as Marcrobius' Commentary on the Dream of Scipio and — at the other end of the temporal span Freud's book and the work of his more recent critics. Students will be asked to prepare rather intensive reading assigments and they must participate actively in class discussions. In addition each class member will write a term paper discussing either a particular aspect of the history of the interpretation of visions and dreams or the records of a visionary or dream experience that was influential or is notably revealing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

HISTORY 396 — History Colloquium
Section 005, SEM
Remembering War: War&Genocide in Germany's 20th C

Instructor: Canning,Kathleen M

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course explores the transformation of the two world wars and the Holocaust from historical event / lived experience into historical memory and memorial. For much of the twentieth century, Germany was either waging war or contending with the catastrophic aftermath of war. The course begins with the end of the First World War, probing how memory of the First World War became a dividing line through the political culture of the Weimar Republic during the 1920s, as debates raged over the reasons for the German defeat, the punitive costs of the peace treaty, and the care of war veterans, widows and orphans. Indeed, the politics and culture of the Weimar Republic were shaped by disputes over the memory of the First World War. Some would argue that the Nazi rise to power is unthinkable without these contests over the war, defeat and the "dictated peace" imposed upon Germany. This course will also explore the different ways in which the Nazi dictatorship, its war of annihilation, and the Holocaust were first repressed during the 1950s and then gradually became sites of contested memory from the late 1960s on. From the "inability to mourn" in West Germany of the 1950s to the first coming to terms with the Holocaust in the 1970s, we will trace the widening scope of historical memory and memorialization in West Germany and undertake a comparative exploration of the place of the Third Reich, the Holocaust, and the Second World War in the national identities and political cultures of the two Germanies from 1948 through German reunification in 1990.

Prerequisites: HISTORY 111, 318, 319, 322 or 386 or a deeper familiarity with the historical events of these periods. History majors who still need to fulfill the upper-division writing requirement shall have priority in enrollment. Three-hour weekly class time includes two hours of group instruction and discussion (seminar), followed by a writing workshop.

Course requirements: This course is writing-intensive: it includes a series of short papers and one longer paper at the end of the academic term. Students will also be asked to introduce readings or make a brief presentation at least once per term. Attendance and participation are central to this seminar course and thus count for one-third of the grade.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior and Senior HISTORY concentrators by permission only. HISTORY concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397

LING 316 — Aspects of Meaning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pires,Acrisio M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Many of the sentences and other linguistic forms that we utter and perceive are novel (we have never encountered them before) and complex. Yet we usually able to compute the meanings of these novel and complex linguistic forms. Semantic theory is a theory of how we compute the meanings of complex linguistic forms based on the meanings of the atomic components. As we will see, there are a number of challenging problems in constructing a semantic theory, beginning with simple questions of how predication works, extending to how pronouns and quantifiers (like 'every') work and on to complex constructions involving tense, aspect, and modals in the diverse languages of the world. Can a unified semantic theory be found for all these phenomena? I dunno — I'm asking!

Advisory Prerequisite: LING 210 or 211.

LING 362 — Talking and Telling
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course introduces students to systematic thinking about the structure and function of conversation and narrative from the perspective of anthropology, sociology and linguistics. We will think about such topics as what makes something a conversation, how conversations are organized, what role speaker characteristics play in talk (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, social rank, culture), the family as an interactional unit, talk in institutions, types of talk (e.g., gossip, interviews), the differences between conversation and narrative, and the role of narratives in ritual, identity construction, and public life. Methodologically the course is aimed at developing students into careful observers who study face to face interactions and narrative. To this end students are taught how to gather oral language data, transcribe it, formulate research questions, and conduct analyses. After an initial independent project, students will work in teams with their collective data to explore other questions collaboratively.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in linguistics, anthropology, or a related field.

MEMS 491 — Honors Senior Colloquium
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

The centerpiece of the MEMS concentration is the senior Honors thesis, which is meant to be the single most meaningful piece of work you will do as an undergraduate at Michigan. This course is designed to guide you in this difficult and rewarding process, from first glimmerings, to conceiving the project, doing the research, and writing your honors thesis. We will spend some time each week working together on learning techniques and methods generally applicable to academic research in the humanities. We will also discuss what makes an honors thesis different from a long end-of-term paper. The honors thesis is a major essay, composed over the course of at least two semesters. The thesis should not be merely an extended survey of the relevant critical or scholarly literature; nor should it be a record of your private musings on a given topic. The thesis should display extended evidence of the author's searching, creative, well-articulated thoughts about his/her subject. It should also be built on a substantial amount of original research, and display a strong conceptual grasp of the issues it raises.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions. The course will meet in a seminar format for 3 hours per week. Students will elect a total of 6 hours for the course but may divide this into two terms. Students will write a 60-100 page Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors student and senior standing.

ORGSTUDY 310 — Formal Organizations and Environments
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owen-Smith,Jason D; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Complex organizations are enduring formal structures that direct human attention, shape decision-making, channel wealth, and concentrate power while standardizing the procedures that govern action in all spheres of society. Such organizations are ubiquitous parts of contemporary life in economics and business, politics, the law, science, education, entertainment, arts, and leisure. People live most of their lives in complex organizations, and society can be understood in terms of these formal structures and the relationships among them. But what are complex organizations? Where do they come from? How do they work? Why are they so important in contemporary life?

This class is organized around the central themes in sociological and economic research on organizations to provide an analytic framework that will help us grapple with these questions. We begin by examining the sources, arrangements, and functions of complex organizations. Next, we focus on their internal dynamics with an eye toward understanding the relationships between these structures and the people that inhabit them. Finally, we step back to consider the organizations themselves, addressing the ways they grow and change and their interactions with their environments, each other, and the larger institutions of society.

At each stage, the class draws on a mixture of classic and contemporary articles, and empirical case studies. The readings will introduce students to the theories that have shaped research on organizations, while the cases provide empirical context for understanding and discussing those concepts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Introductory Psychology (PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115), introductory sociology (SOC 100, 101, 102, or 195), and ECON 101.

PHIL 401 — Undergraduate Honors Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Railton,Peter A; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

PHIL 401 is open to seniors who are declared Honors concentrators in Philosophy, and to others by permission of the instructor. The seminar functions as an intensive workshop designed to help students identify and begin an independent philosophical research project. The seminar will provide advice, discussion, feedback, and support to enable students to enter the Winter Term in a good position to write a successful Honors Thesis. The seminar begins with several weeks of general discussion about research methods and basic methodological questions in philosophy, and then enters a sequence of stages in which students are asked to write a prospectus, a critical literature survey, a proto-chapter, and to give in-class presentations of work in progress.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to Honors concentrators in Philosophy and others by permission of instructor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Curley,Edwin M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

A discussion of selected topics of contemporary philosophical interest within a seminar format. Students write papers for presentation and discussion in class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 402 — Undergraduate Seminar in Philosophy
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Gillies,Anthony S; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

The seminar will be dedicated to the presentation, interpretation, and critical discussion of moral realism. The first part of the seminar will introduce, through the reading of selected classical texts, to the main varieties of moral realism, concentrating on the different standards of realism that have been put forward and on the different sorts of items that have been proposed for a realist treatment (objects and properties of value; truth-conditions of moral judgments; moral reasons). The second part will concentrate on whether and how successfully moral realism can address questions like the content of moral thoughts, the justification of moral claims, and moral motivation. The seminar will also discuss the major alternatives to moral realism that have been proposed in the contemporary meta-ethical debate and will attempt to assess, in view of the principal features of moral experience and practice, how far we can go in moral theorizing without an option of realism.

The reading for the seminar will include short selections from the classics of moral philosophy, Aristotle to Kant. It will also include more specialized texts by authors like Blackburn, Brink, Dancy, Harman, Mackie, McDowell, Moore, Parfit, Prichard, Railton, Ross, Smith, Williams, and others. Students will be required to write two papers, under supervision. The first one, 5 to 7 pages, due after midterm, will review, reconstruct, and criticize, one of the papers that will be read in the seminar. The second one, 8 to 10 pages, due at the end of the term, will address more general issues concerning moral realism, as they have emerged from the discussion in the seminar.

Advisory Prerequisite: Open to junior and senior concentrators and to others by permission of concentration advisor.

PHIL 408 — Philosophy and Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Thompson,Frank W; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Questions in and about economics that are of philosophical interest arise in at least three areas. First, there are questions about the scientific status of economics. E.g., if economic models are literally false representations of reality, how can they aid understanding?

Second, there are puzzles arising within economic theory, especially concerning the notion of rationality. E.g., why model economic agents as homo economicus if such a being would be a 'rational fool'? And third, there are matters concerning the relation between economics and normative questions of economic policy. E.g., what would be an optimal savings rate in very long run? Such questions are conceptually challenging and there is no consensus on answers. This course explores a selection of such questions.

For textbook information, please visit the ECON Textbook Information Website. Information will be posted for each class as soon as it is available.

PHYSICS 441 — Advanced Laboratory I
Section 001, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instruction. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course.

PHYSICS 441 — Advanced Laboratory I
Section 002, LAB

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This is an advanced laboratory course. A wide selection of individual experiments is offered. Students are required to select five experiments in consultation with the lab instruction. Experiments are to be selected from several different areas of physics.

Enforced Prerequisites: PHYSICS 390 and any 400-level Physics course.

POLSCI 327 — Politics of the Metropolis
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Markus,Gregory B; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

A survey of the major demographic, social, and economic trends in metropolitan areas and an analysis of government responses to these trends. Particular emphasis is placed on formal governmental policies in these areas as well as on the distribution of power and influence in the modern metropolis.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 341 — Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Franzese Jr,Robert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

This course examines the politics of developed democracies: i.e., those where day-to-day political struggle occurs within the boundaries defined by broadly unchallenged commitments to relatively free-market capitalism and relatively liberal democracy. (Empirically, today, least ambiguously, "developed democracies" corresponds to the countries of North America, Western Europe, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and perhaps a few others, but the grouping "developed democracies" is a theoretical and not a geographic one.) This is not a course in current or past events in these countries; i.e., it does not seek to provide a political history of these or any one or subset of these countries. Rather, the course analyzes certain systematic regularities or tendencies evidenced in the politics of developed democracies and proceeds by offering, elaborating, and evaluating possible theoretical (social-scientific) explanations for these patterns in developed-democratic politics. The analysis is positive (i.e., non-normative). The focus is on the interactions of interests and interest structures with political institutions in shaping how democracies work (differently) and, ultimately, in shaping important socio-economic policies and outcomes. Specific topics include socio-economic interest structures and democratic politics and stability; the many effects of various electoral systems; the varying structures of parties and party systems and their implications; alternative visions and designs of democratic governance, majoritarian versus proportional, and their consequences for participation, representation, accountability, and mandates; government formation and dissolution; and policy formation and implementation. Course grades will be based upon short-paper writing, a final examination, and participation.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing

POLSCI 357 — Governments and Politics of India and South Asia
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Varshney,Ashutosh; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, SS

A study primarily of the government and politics of modern India, with some consideration given also to Pakistan and Sri Lanka (Ceylon), in a regional comparative analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science or upperclass standing.

POLSCI 389 — Topics in Contemporary Political Science
Section 001, REC
Coming to Terms with Germany

Instructor: Rensmann,Lars

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Contemporary topics in political science; content and number of credits varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Political Science.

POLSCI 409 — Twentieth Century Political Thought
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Lavaque-Manty,Mika Tapani; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course offers a chronological survey of some central contributions to contemporary political thought. Its premise is that 20th-century political thinkers have offered us different (a) vocabularies to understand modern political world and (b) arguments for why and how we should try to change that world. Beginning with the German sociologist Max Weber and ending with the South African novelist J.M. Coetzee, the course draws from contributions outside political theory proper. The course is writing-intensive.

Enforced Prerequisites: POLSCI 101 or 302

POLSCI 497 — Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government
Section 001, SEM
Jewish Political Tradition: Ideas and Experiences

Instructor: Gitelman,Zvi Y; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

"Classic" Jewish literature (Bible, Talmud) contains no systematic, comprehensive works of political thought, but concepts and values in that literature have informed the political thinking and behavior of Jews for several thousand years. Jews' political experience has been both as a sovereign people and a dispersed minority. This course explores political ideas in Jewish sources and how they have played out under conditions of sovereignty and dispersion. We study Jewish political organization and communal life, political stratagems and ideology, probing the influence of environment, leadership, and inherited and borrowed ideas. We shall place the Jewish political experience in the larger context of minority and diaspora politics. Some comparisons will be made with other ethnic groups.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in Political Science.

PSYCH 303 — Research Methods in Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This writing-intensive course provides an overview of the how's and why's of research in psychology as a social science, and it covers such topics as ethics, library research, case studies, observations, surveys and questionnaires, laboratory experiments, APA-style writing, and statistics. It consists of a weekly 75-minute lecture on Monday, in which general ideas about research will be presented, and a weekly 75-minute lab in which research projects will be planned and presented.

Prerequisites: A 'gateway' course in psychology as a social science. A basic statistics course (e.g., STAT 350) is required. You should not take this course if you have already taken one of the psychology as a social science lab courses (e.g., organizational, personality, psychopathology, social).

Grades: Final grades are based on three 'objective' quizzes over terms and concepts covered in class and readings (15% each) and written assignments for the lab (70% total). Each written assignment will be weighted more-or-less by its page length. We encourage you to write drafts of any and all assignments prior to the due dates. If you wish to avail yourself of this option, you will need to work out a mutually-agreed timetable with your lab instructor well in advance of the due date. Attendance per se at lab is not graded but is required: A student cannot pass this course without participating in lab activities and exercises.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425/MATH 425, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290.

PSYCH 331 — Laboratories in Biopsychology
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the Biopsychology Program or in the Cognition and Perception Program with his/her on-going research; (2) to introduce students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior) or cognitive science; (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists or cognitive scientists in laboratory research. Grades are based on a student's: (1) performance in an individual faculty member's lab; (2) an oral presentation; and (3) term paper that describes the student's research experience. Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall). Students concentrating in Brain, Behavior and Cognitive Science will receive priority.

Advisory Prerequisite: Admission by application. STATS 350 or 425 and PSYCH 230, 240, 335, or 345.

PSYCH 338 — Primate Social Behavior I
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This course will review the social systems and behavior of our closest living relatives, the primates. The course will be divided into three parts. I will begin by outlining questions about primate behavior. In this section the order primates will be introduced by examining the biology and behaviour of prosimians, monkeys, and apes. Second, various aspects of social primate systems including spacing, mating, and grouping patterns will be discussed. The course will conclude by reviewing selected topics of primate behavior, such as infanticide and vocal communication. I will draw heavily on field studies of primates and emphasize their behavior in natural environmental and social settings.

PSYCH 341 — Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Hoeffner,James H

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS, NS

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research. The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises

Enforced Prerequisites: PSYCH 240 or 345; and STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425

PSYCH 351 — Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Evans,Evelyn Margaret

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture, discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual, group, and class research projects. Students are provided with hands-on research opportunities, conducting observational studies with preschool children, and experimental studies with school-aged children. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement. Course grades will be based on: three quizzes, an article critique, completion of PEERRS modules, one oral and three written research papers and reports. Attendance at both the lecture and lab sections is required.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: PSYCH 250

PSYCH 381 — Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. Students are introduced to different research methods and concepts, learn to collect and analyze survey data, and conduct an original, experimental research project. In this project (topic varies), students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation, and knowledge of research methodology.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,PSYCH 280.

PSYCH 426 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Reqs: ULWR, BS
Other: Honors

Primary focus is the implementation of an Honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 424 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

PSYCH 427 — Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Sekaquaptewa,Denise J

FA 2007
Credits: 2 — 4
Reqs: ULWR
Other: Honors

The primary focus of this course is the writing of an honors research thesis on the honors project.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of the Psychology Honors Program Director, PSYCH 425 and good standing in the Psychology Honors Program.

PSYCH 442 — Perception, Science, and Reality
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pachella,Robert G

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, BS

This course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. Since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do, the course is a broadly based course that examines the study of perception from a number of different perspectives: Cognitive psychology and information processing; philosophy of mind and phenomenology; history of psychology and philosophy of science. Particular topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation. The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade. Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu. Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

Advisory Prerequisite: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

RCHUMS 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

RCHUMS 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hecht,Warren J

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Mikolowski,Kenneth R

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kasischke,Laura Kay

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 004, SEM

Instructor: Thomas,Laura C

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCHUMS 425 — Creative Writing Tutorial
Section 005, SEM

Instructor: Hernandez,Lolita

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Only open to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

RCSSCI 354 — Nonviolence in Action
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Fox,Helen; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, ID

This course focuses on powerful, nonviolent strategies that have been used successfully by people all over the world to respond to global and local conflicts. Through readings, videos, frequent reading-journal assignments and several longer papers, small group discussions, guest speakers, and student-initiated community action projects, students attempt to define central terms such as violence, war, terrorism, justice, nonviolence, and peace. They look at current US aggressive interventions in Afghanistan and Iraq; the Israel/Palestine conflict; and UN peacekeeping efforts such as Rwanda and Bosnia. They become acquainted with various philosophies of nonviolence (found in Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, "just war" theory; secular pacifism and political activism). They examine case studies of strategic nonviolent action (Poland, South Africa, India, Chile, the Chicano Farm Workers Movement, and the US Civil Rights Movement, as well as current anti-war and anti-globalization protests). They examine their own and others' assumptions about "human nature," and learn to respond orally and in writing to arguments justifying war and aggression. Although the purpose of the course is to pose alternatives to the use of aggression in solving human problems, students are encouraged to come to their own conclusions about when and where the use of violence might be justified. Student-designed community projects might involve facilitating discussion groups about nonviolent methods in a high school or middle school, writing and performing skits in classrooms or public spaces that raise questions about peace and war; producing and distributing a journal or zine containing essays, interviews, and poetry; or creating and exhibiting art that engages viewers in critical thinking about some of the concepts in the course. Five books; coursepack; and frequent short papers comprising about 60 pages of writing (including drafts).

RUSSIAN 347 — Survey of Russian Literature
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course focuses on the masterpieces of Russian fiction written between 1820 and 1870, including such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Evolving fast from Romanticism to High Realism, this period marks a blossoming of Russian culture, despite strained relations with political authorities. We will trace how writers treated the political, social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries, creating a unique kind of literature that claimed authority over society in settling these problems. Topics include romantic self-fashioning and posturing (including such risky aristocratic games as dueling and gambling), gender relations, the fate of the educated in society, violence and repentance, reform and stagnation, history and the private self, Russia and the West. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. Participation in class discussion, two short papers, and a final exam.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

  • Aleksandr Pushkin, Eugene Onegin (Dana Point: Ardis, 1993)
  • Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time (Dana Point: Ardis, 1988)
  • Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons (New York: Norton, 1994)
  • Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Oxford: World's Classics Ser., Oxford UP, 1991)
  • Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (New York: Norton, 1989)
  • Course pack from Accu-Copy.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed.

SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 372 — Contemporary Film Theory
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Kligerman,Mark William

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU

Examination of contemporary approaches to film theory. Explores how different theories and resulting methods of analysis built on structuralist and post-structuralist presuppositions and paradigms have influenced recent film theory and its consideration of narrative practice, the psychological experience of viewing, the construction of moving image representations, and the impact of technology on aesthetic practice.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 236.

SAC 441 — National Cinemas
Section 003, LEC
Russian Cinema

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

Advisory Prerequisite: FILMVID/SAC 230 or 236 or 360

SLAVIC 313 — Russian Cinema
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eagle,Herbert J; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

Russian cinema studied against the background of the artistic and political revolutions which helped shape it. The course spans the period 1917-present, from the Russian pioneers of film montage (Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov, Alexander Dovzhenko) to the varied cinematic approaches of recent directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky, and Nikita Mikhalkov. Films by all of the above directors and others are viewed, analyzed, and discussed both with respect to their intrinsic aesthetic structure and with respect to the cultural trends and socio-political events of the period and country.

SOC 305 — Introduction to Sociological Theory
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGinn,Terence James; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

This course provides an introduction to the works of eminent figures in sociological thought and their analysis of various issues in social organization. The historical and intellectual factors that gave rise to sociology as a distinct academic discipline are examined. Attention is also given to the way in which the concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research. Classical theorists including Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Cooley, and Mead are studied, as well as the theories of contemporary sociological schools. The course asks how these thinkers understand the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization; how they account for social change; and how their social location influenced their thinking. In the context of this analysis, students are introduced to various uses of such theoretical concepts as conflict, structure, function, stratification, exchange, etc.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Sociology course.

SOC 472 — Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Grayson,Carla Elena

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. Students are introduced to different research methods and concepts, learn to collect and analyze survey data, and conduct an original, experimental research project. In this project (topic varies), students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation, and knowledge of research methodology.

Enforced Prerequisites: STATS 350 or 425 or MATH 425; and one of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC,PSYCH 280.

SPANISH 308 — Workshop in Academic Writing
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305.

This course, taught as an intensive workshop, is designed to encourage students to take responsibility for improving their composition skills in Spanish. The objective of this one-credit course is to improve their academic writing in their other Spanish courses, and consequently, students must be take at least one 3-credit Spanish course in conjunction with SPANISH 308.

Enforced Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276; or SPANISH 290 and 310; or SPANISH 276 and 290; or RCLANG 324

SPANISH 308 — Workshop in Academic Writing
Section 002, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: ULWR

Credit Exclusions: SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305.

This course, taught as an intensive workshop, is designed to encourage students to take responsibility for improving their composition skills in Spanish. The objective of this one-credit course is to improve their academic writing in their other Spanish courses, and consequently, students must be take at least one 3-credit Spanish course in conjunction with SPANISH 308.

Enforced Prerequisites: SPANISH 275 and 276; or SPANISH 290 and 310; or SPANISH 276 and 290; or RCLANG 324

SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
Section 001, SEM

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This seminar aims to help students to become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. During the process, students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; and writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs) to lengthy exposition (e.g., seminar papers). Many activities are grounded in hands-on practical experience rather than in theory. This course will provide opportunities to learn by doing, by serving others, and by trying out theories, with the goal of students defining their own tutoring style and developing their own theory of practice. Registration is by permission only.

Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Eisner,Caroline L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This Seminar aims to help students become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. Students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include: reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs)to lengthly exposition (e.g., seminar papers); workshopping each other's papers; conferencing with the instructor; observing OWL Tutorials; observing SWC 301 students in the Peer Tutoring Center and Sweetland faculty during Writing Workshop; practicing peer tutoring onsite and online; and sharing (online and off) our experiences as writers and tutors.

Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

SWC 300 — Seminar in Peer Tutoring
Section 003, SEM

Instructor: Kelley,Kendrick Matthew

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

This Seminar aims to help students become theoretically informed and well-practiced peer tutors. Students learn about writing, teaching, community service, cultural differences, and literacy practices. Activities and experiences include: reading and critiquing peer tutoring pedagogy; examining student papers and conferences together in class; writing extensively, from short explorations (e.g., daily reading logs)to lengthly exposition (e.g., seminar papers); workshopping each other's papers; conferencing with the instructor; observing OWL Tutorials; observing SWC 301 students in the Peer Tutoring Center and Sweetland faculty during Writing Workshop; practicing peer tutoring onsite and online; and sharing (online and off) our experiences as writers and tutors.

Advisory Prerequisite: Application process and permission of department

TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ward Jr,Fred C

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR

Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Ward Jr,Fred C

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR

Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

TCHNCLCM 496 — Adv TchCom for EE/CE
Section 006, LEC

Instructor: Ward Jr,Fred C

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR

Advanced technical communication for EECS. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, proposals, reports, documentation, and web design for design projects, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Usability and performance test design and testing. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentation and written report on design.

Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300; (C- or better).

TCHNCLCM 497 — Advanced Technical Communication for Computer Science
Section 1, LEC

Instructor: Johnson,Rodney Char

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR

Advanced technical communication for computer science. Design and writing of user and task analysis, requirements documents, specifications, proposals, reports and documentation, all aimed at diverse organizational audiences. Preparation and delivery of final oral presentations and written project reports.

Enforced Prerequisites: TCHNCLCM 300 or 215 or 281 with a C- or better

WOMENSTD 320 — Gender and Mental Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Gender and Mental Health is an interdisciplinary course in which faculty and students explore a compelling and socially significant topic from the perspectives of research, practice, and the arts — using the lenses of social sciences, biological sciences, the humanities, and mental health practice professions. This course is designed to allow advanced level undergraduates, with a background in women's studies and/or psychology, to review and examine the multiple ways in which mental health is conceptualized across disciplines. The course will foster critical analyses of multidisciplinary and often dichotomized material, arriving at an integrated perception of the experience of mental illness and mental health. Course goals include:

  1. students will acquire a sense of the lived experience of a person who has mental illness,
  2. students will be able to correct or combat stereotypes and inaccurate portrayals of mental illness,
  3. students will develop a critical appraisal of how mental health and illness are defined in our society using several different disciplinary lenses,
  4. students will be able to evaluate mental health and related programs for women,
  5. students will understand and be able to articulate and synthesize various contextualized perspectives and
  6. students will understand how to translate the above into a social action orientation.

We will use cases, published narratives, research and theoretical material to explore the highly gendered nature of mental fitness and psychological health. Additionally, we will attempt to illustrate the relationships among virulent forms of prejudice, physical and sexual abuse, the pathologizing of difference, and violence in women's and men's lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or PSYCH

 
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