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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Fall 2007, Dept = WOMENSTD
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 55 of 55
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
WOMENSTD 100 — Gender and Women's Lives in U.S. Society
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

FA 2007
Credits: 2

An innovative introduction to contemporary women's issues. In this course you will be an active member of an eleven-week small discussion group, led by one or two advanced student facilitators. Together, your group will explore and discuss a range of topics in an environment that we hope will be challenging, stimulating, open, supportive and exciting. You will be learning about women's issues through reading, journal writing, discussion and experimental exercises.

WOMENSTD 150 — Humanities Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Who can be Human? Rethinking Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Social Justice

Instructor: Ticktin,Miriam I

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem

  • What does it mean to be human?
  • Does it mean one has a right to dignity? To equality? To housing, education, and a job? To be free from racial discrimination, or sexual harassment?

This class will explore how being human grounds struggles for social justice, including human rights and humanitarianism. While the French and American revolutions changed the way societies were understood and organized, instituting systems based on freedom and equality for all, we will ask how this plays out today: how recognizing "humanity" both allows for equality between people, and for new forms of discrimination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 151 — Social Science Seminars on Women and Gender
Section 001, SEM
Gender, Population and Development

Instructor: Fadlalla,Amal Hassan

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS
Other: FYSem

This course examines the discourses and practices of development and population control targeting non-western countries. The course situates these discourses and practices in histories of colonial encounters, international politics, and global relations of power and inequalities. We will survey a diverse range of debates among the critics of population and development policies and projects in order to see how such debates have succeeded or failed in altering hegemonic approaches to development with new approaches that attend to peoples' histories, social locations, and health and human rights. The course will analyze these discourses and practices with reference to local politics and realities of uneven development that produce gender, class, and ethnic disparities. Although the course material focuses on non-western countries, Africa in particular, we will also look at some examples of how these discourses are projected on poor communities elsewhere including the U.S. The course also aims at introducing students to the methodologies of doing research in the social sciences, for instance students will do group projects on either the case of Katrina-New Orleans or the Darfur conflict, Western Sudan as research topics for their final papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 211 — Gender and Popular Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

"Popular culture" is a complex social system and this course concentrates on its visual manifestations in various media. We focus on women as signs or emblems, as producers, and as consumers, of "popular culture", but attention is also given to the representation of masculinity and of race/ethnicity. Mainstream and marginal, appropriated and subverting, reflective and formative, "popular culture" is both a multivalent signifying system and a powerful industry. After a brief thematic introduction to gender, and to analysis, we focus on contemporary American culture, examining such examples as advertising and consumption; Barbie dolls; parental roles in film and advertising; romance in fiction and films like the classics, Pretty Woman and Titanic; and the male "buddy" system in action movies alongside the female friend in other films. IV. 4

WOMENSTD 220 — Perspectives in Women's Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bailey,Joanne Motino; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS, RE

In this course, we will examine women's health issues, across the lifespan, from feminist and sociocultural perspectives. We will explore the social construction of women's sexuality, reproductive options, health care alternatives, and risk for physical and mental illness. Attention will be paid to historical, economic, and cultural factors which influence the physical and psychological well-being of women.

WOMENSTD 240 — Introduction to Women's Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cole,Elizabeth Ruth; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU, RE

This course provides an introduction to the feminist scholarship about women and gender. We explore how women's lives differ across social categories such as race, class, sexual orientation, and age, with an emphasis on women in the United States today. Readings are drawn from both the humanities and social sciences to familiarize students with key questions, theoretical tools, and issues within Women's Studies. A variety of topics are covered, including: violence against women; women and work; reproductive justice. The course grade is based on short written assignments, a group project, exams, and participation in discussion.

WOMENSTD 245 — Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender and Queer Studies
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rubin,Gayle S

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ID

This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the study of sexualities with perspectives from lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer scholarship. Topics include changing historical configurations of same-sex desires and practices; the regulation of bodies and pleasures through genital normativity and the category of sexuality itself; butch, femme, and transgender experiences; meanings and uses of the term queer in contemporary discourse; practices of sexuality in various non-Euro-American cultures and within the Americas; and possibilities for activism. Throughout, the course will consider the interplay between sexualities and differences of ethnicity, culture, race, class, and gender.

WOMENSTD 253 — Special Topics
Section 001, SEM
Gender and the Arts

Instructor: Biddinger,Megan E

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of seven credits of WOMENSTD 252 and 253 may be counted toward graduation.

Feminism and the media have a long-standing and often uneasy relationship with each other. Focusing largely, but not entirely, on the U.S., this course examines this relationship from three perspectives:

  1. Feminist studies of the mass media;
  2. Representations of feminism in the mass media;
  3. Feminist media activism and production.

The first half of the course will not only survey critical feminist theories and studies of the media, but will also develop concepts and tools that students will use in their own analyses. The second half of the course will be dedicated to analyzing examples of representations of feminists and feminism and feminists' own use of media for activism, paying particular attention to the possibilities and limits of each. We will spend a good deal of time discussing what constitutes activism. This course is based on an approach to feminism that takes ending oppression for all as its project. This approach posits understanding masculinity, as well as how gender intersects with other identities, such as race, class, and sexuality, as key to this project. Thus, while much of what we discuss will focus on women, we will also explore these other identities and their intersections.

WOMENSTD 254 — Introduction to Gender and the Arts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: André,Naomi A
Instructor: Siegfried,Susan L

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course is an introduction to gender issues in a wide range of art forms with special emphasis in the visual arts, music and literature. We will meet as a seminar once a week for a combination of lecture and discussion. Classes will be supplemented with required attendance at performances and museums in the Ann Arbor and Detroit area.

Our goal throughout the term is to develop a critical appreciation of the arts and skills in writing about the arts. We will think about how performances of femininity, masculinity, and sexuality intersect with race, class and ethnicity and consider how these issues are produced and received by artists and audiences in the past and present. Writing assignments will include reports on performance and arts events as well as critical analyses. For those who are interested, there will be some opportunities for creative projects.

This course has a Lab Fee of $100.00.

WOMENSTD 295 — Sexuality in Western Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Newton,Esther

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course is an introduction to major concepts in the history and anthropology of sexuality, as well as an historical survey of important trends in the social organization of gender and sexuality in Western Culture beginning with ancient Greece. We continue through ancient Judaism and early Christianity, medieval courtly love, and 19th-century England and America. The last part of the course deals with 20th-century sexual modernism, ending with the Sexual Revolution and the backlash against it.

WOMENSTD 300 — Men's Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Johnson,Timothy R B
Instructor: Vahratian,Anjel M

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ID

The course serves as an introduction to men's health, taught through the perspective of gender studies. Theoretical approaches to the analysis of inequities and differences affected by gender, race, social class, and ethnicity will be central features of the course. The course will introduce and discuss the health/medical/cultural and cross-cultural aspects of topics including cardiovascular disease (high blood pressure, ASCVD), arthrosclerosis, cancer (lung, colon, prostate), reproductive health (sexually transmitted disease, infertility, impotence), AIDS, popular culture and the representation of "masculinity", mental health, addiction (alcohol, substance, tobacco), grief and emotion, rape and violence, carcinogenic (tobacco-lung, human papilloma virus-lower genital track) and genetics of cancer and other diseases. These topics will be approached through case studies meant to illustrate how health/biomedical problems can also be understood as points of entry into broad cultural debates. The format will be lectures, with several guest speakers and small group discussions, supplemented by outside readings.

WOMENSTD 301 — Writing Japanese Women
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This is a course on writing by and about women — women's self-representation and male major authors' representations of women — in Japanese culture. It begins by a feminist reading of one of the world's oldest (9th-11th c.) traditions of women's writing: the memoirs, poetry, and fiction of the Heian court ladies who produced the country's first canonical literature and permanently marked its cultural self-image. It moves on to examine the semiotics of the feminine in Japanese culture using the popular image of women (including the portrayal of Heian women authors and their works) in medieval didactic and gothic tales; in the narrative painting scrolls; in the Nô and Kabuki stage, where male actors performed the "quintessentially feminine" to admiring audiences; in wood-block prints of "beauties" (courtesans or geisha) and stories of "amorous women" in the thriving new merchant culture. The third section focuses on modern women's writing, in particular its resistance to the intervening representations of the feminine and its own productive rereading of the Heian "mothers" in the process of recuperating women's ancient place in the critical representation of Japanese society.

Along with primary sources in literature and the visual arts, secondary sources will include theoretical readings in the psychology of sex, love, and death by Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, and Bataille; in the field of cultural production by Bourdieu; in feminist theories of reading in the Anglo-American academy. Materials and focus will vary from year to year. To be offered in the fall semester alternately with ASIAN 300.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

WOMENSTD 315 — Women and Literature
Section 001, LEC
Intersections: Fictions and Feminism of the African Diaspora

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

This course number is designed to accommodate a wide variety of courses on women and literature.

WOMENSTD 315 — Women and Literature
Section 002, LEC
Being a Heroine

Instructor: Wolk,Merla; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

Despite the fact that a woman sat on the throne of England for most of the 19th century, Victorians were generally unable or unwilling to change their views about what women couldn't do and shouldn't do. The great novelists of the day, however, had no difficulty imagining strong, ambitious, brilliant, adventurous women and making them the heroines of their texts. Women's lack of power in 19th century life is well-known and well-documented. We will note it too, but our focus will be on the qualities with which writers from Jane Austen to George Gissing endowed their heroines. These heroines railed against the narrowness of their lives, sought choice in the midst of choicelessness, questioned what was deemed "unwomanly," and attempted to subvert the rules. We will begin before Queen Victoria, read Jane Austen's Emma, and then move to the great Victorian heroines, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, Dorothea Brooke, from Eliot's Middlemarch, Isabel Archer, from Henry James' The Portrait of a Lady, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, from Hardy's great novel of that name, and the lesser known Rhoda Nunn, the first activist feminist from Gissing's The Odd Women. We will also read about the culture that set restrictions on women and the lives of the authors who managed to break through. Requirements: a take-home mid-term and final; a 10-12 page annotated bibliography; regular attendance, class participation, and bi-weekly questions on the readings. The syllabus and other instructions pertaining to the course will appear on my web-site as they are completed. http://www.silicongroove.net/merlawolk/.

WOMENSTD 320 — Gender and Mental Health
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Gender and Mental Health is an interdisciplinary course in which faculty and students explore a compelling and socially significant topic from the perspectives of research, practice, and the arts — using the lenses of social sciences, biological sciences, the humanities, and mental health practice professions. This course is designed to allow advanced level undergraduates, with a background in women's studies and/or psychology, to review and examine the multiple ways in which mental health is conceptualized across disciplines. The course will foster critical analyses of multidisciplinary and often dichotomized material, arriving at an integrated perception of the experience of mental illness and mental health. Course goals include:

  1. students will acquire a sense of the lived experience of a person who has mental illness,
  2. students will be able to correct or combat stereotypes and inaccurate portrayals of mental illness,
  3. students will develop a critical appraisal of how mental health and illness are defined in our society using several different disciplinary lenses,
  4. students will be able to evaluate mental health and related programs for women,
  5. students will understand and be able to articulate and synthesize various contextualized perspectives and
  6. students will understand how to translate the above into a social action orientation.

We will use cases, published narratives, research and theoretical material to explore the highly gendered nature of mental fitness and psychological health. Additionally, we will attempt to illustrate the relationships among virulent forms of prejudice, physical and sexual abuse, the pathologizing of difference, and violence in women's and men's lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or PSYCH

WOMENSTD 324 — Childbirth & Culture
Section 001, LEC

FA 2007
Credits: 4

This course focuses on the distinctive sociocultural configurations of childbirth practices and beliefs in several different societies. The cross-cultural study of childbirth provides a basis for understanding the cultural logic underlying these practices and beliefs and expands our knowledge of women's perspectives on social change and the medicalisation of childbirth.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

WOMENSTD 330 — Feminist Thought
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Rosen,Hannah

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores important trends and debates in feminist theory over the last three decades. We will approach this vibrant period in feminist thought as an ongoing conversation among scholars in various disciplines and between scholars and activists about how best to understand and challenge the operation of power, power that constitutes differences between women and men and, as importantly, differences among women — those, for instance, of race, class, sexuality, and nation. We will also explore the relationship of particular theories to political practice and changing historical circumstances.

This is an introductory survey course that does not assume prior familiarity with feminist theory. We will nonetheless move at a quick pace through different areas of feminist thought, with each week introducing new texts, ideas, and methods of critique that will be drawn on in subsequent weeks. It is thus important to prepare for and participate fully in each week of the seminar. Seminar participants should also be prepared to engage not only in feminist critique, but also in critiques of various forms of feminism, specifically in regards to questions of difference among women — race, sexuality, class, etc. — and in regards to the notion of "woman" as a stable subject position in general.

Advisory Prerequisite: AMCULT 240 and one additional WOMENSTD course

WOMENSTD 330 — Feminist Thought
Section 002, SEM

Instructor: Lal,Jayati

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores important trends and debates in feminist theory over the last three decades. We will approach this vibrant period in feminist thought as an ongoing conversation among scholars in various disciplines and between scholars and activists about how best to understand and challenge the operation of power, power that constitutes differences between women and men and, as importantly, differences among women — those, for instance, of race, class, sexuality, and nation. We will also explore the relationship of particular theories to political practice and changing historical circumstances.

This is an introductory survey course that does not assume prior familiarity with feminist theory. We will nonetheless move at a quick pace through different areas of feminist thought, with each week introducing new texts, ideas, and methods of critique that will be drawn on in subsequent weeks. It is thus important to prepare for and participate fully in each week of the seminar. Seminar participants should also be prepared to engage not only in feminist critique, but also in critiques of various forms of feminism, specifically in regards to questions of difference among women — race, sexuality, class, etc. — and in regards to the notion of "woman" as a stable subject position in general.

Advisory Prerequisite: AMCULT 240 and one additional WOMENSTD course

WOMENSTD 341 — Special Topics in Gendered Lives
Section 001, SEM
Psychology of Sexual Aggression

Instructor: Zurbriggen,Eileen L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to examine current psychological theory and research relating to the causes and consequences of rape and other forms of sexual aggression. It is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in this field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists. The course is organized topically. We begin by reading and thinking about the social construction of masculinity and femininity and how these might contribute to sexual aggression. We then explore the role of the media in creating and enforcing these cultural constructions. The bulk of the course is devoted to an examination of psychological processes related to victimization and perpetration. We then discuss legal issues related to rape and sexual assault and violence prevention. We conclude the course by discussing alternative visions of sexuality — ones not based in dominance and submission.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240.

WOMENSTD 342 — Special Topics in Gender and Health
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Promotes an understanding of health as a construct shaped by history and ideas grounded in varying interpretations of the body and disease.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 220 or 240.

WOMENSTD 350 — Women and the Community
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Welch,Leseliey Rose

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Expr

"Women in the Community" aims to address the gaps and misconceptions that often exist between feminism as an academic discourse and feminism in practice. Through classroom engagement and community involvement, students will explore the intersection of academia and activism as it pertains to working to improve the lives of women and their communities. WOMENSTD 350 students commit to volunteering in an area community-based organization as well as to active participation in the classroom. The course will consider the writings and work of well- and lesser-known activists and feminists; local, national, and international activism efforts current and past; and the roles of necessity, inspiration, and/or choice in working towards social justice. Students will have the opportunity to dialogue with community activists from diverse backgrounds and learn about community activism from a variety of perspectives. The course will encourage students to see themselves as world citizens and to assess their own passions and potential contributions to creating a more just world. Through readings, written assignments, classroom participation, and service experiences this course endeavors to nurture and facilitate: critical thinking about community service, feminisms, and their relationships to social change; consideration of how feminist thought can be applied to work in communities and how communities can inform feminist thought; and the development of skills for working effectively within community-based organizations and with communities around issues that affect women's lives. No Instructor Consent Needed.

Advisory Prerequisite: 240/EQ.&P.I.

WOMENSTD 360 — History of the Family in the U.S.
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

FA 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

"Parents first embody love and power, and each of their actions conveys to the child, quite independently of their overt intentions, the injunctions and constraints by means of which society attempts to organize experience. If reproducing culture were simply a matter of formal instruction and discipline, it could be left to the schools. But it also requires that culture be embedded in personality. Socialization makes the individual want to do what he has to do; and the family is the agency to which society entrusts this complex and delicate task."

— Christopher Lasch, Haven in a Heartless World

The world we live in — its divisions and conflicts, its widening gap between rich and poor, its seemingly inexplicable outbursts of violence — is shaped far less by what we celebrate and mythologize than by the painful events we try to forget."

— Adam Hochschild, King Leopold's Ghost

This course aims to give a perspective on the contemporary American family by studying the development of this important institution in the past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, economic strategies, work patterns and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity and class as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state and how these factors have affected family life in America. We will want to ask ourselves how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Course work will consist of readings, lectures and discussion, and the viewing of 4 movies as appointed times outside of class. There will be a 10 page historical paper required of each student on some aspect of the history of your own family by using the historical perspective gained in this course to evaluate and analyze historical changes in your own family over time. An alternative topic is provided by the instructor if this subject proves impossible to do. Two essay exams will be given, a take-home midterm and take-home final. Students are invited to visit the instructor as well as the GSIs during office hours to discuss reading, class lectures, or other topics of interest.

WOMENSTD 376 — Women and the Bible
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Tsoffar,Ruth; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU

In this course, we study some of the most important women in the Bible, beginning with the matriarchs and continuing with some of the major women in the Old Testament; then on to the Apocrypha, where we find such women as Judith and Salome who beguined military leaders and heads of state. We conclude with the New Testament, the women there who theologically defined Jesus' messiahship, supported him financially, and understood his ministry not as rule and kingly glory, but as one of service.

WOMENSTD 385 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 100 or 240, and one 300-level WOMENSTD course

WOMENSTD 386 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: W S 385

WOMENSTD 387 — Directed Reading
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course offers students an opportunity to pursue independent, interdisciplinary reading projects on subjects related to women.

Advisory Prerequisite: W S 386

WOMENSTD 390 — Homophobia in the Black World
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will explore the presentation and meaning of homosexuality and homophobia in communities of color in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Africa. The cultural presentation and consequences of homophobia and discrimination vary greatly across these places. Therefore, an emphasis will be placed on understanding different social constructions of homosexuality and how these views are complicated by geographical region, race, gender, and social class.

Intended audience: Upper-level students in Women's Studies, LGBTQ Studies, and CAAS.

Course Requirements: Class participation and two 10-page papers.

Class Format: Class meets three hours weekly in seminar format

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or CAAS.

WOMENSTD 415 — Studies in Gender and the Arts
Section 001, SEM
Imagining Female -Female Eroticism in Early Modern Europe

Instructor: Simons,Patricia; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

We examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and contemporary ones, we investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists. IV. 3.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and one course in Women's Studies or History of Art.

WOMENSTD 419 — Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Robinson,Amorie Alexia

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the analysis of group work and facilitation using a multicultural perspective/context. Attention will be given throughout the course to the influence of the intersections between gender, race, attractional orientation, and other identities that can affect group process and facilitation. Theory, research, and cultural, personal, and life experiences of individuals and groups will be explored for the purposes of developing a fuller understanding and appreciation of varying populations that group facilitators may encounter. This course is designed as an experiential process in which what is learned is also experienced and using these experiences for the foundation for learning the concepts and principles presented. Upon completion of this course, you are expected to have built skills for effective analysis of and participation in group work in a multicultural context.

Through experiential learning and theoretical analysis, we will examine the impact and consequences of social norms, practices, inequities, personal experiences, and psychosocial stressors of those who have been historically stigmatized in American society such as women of color, gay men/lesbians, etc., in order to better understand and appreciate the psychological and emotional struggles they might bring with them into the group process. How best to effectively work with groups regardless of their composition is a goal of this course for each student. Focus will be on the experience of short term groups that are generally formed out of the need for support, education, and consciousness-raising.

This course is designed as a training course for students intending to facilitate small groups through WOMENSTD 420 (Group Facilitation in Women's Studies). It may also be used as supplementary training for other types of facilitation experiences (i.e., Intergroup Relations and Conflict, Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Center, Project Community, or Lesbian Gay Bi Affairs Office). As a student in WOMENSTD 419, you are encouraged to apply to participate as a facilitator in WOMENSTD 420 which is a direct application of the WOMENSTD 419 curriculum.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Women's Studies or Psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended.

WOMENSTD 420 — Group Facilitation in Women's Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hassinger,Jane A

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A seminar for facilitators of small group discussion on women's issues (WOMENSTD 100). Provides training in group process skills and an opportunity to explore women's issues. Students will participate actively in planning and facilitating this seminar, as well as gaining additional group experience in support and task-oriented committees.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 419 and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 425 — Feminist Practice of Oral History
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lawsin,Emily P

FA 2007
Credits: 3

*** You know that Grandma/Lola/Auntie/Role Model you've always wanted to learn more about, but never have enough time to just sit and chat?
*** OR that Research Project/Thesis that you have to do interviews for, but just don't know where to start?
*** OR are you searching for a small seminar where you can learn a really good skill in-depth? THEN THIS ORAL HISTORY CLASS IS FOR YOU!!

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We will examine various methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We will discuss theoretical issues such as relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, "insider-outsider" perspectives, our role as "narrator", legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories. We will also explore how material and cultural artifacts are made, and how meaning is produced in oral history narratives. Students will learn different strategies of how to prepare for, conduct, and process an oral history interview; how to develop an interview question guide, how to do background research, how to phrase questions to get the most out of an interview, and what type of equipment choices one has. Towards the latter half of the course, we will cover post-interview processing, including: transcribing, editing, indexing, and presenting the interview. Students will have the opportunity to uncover "new" historical findings within our local community, by conducting an interview of one woman, adding to the oral history research available on women. This course may be used to meet the "Women, Gender, and/or Sexuality" breadth requirements for the concentration in American Culture.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or AMCULT

WOMENSTD 436 — Human Rights, Gender and Culture
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Ticktin,Miriam I

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course introduces the concept of human rights in interdisciplinary perspective. Processes of globalization have facilitated the adoption of human rights discourse transnationally by widely varying actors, particularly in the 1990s. However, just as those who study globalization argue that globalization does not entail a process of standardization or homogenization, but must be understood via its cultural specificities, this course is based on the argument that the transnational discourse of human rights must be understood in local contexts. The readings will help students explore how an increasingly hegemonic discourse is culturally contextualized and mediated; and while trying to understand how claims of resistance and struggle are being re-articulated in a legal language of rights and entitlements, we will pay particular attention to how these claims often have unintended consequences. We will use gender, race and class as focal points for the varying discourses of rights; this provides a useful perspective through which to examine who benefits from this discourse of social justice, in that women, people of color and non-property owners were left out of the initial definitions of "humanity" that universal human rights were protecting.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in WOMENSTD or ANTHRCUL

WOMENSTD 443 — Pedagogy of Empowerment: Activism in Race, Gender, and Health
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Haniff,Nesha Z

FA 2007
Credits: 3

The Pedagogy of Empowerment will explore race, gender, health and activism in the context of HIV/AIDS in United States Black communities. Through this two-tiered course, students will cultivate strong background knowledge of HIV in Black communities, and explore issues of accountability, apathy, and activism as they pertain to HIV prevention. The course will explore the multifaceted dimensions of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Black communities including: its history and epidemiology; gendered dynamics of HIV prevention; intersectionality, HIV infection, and stigma; homophobia and the politics of inclusion and exclusion; and various community responses. Students will use what they learn about the context of the epidemic to critically analyze chosen HIV prevention interventions, and explore the intersection of academia and activism. All students will learn an HIV education module designed by Professor Nesha Haniff. As an exercise in praxis, each student will be required to use and experience this HIV prevention module in a community of her or his choice. There will be a new emphasis on microbicides — a subject that is critical to women's control over sexual safety. A part of the activism for this class is some level of involvement in advocacy for research and funding in this area. Advocacy in gyno-centered technologies is necessary in shifting the paradigm of condom use as the primary methodology in HIV prevention. This approach is detrimental for women's health and agency and leaves them the problematic of fighting a 21st-century epidemic with 18th- century technology, further women's sexual safety still resides in the hands of men who must make the decision to use a condom. This fact of HIV prevention is totally unacceptable for all women. It is time that women have in their hands methodologies that they can control to keep their own bodies safe. This will be a central theme in the pedagogy of empowerment.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or CAAS 201.

WOMENSTD 447 — Sociology of Gender
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: McGann,Pj; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender that focuses on how gender is embedded in social life. At the individual level, gender is an essential aspect of personhood and personal experience; at the institutional level, gender is a major way that societies differentiate their members. At both the individual and institutional levels, gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality to structure identities, rights, privileges, and opportunities. Specific topics of study include gender identity, how children and adults "become" gendered and "do" their gender(s), gender and sport, gender and desire, the binary nature of the North American gender order, transgenderism, and intersexuality.

Advisory Prerequisite: SOC 200/301/443/PSYCH 405/WOMENSTD 405/permisson of instructor

WOMENSTD 482 — Special Topics Minicourse
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 2
Other: Minicourse

Credit Exclusions: A maximum of 7 credits of WOMENSTD 482 and 483 may be counted toward graduation.

This course takes up a single topic of a very specific or contemporary nature.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 240 or permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 490 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of WOMENSTD 490 and 491.

WOMENSTD 490 and 491 should be elected during the senior year by students writing Honors theses. Students may elect between 2 and 6 credits over the course of the academic year.

The Honors Thesis

The thesis may take a variety of forms, for example: an activism project, a research project, or a creative or performance piece. Whatever the form of the thesis, it must include a piece of scholarly writing that reflects the student's engagement with Women's Studies. Given the interdisciplinary nature of the Women's Studies Program, the honors thesis advisor has the responsibility of determining the appropriate methodology, length, and format of the thesis, based on disciplinary norms and expectations. These expectations should be established clearly, and the specific plans for the thesis (kind of supervision and form of thesis) should be discussed and agreed upon by the thesis advisor and the student early on.

Selection of an appropriate thesis advisor is crucial to the success of the Honors thesis. Only members of the Women's Studies faculty may serve as Honors thesis advisors in Women's Studies. Go to http://www.lsa.umich.edu/women/about/facultyalpha.htm for faculty listings.

During the senior year, honors concentrators register for WOMENSTD 490 the first term and WOMENSTD 491 the second term. In these independent study courses they conduct the research and writing for the thesis under the close faculty supervision of the thesis advisor. . At the beginning of the Fall Semester, the student should provide the thesis advisor with a Plan of Study that includes 1) a research proposal, 2) a list of research and writing goals for the Fall semester 3) a research schedule indicating when and how the student will accomplish his/her research and writing goals, and 4) a preliminary bibliography. The advisor should approve the plan of study no later than the 3rd week of the semester. At the end of the semester, both the student and the thesis advisor will submit reports on the student's progress to the Director of Undergraduate Studies for review.

To register for 490 and 491 the student should submit the independent study form signed by the thesis advisor to the Women's Studies office staff. The staff will then add an electronic override and the student may register for the course the following business day.

The student may receive a "Y" grade in WOMENSTD 490 until the thesis is completed. In the case of a "Y" grade, the thesis advisor submits a Supplemental Grade Report when the thesis is completed or the student formally exits the Honors Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators.

WOMENSTD 491 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of WOMENSTD 490 and 491.

WOMENSTD 490 and 491 should be elected during the senior year by students writing Honors theses. Students may elect between 2 and 6 credits over the course of the academic year.

During the senior year, honors concentrators register for WOMENSTD 490 the first term and WOMENSTD 491 the second term. In these independent study courses they conduct the research and writing for the thesis under the close faculty supervision of the thesis advisor. At the beginning of the Fall Academic term, the student should provide the thesis advisor with a Plan of Study that includes:

  1. a research proposal,
  2. a list of research and writing goals for the Fall semester
  3. a research schedule indicating when and how the student will accomplish his/her research and writing goals, and
  4. a preliminary bibliography.

The advisor should approve the plan of study no later than the 3rd week of the academic term. At the end of the semester, both the student and the thesis advisor will submit reports on the student's progress to the Director of Undergraduate Studies for review.

To register for WOMENSTD 490 and 491 the student should submit the independent study form signed by the thesis advisor to the Women's Studies office staff. The staff will then add an electronic override and the student may register for the course the following business day.

The Second Reader

The second reader of the thesis is a faculty member chosen jointly by the student and the thesis advisor by the end of the fall semester of the senior year. The second reader need not be affiliated with the Women's Studies Program, but his or her area of expertise should be relevant to the thesis topic. The contribution of the second reader may vary, but the student should consult with the second reader while s/he is writing the thesis, and the second reader should comment on thesis drafts as well as contribute to the final evaluation of the thesis.

Completing the Honors Thesis

The thesis is to be submitted to both the thesis advisor and the second reader no later than the last day of classes in the term in which the student intends to graduate. (Graduating seniors will have already submitted their Honors Concentration Release form, Honors Card, and diploma application to the Honors Program, and completed a distribution worksheet with a General Advisor.) The student should also submit three copies of the thesis, with a cover sheet that includes the thesis title, student name, thesis advisor name and telephone number, and second reader name to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Women's Studies for the Undergraduate Committee.

The thesis advisor and the second reader determine whether the thesis should receive an Honors notation and may recommend what kind of notation it should receive. The faculty members of the Undergraduate Committee will read all theses that have been deemed worthy of an Honors notation and assign a notation of "Honors," "High Honors," or "Highest Honors," to each one. Not more than one week after graduation the Director of Undergraduate Studies will inform the student, the advisor, and the second reader of the Honors notation the thesis has been awarded. The Director of Undergraduate Studies then forwards the student name, thesis title, and Honors notation to the Honors Program.

The Honors notation is recorded on the student's diploma and transcript. There will be no notation on the diploma or transcript if the student receives no honors.

The student should provide one bound copy of the thesis to be kept on file in the Women's Studies Program Office.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior Honors Women's Studies concentrators. Permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 498 — Gender and the Individual
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mahalingam,Ramaswami

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Examines how gender shapes and is shaped by individual women and men. We draw on psychological theories, feminist theories, and the empirical research literature to examine how gender operates for women and men. The course considers ways in which gender is constructed socially; examines particular domains in which gender is experienced and performed; and examines sources of gender in biology, lifespan development, and socialization.

Enforced Prerequisites: One of the following: PSYCH 111, 112, 114, or 115, or a WOMENSTD course.

WOMENSTD 501 — Introduction to Graduate Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keller-Cohen,Deborah

FA 2007
Credits: 1

This course introduces students to graduate study in the joint Women's Studies PhD programs. It is intended to give new students a place to form community, to meet Women's Studies faculty, to think about Women's Studies as a discipline, and to begin to discuss professional issues.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 530 — Theories of Feminism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Wingrove,Elizabeth R; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Theories of Feminism explores important trends and debates in feminist theory over the last four decades. We will approach this vibrant period in feminist thought as an ongoing conversation among scholars in various disciplines and between scholars and activists about how best to understand and challenge the operation of power, power that constitutes differences between women and men and, as importantly, differences among women — those, for instance of race, class, sexuality, and nation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 531 — Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hubbs,Nadine M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

A high-level introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer Studies, along with its various sub-fields. The seminar is designed for graduate students in all schools and disciplines and does not assume previous knowledge. Required for the graduate certificate in LGBTQ Studies.

WOMENSTD 580 — Independent Study
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the department faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 590 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mulhorn,Kristine A; homepage
Instructor: Brown,Susan Holly Curwin

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

WOMENSTD 601 — Approaches to Feminist Scholarship in the Humanities
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hubbs,Nadine M; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

What do feminist humanists do and how do they do it? This course explores these questions through comparative analysis of significant works of scholarship by feminists working in various disciplines, including literary studies, history, cultural anthropology and cultural studies. In particular, we will investigate how experience is used to establish authority, how images and other cultural products function as evidence, why and how history matters, how theory enables the interrogation of knowledge production, and how various writing strategies are deployed for different aims. The course is aimed at graduate students interested in practicing as well as understanding feminist scholarship and in deepening their disciplinary work through the use of feminist approaches and methodologies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 690 — Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 001, SEM
Gender and Transnationalism: Globalization, identity and Place

Instructor: Fadlalla,Amal Hassan

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Many feminists and anthropologists have critiqued the historical absence of gender from early analyses of diaspora and transnationalism. They have recently demonstrated the significance of centering the experiences of both women and men in documenting the narratives and practices of dispersal. Building on these theoretical premises, this course examines the various ways in which mobility, border-crossing, (dis)location, and (dis)placement are gendered and are given cultural and political meanings in the era of trans-migration. To what extent have "globalization" and "transnationalism" advance our theoretical understanding of the complexities of social norms and constructions, especially those of race, ethnicity, class, and health and reproduction? We will particularly explore how questions of power, gender, and class intersect to shape immigrants' daily struggles with new systems and how immigrants create and "imagine" their own social spaces within their new settings and with reference to their homelands. We will analyze the increasing trends of mobility and (dis)placement with reference to the rapidly increasing liberalization of global economies and the escalation of poverty, militarism, wars, and violence.

Our readings and discussion will focus on cultural and theoretical perspectives from Anthropology and Women's Studies. And we will take as examples ethnographies and narratives of immigrants from different parts of the world, specifically Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. The seminar is intended for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 002, SEM
Sexuality and Social Justice

Instructor: Zurbriggen,Eileen L

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course is an advanced seminar focusing on the study of sexuality from a social justice perspective. The primary theoretical and methodological framework is social psychological; however, the course also includes readings from sociology, anthropology, gender studies, feminist studies, public heath, philosophy, political science, and other disciplines. The course is not designed to be an overview of all topics related to sexuality and social justice. Rather, we will focus in greater depth on a smaller subset of topics that highlight the importance of power (especially gendered power) in understanding the intersections between sexuality and social justice. The course is designed to acquaint you with some of the key issues, questions, and findings in the field, as well as to allow you to develop some of the critical skills needed by research psychologists.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 003, SEM
Globalization, Culture and Women's Health

Instructor: Low,Lisa K; homepage

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This graduate seminar will examine global perspectives on women's health, with an emphasis on the interaction of personal with structural (e.g., social, political, economic, cultural) factors. Personal factors include both biological and psychosocial conditions; systemic factors include social, economic and political structures. Particular attention will be devoted to understudied issues and the effects of gender based assumptions and traditions for women at high risk for poor health. Analysis of women's health issues within a global context will draw on feminist, social justice and human rights traditions. The influence of global health policy on local community provision of and experience of women's health care will be considered. Issues of measurement, accurate representation, evaluation design, data collection and analysis will be discussed as methods of informing international policy development focused on women's health. During the academic term, we will discuss the role of women as recipients, active participants in, and providers of care with a goal of critiquing and developing theories about the state of women's health worldwide.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 004, SEM
Queer in America

Instructor: Newton,Esther

FA 2007
Credits: 3

This course will cover major ethnographic and historical writing on lesbian and gay cultures and communities in the United States. It will deal with such issues as the history of the work itself, from the sexologists of the late 19th century to the present; the shifting definitions of the object of study from "homosexual" and "queer" to "gay" to "lesbian and gay" to "lgbt" and back to "queer"; the way community has been defined; the early ascendancy of social science work an its later overshadowing by cultural studies and methodological issues having to do with the position of the gay or straight social scientist.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 698 — Special Seminar
Section 005, SEM
Black Masculinity

Instructor: Awkward,Michael

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Explores in greater depth some of the topics offered at lower levels in the WS curriculum. The special topics rubric allows for research, readings, and/or discussions of the topic in greater depth.

Advisory Prerequisite: One Graduate course in Women's Studies and Graduate standing.

WOMENSTD 890 — Advanced Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Every Women's Studies graduate certificate student is required to carry out a research project with a feminist perspective. The form of the project will vary with individual students and is subject to approval by the student's faculty advisor. This can be a chapter of a dissertation, a prelim, a master's thesis project or a project undertaken in the Women's Studies Program.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 530 and 601 or 602. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

WOMENSTD 891 — Joint Ph.D. Advanced Research
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

In the interdepartmental doctoral program, students have the opportunity to work out an interdisciplinary approach to a research problem with a faculty committee from an early stage of their training. They benefit from the kind of interdisciplinary mentorship that is necessary to develop and complete an interdisciplinary dissertation.

The course is designed to culminate in the production of an interdisciplinary research paper. The process for achieving this goal will vary from year to year. However, students are encouraged, wherever possible, to build on the work they began in their first year, in the required courses on Feminist Theory (WOMENSTD 530) and Approaches to Feminist Scholarship (WOMENSTD 601 or 603).

The preliminary exam in Women' Studies is based on the research paper completed in the WOMENSTD 891. The student will defend the paper in an oral exam to the prelim committee. This prelim committee should include at least one member from Women's Studies, who is not also appointed in the English Department, and one from the English Department, who is not also appointed in Women's Studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must be admitted to JT Ph. D in ENGLISH/WOMENSTD, PSYCH/WOMENSTD, HISTORY/WOMENSTD, or SOC/WOMENSTD

WOMENSTD 892 — Advanced Research, LGBTQ Certificate Students
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 3

Every LGBTQ Graduate Certificate student will carry out a substantial culminating research project on an LGBTQ topic.

The project could be a dissertation chapter, a preliminary exam, a masters thesis or a large-scale independent study.

Advisory Prerequisite: WOMENSTD 531

WOMENSTD 990 — Dissertation-Precandidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced Doctoral Students.

WOMENSTD 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

FA 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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