Romance Languages and Literatures

Courses in French (Division 371)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Students with prior study of French may elect this course only on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the department, and in the sections specified for them. The sequence French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar and vocabulary which students need (1) to understand the French of everyday life when spoken at moderate speed; (2) to be understood in typical situations of everyday life; and (3) to read non-technical French of moderate difficulty. French structures are taught in class through many communication exercises stressing listening and speaking. Readings on subjects dealing with French culture and civilization are introduced toward the end of French 101, with an increased amount in French 102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20 to 25 students. Homework consists of studying grammar, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work( 1 1/2 - 2 hours per week) on pronunciation, structural exercises, dialogues, and listening comprehension. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations, listening comprehension and speaking tests.

Section 020: Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). This CSP section, which covers the complete course syllabus, is designed for students who want to be certain that they are highly prepared for French 102 and are willing to devote the effort necessary to be so. Beyond the five hours a week (see Time Schedule) of regular class, another hour will be provided for detailed explanations of central concepts, for additional practice, and for reviews. Also, small group tutoring will be arranged according to individual needs.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

See French 101. French 102 is not open to students who have begun instruction elsewhere. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to take the placement test, or enroll in French 103. For advice, see H. Neu or M. P. Hagiwara.

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

Students elect this course on the basis of the Placement Test or by permission of the department. It is for those with previous study of French (normally 2-3 years in high school or 1 term of college or University French not at University of Michigan) whose proficiency is not sufficient for second-year work. The course objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. It moves with a rapid pace, covering about 60 percent of the French 101 materials by term, and about 60 percent of the French 102 material by the end of the term. Classes meet five times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, but its daily amount is up to 60 percent more than in either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

205. French Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 205/206 are informal mini-courses with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. (Only French 205 is offered in Fall Term). It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Credit/No Credit only, determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year French. French 100, 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

The sequence French 231/232 is built upon the work done in French 101/102. It presents intensive and comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and plays. In addition, French 232 has outside reading: students read a book on their own, discuss it in class, and take a reading comprehension test. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on subjects of intellectual interest, to understand conversations on such topics, and to read unedited French text at sight with a high degree of direct comprehension. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework consists of grammar study, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (30 minutes per week). There are weekly quizzes as well as midterm and final examinations. Both courses also have listening comprehension and speaking tests, and 232, in addition, has an outside reading test.

232. Second-Year French, Continued. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

See French 231.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LSA language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed 100, 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Other Language Courses

305. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 305 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 205/206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-25 students. There are no examinations, and attendance, homework and active participation in classroom activities determine the credit/no credit grades.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).
Section 005.
The purpose of this course is to help students develop a proficiency in the spoken language and improve their writing skills. French grammar is reviewed, and a discussion of readings on various aspects of contemporary French life permits participants to expand vocabulary, to practice speaking French and to increase their understanding of French daily life. Outside readings in connection with the basic cultural themes are studied. Press articles, interviews and the like are used to stimulate discussions. Classes meet twice a week in sections varying between ten and sixteen students. All classes are taught in French. Laboratory activities (listening comprehension program), simulations, one novel, one play. Bi-weekly essays. Two examinations, one final composition. Also, one weekly lecture on some linguistic problems and cultural aspects of modern France for all sections together, as part of the three hours per week required. (M. Gabrielli)

362. Advanced French. French 361. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to develop communication in spoken French and to increase familiarity with French culture. Also, through an analysis of interviews with French people from all walks of life, students are able to distinguish among various styles of expression and to understand how language reveals social class, political leanings, and other cultural characteristics. Although there is no formal teaching of French grammar, some class time is devoted to grammatical difficulties and to the correction of common mistakes which are revealed through the weekly compositions. Course emphasis, however, is on conversation and discussion. Recordings are used in class in an effort to develop an understanding of spoken French of various levels of difficulty. Classes meet three times each week and are taught in French. All sections take three common examinations. Occasional laboratory activities, outside readings, and simulations. (Sections 001-002: Gravdal; Sections 003;004: Ngate)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c)development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays (at least one a week). Final course grade is based on the level of proficiency achieved at the end of the term, with important consideration given to the quality of the work throughout the term. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students majoring in French. (Muller)

380. Intermediate Business French. French 361 and 362. Students may be permitted to take 380 and 362 concurrently. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the language of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is partly built around a fictitious company: EUROSPORT, whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France. The writing will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French. There will be occasional translation exercises and one simulation. Students will write two medium length papers and take a final exam. Coursepack. No auditors. To respond to student demands, the maximum enrollment has been increased to 45. If the course is full, the second meeting will be divided into two recitation sections, taught by B. CHORIER and M. GABRIELLI, meeting twice a week, while the first one will be a lecture. (M. Gabrielli)

453. French Phonology and Morphology. French 361 and 362, or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The course deals primarily with French phonology and morphology from a structural point of view. In phonology, English and French vowels, consonants, syllabic structures, and prosodic features are compared. Students learn to describe French sounds accurately, explain causes of pronunciation problems encountered by speakers of American English, transcribe prose and poems using phonetic symbols, and read phonetic transcriptions of dialogues. In morphology, the evolution of French sounds and words and the formation of words through compounding and derivational processes constitute the main topics. The course is conducted in French. No previous knowledge of phonetics is necessary. Class time is divided into lectures and travaux pratiques. There are three one-hour tests. (Hagiwara)

456/Rom. Ling. 456/Educ. D456. Teaching French/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

The course consists of four main components: phonology, morphology, syntax, and psycholinguistics. In each component, discussions of theories are combined with practical problem-solving. Students are introduced to different fields of linguistics, a contrastive study of English and French phonology, a linguistic method of analyzing the French language, problems of teaching pronunciation, grammar, vocabulary, and an evaluation of different teaching methods, techniques, and available materials. The course is conducted in English. Class time is divided into lectures, discussions, and travaux pratiques. There are midterm and final examinations and a paper. High proficiency of spoken and written French is required. No previous knowledge of linguistics or phonetics is needed. (Hagiwara)


Literature

387/388/389 Introduction to French Literature. The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

387. Introduction to French Literature (1600 to 1800). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course will introduce students to French literature of the 17th and 18th centuries. Its aim is to familiarize them with the literary genres and techniques prevalent in these periods, the cultural and ideological contexts in which the works were produced, and to introduce them to the methods of literary analysis. The class will combine lecture and discussion. Active student participation will be encouraged. Students will be responsible for the following texts: Corneille, Le Cid, Molière, Le Tartuffe, Racine, Phedre, Voltaire, Candide, Rousseau, Les Reveries du promeneur solitaire. Grades will be based on a short paper on each of the works studied and on class participation. There will be no final examination. The course will be conducted in French.

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course is an introduction to four of the principal writers of nineteenth-century French literature. We study the themes of ambition, avarice and solitude in novels by Stendhal, Balzac and Flaubert. We also read poems from Les Fleurs du Mal by Baudelaire. Emphasis placed on the analysis of narrative techniques, imagery and structure. A typical assignment consists of reading some twenty-five pages in a novel with "close reading" of some four or five paragraphs. These pages are then discussed in class. Students are required to write some six to seven papers in French of two to three pages in length. Each paper is corrected for grammar, construction, choice of vocabulary and, of course, for content. The final grades are based on the results of the written work and on student participation in the classroom. There is no final exam. The course is given in French. (Morton)

420. Modern Theatre. French 361 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

The course work will be devoted almost entirely to a short novel (65pp.) by Louise de Vilmorin: "Madame de" written in 1950 (Folio ed.). During the first weeks of the term, we study this work closely with the approach becoming more drama oriented as the term progresses. We then form small groups who have to write both in and outside class their own dramatic adaptation of the original novella. One or two plays thus created will be selected by the beginning of October and rehearsed from that point on, with a view toward a public performance in December. The entire class has the opportunity to participate in the production. Besides the creative aspect of the course, the emphasis is on enunciation, body language, stage presence, teamwork and general group dynamics. Students are evaluated on a paper concerning the novella itself, on their original adaptation and on their participation and progress during the rehearsals. No final examination. No auditors. Regular attendance and participation are imperative. Outside readings (on language dealing with the corresponding creative aspect of the course: Pratique du Style, Trouver le mot juste, Le Francais sans faute. (Gabrielli)

442. Topics and Themes in French Literature. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.
Section 001 Theater in the Mind's Eye or Le Theatre comme y etiez.
This course is an introduction to reading playtexts as drama, i.e., theatrical action. To read plays "as literature" neglects the meaningfulness and dramatic impact they acquire in the theatre. On the other hand, a given theatrical performance can only actualize some of the many possibilities inherent in the text. So the course attempts to approach dramatic texts via the theatrical imagination, as a way of bringing them to theatrical "life" without tying oneself to the practical constraints of an actual performance. We will focus on texts Classical, Romantic and modern - which themselves explore aspects of theatricality, and allow them to teach us how to read them theatrically. No midterm. Final by term-paper. Some lectures, but mainly discussions, in French. If possible, some field-trips to theatrical performances in Ann Arbor will be arranged. TEXTS (for purchase): S. Beckett, Fin de Partie (Minuit); P. Claudel, L'announce faite a Marie (Poche); E. Ionesco, Le Roi se meurt; Molière, Oeuvres completes, t. II (Garnier-Flammarion) and A. de Musset, Theatre, t. I (Garnier-Flammarion). Extra requirements for Graduate students. (Chambers)

Section 002; Women's Writing in French from the 17th Century to the Present. This course will examine the works of French women writers from the 17th century to the present in various genres prose fiction, poetry, essays, letters. We will consider the place of female authors in the literary canon and the problematics of the woman writer but the primary focus will be close analysis of selected texts in the light of feminist criticism. Our discussion will also explore the concept of the female text and the implications of "writing as a woman". Authors will include: Scudery Lafayette, Sevigne, De Stael sand Tristan, Vivien, Colette, de Beauvoir, Wittig, Surraute, Duras and Sixous. NB: Texts will be read in French; discussion will be conducted in French or English depending on the composition of the class. Requirements: an oral presentation; a paper; and a final exam. Prerequisites: French 387, 388, 389 or the equivalent. (Stanton)

451. Introduction to Twentieth-Century French Literature. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

Le cours porte essentiellement sur la generation nee vers 1870, representee par Andre Gide (L'Immoraliste et La porte etroite), Marcel Proust (Un amour de Swann) et Paul Valery (dont nous ne lirons que quelques poemes), ainsi que sur la poesie de Guillaume Apollinaire (1881-1918). Le cours pourrait porter comme titre: les heritiers du symbolisme et la tentative de depassement operee par Apollinaire. Les devoirs (au number de trois, et qui tiennent lieu d'examen) seront rediges en francais par les etudiants qui se specialisent dans cette langue; les autres sont autorises a s'exprimer en anglais. (Muller)

478. Intellectual Trends in Modern France. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

Times change, as anyone who has lived from May '68 to the rise of fabulous Fabius (in France) or from the riots to Reagan (in the U.S.) is well aware. This course assumes that a comprehension of the mechanism of change is of value both for understanding the apparent succession of historical periods and for predicting how society will evolve from here. It will seek to demonstrate that each major change in social outlook affects the whole political, intellectual, and artistic climate of society, so that evolutions occurring in philosophy, politics, art, and letters are parallel. The course will present a theory of fundamental change and will trace the history of ideas in France from 1870 to 1970 from the perspective of that theory. Readings, primarily literary, from Rimbaud to Robbe-Grillet and from surrealism to existentialism to deconstruction will illustrate the theory and form the basis of class discussions. Readings, lectures, and discussions in French. Two papers and a final examination. (Nelson)

481. Literature of the Eighteenth Century. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

A study of the Enlightenment with particular emphasis on Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau and Diderot. (Morton)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (FL).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with emphasis as well on conversation. Text for the course is Lazzarino's Prego with workbook and lab manual; Italian 101 covers the first half of this text (Chapters 1-11). Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm or hour examinations, and a final examination.

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden student knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also encouraged. The course covers the second half of Lazzarino's Prego (Chapters 12-22) with workbook and lab manual; a cultural reader supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm or hourly examinations, and a final examination.

Other Language and Literature Courses

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a brief review of grammar, and the elements of composition are stressed. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Occasional oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

360. Italian Culture and History. (3). (HU).

Through lectures, slides, and films supplemented by readings, this course presents a survey of Italy's cultural achievements in their historical context from the Middle Ages and Renaissance to the present. Students with diverse interests and backgrounds art history, literature, music, etc. will be able to pursue specialized topics within the general historical outline. Topics include Renaissance art and literature, music and the rise of opera, the unification and industrialization of modern Italy, with some attention to contemporary cinema and Italian-American history. The course is taught in English, but students with a background in Italian will have the opportunity of reading some texts in the original.

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short reading materials ranging from newspaper and magazine articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, translations, and dictations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly. (Olken)

420. Topics and Themes in Modern Italian Literature. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Section 001 Donna e Mobile?: The Feminine Presence in Modern Italian Literature.
From Manzoni's introduction of a humble silk weaver and a dissipated and murderous nun, Verga's robust and enigmatic peasant women, and Serao's submissive and frustrated housewives and clerks, Italy's outstanding narrators have chronicled, often unconsciously, the slowly changing role of women in a slowly changing society. From the beginning of the modern period in the early nineteenth century to the second half of the twentieth century themes of inspiration and disillusionment have dramatized the prevailing cultural and psychological attitudes expressed by these writers. Included in the syllabus for lectures and class discussions will also be works by Pirandello, Vittorini and Ginsburg. Lectures and readings will be in English. (Olken)

Courses in Portuguese (Division 452)

101. Elementary Portuguese. (4). (FL).

Portuguese 101 is an introductory course in the Portuguese language as spoken in Brazil and is designed for beginning language students. The approach is audio-lingual and cognitive with oral and written exercises, weekly examinations. Required text: Ellison et al., Modern Portuguese. (Brakel)

231. Second-Year Portuguese. Portuguese 102 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

Portuguese 231 is designed to enhance and develop students' speaking, reading, writing, and understanding of modern Portuguese. It is the sequel to Portuguese 102 and assumes exposure to the grammatical system of the language. Students will read selected short stories and novels by Brazilian authors, do grammatical exercises, write guided essays and converse in Portuguese. There will be bi-weekly examinations. Texts: Magro and De Paula, Leituras Brasileiras Contemporaneas; Jose Mauro de Vasconcelos, O Meu Pe de Laranja Lima. (Brakel)

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

300. Introduction to the Romance Languages. French, Spanish, or Italian: five terms at college level or equivalent. (3). (HU).

The purposes of this course are to discuss the relationships which exist among the various Romance languages, to acquaint students with the methods and objectives of Romance linguistics, and to attract students to a specialization program. Following a brief introduction to the methodology of linguistic analysis, the grammatical structures of French, Spanish, Italian, and Rumanian are compared. The course is conducted in English, and all required reading is in English. Students who can read other languages are encouraged to pursue certain topics in these languages. The text is Rebecca Posner, The Romance Languages: A Linguistic Introduction, and it is supplemented by handouts. (Leonard)

455/Spanish 455/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See Spanish 455 for description. (Wolfe)

456/French 456/Educ. D456. Teaching French/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

See French 456 for description. (Hagiwara)

Courses in Rumanian (Division 463)

101. Elementary Rumanian. (4). (FL).

The principal subject is the Romanian language, its grammar and use. Also stressed is the cultural history of Romania and of Romanian civilization. In this regard, the use of film-strips and records is a prime tool. No special background is needed except interest and receptivity. Oral and written examinations will be given on an approximately monthly basis, more for the purpose of checking student progress than for assigning a hierarchy of grades. The methods of instruction will be lecture, discussion, and audiovisual materials mentioned above. (Rosu)

231. Second-Year Rumanian. Rumanian 102. (4). (FL).

The principal subject is the Romanian language, its grammar and use. Also stressed is the cultural history of Romania and of Romanian civilization. In this regard, the use of film-strips and records is a prime tool. Oral and written examinations will be given on an approximately monthly basis, more for the purpose of checking student progress than for assigning a hierarchy of grades. The methods of instruction will be lecture, discussion, and the audiovisual materials methods above. (Rosu)

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction.

101. Elementary Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and reading Spanish. Grade based on three departmental evening exams, three oral exams, other quizzes and written work, daily oral work. (Spanish 101 and 102 are the equivalent of Spanish 100.)

Section 014: Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). This CSP section, which covers the complete course syllabus, is designed for students who want to be certain that they are highly prepared for Spanish 102 and are willing to devote the effort necessary to be so. Beyond the five hours a week (see schedule) of regular class, another hour (to be scheduled) will be provided for detailed explanations of central concepts, for additional practice, and for reviews. Also, small group tutoring will be arranged according to individual needs.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 103. (4). (FL).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental evening exams, three oral exams, other quizzes and written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who completed 101 at the University of Michigan.

Section 019: Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP). This CSP section is designed for native speakers of Spanish who have some degree of aural-oral fluency in the language but lack basic reading and writing skills. The class will meet five hours a week.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish l02 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

205. Spanish Conversation for Non-concentrators. Spanish 102 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purpose of this one credit hour course is to develop confidence in the use of the spoken language and to encourage development of listening comprehension and oral skills. Most of the course work is done in class, but outside readings which are later discussed in class are sometimes assigned. Often the class is divided into small groups which then pursue activities which are of special interest to the group. These classes meet two hours each week, and the most important qualities necessary to participate successfully are a willingness and a desire to learn. Grades are based solely on class performance. There is no standard text. This course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements. (Dvorak)

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 100, 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students; and to provide some insight into the literature, history, and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of quizzes designed to assess ability to speak, read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 112. (4). (FL).
Section 001.
This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, history, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes designed to assess ability to speak, read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed 100, 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate. (Dworkin)

Other Language Courses

305. Practical Spanish. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purposes of this one credit hour course are (1) to apply Spanish to real-life situations and (2) to increase the linguistic skills (phonological, morphological, and syntactical) necessary for mastery of conversational Spanish. While the instructor serves as the leader in determining classroom activities, the class is often divided into small groups of three or four students. The class meets two hours each week, and the course grade is based primarily on class work. There is no standardized text. The course cannot be used to satisfy Spanish concentration requirements.

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: translations, presentations, readings in Spanish (short stories, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Preparation of sections of grammar and translations will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on weekly assignments, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Anderson)

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 361. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).
Section 001.
Spanish 362 is intended to continue improving the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of combinations of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: translations, presentations, readings in Spanish (short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Compositions of at least two pages will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Section 001 Anderson; Section 002 Vaquero; Section 003 Mignolo)

453. Advanced Syntax. Spanish 361 and 362. (3). (Excl).

This course aims to improve student understanding and mastery of written Spanish through:(a) detailed analysis of specific syntactic problems, such as the tense structure of Spanish, the subjunctive mood, and the pronoun system (b) extensive grammar exercises, (c) vocabulary building exercises and (d) writing and editing compositions. Student grade is based on three major exams, compositions, and class participation (discussion and correction of grammar exercises). Class meets three times a week. (Dvorak)

455/Rom. Ling. 455/Educ. D455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics. Permission of concentration adviser. (3). (Excl).

Theoretical and practical aspects of second language acquisition with special reference to the acquisition of Spanish by speakers of English. Principles of syntactic, semantic, morphological, and phonological analysis applied to practical problems in teaching and learning Spanish. Among the topics included in the course are: theory; analysis of learning problems; course design; textbook analysis; testing; techniques for teaching and learning (a) listening, (b) speaking, (c) reading, and (d) composition skills. Knowledge of Spanish and English is required. (Wolfe)

Literature

331. Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. Open to students at all levels. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (HU).

Literature of the 20th Century is, perhaps, one of the major contributions of Latin American culture to the world. Names such as Pablo Neudo, Octavio Paz, Juan Carlos Maniategui or Jose Maria Arguedas are widely known and translated and are Nobel Prize winners. They have made crucial contributions in identifying and analyzing crucial aspects of Latin American historical and social issues. Jorge Luis Borges, if not awarded with such a distinguished honor is, without doubt, the most influential Latin American writer of this century. This course is designed to offer, through a reading and analysis of major works, an understanding of significant dimensions (artistic, ideological, historical) of Latin American culture. No specific background is required, although familiarity with the literary world would be encouraged. The course is not part of a departmental sequence. It is, though, a course that may help Spanish concentrators, although not specifically designed for interdepartmental curriculum. This course could be taken for Latin American Studies concentration. It will combine lectures, discussions and oral presentations or workshops, depending on the number of students enrolled. Evaluations will be based on oral participation and on three written reports. (Mignolo)

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

A study of Spanish literature in the Medieval and Golden Age periods (1000-1700). Students will read several texts of Spanish literature including Poema de Mio Cid, El Abencerraje y la hermosa Jarifa, and Lazarillo de Tormes. The discussions will center around a broad cultural background including moral and political themes as well as formal aspects of the texts. There will be one short report to be given orally in class, two 3-4 page papers in Spanish on the texts, and one final exam consisting of essay questions on readings. Students will be evaluated on the basis of papers, exams and class discussion. Methods: lecture discussion. (Vaquero)

372. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

The Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, the Generation of '98, and the years around the Spanish Civil War are the periods represented in this survey of modern Spanish literature. The course will thus lay a good historical foundation for further Spanish courses and for comparisons to readings from other literatures. Essays, plays, poems, and novels are analyzed as individual works for the beginning student, and an effort is made to show how they exemplify their historical and cultural context. Some of the authors to be studied are Larra, Zorrilla, Espronceda, Becquer, Galdos, Unamuno, and Lorca. The class format is basically recitation, but lectures and reports will also be used. Exercises consist of quizzes, a term paper, and a final examination. The course is conducted in Spanish. (Hafter)

375. Civilización de Espa a (Spanish Civilization). Spanish 232. Spanish 375 and 376 may not both be included in a concentration plan in Spanish. (3). (HU).

La Civilizacion de Espa a es una muestra interesante de la historia humana: desde las pinturas paleoliticas de Altamira hasta la obra de Picaso, pasando por la presencia de finicios, griegos, romanos y visigodos en la Antiguedad, por la convivencia de cristianos, musulmanes y judios en la Edad Media, por la expansion imperial en la Edad Moderna, y por la reduccion a sus limites actuales en el siglo XIX. Las clases se dictan en espanol y se ilustran con lecturas de textos fundamentales y con proyecccion de transparencias. Los estudiantes realizaran un trabajo de investigacion sobre un tema especifico y examenes parciales a lo largo del curso. (Lopez-Grigera)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).
Section 001 Historical Survey of Latin American Literature (19th Century).
Study of the main Spanish American authors of the century in poetry, narrative, theatre and essay (Andres Bello, Jose Marti, Ruben Dario; Jose Hernandez' Martin Fierro; D.F. Sarmiento, E. Echeverria, M.A. Segura, Florencio Sanchez). The concentration is on reading a selection of literary texts. First course in the sequence 381-382-463. Conducted in Spanish. Lecture and discussion will be the format of the course. The student's performance will be evaluated through grades obtained in: (a) reports, (b) midterm exam, and (c) final exam. Reading list: Andres Bello, A la agricultura; Jose Marti, Versos sencillos; Ruben Dario, Azul y Prosas profanas; Jose Hernandez, Martin Fierro; Domingo F. Sarmiento, Facundo; Esteban Echeverria, El matadero; Alberto Blest Gana, Martin Rivas. (Goic)

462. Golden Age. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).
Spanish Golden Ages.
Estudio de conjunto de la literatura espanola de los silgos XVI y XVII:corrientes ideologicas y esteticas de la literatura espanola en relacion con la europea de aquel momento; obras y autores de mayor relevancia en cada uno de los principales generos; evolucion de los estilos en prosa y verso. Sociologia de la difusion de la obra literaria en la Espana de los Austrias. Analisis literario y linguistico de los textos. (Lopez-Grigera)

463. Literatura Hispano-Americana, Siglo XVI a XIX. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).

The goal of this course is that of exploring some of the most fundamental aspects of the "Description of the Indies" during the 16th and 17th Centuries. Three aspects will be taken into consideration:(a) Seeing and Saying. The impact of the discoveries has generated a conflict between the "eyes" and the "word", between the spectacle presented in front of the eyes of the discoverer and the "limitation" of their own language and world conception to express it, the limitation of communicating to a European audience the characteristics of a new world. (b) Saying and Silence. At the same time that Castilian culture was producing a descriptio n of the Indies, the saying of indigenous cultures was reduced to silence. In between saying and silence has emerged a group of illustrated men, sharing both culture and languages, and trying to bridge the gap between the language of the conqueror and the silence of the native. (c) The writing of history and the history of writing. Writing history was not a simple matter. It was believed, at the time, that only cultures with alphabetic writing were able to write history. the "idea" of writing history was strictly tied with the history of writing. In the context of this problematic, the historiographical discourse of the 16th and 17th Century will be examined. This course is addressed to undergraduate (463) as well as graduate students (563). This course is also suggested for Latin American Studies concentrators. Evaluations will be based on oral presentations, written exams and a final paper. (Mignolo)

469. Spanish Theater of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388. (3). (HU).

After a brief introduction to certain important trends in Twentieth-Century Spanish Drama, the course will concentrate on a number of plays by three of the century's most outstanding playwrights: Valle-Inclan, Garcia Lorca and Alberti. The works selected, representing a wide variety of styles, themes and techniques, will be analysed in detail, both as theatrical pieces and literary texts. The prescribed plays will include, amongst other things, examples of Valle-Inclan's Esperpento, of both Lorca's more conventional and experimental dramas, and of Alberti's politically-committed theatre. Some acquaintance with the Spanish Golden Age comedia and/or other European late nineteenth-century/early twentieth-century drama would be a minor advantage but is certainly not a necessity. The basis of student evaluation will be class participation, papers devoted to each of the three authors, and a final exam. The method of instruction will be a mixture of lecture, analysis of specific extracts and class commentary and discussion. (Anderson)


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