Courses in Linguistics (Division 423)

111. Languages of the World. (4). (SS).

(1)What is language; how language works; different functions of language; language and dialect; languages and systems of writing; problems of decipherment. (2) How languages resemble each other; the structure of all languages (phonemes, morphemes, meanings; their constituents); role of markedness in linguistic structure; features common to all languages (universals); how universals can be used in the further study of languages. (3) How the world's languages differ from each other; "consonantal" and "vocalic" languages; agglutinative and isolative languages; "nominative" and "ergative" languages, etc.; semantic differences; linguistic typology. (4) The great language families of the world; how to demonstrate genetic relationship among languages; inheritance versus borrowing; stability of basic words. (5) How languages change; parent and daughter languages; reconstructing parent languages; recent discoveries in remote history of languages; how far into the past can we establish linguistic relationship. (6) Language and prehistory; where were the parent languages spoken; recent work on prehistoric migrations of peoples and languages. (7) Where linguistics can be exact as mathematics. Knowledge of at least one foreign language is desirable. Readings will be provided in a course pack. Students will be evaluated by tests and one term paper. (Shevoroshkin)

211. Introduction to Language. (3). (SS).

This course is designed to acquaint students with the scope and methods of linguistic inquiry. It should enable students to acquire familiarity with the different branches of linguistics and to come to some appreciation of what linguists do. The course has two principal goals: to introduce many of the basic tools for studying language and to learn to use those tools to improve our understanding of language as we encounter it in our daily lives.

315. Introduction to Sentence Analysis. (3). (HU).

This is an introduction to syntax in a generative framework. No prior knowledge of linguistics or of languages other than English is assumed. One of the most important facts about syntactic analysis is that it is based on argumentation: one cannot simply claim an analysis, one must argue for that analysis. Accordingly, this course concentrates on syntactic argumentation. We learn how to organize data, form logical hypotheses, argue for the best hypothesis, and test the predictions of our hypotheses. There are frequent problem sets and the students are strongly encouraged to meet in groups outside class to discuss the problem sets. There are no exams, papers, or regular readings. The data we use will all come from the students' heads: sentences of natural languages. Class progresses by discussion, with student participation being crucial. This course demands consistent, hard work. The payoff is that you learn a new way of looking at problems and solving them. The scientific methods used in this class encourage you to think critically and take yourself seriously. This course should be of interest to language, mathematics, music, law, and philosophy "types" as well as anyone who wants to build up skills in argumentation. (Napoli)

330. Term Paper Writing. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in writing term papers. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students are introduced to the steps for developing a well organized and properly developed term paper. These include an introduction to library resources, choosing and limiting topics, reading, notetaking, paraphrasing, summarizing sources, etc. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. (Soden)

332. Text Processing and Academic Vocabulary Building. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in reading strategies appropriate for processing academic texts and in the structure of English academic vocabulary. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students will be evaluated on their successful completion of regular assignments and a final exam.

334. Lecture Comprehension. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their listening and notetaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on listening skills within an academic context: (1) subject matter comprehension, (2) paralinguistic cues in academic interactions, (3) cross-cultural differences. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. (Brennan)

336. Speaking in Academic Contexts. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their speaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Instruction focuses on speaking skills within an academic context. Course material includes: (1) oral presentation, (2) cultural aspects of American classrooms, and (3) interactions with professors/TAs. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final assessment task. (Gass)

338. Pronunciation. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 2 credits.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their pronunciation in order to communicate successfully in their academic situations. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students receive instruction in the English sound system. Practice is provided in the form of small group tutorials as well as language laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluency, communicative competence with self-monitoring an important goal. Students will be evaluated on the basis on regular attendance, successful completion of assignments, tests, and video work. (Morley)

340. Writing for Academic Purposes. Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their writing skills to perform successfully in academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. There is instruction and practice in the writing of a range of texts for specific purposes, e.g., extended definitions, descriptions of processes, data commentaries, literature reviews. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified writing assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final evaluation task. (Swales)

351. Second Language Acquisition. (3). (SS).

This is an introductory course in second language acquisition, dealing with how people learn foreign/second languages. We will first examine methodological issues necessary for the interpretation of second language data. The major part of the course will focus on topics of recent second language acquisition research, especially those that enable us to test proposed models of second language acquisition. Through data analysis problems students will have first-hand experience dealing with second language data. Given the introductory nature of this course, no prior coursework in second language acquisition is necessary. A course pack made up of selected readings will serve as the readings. The course is intended for all students who are interested in knowing more about how second languages are learned. (Selinker)

360. ESL Theory, Methods, and Tests I. One introductory course in linguistics. (3). (HU).

This course is designed to provide students with a sound theoretical and practical basis for language teaching. The background of knowledge and experiences it provides is intended not only for those interested in finding out about teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESL), but it is also applicable to English teaching in general, and to foreign language teaching as well. A wide variety of topics related to language learning and teaching will be studied. Current issues in curriculum design and theoretical issues in language teaching and learning will be evaluated. Considerations of the role of teaching pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary will be discussed as will issues involved in teaching skill areas. Different language learning theories and teaching methods will be dealt with to enable students to make informed choices for their own teaching requirements. Additional topics will include a study of situational needs for language use (e.g., language for business, language for science) with special attention to the language of the classroom. (Gass)

406/English 406. Modern English Grammar. (3). (HU).

Linguistics 406 is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. The approach will be functional and theoretically eclectic. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (word formation, "parts of speech," phrases, clauses, sentences, "transformations," and discourse connection), and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. You will have daily practice in grammatical parsing as well as four or five more open-ended problems in grammatical argumentation and application. There will be a final research paper on a topic of your choice and a final exam on the factual material. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further linguistic theory as well as to those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sydney Greenbaum, A Concise Grammar of Contemporary English and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

409/Anthro. 472. Language and Culture. (3). (HU).

411. Introduction to Linguistics. (3). (SS).

See Cultural Anthropology 472. (Yengoyan)

413. Phonology. Linguistics 312. (3). (HU).

The organization of speech into the functionally distinct phonological units of particular languages. Applications of phonological analysis to English and other languages.

485. Linguistic Typology. Ling. 411 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course is a basic introduction to cross-linguistic comparative study of grammatical systems. Emphasis will be placed on the principles and methodology developed for typological analysis and explanation. Topics to be covered include: genetic vs. typological similarities, implicational universals, markedness, hierarchies, "prototypes," iconicity and diachronic typology. Readings will consist largely of articles. Required: several homeworks and a term paper. (Croft)

486. American Indian Languages. One course in phonology and one course in syntax. (3). (Excl).

In this course we will survey the genetic relationships, typologies, and areal characteristics of the indigenous languages of North America. We will take a look at aspects of the grammar of representative languages from several of the major families (Algonquian, Athapaskan, Eskimo, Iroquoian, Penutian, Salishan, Siouan, Uto-Aztecan). The course will also include an overview of the history of the study of American Indian languages and its role in the development of linguistics in the New World. Readings will address some current issues in the study of indigenous languages. The course will be given as lecture and discussion. The prerequisite is one course in phonology and one course in syntax. Grading will be on the basis of two papers. (Rhodes)

492. Topics in Linguistics. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

This is a research seminar, that is, it will involve basic research in verbal semantics as well as surveying current work in the area. We will begin with the assumption that inherent aspect (Aktionsart), causal structure and a "commonsense" classification of actions determine much of the case and voice properties of verbal structures. We will attempt to build a semantically organized lexicon of verbs and verb types useful for both theoretical and field work. (Croft)


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