English Language Institute (Division 363)

110. Integrated Academic Skills. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have been conditionally accepted to the University but who do not yet have sufficient language proficiency to enroll in more than one or two academic/content courses. The course focuses on three major skill areas: reading, discussion and writing. Course material will come from texts and journals from students' fields of interest and newspapers and magazines. Class meetings are five hours per week. Students are graded on a credit/no credit basis. A student receives a passing grade if she or he has attended classes regularly, successfully completed specified assignments and performed satisfactorily on a final evaluation task. (Soden)

112. Listening Comprehension and Note-taking. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have been conditionally accepted to the University but do not yet have sufficient language proficiency to enroll in more than one or two academic/content courses. The course focuses on discrete and global listening skills, note-taking skills from mini-lectures, and written and oral summary skills. Course material will come from taped discussions, video-lectures, and written and oral summary skills. Course material will come from taped discussions, video-lectures, documentary and educational films/video and news programs. Class meetings are five hours per week. Students will be evaluated on the basis of assignments, class participation and assessment of comprehension proficiency. Grades will be credit/ no credit.

310(Ling. 332). Reading and Vocabulary Development. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in reading strategies appropriate for processing academic texts and in the structure of English academic vocabulary. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students will be evaluated on their successful completion of regular assignments and a midterm and final exam. (Reinhart)

312(Ling. 344). Academic Grammar I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who still lack accurate control of key grammatical structures associated with both spoken and written academic English. Course topics will include the article system, the use of modals, tense and voice usage, nominalizations and patterns of cohesion. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. (Reinhart)

313. Academic Grammar II. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

Designed for non-native graduates and undergraduates who already possess a good knowledge of English grammar. This course is a continuation of Academic Grammar I. Topics include advanced features of prepositions, tense and article usage, complex nominalization and qualification. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments and satisfactory performance on a final evaluation task. (Selinker)

320(Ling. 340). Writing for Academic Purposes I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their writing skills to perform successfully in academic work. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. There is instruction and practice in the writing of a range of texts for academic purposes, e.g., extended definitions, introductions, descriptions of processes, and data commentaries, and literature reviews. Grades are based on regular attendance, satisfactory completion of specified writing assignments, and satisfactory performance on a final evaluation task. (Section 001: Swales; 002 Staff)

322(Ling. 330). Term Paper Writing. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who could profit from instruction in writing term papers. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. Students are introduced to the steps for developing a well organized and properly developed term paper. These include an introduction to library resources, choosing and limiting topics, reading, note-taking, paraphrasing, summarizing sources, etc. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final term paper. (Soden)

330. Language and Communication I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native undergraduate and graduate students. The focus will be on interpersonal communication skills including: two-way interactions, group interaction, student-professor consultations and student-student negotiations. Classes meet two hours per week for ten weeks. Evaluation will be ongoing in terms of class participation, completion and quality of assignments and a final assessment of proficiency. (Madden)

332(Ling. 334). Lecture Comprehension. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their listening and note-taking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are three hours a week for seven weeks. Instruction focuses on listening skills within an academic context: (1) subject matter comprehension, (2) paralinguistic cues in academic interactions, (3) cross-cultural differences. Grades are based on regular attendance, successful completion of specified assignments, and satisfactory completion of a final examination. (Brennan)

334(Ling. 336). Speaking in Academic Contexts. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University, but who need to improve their speaking skills in order to perform successfully in their academic work. Class meetings are twice a week for ten weeks. Instruction focuses on speaking skills within an academic context. Course material includes: 1) academic discussion, 2) summarizing, 3) paraphrasing, 4) oral presentations and 5) debates. There will be an emphasis on reading as a basis for class discussion. (Gass)

336(Ling. 338). Pronunciation I. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their pronunciation in order to communicate successfully in their academic situations. This course is designed to serve two purposes. The first is to meet short range goals of improving speech intelligibility through modification of articulation (i.e., selected vowels, consonants, consonant clusters, syllabics, etc.) and vocal qualities (i.e., selected features of phrasing, stress, unstress, reductions, rhythm, linking, intonation, etc.). The second purpose of the course is to guide students in developing processes which will enable them to continue self-modification of pronunciation after formal course work ends. Class meetings are twice a week. Students receive instruction in the English sound system. Practice is provided in the form of small group tutorials as well as language laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluency, communicative competence with self-monitoring an important goal. Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, successful completion of assignments, tests, and video work. (Morley)

337. Pronunciation II. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).

This course is designed for non-native graduate and undergraduate students who have sufficient language proficiency to be admitted to the University but who need to improve their pronunciation in order to communicate successfully in their academic situations. This course will focus on three areas: (a) instruction and practice in the use of English vocal prosodics (especially volume, rate, phrasing, stress, rhythm, and intonation) to improve fluency in spoken English; (b) instruction and practice in application of mechanics of speech articulation (especially precision of articulation and clarity of articulation) to improve accuracy in spoken English; (c) instruction and practice in the use of speech formatting and speech stylistics of delivery to improve communicability. Class meetings are twice a week. Students receive instruction in the English sound system. Practice is provided in the form of small group tutorials as well as language laboratory exercises. Emphasis is placed on accuracy, fluency, communicative competence with self-monitoring an important goal. Students will be evaluated on the basis of regular attendance, successful completion of assignments, tests, and video work. (Morley)

380(Ling. 180). Introduction to FTA Instruction. FTA screening exam and permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (2). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for and restricted to graduate students who are not native speakers of English and who are being considered for teaching assistantships at the University. Students will be assigned to the course based on their performance on a FTA screening examination administered by The Testing Division of the English Language Institute and judged in concert with representatives of the department in which the student would teach. This course is designed for students whose English skills are insufficient to allow them to profit from ELI 381 or 383. The main purposes of the course are to develop comprehension of spoken pedagogic discourse in English (via a range of analytic techniques), and to develop competence in those small-scale communicative acts needed for effective teaching (both to groups and in one-on-one situations). Examples of these acts are topic-introductions, definitions, exemplifications and initial responses to questions. All students will be required to take both the class and the workshop. The course is graded credit/no credit. It may be repeated for credit with the instructor's permission. (Ard)

381. FTA Presenting Skills. FTA screening exam and permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for and restricted to graduate students who are not native speakers of English and who are being considered for teaching assistantships at the University. Students will be assigned to the course based on their performance on a FTA screening examination administered by the Testing Division of the English Language Institute and judged in concert with representatives of the department in which the student would teach. The purpose of this course is to teach students about the nature of successful extended classroom presentations and to provide them with practice in these skills. Students will give regular presentations and practice responding to questions. Most of these activities will be video recorded. The students will meet regularly with the instructor in charge for a discussion and critique of their performance. In addition, students will engage in other follow-up activities. Students who are lacking in some of the prerequisite skills for successful performance may be asked to take certain workshop modules of 380. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. The course will be graded credit/no credit. The course may be repeated with the permission of the instructor. (Gass)

383. FTA Interacting Skills. FTA screening exam and permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1). (Excl).Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

This course is designed for and restricted to graduate students who are non-native speakers of English and who are being considered for teaching assistantships at the University. Students will be assigned to the course based on their performance on a FTA screening examination administered by the Testing Division of the English Language Institute and evaluated in concert with representatives of the department in which the student would teach. The purpose of this course is to teach students the nature of interactive language use in office hour tutorial, and laboratory settings and to provide them with opportunities to practice these skills. Many class activities will be video-taped and transcribed. Students will meet regularly with the instructor for discussion and critique of their performance. Class meetings are once a week for ninety minutes. The course will be graded credit/no credit and may be repeated with the permission of the instructor. (Madden)

392. Topics in English for Non-native Speakers. Permission of instructor. A maximum of four ELI credits may be counted toward a degree. (1-2). (Excl).

This section is taught by Prof. Reinhart.


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