German Languages and Literatures

Dutch Courses (Division 357)

111. First Special Speaking and Reading Course. (4). (FL).

This course provides the student with the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We mainly use the monolingual course-book LEVEND NEDERLANDS (LIVING DUTCH) and each lesson from the book will consist of everyday conversation, a grammatical explanation, exercises, a coherent word list, questions about the conversation, discussion, and homework. To enliven the class the teacher will provide the students with songs, newspaper articles, comics, etc. Films and video will be used where possible. The students are strongly advised to visit the cultural meetings organized by the Netherlands America University League. Books: LEVEND NEDERLANDS, Cambridge University Press, New York; W. Z. Shetter, INTRODUCTION TO DUTCH, Nijhoff, The Hague; P. de Kleijn, E. Nieuwborg, BASISWOORDENBOEK NEDERLANDS, Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1983; J. Hulstijn, M. Hannay, An ENGLISH SELF-STUDY SUPPLEMENT TO LEVEND NEDERLANDS, Amsterdam, 1981. Also recommended: B. C. Donaldson, DUTCH REFERENCE GRAMMAR, The Hague, Nijhoff, 1981. (Broos)

231. Second-Year Dutch. Dutch 112 or the equivalent. (4). (FL).

The course will start with an overview of the basic grammar of the Dutch language. We will develop skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening by means of texts to be announced. Comics, songs, newspaper articles, and literature will enliven the course and introduce the students to contemporary Dutch society. Students are strongly advised to visit the evenings organized by the Netherlands America University League. Books: P. de Kleijn, E. Nieuwborg, BASISWOORDENBOEK NEDERLANDS, Groningen, Wolters-Noordhoff, 1983; J. Hulstijn, M. Hannay, AN ENGLISH SELF-STUDY SUPPLEMENT TO LEVEND NEDERLANDS, Amsterdam, 1981; and, B. C. Donaldson, DUTCH REFERENCE GRAMMAR, The Hague, 1981. (Broos)

339. Independent Study. (2-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

This course serves the needs of students who wish to develop special topics not offered in the Dutch Studies curriculum. It may be a program of directed readings with reports, or it may be a research project and long paper. Courses in the past covered different areas like Dutch-Indonesian literature, the language of Rembrandt and his contemporaries, Dutch between English and German, etc. Courses must be supervised by a faculty member and the student must have the faculty member's agreement before electing the course. (Broos)

480. Modern Dutch Literature. Dutch 231 or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course will examine the poetry and prose of both The Netherlands and Belgium in modern times. The reading of poems, short stories, novellas, etc. in the original language will provide the student with material for discussion about authors, opinions, place and points of view of Modern Dutch literature. Topics in the past have included modern Dutch poetry, Dutch colonial literature, the legacy of Anne Frank: World War II in modern Dutch literature. In cooperation with the writer in residence, the student will have the unique opportunity to exchange ideas and opinions with the author about his or her work. The course will be conducted totally in Dutch. (Broos)

491. Colloquium on Modern Dutch Culture and Literature. (3). (HU).

This course is conducted in English by the annual visiting writer-in-residence, usually a well known novelist or poet chosen by the Dutch Ministry of Culture to represent The Netherlands. This year's writer will be the distinguished Thomas Rosenboom, known for his award winning novels and translations. The difference from ordinary literature and creative or news writing courses is that you will meet an esteemed writer and have the opportunity to exchange views on culture, literature, the practice of writing, communication, etc. both American and Dutch. Students are encouraged to bring in their own writing for reviewing and critical assessment. The course has not the ordinary professorial approach and is open to all lovers of texts, literary or otherwise, both American and European. Regular class attendance and participation in class discussions followed by at least one substantial paper will be required. (Rosenboom)

German Courses (Division 379)

101. Elementary Course. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. The first-year program is designed to develop basic proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students are provided with opportunities to practice using German in a range of situations frequently encountered in German- speaking cultures. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. It is highly recommended that students use taped exercises available in the Language Laboratory. There are two quizzes, four chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write one short composition and present a brief dialogue in German.

102. Elementary Course. German 101 or the equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 100. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary elementary German. See German 101 for more details. Course requirements include two quizzes, four chapter tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write two short compositions, present a brief dialogue in German, and read selections that explore some cultural differences between life in German-speaking countries and the United States.

103. Review of Elementary German. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 100 or 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with 2-3 years of high school German or with one or more terms of college or university German not taken at the University of Michigan who are not yet at the second-year proficiency level. This one-term course in contemporary elementary German is designed to improve students' proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students use German in a range of situations frequently encountered in German-speaking cultures. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. It is highly recommended that students use taped exercises available in the Language Laboratory. There are five tests, a midterm, and a final examination. In addition, students write two short compositions, present a brief dialogue in German, and read selections that explore some cultural differences between life in German-speaking countries and the United States. These sections meet FIVE times per week. Students can enroll in 231 upon completion of this course.

111. First Special Reading Course. Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Course content focuses on an introduction to the essentials of German grammar and syntax both in class lectures and in texts. Students are required to read but not to write and speak German. The course uses traditional methods of instruction which present rules of grammar and syntax as well as a basic vocabulary. Since much memorization is necessary, it is essential that students have time to do required course work which averages about twelve hours each week exclusive of class time. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, three one-hour examinations devoted to specific problems of grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The class is taught in English, and the course text is Jannach, GERMAN FOR READING KNOWLEDGE, (third edition). There are no course prerequisites, but German 111 is open only to graduate students who wish to fulfill a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates in special programs who already have met the LSA foreign language requirement. Undergraduates must receive departmental permission prior to electing the course. (Hofacker)

231. Second-Year Course. German 102 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or. (4). (FL).

First course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. The second-year program is designed to increase students' proficiency in speaking, writing, understanding, and reading German. Students are expected to increase the level of accuracy at which they can express themselves and the range of situations in which they can function in German-speaking cultures. They will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss a large variety of texts from some of the most popular West German periodicals. Traditional whole class instruction is supplemented with communicative activities involving pairs or small groups of students. There are four hourly tests, a midterm, and a final examination. Students write and rewrite two essays on topics of personal interest; the third and last essay is written in class. The language of instruction is German.

232. Second-Year Course. German 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 236. (4). (FL).

Second course of a two-term sequence in contemporary intermediate German. See German 231 for more details. Students will be able to read, comprehend, and discuss short German prose, as well as a longer work WITH the benefit of English equivalents for complicated passages. They will write and rewrite three essays on topics of personal interest: the fourth and last essay is written in class.

305. Practical German. German 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be elected for credit twice.

An informal mini-course designed for students who want to improve their confidence and proficiency in conversational skills. Emphasis will be placed on using German in specific real-life situations and learning appropriate phonological, morphological, and syntactical structures needed for those situations. Outside readings may be assigned for discussion in class. The class will frequently be divided into small groups to pursue areas of special interest to the group. The credit/no credit grades are based solely on attendance, homework, and in-class participation. Classes meet twice a week for an hour. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

325. Practice in Writing and Speaking German. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (Excl).

The sequence of German 325 and 326 is primarily intended to improve fluency and accuracy in written and spoken German. One hour each week is devoted to a systematic grammar review including translation from English to German. The remaining class time is devoted to German conversation based on readings and topics chosen at the discretion of the individual instructor. A German essay of one or two pages is assigned approximately every week. One or more five-minute oral presentations may be required. There are midterm and final examinations.

350. Business German. German 232. (3). (Excl).

This is an introduction to the vocabulary, practices and procedures found in German business activity. Included are the nomenclature of office procedure, business letters and reports. In addition the course examines the German educational and political system from the standpoint of business practices, such as merchandising and advertising. The reading consists of the reading of actual business, merchandising and advertising material. There is a midterm and a final examination, and the writing of papers and translations during the course is required. The text consists largely of a course pack and a basic text. (Fabian)

381. Eighteenth to Nineteenth-Century Drama. German 232 or the equivalent (placement test). (3). (HU).

This course provides an introduction to German literature of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries through several of the great classical dramas. In conjunction with German 382, 383, 384, or 385 this course can be elected in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or minor. The course will begin with the reading of Lessing's lively comedy set against the backdrop of the Seven Years' War, MINNA VON BARNHELM. Our second text will be the best known in this entire period, DIE GRETCHEN-TRAGODIE from Goethe's FAUST. The struggle of the great individuality in the context of political intrigues and social forces of history is the central theme of the next play, Schiller's MARIA STUART, the tragedy of Mary, Queen of Scots, held captive by Queen Elizabeth I of England. Our final play will be Kleist's PRINZ FRIEDRICH VON HOMBURG, an astonishingly "modern" drama, which depicts the existential struggle of a young man in confrontation with death. The emphasis of the course is on the analysis of the works, mainly in class discussion. Students will write two short interpretive papers and a final exam. (Grilk)

384. Short Fiction: Romanticism to Realism. German 232 or permission of chairman. (3). (HU).

Drawing on novellas by the great masters of 19th-century German prose, this course provides carefully paced reading practice at the third year level. Included are works by Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Kleist, Grillparzer, Droste-Hulshoff, Keller, Meyer, and Gerhart Hauptmann. Chosen to be representative of the most significant works by the top writers of this period, these works encompass Romanticism, Poetic Realism, and Naturalism, the first phase of "modern" German literature and should provide a comprehensive and aesthetically rewarding survey of the main trends and currents on covering the aims of the Romantics, pre-Freudian psychological writing, 19th-century sociological problems, painting and music of the period. Discussion is emphasized. A course pack is available. A term paper and a final exam are required. (Section 001 Dunnhaupt; 002 Staff)

415. The German Language Past and Present. Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

The objectives of German 415 are to introduce students to the assumptions, terminology, and methodologies of both descriptive and historical linguistics, and to apply these to a survey of the historical background of German from pre-literate times to the present, with emphasis on the emergence of the standard literary dialect. Although our main concern will be the internal structure of the language, we will relate this to the cultural context in which it has evolved. Instruction is through lectures and discussions. Evaluation will be based on homework problems, quizzes, short papers, and a final examination. Students should have attained at least fourth-term proficiency in German. (Kyes)

417/Anthro. 476/Ling. 417. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics. Ling. 411 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

See Linguistics 417. (Dworkin)

425. Intermediate Composition and Conversation. German 325 and 326; or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Various approaches are used to improve the student's written and spoken German. Each week a composition of at least two pages is assigned. Sometimes the instructor assigns a specific topic while at other times students select their own topics. Occasionally students are required to listen, in the language laboratory, to a tape on some aspect of German history or culture and to use it as a departure point for an essay. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor and the students. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. German is used exclusively in class. The final course grade is based on compositions as well as participation in discussion. German 425 is regularly offered during the Fall Term while German 426 is regularly offered during the Winter Term. German 426 may be taken independently of 425. (Scholler)

431/Education D431. Teaching Methods. Senior standing; and candidate for a teaching certificate. (3). (Excl).

A study of methods and materials available to the teacher. This course is required of all candidates for a teaching certificate.

450. Medieval German Literature in Modern German Translation. Senior or graduate standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The course is designed as an introduction to literary works from pre-Carolingian times to the classical period of the Hohenstaufen dynasty (8th-13th centuries). Readings will be selected from six centuries of emerging and flourishing literary genres. They will cover heroic poems, courtly romance (especially Arthurian), and the lyrics of the Minnesang (with musical illustration); and they will also include other types of literature, for example, legend, novella, and Spielmannsepik. The discussions will center upon themes, motifs, moral concerns, political, and broad cultural background as well as formal aspects of the works. Within limits, attention will be directed to pertinent cases and similar developments in other European literatures (Latin, English, French, Scandinavian). Among the authors to be studied are Walther von der Vogelweide, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and the first female author of stature in medieval Europe, Roswitha von Gandersheim; among the anonymous works, the earliest chivalric romance (RUODLIEB) and the NIBELUNGENLIED. There will be an oral report, a term paper of 10-15 pages, and a final examination. The course lectures will be in German, the discussions in German and English. (Scholler)

458. German Literature after 1945. Junior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

The main purpose of this course is to provide a survey of the various authors, movements, styles, attitudes, etc. prevalent in postwar German prose to advanced students in German via the (relatively) short narrative form. The scope will encompass the two generations of postwar writers. Central themes will include: (1) the interrelation between narrative style and chronology; (2) comparison of the two groups; (3) the interaction between literature and ideology so significant to the postwar era in Germany; (4) the problems of linguistic insufficiency; (5) generic classification of short forms examined; (6) audience and reception of the works. Basic method of instruction will be discussion, along with occasional lectures. Evaluation will be based on class participation, two papers (one short interpretation of 5-7 pages, one long research paper of 10-15 pages) and a final examination. Authors to be read include Gunter Grass, Heinrich Boll, Peter Handke, Thomas Bernhard, Anna Seghers, Christa Wolf, Ingeborg Bachmann, Gabriele Wohnmann, Imrtraud Morgner, and others. No special background is required, but considerable fluency in German is necessary. The course is elective. (Fries)

491. German Honors Proseminar. Senior Honors standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Completion of the sequence of German 491 and 492 is required for an Honors concentration in German. Interested students not already in the German Honors concentration program should apply to Professor Crichton for admission (minimum 3.0 GPA with at least 3.5 in German). In German 491 students will read and discuss a selection of German dramas, novellas, short novels, and poems from the age of Goethe to the present. The course gives students experience in the analysis of various literary genres and acquaints them with representative works by major authors from various literary periods. While they are by no means restricted in their choice of a topic for the Honors thesis (492, Winter Term) to the works of authors discussed in 491, some students may find that their search for a topic which they would like to explore in greater depth is facilitated by the broad spectrum offered in 491. Class discussion is in German. Each student gives an oral introduction to one of the works discussed. There are two interpretive papers totaling about 20 pages. No examination. (Crichton)

German Literature and Culture in English

Courses in this section do not require knowledge of German.

330. German Cinema. (3). (HU).

This course traces the development of the German cinema in its social, political and cultural context. It presents major films and filmmakers in relation to their historical circumstances and to developments in the other arts. The subject matter falls into three periods: The Expressionistic period of film making following World War I up to 1933, the era of the Third Reich from 1933 to 1945, and from 1965 to the present. Filmmakers discussed include F.W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, G.W. Pabst, Volker Schlondorff, R.W. Fassbinder, Werner Herzog and Wim Wenders. The films cover various genres of fictional and documentary approach. Ten to twelve films will be shown. There will be some opportunity for additional viewing on an individual basis. The course will consist of lectures and directed discussions. The required readings consist of secondary material on the cultural background of the German cinema, and commentaries on the films and film makers. Students will write five short (two to four page) papers and a term paper. A course fee of $20 will cover film rentals. (Fabian)

334. Eighteenth-Century Literature in Translation. (3). (HU).

Knowledge of German is not required. German concentrators are required to study assigned texts in German. Subject: Major literary achievements of the German 18th century in their European context. The tentative list of topics includes: (1) Survey on major trends and of the interaction between cultural manifestations and political/social realities. (2) The rise of middle class man and his role as a protagonist of tragedy: Lessing's play EMILIA GALOTTI. (3) Theatrical culture of 18th-century Southern Germany: courtly, monastic, and guild theatre. (Lecture with slides.) (4) Some highlights of 18th-century German poetry, with poems set to music. (5) German comedy, a contradiction in terms? Lessing's play MINNA VON BARNHELM. (6) The culture of the illustrated book. (Lecture with slides.) (7) The struggle of the great individual against the establishment: Goethe's play GOTZ VON BERLICHINGEN. (8) An early feminist? Sophie La Roch: Mentor of Germany's daughters. (9) Another revolt against the establishment: Lenz' play THE SOLDIERS. (10) Man and his emotions: Goethe's novel THE SUFFERING OF YOUNG WERTHER. (11) The message of the German enlightenment: Lessing's NATHAN DER WEISE and Kant's question WHAT IS ENLIGHTENMENT? (12) Wieland's verse epic in John Quincy Adam's translation: OBERON. (13) German, Swiss, and British art based on Wieland's OBERON. (Lecture with slides.) (14) The rise of the German opera: The libretto of Mozart's MAGIC FLUTE. Lectures will have an opportunity for discussion at any juncture. Readings from several texts will be assigned for class discussion. One hour midterm and final emphasizing the readings from the texts will be required. (Schelle)

441. German Masterpieces in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

By providing an introduction in particular to German literature in terms of its "masterpieces," this course also confronts the concept of masterpieces in any art form. Consequently, we shall be reading selected prose narratives and dramas in translation, discussing their intrinsic literary merits, and using them to learn more about the major figures, periods and developments in German and European literature, philosophy and art (e.g., Zola, Ibsen, Strindberg, Romanticism Expressionism, Schopenhauer and Nietzsche). Moreover, we shall examine, by example, what constitutes a masterpiece as the unit of a literary canon. In this context, questions such as the following will be raised: Is a work a masterpiece because it describes its times, or because it transcends them? Must its technique be exemplary, or can its conception, even though not realized in an aesthetically satisfactory manner, raise it above the patently less ambitious works of its time? In other words, we shall try to understand more about the individual author's intentions and our own expectations of literature in general. Students will be responsible ONLY for the literary texts themselves, which will, according to availability, include works by Goethe, Schiller, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Buchner, Hauptmann, Thomas Mann, Kaiser, Kafka, Brecht, Durrenmatt, and Grass. Although the amount of material to be covered will necessitate many lectures, as much time as possible will be given to discussion. Three papers (10-15 typed pages) and a final examination will be written. There are no surprise quizzes. (Cowen)

449. Special Topics in English Translation. Junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

First, this course will offer a basic introduction to the Freudian and Jungian theory of human psychology and psychopathology: the nature of the personal and impersonal unconscious; theories of instincts and their transformation; the development and function of the ego; the mechanisms of defense and repair; and theories and methods for the interpretation of dreams and works of art. Second, this course will conclude with two studies in applied psychoanalysis. 1. Kafka and Freud: Kafka's childhood and his relationship to his father will be examined in light of the trauma of the bourgeois nuclear family as described by Freud. Also, the Freudian theory of dream interpretation will be applied as a technique for the analysis of Kafka's literary fantasies of guilt, punishment and suicide. Texts: Freud's THE INTERPRETATION OF DREAMS; Kafka's short stories and THE TRIAL. 2. Hesse and Jung: "The search for identity" of Hesse's protagonists will be examined in the perspective of Jung's individuation process, the persona, the shadow, archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, and man's quest for mystical illumination. Texts: Selections from THE PORTABLE JUNG; Hesse's SIDDHARTHA and STEPPENWOLF. Kafka's and Hesse's lives will also be analyzed from the perspective of theories of neurosis and artistic creativity. Midterm and final exam. Inadvertently omitted from the Time Schedule. Class will meet MWF 3:00-4:00 p.m. (Peters)

Scandinavian Courses (Division 471)

103. Elementary Swedish. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Swedish, this course provides a basic introduction to Swedish grammar and vocabulary, with the emphasis placed on developing communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and reading. The students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, assignments and tests. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden.

105. Elementary Danish. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Danish, this course provides a basic introduction to Danish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and reading. Regular exercises and tests. Grades will be determined on a basis of class participation and test results. The teacher for this course is a native speaker from Denmark.

233. Second-Year Swedish. Swedish 104. (4). (FL).

This course covers the material of a second year course in Swedish language. The emphasis is on speaking, writing, reading, and listening skills. Readings are selected (for oral commentary) from contemporary Swedish prose, poetry and politics. Both books and newspapers are used. All instruction will be in Swedish and tests and examinations will be given at regular intervals. Grades will be determined on the basis of class participation and tests. Students needing Swedish 103 and 104 or the equivalent for entry into this course can meet the prerequisite by passing an examination given by the instructor. The teacher is a native speaker from Sweden.

235. Second-Year Danish. Danish 106. (4). (FL).

This course covers the material of a second year course in Danish language. Emphasis is on speaking, reading, writing and listening skills. Readings are selected (for oral and written commentaries) from contemporary Danish poetry, prose, newspapers etc. All instruction will be given in Danish and tests and examinations will be given at regular intervals. Grades will be determined on a basis of class participation and test results. Students needing Danish 105 and 106, or the equivalent, for entry into this course can meet this requirement by passing an examination to be given by the instructor, who is a native speaker from Denmark.


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