ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Courses in French (Division 371)

ELEMENTARY LANGUAGE COURSES. Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school MUST take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. Students who began French at another college or university must take the Placement Test.

101. Elementary French. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (FL).

Students with any prior study of French must take the placement test. The sequence French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar and vocabulary which students need (1) to understand the French of everyday life when spoken at moderate speed; (2) to be understood in typical situations of everyday life; and (3) to read non-technical French of moderate difficulty. French structures are taught in class through many communication exercises stressing listening and speaking. Readings on subjects dealing with French culture and civilization are introduced toward the end of French 101, with an increased amount of reading in French 102. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20 to 25 students. Homework consists of studying grammar, writing exercises and compositions, and laboratory work (l l/2 2 hours per week) on pronunciation, structural exercises, dialogues, and listening comprehension. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations, listening comprehension and speaking tests.

CSP section available. See the Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP) section in this Guide.

102. Elementary French, Continued. French 101 or equivalent. French 102 may be followed by 231. No credit granted to those who have completed 103. (4). (FL).

See French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103 or 102. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H.Neu or for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course. (Neu)

103. Review of Elementary French. Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 102. (4). (FL).

The course objectives and methods of instruction are identical to those of French 101/102. It moves at a rapid pace, covering about 60 percent of the French 101 materials by midterm, and about 60 percent of the French 102 material by the end of the term. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework is similar to French 101 and 102, but its daily amount is up to 60 percent more than in either French 101 or 102 because of the rapid pace. Videos will be viewed about once a week to complement les sons. Examinations are similar to 101/102, and the final examination is identical to that of French 102.

205. French Conversation for Non-concentrators. French 102, or 103, or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 205/206 are informal mini-courses with emphasis on self-expression in conversational French. (Only French 205 is offered in Fall Term). It is for students who would like to keep up with their knowledge of the language. Class work consists of studying the essential vocabulary, reading of simple journalistic prose, and conversation based on the reading material. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-24 students. There are no examinations, and the grading is Credit/No Credit only, determined on the basis of attendance, homework, and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year French. French 102, or 103, or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. The sequence French 231/232 are the third and fourth terms of language study offered. It presents a comprehensive grammar review, study of finer points of French structure, and the reading of journalistic prose, short stories, and plays. In addition, French 232 has outside reading: students read a book on their own, and take a reading comprehension test. The proficiency gained by the end of French 232 should enable students to express themselves in French on topics of interest, to understand conversations on such topics, Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Homework consists of grammar study, written exercises, and laboratory work. There are comprehensive coursewide tests as well as the midterm and final examinations.

232. Second-Year French. French 231 or equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

See French 231.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of these courses does not satisfy the LSA language requirement.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have received credit for college French. No credit granted to those who have completed 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

This course is for undergraduate and graduate students who would like to gain a good reading knowledge of French in one term. The essentials of French grammar as well as vocabulary and idioms are presented for passive recognition, followed by translation and sight-reading exercises on materials taken from both humanities and sciences. The skills gained in the course should enable students to read technical writings of moderate difficulty. Toward the end of the term students select a short article or a chapter of a book in their field of interest for outside reading. Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. There are weekly quizzes as well as course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Other Language Courses

305. Practical French. French 232 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

French 305 is a minicourse for students who would like to keep up with their French in an informal atmosphere. It is organized like French 205/206, but cultural and intellectual readings provide topics of conversation. Classes meet twice a week in sections of 20-25 students. There are no examinations, and attendance, homework and active participation in classroom activities determine the credit/no credit grades.

361. Intermediate French. French 232 or equivalent. No credit granted to those who have completed 360. (3). (Excl).

The purpose of this course is to help students develop a proficiency in the spoken language and improve their writing skills. French grammar is reviewed, and a discussion of materials on various aspects of contemporary French life permits participants to expand vocabulary, and to increase their understanding of French daily life. Outside readings in connection with the basic cultural themes are studied. Press articles, interviews and the like are used to stimulate discussions. Classes meet three times a week in section. All classes are taught in French. Laboratory activities (listening comprehension program), simulations, two novels. Bi-weekly essays. Two examinations, one final composition. (Gabrielli)

362. Advanced French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

As a follow-up of French 361, this course is designed to develop communication in spoken French and to increase familiarity with French culture. Also, through an analysis of interviews with French people from all walks of life, students are able to distinguish among various styles of expression and to understand how language reveals social and other relevant cultural characteristics. Although there is no formal teaching of French grammar, some class time is devoted to grammatical difficulties as revealed through the essays. Classes meet three times each week and are taught in French. All sections take three common examinations. Laboratory activities, one novel, literary short stories and one play, bi-weekly essays. (Gabrielli)

371. Writing French. French 361. (3). (Excl).

The main objective of the course is to develop the skills necessary to writing correct, fluent French. In order to achieve it we will work on three levels: (a) development and reinforcement of correct grammar through presentation of specific syntactic problems, practice exercises, and individual diagnosis of students' writing; (b) development of vocabulary (elimination of faux-amis, finding "le mot juste"); (c)development of quality in composition from imitation to creation (learning how to organize an essay and how to write in tight sparse prose). Students are expected to write frequent essays (one a week). Final course grade is based on the level of proficiency achieved at the end of the term, with important consideration given to the quality of the work throughout the term. This course is elected primarily but not exclusively by students majoring in French. (Belloni)

372. Problems in Translation. French 371 or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

This course is an introduction to the problems of translation from English into French as well as from French into English. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the basic prerequisites of translation, helping them to develop a proper attitude toward the original and the target language, and to give them some practical training. Students work on a variety of texts on different levels ranging from newspaper articles or magazines to technical texts, literary texts. In the second half of the term students will be responsible for individual translation projects which will serve as a basis for class discussion. Evaluation: day to day preparation, participation, homework, in-class assignments, individual project. The course is viewed as a continuation of French 371 and is open to students who have completed more advanced classes. (Belloni)

380. Intermediate Business French. French 361 and 362. Students may be permitted to take 380 and 362 concurrently. (3). (Excl).

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the LANGUAGE of business transactions in France. It deals with both written and spoken commercial French. It is partly built around a fictitious company whose activities are divided into themes dealing with various aspects of the business world: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France. The writing will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French. Attendance mandatory. Coursepack. NO AUDITORS. Maximum enrollment is 25. (Gabrielli)

426(453)/Rom. Ling. 453. French Phonology and Morphology. French 361 or 362 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will introduce you to the basics of French phonology and phonetics and offer you a review of French pronunciation and vocabulary. We first compare written and spoken French in order to analyze the numerous gaps between the two, which cause learning problems for many speakers of American English. We then study prosodic features such as stress, syllabic structure, and intonation, and proceed to compare French and English vowels and consonants to see how they are organized into their respective phonological systems. We will also examine briefly some of the salient features of very colloquial French and of a few dialects (e.g., French spoken in the south of France and Canada). Under morphology, we will study the evolution of the French language in terms of sound changes that help explain the seeming "irregularities" of Modern French as well as derivation of words. The course will be conducted in French, and the classroom work will consist of lectures, discussions and TRAVAUX PRATIQUES, which emphasize practical work with the language. Your course grade will be based on two in-class one-hour examinations and the TRAVAUX PRATIQUE, some of which must be submitted. (Hagiwara)

Civilization

384. Origins of Contemporary France: From the Gauls to de Gaulle. French 361. (3). (HU).

This course attempts to give the student a sense of the complexity of French history. It focuses on a few key periods starting from the Renaissance, the age of Louis XIV, the enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution up to the 5th Republic hopefully. It is less the sequence of events that interests us than the evolutions of institutions and "mentalities," the daily life and the transformations of the society. Three classes per week. The course is conducted in French. Three papers and a final exam. (Gabrielli)

Literature

331. French Literature in Translation. Not open to French concentrators. (3). (HU).

THE LANGUAGE OF DESIRE. This is a Collegiate Fellows course, emphasizing critical thinking. See page 3 of this COURSE GUIDE for a complete list of Collegiate Fellows courses. This course is open to all interested freshmen and sophomores. There are no prerequisites. The course will examine a number of novels and short stories from European and American literature ranging from the 18th century to the present in terms of the ways each of them (1) involves a representation of sexual desire, (2) offers a CRITIQUE and ANALYSIS of desire through language, and (3) demonstrates how sexuality and desire, things we tend to think of as personal and private, are determined by systems of cultural values expressed in language. The basic readings for the course will include:

Laclos', LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES, 's, THE ETERNAL HUSBAND, Jensen's, GRADIVA, 's, SWAN'S LOVE, 's, MISS LONELYHEARTS

as well as short stories and essays by Sartre, Schnitzler, Moravia, Kundera, Smiley, Nin, Bourjaily, and Barthes. Students will be graded on the basis of class participation, written assignments and exams. (Kavanaugh)

387/388/389 INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE.

The objective of this series of courses is to acquaint students with significant literary works and literary theories drawn from the entire range of French literature. Each work is analyzed (in French) individually for its own merit and is then placed within the context of its period. Students are asked to read carefully the assigned works, to reflect on them, and to express their reactions and ideas in class. The instructor holds class discussions, points out the artistic values of the work, and attempts in many cases to show the evolution of literature as it reflects various external factors. Grades may be based on discussions, papers, and a midterm and/or final examination.

387. Introduction to French Literature (1600 to 1800). French 232. (3). (HU).

This course's basic objectives are to familiarize students with the study of literature in French and to help them read texts critically and creatively. A further goal will be to acquaint students with some more or less representative masterworks from an important period of French history and a major segment of the French literary tradition. Works studied will come from several genres: comedy, tragedy, fable, fiction, autobiography. We will be asking ourselves about the nature of literary rhetoric and literary forms, and also trying to understand the relations between literary works and the social and historical circumstances of their production and reception. Authors studied will include Molière, Racine, LaFontaine, Madame de Grafigny, Voltaire, Rousseau and the elusive (male or female?) author of the LETTRES PORTUGAISES. Classes will be above all discussions, with only occasional lectures. Several short writing assignments (including both critical papers and creative exercises in style and writing); oral midterm; no final. (Paulson)

388. Introduction to French Literature (1800 to 1900). French 232. (3). (HU).

This course will focus on five of the most important writers of 19th century French literature, namely Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Zola and Maupassant. Emphasis will be placed on the literary aspects of the works read as well as the historical, political and artistic context of the day. A typical assignment will consist of reading some twenty pages of a given work and preparing to discuss them in class. Students will write four papers in French (three or four pages in length). Each paper will be corrected for grammar, choice of expression and content. The course grade will be based on the results of written work and on classroom participation. Regular attendance is required. There is no final examination. The course is conducted in French. (Gray)

389. Introduction to French Literature (1900 to present). French 232. (3). (HU).

An introduction to the study of literature, taking as its base the efforts of twentieth century French writers to understand both literature itself, and its relation to what is most specific about our lives and our historical situation. Predominant themes will include the impotence and failure of the writer; time, memory and trauma; the role of fiction and illusion; the status of the subject and the philosophy of existence. The course will give students the tools to read and analyze lyric poetry, theater and narration. Readings will include: Apollinaire, CALLIGRAMMES; Proust, CAMBRAY (the first part of his monumental A LA RECHERCHE DU TEMPS PERDU); Autaud, LE THEATRE ET SON SOUBLE; Sartre, LA NAUSEE; Beckett, EN ATTENDANT GODOT and L'INNOMMABLE; Genet, LE BALCON; and Duras, LE RAVISSEMENT DE LOL V. STEIN. Students will also be expected to complete assigned reading in O. Ducrot and T. Todorov, DICTIONNAIRE ENCYCLOPEDIQUE DES SCIENCES DU LANGAGE. Required work: Four brief (3-5 page) papers, midterm and final examination. (Graham)

431(478). Intellectual Trends in Modern France. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Plus ca change, plus ce n'est pas la meme chose: from the "events" of May '68 to the Rise of the Right Chirac to LePen (in France), from the anti-war demonstrations of the 60s to the Reagan years (in the U.S.), things obviously changed a great deal. But in the mechanisms directing change some elements are constant, and to uncover them, this course presupposes (a) that every major change reverberates in all of society's activities politics, philosophy, art, literature so that a parallel evolution can be observed in each of these areas; and (b) that an understanding of the mechanism of change is useful for comprehending the succession of historical "periods" and for predicting the direction of future social and intellectual transformations. The course proposes a working theory of change and traces on that basis the history of ideas in France from 1875 to 1975. Readings, which are primarily literary, usually going from Rimbaud to Robbe-Grillet, from surrealism to reconstructionism, form the basis of class discussions. The course is conducted in French; there are usually two papers of 7-10 pages each and a final examination. (Nelson)

460. (442). Topics and Themes in French Literature. French 387, 388, 389, or the equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

SECTION 001 THE MEDIEVAL STORYTELLER. An introduction to the "caravan of tales" which spans the continents and the centuries, studied in the craft of the medieval storyteller and the body of stories, myths and legends it propagated. While the course is centered on the French Middle Ages, it will also take into account the propensity of tales to reappear in the same form at different times and places, and examine some of the theoretical approaches to myths and folklore which respond to this. Students will read a collection of medieval French short fiction, in modern, in modern translation, comprised of FABLIAUX, LAIS, short romances, saints' lives and troubadour biographies. Written work will include two papers on works discussed in class and a longer final paper, which may treat a relevant work of another time or place (acceptable topics might range from Chaucer to non-Western mythology or from classical antiquity to contemporary American culture). Required work will also include a midterm examination and a brief oral presentation outlining the topic of the final paper. Students wishing to use the course to satisfy the Junior-Senior writing requirement should consult the instructor at the beginning of the term. (Graham)

Section 002. LITERATURE AND THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. Study of the importance of the French Revolution as an agency of cultural change, with particular reference to literary and historical works from both the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Objectives include: understanding literature as a vehicle both for questioning the social order and for expressing resistance and reaction to social change, examining how the Revolution led to heightened awareness of sexual and racial exclusion, inquiry into the Revolution's role in the Romantic sense of literature's uneasy relationship with society understanding how important problems of narrative and interpretation are common to history and literature. Teaching methods will include discussions, occasional lectures, a number of short and specific writing assignments, and independent study and presentations to be carried out by small groups of students. Authors studied will include (but not be limited to) Voltaire, Rousseau, Claire de Duras, Vigny, Michelet, Tocqueville. No examinations: evaluation based on short writing assignments, presentations, participation, and one term paper. Readings and class in French. (Paulson)

Courses in Italian (Division 399)

101. Elementary Italian. (4). (FL).

This course has as its primary objective the acquisition of a fundamental understanding of basic Italian grammar with parallel emphasis on conversation. Text, workbook and lab manual required; Italian 101 covers the first half of the text Course topics include (1) fundamental sentence structure, (2) verb conjugations, (3) adjectives, adverbs, and sentence agreement, and (4) nouns, pronouns, and conjunctive pronouns and their position. Methods of instruction include (1) grammar drill, (2) conversation exercises, (3) translation both oral and written, and (4) weekly quizzes. Grading is based on quizzes, class participation, midterm, and a final examination.

102. Elementary Italian. Italian 101 or equivalent. (4). (FL).

This course continues the presentation of the essentials of the Italian language and attempts to broaden student knowledge of Italian life and culture. Conversation in the language is also emphasized. The course covers the second half of the text with workbook and lab manual; readings supplements this set of texts. Course topics include a continuation of Italian grammar; use of idiomatic expression; the culture, geography, and everyday life of Italy; and conversation topics that encourage discussion. A variety of instructional methods are used: grammar presentation and exercises, readings in Italian (dialogues, short articles, Italian newspapers, and magazines), original writing and oral discussion. Grading is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination.

Other Language and Literature Courses

205. Italian Conversation for Non-concentrators. Italian 102 or equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Italian 205 emphasizes fluency and self-expression in conversational Italian. This course is for students who have had a least two (2) terms of Italian and are interested in acquiring a certain facility with the spoken language. Class work consists of reading materials from various sources (magazines, newspapers, short stories, etc.) which will be discussed in class. Use of the language laboratory will provide additional conversational material on various aspects of Italian life. Class will meet twice a week. There are no examinations, and the grading is on a credit basis only. Success in the course is determined on the basis of attendance, homework and participation in classroom activities.

231. Second-Year Italian. Italian 102 or equivalent; or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course reviews grammar, introduces students to standard modern Italian through the reading of short stories, plays and poetry, and increases student facility in writing and speaking Italian. Compositions are required and are based upon reading or other topics of interest. Class discussions center on readings or current events. Grading is based on class participation, compositions, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

232. Second-Year Italian, Continued. Italian 231 or permission of course supervisor. No credit granted to those who have completed 112. (4). (FL).

This course aims at a further development of each student's reading and speaking knowledge of Italian including increased facility in both conversation and oral comprehension. There is a continuing review of grammar, and the elements of composition. Various genres of literature are read and discussed, and occasional short papers are required on these or other related topics. Oral reports on various topics are also required. Grading is based on short papers, class participation, quizzes, a midterm, and a final examination.

359. Italian Culture and History to the Eighteenth Century. (3). (HU).

The course, which will be taught in English, aims (1) to familiarize students with the major texts of the Italian Medieval and Renaissance worlds; (2) to introduce students to the historical and cultural changes of the period; and (3) to understand the shift from Medieval to Renaissance culture. Texts to be read include: selections from ST. Augustine's CONFESSIONS, St. Francis, Provençal poetry, Sicilian poetry, Sweet New Style, Dante's VITA NUOVA and INFERNO, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ficino, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Michelangelo, Ariosto and Machiavelli. While not essential, a working knowledge of Italian is useful. (Ward)

361. Intermediate Italian. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

All the basic skills of the language will receive attention in this course, the primary goal of which is the improvement and refinement of oral, reading and writing proficiency. Review of difficult points of grammar will be taken up when necessary, but the major concentration will be on class discussion of short reading materials ranging from newspaper and magazine articles, short fiction and poetry to polemic essays on contemporary cultural, political and social topics. Short essays will be part of the regular assignments, as will occasional prepared oral presentations, translations, and dictations. The variety of the materials covered will be as broad as possible to introduce students to the several different writing styles and manner of presentation of the language. The course will be conducted in Italian and will meet three hours weekly.

420. Topics and Themes in Modern Italian Literature. One literature course (in any field); knowledge of Italian is not required. (2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

WOMAN AS HEROINE, HELPMATE, HELOT, and HARRIDAN in MODERN ITALIAN LITERATURE. From Goldoni's vivacious and independent Mirandolina, Manzoli's humble and devout Lucia, and Serao's submissive and frustrated housewives, Italy's outstanding writers have chronicled, often unconsciously, the changes and setbacks not only of society but of the particular role of women within that society, as well. Themes of inspiration and combativeness alternate with those of enervation, and disillusionment, interwoven through more than two centuries of narrative fiction and drama. The expression of these themes highlights prevailing cultural and psychological attitudes, which will be traced through works by Carlo Goldoni, Alessandro Manzoni, Giuseppe Verga, Grazia Deledda, Matilde Serao, Natalia Ginsburg and others. Lectures, class discussion, and readings in English. (Olken)

484. Early Italian Poetry. Italian 232 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

SECTION 001 MICHELANGELO AS RENAISSANCE ARTIST. This course will examine Michelangelo's entire artistic oeuvre, with special attention given to his poetry. Also considered will be his sculpture, painting, and architecture, as well as the musical presentation of his madrigals. The aim of the course will be twofold: first, to study Michelangelo's art in terms of the rich tradition within which he works; and second, to see what it is about Michelangelo's work that is so strikingly new in sixteenth-century Renaissance art and letters. The course will be conducted as a seminar, with readings in English and Italian. During the second half of the course, guest lecturers will fill in the background for understanding Michelangelo's non-literary artistic products. Two short papers will be required, and there will be a final exam in essay format. (Lucente)

Courses in Romance Linguistics (Division 460)

300. Introduction to the Romance Languages. French, Spanish, or Italian: five terms at college level or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

The purposes of this course are to discuss the relationships which exist among the various Romance languages, and to acquaint students with the methods and objectives of Romance linguistics. Following a brief introduction to the methodology of linguistic analysis, the grammatical structures of French, Spanish, Italian, and Rumanian are compared. The course is conducted in English, and all required reading is in English. Students who can read other languages are encouraged to pursue certain topics in these languages. The text is a course pack supplemented by handouts. In recent years, students have come to the course with knowledge of several Romance languages and of general linguistics. This adds to the interest of the course, but should not discourage the student who knows only French or Spanish. (Leonard)

453/French 426. French Phonology and Morphology. French 361 or 362 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

See French 426. (Hagiwara)

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school are given a placement test to determine the course level at which they will start their college language instruction. Students who began Spanish at another college or university must also take the placement test.

101. Elementary Spanish. (4). (FL).

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish, this course provides a basic introduction to Spanish grammar and vocabulary, with emphasis placed on developing functional, communicative language skills. Extensive practice in listening, speaking and writing Spanish. Grade based on three departmental exams, quizzes, written work and daily oral work. (Spanish 101 AND 102 are the equivalent of Spanish 103.) CSP section available. See the Comprehensive Studies Program (CSP) section in this Guide.

102. Elementary Spanish, Continued. Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed 103. (4). (FL).

A continuation of Spanish 101; composition and reading skills given more practice. Grade based on three departmental exams, three oral exams, other examinations, quizzes, written assignments (including several compositions) and daily oral work. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan.

103. Review of Elementary Spanish. Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed 102. (4). (FL).

A refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. It prepares students for Spanish 231. Transfer students should elect Spanish 102 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

205. Spanish Conversation for Non-concentrators. Spanish 102 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purpose of this one credit hour course is to develop confidence in the use of the spoken language and to encourage development of listening comprehension and oral skills. Most of the course work is done in class, but outside readings which are later discussed in class are sometimes assigned. Often the class is divided into small groups which then pursue activities which are of special interest to the group. These classes meet two hours each week, and the most important qualities necessary to participate successfully are a willingness and a desire to learn. Grades are based solely on class performance. There is no standard text. THIS COURSE CANNOT BE USED TO SATISFY SPANISH CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS.

231. Second-Year Spanish. Spanish 102, or 103, or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 112 or 230. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading and writing skills of students; to review the fundamentals of Spanish grammar; to build vocabulary; and to provide some insight into the literature, history and culture of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade based on a series of exams designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued. Spanish 231 or the equivalent; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 112. (4). (FL).

This course is designed to develop fluency in understanding, speaking, reading and writing Spanish and to provide a deeper understanding of the literature, culture, outlooks, and habits of Spanish-speaking peoples. Course grade is based on three exams, designed to assess ability to read, write and understand Spanish, plus periodic written work (including compositions), and oral class participation.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language.

111. First Special Reading Course. No prerequisite; may not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students, a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate.

Other Language Courses

305. Practical Spanish. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

The purposes of this one credit hour course are (1) to apply Spanish to real-life situations and (2) to increase the linguistic skills necessary for mastery of conversational Spanish. While the instructor serves as the leader in determining classroom activities, the class is often divided into small groups of three or four students. The class meets two hours each week, and the course grade is based primarily on class work. There is no standardized text. THIS COURSE CANNOT BE USED TO SATISFY SPANISH CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS.

361. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 361 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used, centered on a grammar-based course book. The student will do readings in Spanish, prepare discussion topics, revise and extend grammar, prepare exercises and translations, and expand vocabulary. Ample time is allotted to class discussion of the readings, and to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, exams, and participation in discussion. (Anderson)

362. Introductory Composition and Conversation. Spanish 361. (3). (Excl).

Spanish 362 is intended to improve the student's written and spoken Spanish. A variety of instructional methods are used depending on the instructor: translations, presentations, readings in Spanish (short stories, plays, newspaper and magazine articles, etc.). Compositions of at least two pages will be assigned weekly. Class discussions are based on topics selected by the instructor. Brief presentations by individual students are occasionally required. Classes are taught in Spanish exclusively. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in discussion and other class projects. (Anderson)

Literature

371. Introduction to Spanish Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

A study of Spanish literature in the Medieval and Golden Age periods (1000-1700). Students will read several texts of Spanish literature including POEMA DE MIO CID, EL ABENCERRAJE Y LA HERMOSA JARIFA, and LDAZARILLO DE TORMES. The discussions will center around a broad cultural background including moral and political themes as well as formal aspects of the texts. There will be two three-four page papers in Spanish on the texts, and one final exam consisting of essay questions on readings. Students will b evaluated on the basis of papers, exams and class discussion. Methods: lecture-discussion. (Casa)

373. Topics in Spanish Literature. Spanish 232. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

SECTION 00l: THE SPANISH BALLAD THROUGH THE AGES. The ballad is the most important single form of popular or traditional verse in Spain, while its versification is known simply as "the Spanish metre." The course will present a historical and analytical survey of the different manifestations and uses of the ballad from its origins (14th century?) to modern times (20th century). Some of the most remarkable features about the Spanish ballad tradition are precisely its longevity, vitality and variety, from the narration of heroic deeds of warlike combat through to the complex evocativeness of modernist verse. Both anonymous "popular" texts and "high art" compositions by professional writers will be studied. A substantial course pack will offer a representative selection of texts, and this will constitute the principal source of readings. The class will be based on lectures (for background information) and close commentaries of texts: some student participation in the latter will be expected. Evaluation will be based on two tests, a midterm and a final exam. All class activity will be conducted in Spanish. (Anderson)

375. Civilización de Espa a (Spanish Civilization). Spanish 232. Spanish 375 and 376 may not both be included in a concentration plan in Spanish. (3). (Excl).

This course will focus on some current issues that confront Spanish democracy. Social, economic, political and cultural aspects of Spanish life will be discussed. For example, what do the Spanish people think about abortion or the relationship between the Church and the State? How has the Spanish economy changed since Spain's entry into the Common Market? Are the Spanish people satisfied with their monarchy and the present socialist government? What do the Spaniards think changed when Spain joined NATO. How did the cultural life improve after the death of the dictator Francisco Franco? The objective of the course is to discuss the contemporary problems as well as the historical origins of these and other questions and to expose students to the perspective that the current democracy introduced. The course will cover information about these issues through readings and lectures. The goal is to stimulate critical thinking by the students and discussion in the class. (Calvo)

381. Introduction to Latin American Literature. Spanish 232 or the equivalent. (3). (HU).

This course intends a panoramic history of Spanish American Literature from the beginning of the XIXth Century to the XXth Century. The Modern epoch, Neoclassicism, Romanticism and Naturalism are the main periods considered. Modernism and Mundonovism will be the generations especially studied. Different genres of poetry, narratives, theatre and essays belonging to the main romantic and modernist authors will be particularly emphasized. Andres Bello, Simon Bolivar, Ernesto Echeverria, Domingo F. Sarmiento, and the "poesia Gauchesca," Josi Marti, Ruben Dario, Gabriela Mistral will be read in a significant number of pages. The objectives of the course are to acquaint the students with the literary and culturally important characteristics of this literature and of its history, to learn about the evolution and particularities of literary genres in Spanish America, and to read a significant list of important authors. The format of the class will be lecture and discussion. Participation of the students is encouraged. The evaluation will take into consideration: participation 10%, assignments 30%, midterm paper 30%, final paper 30%. There will be a course pack available at the beginning of the term. Reference text: Cedomil Goic, HISTORIA Y CRITICA DE LA LITERATURA HISPANOAMERICANA. Barcelona, Editorial Critica, 1989. (Goic)

400(432). Spanish and Latin American Literature in Translation. Spanish 361-362 or permission of instructor. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish (or teaching certificate major or minor). (3). (Excl).

SPANISH DRAMA GOLDEN AGE AND MODERN. Two periods stand out particularly in the history of Peninsular Spanish drama: the so-called "Golden Age" (spanning much of the 16th and 17th centuries), and the first third of the 20th century (up to the outbreak of the Civil War). In this course we shall be reading several plays from both of these periods, which perhaps best exemplify the Spanish "tradition" of drama. Among authors represented from the Golden Age will be Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina and Calderon de la Barca, all of whose plays present striking parallels and contrasts with English Elizabethan and Jacobean drama. Likewise, the 20th century dramatists Valle-Inclan and Garcia Lorca offer some distinctly Spanish aspects of theatre (ESPERPENTO, rural tragedies) while at the same time providing a number of perspectives on broader European movements of the time, especially Symbolism and Surrealism. Lectures will cover the necessary context and background information; however, most of the time we shall be concerned with close textual commentary of the plays read, and this will require considerable student input in discussion. Evaluation will be by three papers (two shorter and a term-paper) and class participation. All texts, all class work and all discussion will be in English. (Anderson)

459(485). Don Quijote. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (HU).

Cervantes' masterpiece is not only am ambiguous and highly debated work, but also a compendium of Renaissance literary genres. The author launches his personage on a series of adventures whose meaning is not always clear. For this reason, the work has been considered both a funny book whose only purpose it was to entertain by satirizing chivalric novels, and the ultimate presentation of sublime idealism. The class will deal with these contradictory explanations, with the literary tradition that made it possible, chivalric romances, pastural literature, the short-story, and with the important contributions of Cervantes to the formation of the modern novel. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion and to write three papers on different subjects during the term. A final examination is also required. It is suggested that students buy the book before the summer break and begin to read it before the term begins. The edition to be used is that of Luis Andres Murillo for Castalia. (Casa)

470(463). Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl).

This course will examine major debates in Spanish American literature from the colonial period through Independence. Two of these persistent topics are (1) the relationship between Europe and America and (2) concepts of humanity, specifically the nature of the Amerindian native. We will study the elaboration and transformation of these ideas as they appeared in the earliest days of colonization in Hispaniola and the subsequent work of Fray Bartolome de las Casas, through the eighteenth-century "rediscovery" of ancient American cultures and the critique of colonialism in the revolutionary period. Amerindian and MESTIZO views of the conquest and feminine perspectives on colonial life will be considered within the larger project. Texts historical, fictional, polemical and poetic will be read. There will be preliminary and final examinations plus five short writing assignments. (Adorno).

475(488). Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century. Spanish 361 and three courses chosen from among Spanish 371-388 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Spanish 475 explores the Latin American novel of the twentieth century in the context of both native and European traditions. It pays special attention to recent literary phenomena such as testimonial and Chicano novels. Asturia, Borges, Cortazar, Garcia Marquez, Rigoberta Menhu, Isabel Allende, Rudolfo Anaya are some of the authors to be read. The impressive amount of translation into English of recent Latin American novels will allow us to discuss issues related to translation and understanding across cultural boundaries. The course will be conducted in Spanish, although English is permitted in class discussion and student oral presentations. (Mignolo)


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