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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in American Culture (Division 315)

This page was created at 3:50 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in American Culture

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for American Culture.

To see what has been added to or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


Amer. Cult. 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Gender, Slavery, and Freedom. Meets with Women's Studies 150.001.

Instructor(s): Hannah Rosen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore the role of gender in the history of slavery, emancipation, and the struggle of African Americans to construct a meaningful freedom in the United States. We will investigate how the organization of gender was conditioned by and undergirded systems of both slavery and racism in the 18th- and 19th-century U.S. South. How did African-American women experience slavery differently from African-American men? What was the nature of gender relations within slave communities? What notions of womanhood and manhood were imposed on slaves by slaveholders and what notions did slaves construct for themselves? What were Black women's visions for freedom and expectations for citizenship? And how did gender shape post-emancipation struggles between Blacks and whites as well as between Black women and men?

To explore these questions, we will consider topics such as slave resistance, labor, family, sexuality, gender and racial identities, and rape and other forms of violence. Readings will include primary sources (such as slave narratives and testimony from former slaves during the post-emancipation period) as well as historical and theoretical scholarship. Seminar participants will be responsible for active participation in class discussion, four short papers, and one long final paper. First-year students only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 From Ellis Island to "The Promised Land": Introduction to Immigrant Literatures

Instructor(s): Magdalena Zaborowska

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ellis Island, a gateway or "processing station" for immigrants coming to the United States in early twentieth century, is said to have admitted the ancestors of about 40% of people who comprise today's U.S. population. Referring to the ambivalent history of this patch of land located in Upper New York Bay, a documentary calls it "An Island of Hope, an Island of Tears." It will begin with an introduction to and retracing of several immigrant journeys that illustrate the interweaving of "hopeful" and "tearful" aspects of male and female newcomers' acculturation and Americanization. Ellis Island as a literal and symbolic location, and the historic and cultural period spanning 1890-1930 will serve as central foci for the first part of the course. We will read literary texts, such as Emma Lazarus' famous poem, "The Colossus" (1883, 1903) Abraham Cahan's Yekl: A Tale of the Ghetto (1896), Mary Antin's From Polotzk to Boston (1899), Israel Zangwill's play "The Melting Pot" (1909), and Anzia Yezierska's Breadgivers (1925), as well as excerpts from reviews, editorials, and past and recent historic and critical studies of the period, such as the nativist reports of the Dillingham Commission (1907-11) and the infamous Dictionary of Races or Peoples (1911). We will study early twentieth-century popular representations of ethnicity and xenophobic and anti-Semitic depictions of the immigrant as the "other," who must be "melted" into a model American. We will also watch Charlie Chaplin's burlesque depiction of the immigrant story in his 1917 film, "The Immigrant," a cinematic re-reading of the gender dynamics in "Yekl," a documentary on Ellis Island, and a slide-show tour of its contemporary museum of immigration. The second part of the course aims to examine various meanings of "(im)migrant" vs. "American" and the political and cultural consequences that this juxtaposition has had on newcomer stories and concepts of post-World War II American identity. We will read poems and view art produced by immigrant artists, discuss fragments of Audre Lorde's Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982), Eva Hoffman's Lost in Translation: A Life in a New Language (1989), and Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land (1996), as well as John Edgar Weideman's short story, "Valeida." We will also consider the development of scholarly discussion on immigration, from Oscar Handlin's The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the American People (1951), through Sam B. Girgus' The New Covenant: Jewish Writers and the American Idea (1984), Werner Sollor's Beyond Ethnicity: Consent and Descent in American Culture (1986) and The Invention of Ethnicity (1989), to Susan Stanford Friedman's Mappings: Feminism and the Cultural Geographies of Encounter (1998). In addition to regular attendance and participation, the students taking the class will be expected to give oral reports, work in teams, and write a short and a longer final essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 201. American Values.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margarita de la Vega-Hurtado (delavega@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the riot of ideals, aspirations, conflicts, visions, and material realities that have defined American culture. It will draw on a range of sources including fiction, music, movies, architecture, and images in art to reconstruct a history of ways in which Americans have imagined their nation. And, while this is not a history course, we will read a lot of history to follow the life of the American imagined community from the struggles to make sense of industrial growth, national expansion, and urbanization in the late 19th century to the current struggle to understand an increasingly multi-ethnic population, an increasingly service-oriented economy, and a growing distrust of government with the history of ideas about what "America" should mean. We will think about American culture as it is manifest in ideas about patriotism and war, race and national progress, and the idea of separate spheres as a solution to the moral problems of industrial capitalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 U.S. Low Budget & Independent Cinema, 1977-Present.

Instructor(s): Liz Brent (esb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

David Lynch...The Coen Brothers...Spike Lee...Jim Jarmusche...Wayne Wang...Julie Dash...Richard Rodriguez... The past twenty years represent a new era in narrative cinema, a new generation of filmmakers, and an economic and industry context in which independent cinema has flourished. This generation of filmmakers created stylistically innovative and ideologically complex movies on virtually no budget, often on personal credit cards. The proliferation of independent film festivals nationally and internationally, and the availability of video rental opened up new opportunities for these young, innovative filmmakers. This course focuses on cinematic and ideological analysis of these low-budget films and of the broader cultural, economic, and historical context through which they were produced, such as: the marketing of multiculturalism; the economics of film production and distribution; the proliferation of film festivals; the influence of MTV; new video technology; conservative efforts at censorship and broader national events and issues. Lectures/discussions will focus on stylistic elements within the film texts, as well as the broader cultural context of the means of production how it was that these films got made in the first place. We will also examine the ways in which these films draw from, alter and add to ideological conventions of Hollywood cinema around issues of: masculinity; national identity; family values; violence and the media; Judeo-Christian iconography; community; psycho-sexual drama; capitalism; the immigrant experience; Utopianism; and the burden of history. Film screenings will include: Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1978); Stranger than Paradise (Jim Jarmusche, 1985); She's Gotta Have It (Spike Lee, 1986); Blue Velvet (David Lynch, 1986); Sex, Lies, and Videotape (Steven Soderberg, 1989); Daughters of the Dust (Julie Dash, 1992); El Mariache (Robert Rodriguez, 1993); Smoke/Blue in the Face (Wayne Wang, 1995); Bound (Wachowski Brothers, 1996); Sling Blade (Billy Bob Thornton, 1996); Boogie Nights (1997); Watermelon Woman (1997).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 4: overrides are dependent upon enrollment and none will be issued until at least the first day of class.

Amer. Cult. 210. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Introduction to the History of Filipinos in the United States. A previous course in U.S. history, Asian American Studies or, especially, "Introduction to American Culture," is recommended.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Alidio

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated with permission for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of the history of Filipinos in the United States. Rather than approaching this history as a singular movement of immigrants from the Philippines to the United States, we will locate the beginning of "Filipino American" history in colonial encounters. In light of the recent centenary "commemorations" of the revolution against Spain in 1896 and the U.S. colonization of 1898, scholars have begun to approach "Filipino" identities as products of historical imagination, culture and ideology at the intersection of Spanish, American and Philippine national communities.

This course will investigate the historical transitions that Filipino men and women made from being U.S. colonial subjects to becoming "Filipino Americans." Were these transitions complete? How can we understand Filipino immigration and labor struggles in America as part of a broader set of questions of U.S. expansionism and Philippine nation-formation? In particular, we will consider Filipino immigration in three legislative time periods: (1) from the turn-of-the-century U.S. colonization of the Philippines to the passage of immigration restriction in 1934; (2) from 1934 to the 1965 Immigration Reform Act; and (3) post-1965 immigration. This course will ask students to evaluate the usefulness of dividing Filipino American history into "waves" of immigration, and to propose modifications or alternatives to this historical approach.

This course has three objectives. First, it will acquaint students with late nineteenth-century Western imperialism as a formative period for Philippine and American national identities within the cultural and political landscape of empire. In this vein, this course will propose that U.S. imperialism did not end with the granting of Philippine independence in 1946. Rather, by focusing on Filipino racial representations over time, we will trace the continuing influence of empire upon American ideas of race, progressivism, and power. We will examine Spanish-Philippine-American War; the role of gender, race, and civilization in the construction of colonial ideologies of "benevolent assimilation"; and racial and ethnological conceptions of Filipinos in U.S. World Fairs. Secondly, we will examine how U.S. imperialism created the conditions for Filipino communities and politics in early twentieth-century America. The movements of Filipino students and workers to the United States and of American civil servants to the Philippines took place as circular migrations that re-shaped the racial and cultural boundaries of each national community. We will examine the role of colonial education in creating government-funded Filipino student communities in the U.S.; labor migrations to Hawaii and the U.S. mainland; the dimensions of class, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and interracial relationships that shaped Filipino bachelor societies and their urban leisure participation in American cities; and labor activism, Philippine independence and "Filipino American" civil rights from the 1930s New Deal to the United Farm Workers' struggle of the 1960s. The third course objective is to encourage a critical analysis of historical memory and "ethnic" identity. The last weeks of the course will focus on the diversity of Filipino communities after the passage of the 1965 immigration reform act. This includes: the U.S.-based political opposition to Ferdinand Marcos' dictatorship; diasporic cultures based upon culture, sexuality, and national identities; and reflections on the centennial of Philippine independence from Spain and colonization by the United States. How do contemporary formations of Filipino communities in the U.S. reflect or disrupt our ideas about the "transnational" Filipino American past?

Course texts: Because there are no foundational texts in Filipino American history yet published in book form, most of the readings for this course are articles found in the course pack. The required texts are all on reserve in the Shapiro Undergraduate Library. These include: "Essays into American Empire in the Philippines, Part II: Culture, Community and Capital" Amerasia 24: no.3 (Winter 1998). Vicente L. Rafael, ed., Discrepant Histories: Translocal Essays on Filipino Cultures (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1995). Craig Scharlin and Lilia V. Villanueva, Philip Vera Cruz: A Personal History of Filipino Immigrants and the Farmworkers Movement (Los Angeles: UCLA Labor Center, Institute of Industrial Relations and UCLA Asian American Studies Center, 1992)

Course requirements: The assignments for this course include a midterm exam, a five-to-seven-page critical review of two articles read and discussed in class, and a final paper. Also as part of your discussion grade you will be expected to submit a weekly two-page review of the readings, and lead (or co-lead) the discussion for one class session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 213. Introduction to Latino Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will serve as an introduction to the study of the historical situation of Latino/a cultures within the United States. Basic questions of cultural conflict, identity, labor, migrations and immigrations, and social movements will be analyzed through various media, including the short story, novel, poetry/performance, music, film, painting, murals, autobiography, and fashion. Emphasis will be upon issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality as they inform the making of a Latino/a identity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 214. Introduction to Asian American Studies Social Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Akutsu

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the nature of American culture and society through a specific study of one racial/ethnic group, Asian Americans. The Asian American experience reveals the dynamics of race relations and economic stratification in the USA as well as the continuing process of defining America and American. This course provides an introductory study of the experience of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The groups covered include Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian Americans as well as the heterogeneity within the various ethnic communities, such as gender, class, generation, and region. Topics for discussion will include international/domestic relations, immigration policy, ethnic literary expressions. The format of this introductory course is largely lecture with an emphasis on encouraging and incorporating student discussion and dialogue especially in applying their knowledge gained from this course to an analysis of contemporary American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, Introductions, table talk, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 230/Hist. of Art 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/230-001.html

See History of Art 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/womenstd/240/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Hollywood Film Industry and American National Identities. (4 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jonathan Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will study how an idealized model of American national identity got established, questioned by the Hollywood film industry between (roughly) 1930 and 1980. The Hollywood studio film was distinguished by its ability to project images of normative Americans and to undercut those notions; in Hollywood, threats and alternatives to that identity were constructed, undermined, and remade sometimes in the very same film. We'll witness how films like Stagecoach, Scarface, It's a Wonderful Life, Shadow of a Doubt postulate models of Americans and/or the threat to it; then we'll see how more recent films like The Godfather, Chinatown, and Unforgiven extend this process by challenging the rules by which these genres work. We'll also witness Hollywood's treatment of such issues as race, immigration, sexuality, and the family and test the Hollywood version against acts of literary imagination, historical analysis, sociological inquiry. Requirements: journals; one paper; midterm; and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code:

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 015 The Photo Essay. (3 credits). Meets with Art and Design 362.001. Basic Knowledge of camera and darkroom highly recommended. Not open to freshmen.

Instructor(s): Joanne Leonard (joannell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer students an approach to thinking about and using photographs and text in constructing blended narratives that speak to the relation between personal experience, memory, and cultural meanings. Students do 4-5 assignments in the term, each designed to underscore particular approaches to the possibilities with the notion of photo essay and to the possibilities and difficulties in combining text with imagery. Students must own an adjustable still photographic camera, any format (35mm, 2 1/4, or 4 x 5). Black and white photographic materials are stressed, and darkrooms for black and white work are available for students of this class. Students may work in color if they are involved in a color photo class at the School of Art or otherwise have means of color processing and printing available to them. Classes meet twice a week for three hours each meeting. Some classes are lecture, demonstration, discussion, and/or critique. Other class meeting times will be used for in-class lab time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 016 Urban Social Movements and the Pursuit of Racial Equality. (3 credits). Meets with History 393.002.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/393/002.nsf

See History 393.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 017 Oral History and Autobiography of Asian Pacific American Women. (3 credits). Meets with Women's Studies 253.004.

Instructor(s): Emily Lawsin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the conception that individual Asian American and Pacific Islander women have of themselves. The course focuses on oral histories and autobiographies of Asian Pacific American women, providing a forum to discuss their consciousness of gender, race, and class. The texts might include an introduction to narratives, for example, by Chinese, Japanese, Native Hawaiian, Korean, Sotuth Asian, Vietnamese, and/or Filipina American women; thereby allowing students to compare and contrast the experiences of different APA ethnicities and generations. We will examine how these women became agents of social change, both publicly and privately, at home and in their communities. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussion, exams, as well as a final project, such as an oral history of an Asian American or Pacific Islander women. By gathering new histories, students will contribute to the research on APA women, and in themselves become agents of change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Empowering Families and Communities. (4 Credits). Meets with Psychology 319/320.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 319.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Dances of Latinas/Latinos. Meets with Dance 354.

Instructor(s): Evelyn Velez-Aguayo (aguayo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine contemporary dance and performance art as a transformative form beyond the body. Through an analysis of selected choreography and performance, we will establish a dialogue that recreates the historical-political-cultural background and context of works about Puerto Rico, New York, and Latino America. The choreography presented will focus on factors such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. We will examine choreography and other artistic collaborative efforts (i.e., music/composers, installation, performer, literature, and visual art) within the issues of cultural identity and how this affects process, movement, and the dance aesthetics. Students are required to participate through movement, discussion, observation, analysis, and performance. Other requirements include: related readings of text and articles, journal entries, one critical essay, written critiques, and complete participation in discussions, workshops and attendance to performances. Taught by Puerto Rican Choreographer/Performance Artist/Assistant Professor of Dance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 002 Filipino American Literature.

Instructor(s): Emily Lawsin

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores fascinating literature by Filipina/os in America. Using novels, short stories, plays, poetry, and spoken word, we will examine the development of various themes within Filipino American literature. For example, is it a literature of "exile and emergence," and/or one of "rootedness"? How does the literature reflect the diversity of the Filipina/o American experience? By placing the texts in a social, economic, personal, and ideological context, we will see different perspectives and generations of American life. As an introduction to Filipino American literature, part of the course objective is to look critically at how fiction can intersect with autobiography and how cultural literacy can inform our understanding of texts and community. We will also discuss the intersections of Philippine Literature in English from the Philippines and Filipino American Literature in the United States, and how this relationship introduces a unique body of creative writing. Readings may include (but are not limited to) writing by classic authors such as Carlos Bulosan, Bienvenido N. Santos, Jose Garcia Villa, and N.V.M. Gonzalez; to contemporary authors such as Jessica Hagedorn, Peter Bacho, Al Robles, Jeff Tagami, Oscar Penaranda, Virginia Cerenio, Marianne Villanueva, Cecilia Brainard, Luis Francia, Eric Gamalinda, Evelina Galang, Eileen Tabios, Nick Carbo, Vince Gotera, Joel B. Tan, R. Zamora Linmark, William Oandasan, Timoteo Cordova, and Jeannie Barroga; to emerging writers and spoken word artists such as Irene Suico Soriano, Dawn Bohulano Mabalon, Allyson Tintiangco-Cubales, Darlene Rodrigues, Maya Santos, Faith Santilla, Alison de la Cruz, and others. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussions, exams, as well as a final project, such as analyzing and/or producing a Filipina/o American creative text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 313/Anthro. 314. Cuba and its Diaspora.

Section 001 Required Film Screening T, 5-7 p.m. Sections 002 and 003 may be elected to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001 Students must have completed 222, 223, 322 Prior to Electing 323. Four Full Terms of Ojibwa are required to satisfy the Colleges Language Requirement. Permission of American Culture Director Required.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 328/Engl. 382. Native American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 335. Arts and Culture in American Life.

Section 001 Arts and Culture in American Life.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An upper-level introduction to modern American cultural history, this course will establish late nineteenth-century contexts and then explore key topics in twentieth-century American artistic life and popular culture. Special emphasis will be placed on cultural and artistic modernism, racism and anti-racism, and responses to popular and folk culture in the first half of the twentieth century. We will approach these themes through developments in music, literature, photography, film, and painting. The multidisciplinary perspective developed here will introduce students to a spectrum of cultural phenomena as sites of historical and critical inquiry. We will explore how the practices and discourses of modernism and postmodernism developed not in an isolated vacuum but rather as symbiotic responses to the ever-changing commercialization of cultural life and ordinary leisure. As the course moves closer to the present time, we will explore how the multiple worlds of popular music have served as battlegrounds over the representation of cultural identity, gender roles, and racial and ethnic diversity. The format will combine lecture and discussion. Requirements should include regular attendance, a midterm and final exam, some brief written commentaries, and frequent reading quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 342/Hist. 368/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

When someone says they "do" American Studies, what exactly do they mean? This course asks students to think self-consciously about American Studies as a practice that has continually shifted over time, as a dynamic inquiry that evolves continually through multiple ongoing conversations among historians, political activists, feminists, sociologists, anthropologists, literary scholars, popular culture critics, queer theorists, scholars in ethnic studies and gender studies, etc. Readings are designed to give students some sense of how certain scholarly debates have developed within the field, as well as how these debates are being transformed in the present moment. One effect of these conversations has been a constant rethinking of the "meaning" of American Studies itself: if at some point the field practitioners were supposed to explain the meaning of "America" (or more specifically, the US), at other points scholars seem to be posing more questions than answers about their subject: How do we/Can we even define an American? What constitutes American culture? Can we really define America as if it's just the United States especially now, in the context of so-called "transnational" culture, or global ecosystems? The overall goal of this course then, is to suggest that both the discipline of American Studies, and its subject "America" are under continual reconstruction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 360/Great Books 350/Hist. 360. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 374/Hist. 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Lassiter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s): Kamtekar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of department

Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 421/Soc. 423. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee Schlesinger (schlesin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/soc/423/001.nsf

See Sociology 423.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001 Permission of American Culture Director is Required.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001 Permission of American Culture Director is Required.

Instructor(s): Irving (Hap) Mc Cue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 430/WS 430. Feminist Thought.

Section 001 Women of Color and Third World Women. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 458.004.

Instructor(s): Nesha Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 240 and one 340-level WS course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 The Gilded Age. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.005

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 397.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Uncle Tom's Cabin in 19th-Century America. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.002.

Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 397.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 The Harlem Renaissance. (4 credits). Meets with History 396.001.

Instructor(s): Paul Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 396.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 Capialism, Industrialization, and Community Formation in Antebellum New England. (3 credits). Meets with History 593.002 and American Culture 601.001.

Instructor(s): Weil

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 593.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 American Indians and Film. (3 credits). Meets with History 393.003.

Instructor(s): Liza Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course looks at American Indian characters in film throughout the twentieth century, including documentary, recreations of war, interracial romance, comedy, cartoons, and some television. We will critically examine the contradictory representations of Indians in non-Indian and Indian vehicles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Amer. Cult. 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 North & South American Literature. Meets with English 473.001. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): James Mcintosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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