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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in Classical Archaeology (Division 342)

This page was created at 3:53 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Classical Archaeology

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CLARCH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Classical Archaeology.

To see what has been added to or changed in Classical Archaeology this week go to What's New This Week.


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (Cl.Arch 221 offered in the Fall) and Rome (Cl.Arch 222 offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (Cl.Arch 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.


Class. Arch. 221/Hist. of Art 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/221-001.html

This course surveys the history, culture, and art of Crete and Greece as revealed by archaeology from the third millennium through the 4th century B.C. In the prehistoric period, particular attention is given to architectural and ceramic developments as well as to the crosscurrent of trade and economic contacts among Asia Minor, Crete, and mainland Greece. Emphasis is also given to the impact archaeology has had on views and theories of history: the destructions of the civilizations of Crete and Troy, the end of the Bronze Age, the volcanic eruption of Thera. In the historic period, major artistic developments in architecture, sculpture, and painting are considered and special attention is given to social interpretations: temples as banks and monasteries; sculpture as dedication, decoration, and commemorative propaganda; architectural sculpture as realized myth. Discussions in the sections will be interactive, concentrating on archaeological field techniques, analysis, and ancient society. The sections will meet in the Kelsey Museum where it will be possible to work with the actual ancient artifacts recovered in University of Michigan excavations. There are three one-hour examinations, as well as illustrated lectures and assigned readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 433/Hist. of Art 433. Greek Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/433-001.html

The course follows the development of Greek sculpture, both in the round and relief, from the renaissance in the late 8th century B.C. through the various phases of experimentation in the 7th and 6th centuries to the high points in the 5th and 4th centuries. Standing male and female figures are the principal types followed, with increasing attention given to architectural sculpture culminating in the majestic programs decorating the Temple of Zeus at Olympia and the Parthenon in Athens. Stylistic analysis, formal development, and interpretation both of free-standing figures and programmatic architecture sculpture as social and political documents. There will be a midterm hour exam and a final; students will also be expected to write a paper of intermediate length (10-15 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 440/Hist. of Art 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece.

Section 001 The Topography of Athens

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/440-001.html

Traditionally the indisputable focus of all reconstructions of ancient Greek culture, Athens offers an abundance of archaeological material which documents the tenacity of the Greek polis at its best. This course will examine specific monumental manifestations of the polis phenomenon in view of recently discovered evidence that has dramatically reshaped the archaeological profile of this city. Particular emphasis will be placed on the topographical exploration of the historical centre of the city (the Agora and the Acropolis) and its material configurations of public versus private and sacred versus secular space, on the interactions of the centre with the surrounding countryside of Attica in light of recent contributions of landscape archaeology, and last but not least, on the post-antique life of the city and its cultural traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 442/Hist. of Art 442. Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy Papalexandrou (apapalex@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/F2000/442-001.html

See History of Art 442.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 481/Hist. of Art 481. Art of Ancient Iran.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~histart/hartspc

See History of Art 481.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Arch. 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Class. Arch. 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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