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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in Classical Civilization (Division 344)

This page was created at 3:53 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Classical Civilization

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CLCIV

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Classical Civilization.

To see what has been added to or changed in Classical Civilization this week go to What's New This Week.


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (Cl.Arch 221 offered in the Fall) and Rome (Cl.Arch 222 offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (Cl.Arch 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


Class. Civ. 101. Classical Civilization I: The Ancient Greek World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Great Books 191 or 201. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/clciv/101/001.nsf

This course serves as an introduction to the civilization of ancient Greece from its beginnings to the fourth century BCE. All reading is in English translation. Lectures will trace the development of Greek literature and thought within the context of Greek society, with emphasis on gender relations and the crisis in traditional values during the late fifth century. Literature read includes Homer's Iliad and Odyssey; selected lyric poetry; selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; selected comedies of Aristophanes; selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides; and philosophical writings of Plato. The readings average about 90 pages per week. There will be a midterm, two brief papers, and a final examination. First-year Honors students in Honors sections will write enough to meet the Introductory Composition requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 Who Owns the Past?

Instructor(s): John Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do the British Museum's Parthenon marbles rightfully belong in Greece? Should Native Americans or anthropologists control the bones of someone dead for 10,000 years? Who should have access to the Dead Sea Scrolls? To whom belong the cultural spoils of war? Do landowners have rights to the antiquities on their property? When archaeologists excavate, or when curators design museum exhibitions, how can they acknowledge that views of the past other than their own may have validity? Such issues are controversial, because the past has power in the present making its study inevitably political. This seminar will consider a wide range of ethical, legal, disciplinary, and cultural issues, all of which in one way or another raise the question: who owns the past? Individual classes will revolve around discussion and debate centered on case studies introduced via readings, illustrated presentations, and videos. The emphasis will be on thinking and speaking critically and persuasively (presentations and discussion in class) and on writing clearly (short papers).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 002 Some Heroes in Literature.

Instructor(s): D.O. Ross (doross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literary heroes come in a variety of shapes and sizes some easily recognizable, some in disguise. We will get to know just a few, beginning with Odysseus in Homer's epic and with two or three of Sophocles' tragic heroes. We will consider some figures from modern literature who undertake similar journeys (such as Dorothea in George Eliot's Middlemarch) or who find themselves in a tragic impasse (like Willy Loman in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman or Ethan Frome in Edith Wharton's novel).

What we find along the way, in these and other works, will depend on you. The only requirement is that you come willingly and prepared to discuss the readings not as an opportunity to display your native intelligence or to convince others of the rightness of your views, but to listen, to explore, and to evaluate new ideas, and to learn about and understand a work of literary art not according to your preconceptions, but in its own terms.

The final grade will be based on two short papers (5-6 pages) and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 003 Herodotus, the Father of Lies?

Instructor(s): John Shean (jfshean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jfshean/herodo~1.htm

Herodotus, the "father of history", wrote about much more than the wars fought between the Persians and the Greeks. One half of his work deals with ethnographic material vivid descriptions of contemporary cultures which serve to underline the differences between Greeks and barbarians. Herodotus weaves together fact, fantasy, and folklore to tie together all the disparate parts of his History in order to give his work a unifying theme namely the hybris of man and his arrogance in transgressing divinely ordained boundaries. The seminar will consider some of the unifying themes of Herodotus' work as well as sundry specific issues with a special focus on his particular views concerning the relationship between gods and men, Greeks and barbarians, men and women, and Athenians and Spartans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 215. Ovid.

Section 001, 002 Oct. 24-Dec ?. (Drop/Add deadline=October 30).

Instructor(s): Ruth Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU).

Foriegn Lit Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rscodel/ovid.html

Ovid has been among the most influential writers in the European literary tradition, and he is one of the most enjoyable authors in the canon. This mini-seminar will examine both the original contexts of his works and what he has meant for later readers, with emphasis on the love poetry and the "Metamorphoses." Themes will include his treatment of women and sexuality, his narrative technique and wit, his relationships with Augustus and with Roman power, his presentation of self, and whatever aspects the group finds most interesting. We will look at both recent adaptations, including Ted Hughes' "Tales from Ovid" and the collection "After Ovid," and Elizabethan translations, including Golding's "Metamorphoses" (which Shakespeare used) and Christopher Marlowe's "Amores." We will also look (briefly) at paintings based on Ovidian themes from the Renaissance to the present. There will be two short papers and oral reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Class. Civ. 372. Sports and Daily Life in Ancient Rome.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amphitheater full of gladiators, the circus full of chariots (with or without Charleton Heston) are among the most abiding images of Roman, and perhaps, any western culture. The Olympic games were as much a Roman institution as they were Greek indeed the Roman empire was the first great age of public entertainment. But what did it all mean? How is entertainment related to the interests of society as a whole? These are two of the questions that we will explore through a discussion of the place of Roman entertainment in Roman society. We will start by looking at the broad structures of Roman life, and then move through the diverse entertainments of the Romans from athletic events to the theater, from chariot racing to public execution, beast hunts, and gladiators. Readings include selections from ancient authors and from recent scholarship.

Textbooks are available at Shaman Drum, the Course packs (one of sources, one of modern readings) from Accu-Copy. The final grade will be the two hour exams, quizzes in section, homework assignments, and section participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 388/Phil. 388. History of Philosophy: Ancient.

Sections 003 and 004 meets the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Rachama Kamtekar

Prerequisites & Distribution: One Philosophy Introduction. (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Philosophy 388..

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Class. Civ. 452. Food in the Ancient World: Subsistence and Symbol.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Food keeps people alive that is a universal truth. But patterns of eating and drinking are individual to each culture, offering one means by which groups distinguish and identify themselves. The ancient Mediterranean world was no exception. This course will trace the mechanics of food available and levels of general health. Styles of consumption were also used to mark out both symbolic boundaries and social distinctions: religious cults followed dietary restrictions, the rich displayed their wealth through lavish banquets, men ate and drank differently (and usually better!) than women. Social occasions where food and drink were key (the Greek symposium, the Roman dinner party) will be analyzed, and possibly even reenacted. The course will consider a range of periods and case studies and utilize a variety of textual and archaeological evidence.

We will also spend part of the course specifically studying animals in the ancient world: what animals were eaten, how they helped in food production, what forces or virtues they were taken to symbolize. Students in this course will work with objects in the holdings of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, and we will create a small museum exhibit Animals in the Kelsey as a class project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 481. The Classical Tradition.

Section 001 Pagans and Christians: The formation of Christian identity in the Roman empire. Meets with Religion 380.001.

Instructor(s): Sabine MacCormack (sgm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Class. Civ. 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course, tracing the formation of Christian identity in the Roman empire, examines religion as a form of cultural and political expression, and as a method of imagining a supernatural world. We thus begin with what at the time was meant by cultural and politics, and with ancient concepts of the supernatural. The period covered, from the mid-first century BCE to the later 6th century CE, may be subdivided into three phases. (1) Then formation of diverse Christian collective identities will be contextualized by also studying the membership and opinions of other religious groups. These include devotees of heroic founders, of civic and agricultural deities and of personal saviours such as Isis, as well as adherents of Gnostic and philosophical sects. (2) By the end of the second phase, in the late 4th century CE, non-Christian worship had been officially banned, and Christian groups had formed into an empire-wide organization. Non-Christians now fended to be described by the blanket term "pagan", even though their beliefs and forms of worship were and had always been very diverse. Simultaneously, monotheistic ideas became more prevalent in "pagan" thought. We will ask why this was so, while also studying pagan and Christian concepts of holiness and political identity. (3) Finally, we will study the transformation of "paganism" into a cultural tradition, and the evolution of a Christian power structure spanning the entire Mediterranean world, and reaching beyond it into Northern Europe and the Middle east. We will conclude by asking to what extent and why Christians succeeded in becoming the exclusive bearers of religious authority. Reading will be mainly from original sources, e.g. Cicero, On the Nature of the Gods; the first Book of Maccabees; Acts; The Letter to the Romans; Lucian, Peregrinus; Acts of Perpetua and Felicity; Porphry, Life of Plotinus; Julian, Caesars; Symmachus, Third Relatio; Augustine, Confessions; John Lydus, Magistracies; John of Ephesus, Lives of the Eastern Saints.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

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