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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in English (Division 361)

This page was created at 1:05 PM on Sat, Sep 23, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 – December 22)

Open courses in English

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

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A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/ after March 29th, 2000. For a listing of of the Fall 2000 Courses that satisfy concentration requirements, please visit the English Web site at: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/f00/FOOREQ.html

For a list of courses fulfilling English concentration requirements, please visit the following Web site: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/f00/FOOREQ.html

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department [(734) 764-6330].

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Fall Term 2000 is September 24, 2000.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century – to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


Engl. 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.


Engl. 125. College Writing.


Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Describing the Self in Autobiography.

Instructor(s): Shirley Neuman (sneuman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do we tell the stories of our lives? Out of all the details, the small and large events that make up a life, how do we decide what to include? what to omit? what is important? how to make a story out of it? What is the role of memory in telling the stories of our lives? of forgetting? of public record? of private recollection and private intention? How do we use language to convey our stories? how does the language we have available shape our lives and the stories we tell about them? How do our family, social, professional, racial and ethnic, and national circumstances shape our understanding of the "I" telling story? How do we tell the story of who we are if part of what we feel ourselves to be is not acknowledged as fully legitimate by the larger society? Who do we tell the stories of our lives for? who do we tell them to? In telling the stories of our lives, do we present a single, coherent self who parades through our story bearing our name? or are we many selves, depending on the time, people, circumstances? These are some of the questions we will be asking ourselves as we read, discuss, and write about several autobiographies and possibly view some film autobiographies. Our focus will be on autobiographies that describe their authors growing up and discovering a vocation. We will be comparing autobiographies by authors of different racial, ethnic, and national backgrounds.

Students in this first-year seminar will be given opportunities to learn skills of public presentation, will begin to acquire research skills, will improve their writing, and will learn collaborative skills through several small and varied assignments throughout the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 – Black Multiculturalism. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 104.001

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 104.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 – Richard Wright, Black Protest and American Citizenship.

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we'll study the relationship between modern fiction written by African Americans and the modern Civil Rights Movement. The novels associated with the struggle for racial equality and inclusion are often called "protest fiction" because they employ common literary techniques and forms, such as realism, to address burning racial issues of their time, including lynching, segregation, migration to northern industrial cities, and economic deprivation. Either directly or indirectly, all of these novels ask pressing questions about the meaning of American citizenship and racial community under the conditions of racial segregation. What does it mean to be Negro and American? Can a healthy sense of community and citizenship be created despite racial oppression? Should African Americans fight in World War II, even though their civil rights are denied them at home and within a segregated military? What are the obligations of oppressed communities to the nation that oppresses them? We begin our study with the most famous protest novelist, Richard Wright, and with the most famous novel, Native Son. Other novelists to be studied include William Attaway, James Baldwin, Ann Petry, Chester Himes, Gwendolyn Brooks, John Oliver Killens, and Alice Walker. In addition to fiction, we'll read pertinent essays in history, literary criticism, and sociology.

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Engl. 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 004 – Rhetorical Activism and U.S. Civil Rights Movements.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL140f00/desc.html

The signers of the United States Constitution declared freedom of expression the most important right of United States citizens. Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and hundreds of others incited a nation to free millions of enslaved people through their rhetorical activism. Susan B. Anthony and dozens of other women used the only power they had, the power of language, to ensure women their right to vote in this country. And the persuasive eloquence of Martin Luther King, Jr., changed this nation's consciousness. How do people use language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society? That will be our central question as we study texts representing a range of positions from five U.S. civil rights movements: the early woman's rights, antislavery, 1960s civil rights, women's liberation, and gay rights movements. Students will participate in class discussions, write occasional brief responses to readings, and do a project that will include a presentation and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages may be required.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Manu Samriti Chander (mchander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Manu Samriti Chander (mchander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/english/223/006.nsf

No Description Provided

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course furthers the aims of English 124 and 125 in helping to analyze the various claims of a given issue and to develop ways of exploring and defending positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. Careful attention will be paid to the process of reasoning, the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the discovery of ideas and evidence through analysis and rigorous articulation in written discourse. The course will also focus on considerations of style, formal strategy techniques, and revision as integral to precision in making points and developing argumentative ideas both for purposes of individual reflection as well as for the purpose of persuading an audience.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007 – Arguing Responsibly (Argumentative Writing).

Instructor(s): Allan Cook (arcook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~arcook/225_007.htm

Popularly, argument involves demonstrating a valid point through reasoned presentation of sufficient evidence. While true enough, this definition constructs argument as confrontation and contest, overlooking the process as logical, ethical, and cooperative. Rather than reserving argument for combatants like lawyers and philosophers, we need to recognize it informs all writing tasks as an integral part of our thinking process. When we move from voicing simple, untested opinion to openly and honestly evaluating the bases for those opinions, we are engaging in argument.

In this course, you will develop such an approach examining your own positions on a social issue of import to you and then testing your claims in a deeper exploration in concert with other students as you negotiate an argumentative presentation. Building on the basic skills of your freshman composition class, you will write a series of arguments that observe, explain, evaluate, convince, negotiate, and persuade, and a final reflective portfolio.

Course assignments include five written arguments and revisions ranging from a two-page exploratory essay to a 8-10-page persuasive essay, one one-page summary, an annotated bibliography of five articles, peer response letters, a collaborative class presentation, participation in weekly e-mail conversations, and a demonstration portfolio with self-reflexive evaluation.

REQUIRED TEXTS:

Crusius, Timothy W., and Carolyn E. Channell. The Aims of Argument. Third Edition. Mountain View, Ca: Mayfield, 1999. (AA)

Aaron, Jane E. The Little, Brown Compact Handbook. Third Edition. New York: Longman, 1998. (LB)

Course Objectives:

  • To develop advanced concepts of rhetoric and argument.
  • To develop critical thinking skills in evaluating the rhetorical methods of common arguments and in evaluating their effectiveness.
  • To synthesize, evaluate, and identify areas of common interest in a range of positions in published arguments.
  • To develop familiarity with methods of argument with an emphasis on rhetorical appeals and case structures of thesis, reasons, and evidence.
  • To develop expertise in library and Internet research and develop critical skills in evaluating the quality of arguments from both sources.
  • Develop advanced skills with bibliographic tools: paraphrase, quotation, summary, note taking, and annotated bibliographies.
  • Develop collaboration and presentation skills.
  • Enhance personal process writing approaches including drafting, revising, collaborating, evaluating, editing, and proofreading arguments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017 – The Other

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren (agbergrn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/english/225/017.nsf

"Others" – a study of opinions, issues, and rhetorical strategies.

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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Engl. 227/Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 229/LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng229.html

In this course, students analyze and practice the types of writing done by technical and professional writers – in particular, manuals, reports, correpondence, and proposals. Like all effective writing, technical and professional writing emerges from an understanding of purpose and audience, from an understanding of "the rhetorical context." It is the specifics of its rhetorical context – not any implied intellectual difference – that distinguishes technical and professional writing from other forms of writing. Thus, a major goal of this course will be to help students develop the analytical skills they will need to navigate the rhetorical contexts technical and professional writers encounter in a variety of fields. Since most technical and professional writing is the result of collaborative activity, students should expect to work in teams in the course, but the course will also address more personal issues, such as the writing of resumes and letters of self-promotion. This course carries Humanities distribution credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lillian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will want to, in this class, think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones From the River, thinks: Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone. We will discuss various 20th-century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to "speak" to us. We will write 2 essays/workshop our essays, and take a final exam.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What a story means has a lot to do with how it's told. In this section of "What is Literature," we will explore some essential questions of contemporary literary discourse through the consideration of narrative and the delights and implications of story-telling. Using as our main source what D.H. Lawrence called "the great book of life," the novel, we will look at the varied strategies authors employ to present their stories to their readers and how those strategies reflect the writers' ideology and culture. We will see that talking about the narrator and modes of narration in a text leads us to new ways of thinking about character and plot and to our roles as readers of these texts. I have chosen some of my favorite stories from some of my favorite authors such as Woolf, Spiegelman, Hemingway, Brontë, O'Brien, Morrison, Alexie, and James. Requirements: a ten-page journal on an author whose work we study in class, done in preparation for the term paper; an essay, about 8 pages on the subject studied in the journal; contributions to the further discussion of class texts on the computer conference (COW); a final exam; regular attendance, and active class participation in discussion.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses how our expectations of literature are shaped by our assumptions about gender, ethnicity, and class. Who is literature for? What purpose does it serve? What makes a "good" story or novel, and how do we know this? How do specific literary periods and even technological developments (such as the invention of the computer) change our ideas of literature? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? This course also explores questions of literary genre, such as the thin line between autobiography and fiction, between prose-poems and stories, and between short stories and novels: for instance, is the difference just one of length? Can a series of short stories be a novel? While we may use an anthology for this course, other works will be chosen from a list that includes Frederick Douglass' Narrative, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Sandra Cisnero's The House on Mango Street, and Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony, as well as Voltaire's Candide (to read across time) and Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart (to read across cultures). We will also read exerpts from Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, which speculates about how a writer's background and audience may influence her art. This course will include a number of informal responses as well as three formal papers, as well as a midterm and a final. Class participation and discussion are essential components of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 005 – Honors.

Instructor(s): Steve Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine the ways in which different genres and periods have employed literature to understand and reflect upon historical catastrophes and crises. The genres considered will include drama, narrative poetry, novels, short stories, and the non-fictional memoir, and will range from the 17th century to recent fiction; each work will be paired with another from a different genre or period that shares with it certain themes, which will allow us to determine how our critical questions change when we move from one genre or historical period to another. Shakespeare's King Lear, for example, will be read alongside Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Milton's Paradise Lost will be contrasted with James Galvin's account of a harsher Eden lost in this century in the American West. Grades will be based on short weekly writing assignments and two longer essays.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 006 – What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Yaeger (pyaeger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all intertwined and interconnected in a variety of ways.The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of a dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to the literary culture of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. It is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point. Enrollment in each section of this course will be capped at 30. Each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest. Some of these presentations will involve special guest speakers recruited from the faculties of other universities. Students will write a number of short essays, 4-6 pages.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 – What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all intertwined and interconnected in a variety of ways.The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of a dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to the literary culture of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. It is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point. Enrollment in each section of this course will be capped at 30. Each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest. Some of these presentations will involve special guest speakers recruited from the faculties of other universities. Students will write a number of short essays, 4-6 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 008 – Narratives of Law and Literature.

Instructor(s): J Early

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines narrative to consider how two fundamental categories of human endeavor, the legal and literary, act and interact. In oral cultures, myths and stories often educated individuals and communities in important codes – moral, social, medical, etc. – and those functions did not cease entirely with the establishment of writing, or even the rise of institutions whose job it was to "give" law to the people. In classical literature and the development of Judeo-Christian thought what we now think of as literature was once a primary vehicle for promulgating and disseminating various forms of law. Modern artists (and philosophers, historians, and revolutionaries) continue to write texts that explore questions of justice, the nature of order, the sources of human conflict – all problems often seen as the province of law. Conversely, legal discourse adopts narrative, particularly in the adversarial model of legal process where divergent narratives of truth compete, and where one may be found more believable, 'compelling', 'dramatic', even probable when it is inflected by aesthetic or structural standards derived from art and literature. This course will use Classical, Biblical, Renaissance, and nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts to examine these domains and their actions and interactions to consider the functions and properties of narrative. Major texts (whole or selections) may include Aeschylus, The Eumenides; Shakespeare, Measure for Measure; Robert Browning, The Ring and the Book; M. E. Braddon, Lady Audley's Secret; materials related to the Oscar Wilde trial; Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem; and assorted short pieces ranging from Bible passages to selections from trial transcripts and popular detective fiction. In addition to short response papers, written work will include three papers and two exams.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 009 – Introduction to the Literary Culture of the United States.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all intertwined and interconnected in a variety of ways. The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of a dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to the literary culture of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. It is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point. Enrollment in each section of this course will be capped at 30. Each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest. Some of these presentations will involve special guest speakers recruited from the faculties of other universities. Students will write a number of short essays, 4-6 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 010 – What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Jonathan Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Course Description for 239 Sections 6-10

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all intertwined and interconnected in a variety of ways.The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of a dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to the literary culture of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. It is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point. Enrollment in each section of this course will be capped at 30. Each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest. Some of these presentations will involve special guest speakers recruited from the faculties of other universities. Students will write a number of short essays, 4-6 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W. Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry sings, tells stories, celebrates, and mourns. It is structured language that becomes fixed in our minds and shapes the way we see the world. Understanding poetry is often challenging and (almost) always rewarding. Poetry teaches slow and careful reading; it invites connections. Learning to read it well is demanding and forms the basis for life-long skills applicable wherever reading is done attentively. Our course will involve close attention to a broad range of poetry; there will be many short response papers to stimulate discussion, a midterm, and a final.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002 – Honors.

Instructor(s): George Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for any Honors student wishing to increase his or her enjoyment and understanding of poetry. Through a wide range of poems we will explore both the ways in which poems work and the ways in which we can understand and improve our responses to them. After an introduction to poetic analysis we will progress chronologically from Shakespeare to the present, emphasizing particularly the diversity of the last two centuries and ending with in-depth study of a major modern poet (probably W.B. Yeats). Class discussion and occasional informal lectures will focus primarily on close reading of individual texts, but students should also emerge from the course with some grasp of the historical development of poetry in English. Frequent short papers, the last of which will serve as a final exam; no prerequisites. The text will be The Norton Anthology of Poetry, Fourth Edition.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Andrea Henderson (akhender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an introduction to poetry, emphasizing the association of form and content and their link to the historical context in which poems were originally written. Our poets will range from Shakespeare to T.S. Eliot. The course will, for the most part, be organized chronologically, but we will on occasion trace certain themes, techniques, and forms as they appear in a cluster of poems of different periods. We will also use other cultural artifacts to illuminate the workings of the poems of particular eras. The class will discuss, for instance, the common features of Renaissance poems and paintings, and the relationship between twentieth-century impressionism and the poetry of Wallace Stevens. Course requirements include active class participation, several short papers, and a final exam.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Alan Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will try to get a sense of the potentials as well as the limits of the genre through examining poems with a wide variety of poetic forms and subjects representing different cultures, sensibilities, and historical periods. We will also give substantial attention to two major poets to be chosen after the class is formed. The class will be conducted mainly by discussion and there will be frequent short papers and a final examination.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): John Knott (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to lyric poetry, with reading drawn from a wide range of English and American examples, from the earliest English poetry to the present. We will begin by considering some basic elements of poetry (including prosody, diction, tone, metaphor) and various verse forms, with attention to the evolution of some of these (the sonnet, for example). The class will typically proceed by intensive discussion of a few poems each day. We will conclude by spending a couple of weeks on the work of a contemporary poet. Assignments will include exercises, three or four short papers, and a final examination.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at – and hear – poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010, 011.

Instructor(s): Mary Zwiep (mnz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course begins to answer the question of how to read poetry with pleasure and skill. We will look carefully at poem after poem, with an emphasis on the poet's craft, or how the poem is put together. Requirements will include some memorizing, several short "exercises," two formal papers of analysis, midterm, and final. Regular attendance is expected. Class proceeds by discussion. Text is the complete Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosodythe techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams, short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so) and two five page analytical papers. The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Beaston (beaston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We shall read a wide-ranging selection of poems from The Norton Anthology of Poetry (shorter fourth ed.) in order to develop strategies for understanding and appreciating poetry. John Hollander's Rhyme's Reason (enlarged ed.) will aid us in our enterprise. Since, for purposes of this course, we shall regard the appreciation of poetry as a partly communal activity, rather than a strictly individual one, you will be expected to attend each class period prepared to share your individual reading experiences with other members of the class. Course requirements include four short papers (2-3 pages), several in-class writings, some memorization, and midterm and final examinations.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Xavier Nicholas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of English 240, we will approach poetry as a "pleasurable" activity which exercises our intelligence and imagination in a dynamic and disciplined way. We will explore the richness and diversity of poetry written in English, focusing on the form as well as the content of specific poems. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poets in The Norton Anthology of Poetry to a brief but detailed study of the works of two African-American poets, Gwendolyn Brooks and Robert Hayden. We will also examine how the study of poetry can liberate and broaden our experience of ourselves and the world we inhabit. Requirements include regular attendance and active participation in class, four short papers, and a final exam.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students interested in reading poetry with increased pleasure and understanding. We will read specific poems closely to illustrate questions of voice, narrative, diction, rhythm and meter, sound, figures of speech, the line, form, authorship, audience, and context. Students will also learn something about the historical development of poetry in English. I will hold extra classes for student interested in poetry aloud. During the term, we will move from a general survey of traditional poetic techniques and forms to a brief but detailed study of a few poems in free verse. We will also explore how poetry can recall childhood memories, help create communities, and stimulate moral and political thinking and feeling. I expect to ask students to write three short papers and a midterm. Other requirements for the course are regular attendance and active participation in class. Final grades will reflect all the requirements. Texts: Nims, Western Wind, 4th edition, and the Norton Anthology of Poetry, 4th edition.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 016.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 245/RC Hums. 280/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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Engl. 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will concentrate on the movement and development of Shakespearean tragedy by studying "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so we will also consider the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm, a final, and a series of short written assignments.

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Engl. 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001 – American Voices.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the major themes in American literature is the "Americanization" of members of the various racial, religious, and ethnic groups within American society. This section of English 270 will follow the theme of Americanization beginning with pieces from Nathaniel Hawthorne, one of the writers in the traditional American canon, and continuing with novels and short stories from other American voices and talents including women, Chicano, Asian-, African-, Native- and European-American writers, selections which more fully represent "American" or United States literature. The class will be a mix of lecture and discussion and all students are expected to read and be fully prepared to discuss the works in class and on COW, a computer conferencing system on the Web. Requirements also include a final and a 6-8 page paper.

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Engl. 274/AAS 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 – African American Literature in the U.S., from 1773 to 1912.

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study the emergence and early development of African American literature in the US, from 1773 to 1912. Through close readings of a wide variety of African American texts and genres, we will explore the constraints and opportunities that governed the writing of these texts. We will ask: how did these novels, autobiographies, and poetry speak to the different experiences and concerns of African Americans in the US? How did they help blacks gain a national voice in a slaveholding and racially polarized nation? Writers include Frederick Douglass, Williams Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs, Frances Harper, and Charles Chestnutt. Assignments will include short response papers and midterm and final exams.

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Engl. 285. Introduction to Twentieth-Century Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will consider how a variety of writers reflect and respond to the major historical, social, political, philosophical, and moral issues and preoccupations of the 20th century. The works we will study are eclectic and arbitrarily chosen; there is no attempt to be all-inclusive, nor will we limit ourselves to English and American authors. Our subject will be some representative works of modern thought and literature. We will place equal emphasis on what these works say and how they say it. Our purpose is to sharpen the insight and intelligence with which we read and analyze some of the probing "documents" of our time. Candidates for the reading list [availability of texts and reasonableness of prices will be factors] include works by Albert Camus, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Arthur Koestler, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, Jerzy Kosinski, Margaret Atwood or several others. Informal lecture and discussion, the amount of which will be influenced by the size of the class. Thoughtful, active participation "counts." Two papers [ca. 5-7 pp. each] and a final exam.

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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Engl. 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W. Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rwbailey/English_305.html

Though a requirement for students seeking certification as secondary school English teachers, English 305 appeals to a broader audience interested in the structure of English and its varieties. Topics to be discussed include: gender-based differences in American English and regional and social dialects in the United States, including African-American English, Appalachian English, Hispanic English, and Native American English; English as a rule-governed language, shaped by its history, and the history of ideas about good (and "bad" English). English 305 is designed for native-speakers of English (with no prior study of the language or of linguistics) who are curious about the language community of which they are a part. A midterm and final examination allow students to demonstrate the ability to make well-founded generalizations based on the material studied. Short papers invite explorations of domains of language.

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Engl. 310. Discourse and Society.

Section 001 – The Henry Ford High School Project

Instructor(s): Pilar Anadon

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 124 or 125. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth. It is rooted in respect for the youths' abilities and voices, in excitement about an educational process that promotes creativity, and in imaginative collaboration with the school faculty and administration. Working two to three hours a week at Henry Ford, Southeastern, and Cooley High Schools in Detroit, Adrian and Maxey Boys Training Schools, Vista Maria, and Boysville, students assist youth in creating their own video tapes, plays, photographs, music, etc. In two hour class meetings we discuss background reading, analyze and develop our work with the youth, and teach each other hands-on methods. A further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 AH for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 – Fantasy

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313Ff00syl.html

This course explores the nature and uses of fantastic narratives from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present, drawing texts from such widely different fields as fairy tales, science fiction, and the so-called New Novel. No special background in literature is required. The course requires attendance at two lectures and one discussion section per week. The written work for the course will revolve around a series of short papers and two medium-length papers. There will be no exams. Texts include: Household Stories of The Brothers Grimm; Tales of E.T.A. Hoffmann; The Portable Poe; The Alice books, Lewis Carroll; The Island of Dr. Moreau and Best Science Fiction Stories, H. G. Wells; The Complete Stories, Franz Kafka; Orlando, Virginia Woolf; The Erasers, Alain Robbe-Grillet; The Tolkien Reader; The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster; Cosmicomics, Italo Calvino; Like Water for Chocolate; Laura Esquivel, Woman on The Edge of Time, Marge Piercy.

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Engl. 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 006 – The Beat Generation. The course meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/enll/313/006.nsf

"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked,dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix."

That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by the work being done by Action Painters and jazz musicians from the Bebop school. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, read poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch, etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings by Jackson Pollock. The course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Expect brief weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final, plus a three-page and a ten-page paper. A half-dozen films will be shown in the evenings after class. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to English concentrators.

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 – Women and Space. This course meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Anne Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the relationship between women and space in twentieth century writings by women as a way of addressing questions of geography and identity. As elite women experience greater mobility, how do they represent their voluntary migrations? How do interiors continue to locate female experience? How do dislocations, the result of immigration or travel, result in the relocations of female identities within written narratives? How are spatial metaphors used to describe the place of the woman writer in culture? Primary texts include Woolf's A Room of One's Own, Dinesen's Out of Africa, Ehrlich's The Solace of Open Spaces, Cather's The Professor House, Cisnero's The House on Mango Street, Brookner's Hotel du Lac, and Kincaid's A Small Place. Assignments involve several short essays and either a midterm/final or a paper and its revisions.(Herrmann)

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Engl. 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 003 – Isn't it Romantic?: The Marriage Plot from Austen to Austen

Instructor(s): Jen Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For longer than you want to know, folks considered the marriage plot to be the most appropriate storyline for girls and young women to consume. Within the strictures of this plot, novelists like Jane Austen found ample ground for stories that delved beyond the confines of whether (and how) the heroine could get her man (or, to be strictly accurate, be gotten by him). Other writers, though, found the marriage plot profoundly inadequate for their artistic expressions – yet if these writers were women, they might also find that pressures to conform to this accepted plotline were overwhelming. All of this has ideological implications for the young girls who consume these texts as well as for the women who write them. In this course, we'll examine romance in literature, primarily female-authored novels, to see what permutations have been possible even in highly restrictive time-periods. We'll bookend the course with two Austen novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, and we'll fill up the middle with examples of "obedient" and "resisting" marriage plot books, including some Brontë, Woolf, and contemporary examples. We may even read some slash, a form of Internet fan fiction in which writers (often women) identify romantic undercurrents invisible to writers of television buddy shows like Star Trek, Starsky and Hutch, or Due South. You should expect to write at least two papers, one of which will be a substantial research paper, to participate weekly in a web-based discussion group, to take a final exam covering all the course material, to participate actively in every class, and occasionally to find yourself completing assignments dictated by the needs of the particular group of individuals making up the class and therefore not included in this list.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 – How to be Gay: Male Homosexuality and Initiation

Instructor(s): David Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Just because you happen to be a gay man doesn't mean that you don't have to learn how to become one. Gay men do some of that learning on their own, but often we learn how to be gay from others, either because we look to them for instruction or because they simply tell us what they think we need to know, whether we ask for their advice or not. This course will examine the general topic of the role that initiation plays in the formation of gay identity. We will approach it from three angles: (1) as a sub-cultural practice – subtle, complex, and difficult to theorize – which a small but significant body of work in queer studies has begun to explore; (2) as a theme in gay male writing; (3) as a class project, since the course itself will constitute an experiment in the very process of initiation that it hopes to understand. In particular, we'll examine a number of cultural artefacts and activities that seem to play a prominent role in learning how to be gay: Hollywood movies, grand opera, Broadway musicals, and other works of classical and popular music, as well as camp, diva-worship, drag, muscle culture, style, fashion, and interior design. Are there a number of classically "gay" works such that, despite changing tastes and generations, ALL gay men, of whatever class, race, or ethnicity, need to know them, in order to be gay? What roles do such works play in learning how to be gay? What is there about these works that makes them essential parts of a gay male curriculum? Conversely, what is there about gay identity that explains the gay appropriation of these works? One aim of exploring these questions is to approach gay identity from the perspective of social practices and cultural identifications rather than from the perspective of gay sexuality itself. What can such an approach tell us about the sentimental, affective, or aesthetic dimensions of gay identity, including gay sexuality, that an exclusive focus on gay sexuality cannot? At the core of gay experience there is not only identification but disidentification. Almost as soon as I learn how to be gay, or perhaps even before, I also learn how not to be gay. I say to myself, "Well, I may be gay, but at least I'm not like THAT!" Rather than attempting to promote one version of gay identity at the expense of others, this course will investigate the stakes in gay identifications and disidentifications, seeking ultimately to create the basis for a wider acceptance of the plurality of ways in which people determine how to be gay. Work for the class will include short essays, projects, and a mandatory weekly three-hour screening (or other cultural workshop) on Thursday evenings.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 – Literature of the American Wilderness. Meets with RC Environmental Studies 407.001. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): John Knott (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is wilderness, and how have American attitudes toward wilderness evolved? The course will explore these questions and others about how Americans (including Native Americans) have perceived the natural world and their relationship to it, as these arise from texts ranging from the earliest writing about America to twentieth-century responses to Alaska. Readings will include texts illustrating the place of wilderness in the American imagination, such as Thoreau's The Maine Woods, Muir's My First Summer in the Sierra, Cather's O Pioneers!, Leopold's Sand County Almanac, Faulkner's The Bear, and Momaday's House Made of Dawn. We will also read poetry (Snyder, Berry, Ammons, Oliver) and selections from twentieth-century nature writers (including Abbey, Dillard, Lopez). Students will be expected to keep a weekly journal, to write a paper of about ten pages, and to take a final examination. Anyone with an interest in the literature and the issues it raises is welcome.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 – Literature of the Apocalypse.

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 005 – The Literature and Culture of Modern India. Meets the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Aamir Mufti

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look at the development of literature and culture in 20th-century India. We will look at some of the greatest works of modern Indian culture, by such figures as Rabindranath Tagore, Satyajit Ray, and Salman Rushdie. We will explore the manner in which literature and culture in modern India have developed in interaction with powerful social forces, such as the struggle for national independence under the stewardship of such leaders as Mahatma Gandhi.

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Engl. 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 – American Ethnic Literatures. This course meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines primarily twentieth-century immigrant and minority literature from a variety of perspectives: literary, social, historical. Including some autobiography and poetry, the course focuses mainly on fiction by multi-cultural writers, who comment on their sense of community and alienation, their relationship to specific ethnic heritage and to mainstream culture, and their awareness of where ethnic identity intersects with gender and class. Students will be evaluated on class participation, which includes an oral report on a poet of choice, and their course writing, which consists of several 3-4 page papers, a midterm, and a final. Course sessions will alternate between mini-lectures on issues raised and the history of specific ethnic groups, and discussion/close readings of the texts. Students will read excerpts from Unsettling America, an anthology of multi-cultural poetry) and several longer works which may include Anzi Yezierska's The Open Cage, N. Scott Momaday's The House of Dawn, Toni Morrison's Beloved, Joy Kowaga's Obasan, Gus Lee's China Boy, Oscar Hijuelo's The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, and Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street.

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Engl. 320/AAS 338. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

Section 001 – Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 338.001.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 – Fiction

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately fifty pages.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Waitlist on CRISP. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 003, 004 – Fiction

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Waitlist on CRISP. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 – Poetry

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although we shall read quite a number of modern and contemporary poems in order better to understand our actual and possible contexts as writers, most of our work will take place in workshop format: we shall write poems weekly, exchange them, read them aloud, and critique them both orally and in writing. For the workshop to succeed, everyone will need to turn in work on time and be able to offer constructive criticism – criticism that is respectful but not fawning, honest but not cruel, personally meant but not egotistical. Evaluation will be based on the quality of the work produced weekly, on the quality of a final portfolio, and on workshop citizenship. The goal of the course is that all of us realize our best potential as poets, which should mean that we learn together to improve our craft.

In order to enroll in this course, students need 1) Waitlist on CRISP. 2) Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant by noon on the first day of class. 3) When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

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Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 006 – Poetry.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor (keitay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is a poetry writing workshop intended for student writers with some experience in the art. The hope is that these writers will produce new work and participate in the critical discussion of their own work and that of their colleagues. Members of the class will submit new poems every week for evaluation. A few formal and thematic assignments will be given as needed to help focus some of the writing.

Although the on-going process of writing poems is the central focus of the class, a fair amount of reading and some critical writing will also be required. Final evaluations will be based on 25-30 pages of poetry that has gone through some level of revision, 3 short papers about poetry readings, one classroom presentation on a living poet, and two short classroom presentations on different poetic forms or devices.

There will be three required textbooks: Imagist Poetry, edited by Bob Blaisdell ($2.00); The Vintage Book of Contemporary World Poetry, edited by J.D. McClatchy ($16.00); and American Poetry: The Next Generation, edited by Gerald Costanzo and Jim Daniels ($25.00). These anthologies are intended to provide example and context.

Students who would like to participate in this class should talk with the staff in the English Department about presubmitting samples of their work. Preference will be given to those enrolled in the creative writing subconcentration.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an upper-level composition course for students interested in improving their writing, with particular attention paid to the development of individual style expressed in the details of voice, tone, nuance, and rhythm. All classes will proceed on the assumption that these basic principles inform good writing: that writing is thinking; that writing well requires attention to issues of audience; that revision is a necessary part of the writing process; and that all writing reflects the writer's view of the world. Class discussion will include a consideration of student writing. To focus discussion and to provide subject matter for writing assignments, readings by professional writers will be assigned in most sections. Writing assignments will vary according to instructor, but the general requirement is 40 pages of prose (300 words to a page). Course descriptions for individual sections not listed below can be found on the department's Web page or in 3020 Angell Hall.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 – The Dwarf, The Demon, and The Divided Self

Instructor(s): Lilian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Dwarf, The Demon, and The Divided Self. "Works of fiction exist in a space between the Double and the Other. To enter into a work of fiction is in a sense to transform the Other into a Double," writes Professor Coates. Our seminar will concentrate on how authors involve us in the most unlikely identifications. How, for example, does John Irving, in A Prayer For Owen Meany, create a hero for us out of a little guy who looks translucent (his blue veins show through his skin), has a strange sounding voice, and is extremely manipulative. We will be reading works that help us make meaning and connections out of the three unlikely joined subjects in the title of this class. We will want to consider the ways in which we, in the process of reading and writing, actually create the text and recreate our "selves." Coursework includes five 8-page essays with revisions.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 – Ripening Memories: The Making of Meaning

Instructor(s): Lilian Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"I am moved by fancies that are curled/around these images, and cling," says T.S. Eliot.

In some significant ways a literary text may serve its reader similarly to a past life remembered, a memory, a dream. In this seminar, we will want to concentrate our attention on how that process works. How does an author carve a living, changing world out of print and paper? How do we carve our lives out of past lives – our own and others? What do we choose to remember and what "to forget"? We will, as the seminar progresses, find ourselves asking: "what actually did we hear and see in the past," both in our personal lives as well as in the lives of the characters we meet in the texts and films we read and view, respectively. It will be a fascinating story for us to unfold and we will find some fascinating authors to help us unfold it: for example, John Irving; Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Isabell Allende, Michael Cunningham. (5 essays and peer responses)

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003 – Writing/Literature

Instructor(s): Rosemary Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The links between writing and literature are many, and, in this course, we will be examining the variety of connections and practicing the diverse forms. Be prepared to write a literary analysis, a literature review, a personal essay, a (small) literary research project, a piece on composition, a short story, a collaborative piece of writing. Also be prepared to have one of your writings "published" in a class literary magazine. We will be focusing on grammar and mechanics – the nuts and bolts of writing – as well as larger philosophical and pedagogical issues. Students will write about 30 pages of polished prose that has been revised several times, as well as a number of short, 2 page peer critiques. Readings will be determined by the writing assignments and may involve library and web visits.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004, 008.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will furnish students with the tools, guidance and freedom to write with increased confidence and strength. In-class writing excercises, as well as more structured assignments and individual attention will enable students to take greater risks on thematic, technical and personal levels. Topics will be of the students' own choosing. Readings of established writers in traditional essay, humor, and creative non-fiction will provide a range of models in style and subject from which students may borrow and experiment. Swapping ideas and techniques is encouraged; in-class discussions and workshopping will be safe yet challenging.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course (1) that gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers), (2) that allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing, (3) that offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and (4) that keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term. Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 006 – Writing for Life: Community Learning

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course requires that the students do volunteer service in pairs at a non-profit community organization. While all students will be asked to do some on-site writing – for instance, contribute to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, or brochure – and so gain professional experience in the process, this course's primary focus will be on the student's interactions with and responses to his/her work site. We will meet weekly as a group to evaluate ourselves, and to share a number of related writing assignments. In addition to keeping a weekly journal which records personal responses, students will also write a short descriptive paper about the place they work; conduct an interview with one of their co-workers and/or person "served"; and do modest research that combines local history of the agency with more general information about the field. These smaller writing assignments will culminate a final larger paper. At the heart of this course are questions of perspective (insider versus outsider), goals and methods (of the community organization, as well as of the student writer herself), and the possible uses of the various forms of information gathering and evaluation (for example, interviews, formal research, personal observation and experience). Finally, students in the course will also be asked to share with one another, and perhaps a larger audience, their work through a more formal oral presentation at the course end. Course grade will be based on the student's writings, class participation (including the oral report), and a reasonable but consistent time commitment to the place they work.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 – Technical Writing.

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Technical" writing is not necessarily "scientific" writing; rather, it refers to the dissemination of knowledge that is the territory of experts or specialists. As you pursue a major, you are developing an expertise, becoming a specialist; thus, your work in this class will reflect your own educational and professional interests. The emphasis in technical writing is on recognizing your audience, developing a persuasive and readable voice, and writing with specificity. Discussions and assignments will include letters of application and resumes, grant proposals, informative essays, and a longer research project. We will be reading, discussing, writing (and rewriting), critiquing and workshopping. You will find this writing-intensive class most valuable if you have a specific project on which you are ready to focus.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Lauren Kingsley (kiwirosa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 325.004.

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Engl. 327/Theatre 327. Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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Engl. 350. Literature in English to 1660.

Section 001 – This course satisfies either the pre-1600 or the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/enll/350/004.nsf

This course is the first of a two-term sequence designed to study the historical development of literature in English. Most of our attention will be devoted to close analysis of a dazzling variety of texts from the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. We will work to foreground the historical, social, cultural, and intellectual issues to which these texts respond, and to interrogate our criteria for designating a text as "major." Writers to be studied include Chaucer, Marlowe, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert,and Milton. There will be two essays of approximately five pages each, a midterm and a final examination.

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Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001 – This course meets the PRE-1600 OR PRE-1830 English Concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Steve Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mullaney/Shakespeare.html

A study of Shakespeare's dramatic works, selected to represent his exploration of major genres over the course of his career. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of Shakespeare's stage with cultural controversies of his period. Our goal will be to appreciate Shakespeare and to examine the impact of his drama in its own day and its ramification for ours. The plays likely to be studied: A Midsummer Night's Dream; The Merchant of Venice; Measure for Measure; Hamlet; Othello; King Lear; The Tempest. The text used will be The Riverside Shakespeare. There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as three relatively short essays.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 – Self and Society in Early English Literature. (Honors). Meets the Pre-1600 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Karla Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Some of the most fascinating and challenging works in earlier English literature worry about the problems that arise when people seek to find and understand themselves, both as inwardly defined individuals and as socially defined members of various groups: a marriage, a noble court, or a nation, for instance. Do self-discovery and social identity confirm and support one another? Do they undermine or even endanger one another? How does literature contribute to the quest for a self, whether in or out of society? We will read a variety of literary versions of the relation of self and society, including works by Marie de France, Chaucer, the Gawain-poet, Spenser, and Shakespeare. Requirements include class participation, several moderate papers and presentations, and a final examination.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 – New Literary Histories. Meets the PRE-1600 and New Traditions concentration requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Theresa Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What did women write before 1660? How did that compare with men's writing? How were minorities defined? What did books look like before the invention of the printing press? How did the printing press change the way we read? This course explores the new literary histories that attempt to answer these questions. We will read several kinds of literary history, seeking to understand the value and limitations of each. At the same time, we will engage the literary texts emphasized by particular histories. Finally, we will examine early manuscript and print versions of some works in order to determine how material forms shaped early readers' interpretations-and how those forms can help us to appreciate literary works' historical potential for meaning. Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two short essays.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 – This World and Other Worlds in Medieval English Literature. This course meets the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Lawrence Beaston (beaston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/EN370/index.html

We shall read a number of medieval literary masterpieces – including Beowulf (in translation), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, The Wife of Bath's Tale, and the Book of Margery Kempe as well as selections from Middle English lyric and drama – with an eye to the writers' views of this world and their visions of other worlds. In our discussions, we shall explore literary conventions, sources (theological and popular), and cultural contexts. Coincidentally, we shall consider how these views and visions survive today. You will gain a great deal of experience reading Middle English. Two short papers (2 pages), one longer essay (5-7 pages), several in-class writings, and two examinations will be required.

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Engl. 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 – (Honors). This course meets the PRE-1830 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore British Romantic poetry, defined by reference to the works of the six canonical poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley, Byron) and with an emphasis on the philosophical projects undertaken through that body of writing. Some examples of such projects: redefinition of the writing and reading subject; fusion of critical and creative functions in poetry; invention of art as a mode of knowledge and politics; literary production as both reflecting and resisting economies of modern life. Requirements: serious and informed class-participation; submission of questions/comments for each syllabus item; weekly essays, 2-5 pages. Written work will consist of two five-page papers and one longer essay (c.15 pages). These first two essays will in part constitute explorations in the longer research project for the course.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 – What Was Modernism?

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore Modernism – the style/movement that dominated the "high" art of the first decades of this century. While we will read a few poems (Eliot, Yeats) and glance briefly at some of the art and music, the focus of the course will fall primarily on fiction. Works to be read include Conrad's Heart of Darkness, Mann's Death in Venice, Joyce's Portrait of the Artist, Kafka's The Metamorphosis, Woolf's To the Lighthouse, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover, Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, and Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God. Course grades will depend on two essay exams, frequent short, informal writing assignments, and two five page analytical papers. Regular attendance is essential.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 – Victorian and Modern Literature

Instructor(s): Mary Zwiep (mnz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will explore a representative selection of the best poetry, fiction, and drama written during a period of a hundred years, from roughly 1850-1950. The course should give you a general historical perspective – an understanding of changing techniques and the ideas behind them. Works are chosen chiefly for their aesthetic value and we will keep in mind Stephen Dedalus' criteria for the "wholeness, harmony and radiance" of art. A tentative reading list will cover novels by Trollope, The Warden, James What Maise Knew, Forster Howards End, Woolf To The Lighthouse, and Faulkner As I Lay Dying; short stories of Joyce Dubliners and Hemingway In Our Time; selected poems Tennyson, the "Imagists", Eliot The Wasteland, Stevens "Sunday Morning" and Frost; plays by Shaw Major Barbara and Beckett Waiting for Godot. Class emphasizes discussion based on close reading of the texts. Requirements: at least two essays and an exam, assorted "informal" exercises.

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Engl. 382/Amer. Cult. 328. Native American Literature.

Section 001 – Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Betty Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will read the Native American novels, non-fiction works, and films most commonly associated with the Native American Renaissance and the construction of contemporary pan-tribal culture. Produced in a thirty year period, 1968-98, these texts popularized the Native American experience and profoundly affected the ways in which Americans and Native Americans view indigenous cultures and peoples. The works of Vine Deloria, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Silko, and others will guide our explorations into tribal sovereignty, spirituality, gender, and the creation of a pan-tribal literature. Recent Native American films, such as Smoke Signals and Dance Me Outside, will assist our discussions on native self-representation in popular culture. Course assignments will include three five page papers.

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Engl. 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 – Jewish Literature in America. Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Julian Levinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider the literature of the past century written by Jews in America. Reading fiction and poetry written by immigrants and those born in the United States, in Yiddish and English, we will consider questions such as the following: What is "Jewish" and "American" about this literature? What are its major themes and concerns? Who writes Jewish literature and how? How central is the Holocaust, Israel, family myths, Biblical themes, tradition? In addition to reading some familiar authors, we will read a number of Yiddish texts in English translation (no knowledge of Yiddish is required) in order to reclaim this largely unknown literature. We will choose among the following: I.B. Singer, Yankev Glatshteyn, Kadia Molodovsky, Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Cynthia Ozick, Grace Paley, H. Leivick, Henry Roth, Philip Roth, and others. Course requirements include lively participation, three papers, and short in-class writing assignments.

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Engl. 406/Ling. 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory – as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

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Engl. 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 – Reading Old English. Meets with English 501.001. Meets the PRE-1600 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Thomas Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the earliest texts written in English over a thousand years ago. We will begin with Old English, the language spoken by our forebears until the unpleasantness at Hastings – the Norman Conquest. Since Old English is so different from Modern English as to seem like another language, the first object of this class will be to master the rudiments of the structure and vocabulary of the earliest attested form of English. The reward is being able to read an excitingly different corpus of prose and poetry. We will conclude with the study of the later texts which continue the Anglo-Saxon tradition alliterative tradition. My chief aim is to help you develop a new appreciation of where our language, culture, and intellectual traditions come from.

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Engl. 412/Film-Video 412. Major Directors.

Section 001 – American Comic Masters Since the 60's: Allen, Brooks, Edwards, and Ashby. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: F/V 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for a total of nine credits with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 412.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 [includes cost of film pass.] Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 – Research and Technology in the Humanities. Meets with English 516.001.

Instructor(s): Eric Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~lsarth/RTHf00/415f00syl.html

This upperclass and graduate-level course fosters both sharpened general analytic and presentational skills and technical mastery of a broad range of modern computer-based technologies for collaboration and for gathering, manipulating, analyzing, and presenting electronic data in the humanities, both locally and via networks, with special attention to creating and publishing "compound documents" (e.g., Web sites and CD-ROMs). The course begins with five weeks of intensive technical training and proceeds to five weeks of discussion of works that question the impacts of technology. By the middle of the academic term, restrained only by time and their imaginations, students also will be working in self-selected groups on creating sophisticated multimedia products using a variety of techniques to address some substantial issue in the humanities. Technical topics include at least information gathering from digital sources, HTML authoring, hypertext documents or novels, collaborative technologies, the meaning of the digital revolution, text analysis, and image manipulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 005 – Television and Literature: Intersections of Substance, Style and Social Commentary

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 415

Television and Literature: Intersections of Substance, Style, and Social Commentary

The continuing dynamic role of television in our lives, as a purveyor of culturally significant narratives, results, in part, from the medium's unique properties and from creative producers' resistance to affixing relevant boundaries upon texts, ever-energized, of course, by television's habitual, multiple relationships to viewers. Conventional arguments about whether television is a visual or verbal medium are rendered relatively inconsequential in the face of more intriguing questions of its attractions for and effects upon viewers, as it collapses distinctions between fiction and fact, intimacy and distance, unreality and reality, time present and time past, narration and illustration, attribution and allusion, imaginative invention and authentic action. We investigate such matters cross-disciplinarily and inter-textually, looking into correspondences and differences between significations and significances in popular novels and broadcast texts. We mine two powerful story-telling media, television and print, for whatever intriguing issues, ideas, and meanings that we as cultural spectators and participants might uncover in them: The Sopranos (HBO/TV) and Excellent Cadavers (novel); The Practice (ABC/TV) and The Client (novel); Sex and the City (HBO/TV) and Madame Bovary (as novel and TV 2000 adaptation), and so on. We apply appropriate theories and critical lenses to deciphering and interpreting form, content, and quality. First, we begin by analyzing narrative techniques unique to live televised sports text and, then, tackle comparative evaluations of compelling storytelling functions and techniques as they appear in several popular genres, on screen and in print.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 415. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature.

Section 006 – Introduction to Fantastic Literature. Meets with Comparative Literature 430.002.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Comparative Literature 430.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 – The Stages of Arthur Miller. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the premiere of Death of a Salesman by offering a complete overview of the work of U-M alumnus Arthur Miller. Beginning by examining his earliest work, the prize-winning entries that garnered him two Hopwood Awards, we will move on to consider the series of plays which have established his international reputation: All My Sons, Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, A View From the Bridge, Incident at Vichy, his adaptation of Ibsen's An Enemy of the People, After the Fall, The Price, and The American Clock (inspired by Stud Terkel's Hard Times ). Emphasis will be placed on the history of these plays in production, both in the U.S. and abroad. This course will take advantage of the holdings of Miller's work in the Shapiro Library's video collection, and students will also be introduced to the collection of original Miller manuscripts in the University of Michigan's Rare Books Library. There will be 3 short papers of 4-5 pages each, plus a final term project. Students will take an active part in the "Arthur Miller International Symposium" which will take place at the University of Michigan, October 26-29, 2000.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 – Imitations

Instructor(s): Nicholas Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The article of faith on which this course is based is that imitation – written exercises – is not merely sincere falttery, but also a good way to read. We will focus on the work of ten or twelve comtemporary authors (Baxter, Cheever, Kerouac, Kincaid, Kingston, O'Brien, Wallace, etc.) and the craft of writing as a problem posed. Instead of asking "What does Jamaica Kincaid mean in Annie John " for instance, we'll talk about her descriptive imagery; we'll talk of how O'Brien compiles lists in The Things They Carried, not of the weapons listed or the meaning of the war. Close reading; classroom discussion; essay in emulation/imitation, and several writting assignments will be expected throughout the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 – Shakespeare in Argentina, Chaucer in Africa, Defoe in the Caribbean: Why?

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 – Texts of U.S. Slavery, Race, and Labor. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 495.001. Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this seminar we will read antebellum texts on slavery, labor, and African American uplift in order to explore 19th century concepts of race and labor. We will study the various, conflicting representations of enslaved and free Black labor that influenced national debates over slavery, the reform movements of abolition and uplift, and the relation of these representations to national ideas about race and legitimacy. Readings include the autobiographies of former slaves, Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and freeborn Harriet Wilson, as well as writings by Emerson, Olmsted, Marx, and noted slavery supporter, George Fitzhugh. We will focus on how perceptions of Black labor framed the ways in which emancipation and equality were imagined, and on the role of labor in African Americans' efforts to represent themselves as legitimate subjects in the antebellum public sphere. So as to meet the upper-level writing requirement, writing assignments will include short response papers, midterm and final papers.

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Engl. 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 008 – White Writers, Black Characters: The Art of Transracial Writing

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the ideologies, characteristic techniques, language and images that non-Black novelists and short story writers employ in the creation of Black literary characters. Students will explore and analyze "race" and "racial" ideologies across two centuries by both African and North American writers. Probable authors will include Nadine Gordimer, J.M. Coetzee, Doris Lessing, Madison Smartt Bell, Robert Heinlein, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway. Two papers and a journal will be required.

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Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with fifty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho-Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 423 is an advanced level course in the writing (and reading) of short fiction. The primary focus of the class will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published contemporary stories. Students will be required to write two complete stories (2500-5000 words) for the workshop, and revise one of these by the end of the academic term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and occasional short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will usually consist of three to four stories each week. Text: Vintage Book of Contemporary American Short Stories ed. Tobias Woolf. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist at CRISP and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 003 – Writing Under the Influence

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students in this class will revise their current work under the tutelege of established writers that they themselves have chosen to study. This course can be thought of as both a seminar, and a workshop.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 – On Finding Your Voice.

Instructor(s): John Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on

  1. improving your vocabulary,
  2. strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and
  3. helping you find your voice.

I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo – be prepared to bust ass for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

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Engl. 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002 – Creative Non-Fiction

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In common usage, the term "creative writing" refers to fiction and poetry, something made-up. What I find disturbing in this usage is the implication that creative is one thing essay-writing isn't. In this course in essay writing, we will operate on the premise that those distinctions are false. We will approach the writing of essays as a creative, imaginative process, in which the writer works with a mixture of "facts" and things "made-up" (another distinction that is not so easy to make). It takes imagination to read one's own mind well enough to know what one thinks; it takes imagination to read the mind of others; and it takes imagination to read those minds in relationship as we develop our ideas and find the language to express them. As we work imaginatively, we will discredit another unspoken assumption: that creativity is an ability only artists have. Our class will be run as a workshop in which we read imaginative texts by professional writers (Thernstrom, O'Brien, Rosellen Brown, Russell Banks, and others) and the writers in the class, and use our discussions of them as a springboard for our own writing. You will write three essays, weekly questioning of the texts and their writing strategies, and constructive responses to each other's writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5

Engl. 427/Theatre 427. Advanced Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): OyamO (oyamo@umich.edu) , Oyamo (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 327. Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 427.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 002 – Mapping the Moment

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will attempt to isolate the moment, the purest form of the moment, understanding that the moment simutaneously encompasses the events that we experience, events that we remember, events about which we are completely unaware, as well as events that could have happened or that happened only in imagination or dream. Every moment encompasses both the macroscopic and microscopic whether or not we are personally engaged with all of the moment's components. How marvelous and daunting, then is the task of writing accurately about just one moment. Your task for this class will be to isolate and write with accuracy about just one moment. We will celebrate the fullness of the moment by mapping as much of one moment as is possible in a single term. A poem of substantial revision will be due weekly. Progress and problems in mapping the moment will be addressed in our online forum. Two texts: Powers of Ten and Open Closed Open.

All students admitted into the English Creative Writing Subconcentration can be issued a permission to enroll (overide). All other students should waitlist and submit their portfolio to the English Department Main Office, 3187 Angell Hall, before the first day of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Permission of instructor

Engl. 430. The Rise of the Novel.

Section 001 – Meets the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): David Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The success of the novel as a popular literary genre tends to obscure the fact that it is a fairly recent innovation. In this course we will survey the first century of the novel's development in Britain, reading path-breaking works by such writers as Haywood, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Lewis, and Austen. What distinguishes the novel, we will ask, from other literary forms, and why did this genre take hold when it did? What were the chief concerns, whether social, moral, or aesthetic, of novelists writing in the eighteenth century, and how did these evolve over the course of the period? Finally, how do the best-sellers of eighteenth-century fiction reflect and contribute to conditions of daily life and thought at the time? Assignments include an oral presentation, two essays, and a final. Students will have the option of substituting for certain of these assignments an original group web project on some aspect of eighteenth-century culture to be included as part of the Eighteenth-Century England web site (http://www.umich.edu/~ece/).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many issues that concern us today really took flight in the Victorian period – issues of class, gender, sexuality, politics, popular culture, family life, and more. And the period's most characteristic literary form, the novel, provides a hugely entertaining and suggestive way of thinking about these issues then and now. In this course we explore the pleasures of reading Victorian novels – they were, in effect, the popular miniseries of their day – and enrich our understanding of these novels by keeping an eye to their relevant social contexts. Our primary emphasis goes to canonical authors such as the Brontës, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. But we also explore the formation of canonical value by looking to one or two texts from less traditionally celebrated authors. Coursework includes three papers, a presentation, and a reading journal.

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Engl. 432. The American Novel.

Section 001 – This course meets the American Literature requirement.

Instructor(s): Xavier Nicholas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a critical study of the American novel of the past two centuries. Its purpose is to explore the richness and diversity of the American experience in terms of how that experience has been defined, ordered, and artistically transformed through the American novel. Nine major novels will be read in depth, analyzing them as works of art, probing their political ideas, examining their relation to their time and place, and observing their connections with each other. The works will be studied as reflections of the American artistic and cultural tradition, with a view toward sharpening students' understanding of the relationship between American verbal art and American culture.

Course Requirements:

  1. Attendance at all lectures and discussion sessions.
  2. Reading and participation in discussion of all assigned texts.
  3. Seven informal, one page discussion pages on assigned topics handed in during the academic term.
  4. Two formal, critical papers, five pages in length, on assigned topics.
  5. Midterm and Final Examinations.

Texts: Available at Shaman Drum Bookstore.

  • The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Billy Budd, Herman Melville
  • The House of Mirth, Edith Wharton
  • The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway
  • Light in August, William Faulkner
  • Ceremony, Leslie Silko
  • Meridian, Alice Walker
  • Beloved, Toni Morrison.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jen Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our studies of the modern novel will be centered on Joyce's Ulysses, which likely will occupy the greater part of both our class time and our energy. To contextualize this difficult and important work, we'll read a selection of other texts published within approximately 10 years of its publication date, 1922. These texts will include Passage to India, Women in Love , Mrs. Dalloway, Plum Bun, and The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas, a selection that will allow us to consider a variety of modes of modernist experiment. Students should expect to complete at least 30 pages of formal writing (including revision) which will be divided between an essay on Ulysses, written in stages, and an essay on at least one of the other texts for the course. Every student will also participate in an online discussion group designed to help us get the most from our classroom meeting time. A final exam will help students assemble and codify the knowledge gained during the semester. All students should (re)read Alice in Wonderland (both parts – Alice's Adventures and Looking-Glass ) before the first class and bring your book, any edition, to our first meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 440. Modern Poetry.

Section 001 – Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we shall study the major poetry in English of the period 1900-1940. Our principal subject matter will be work by the most important poets – Thomas Hardy, W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, H.D., W.C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Robert Frost, Hart Crane, Wallace Stevens – but we will also devote some time to special topics like Imagism, the poetry of The Great War, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as to the social, historical, and literary backgrounds of modern poetry. The objective of the course is a clear understanding of the techniques and themes of modern poetry, which are especially significant because they continue to influence and inform the poetry of our own time. The format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include two papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 443/Theatre 321. History of Theatre I.

Instructor(s): Claire Conceison (claireco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/music/thtremus/321/001.nsf

See Theatre and Drama 321..

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Engl. 444/Theatre 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 001 – Renaissance Drama. Meets with RC Humanities 387.001

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 387.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 445. Shakespeare's Rivals.

Section 001 – Of Loneliness and Lies: The Performance of Authenticity in Early Modern England. A Renaissance Drama Course. This course satisfies the PRE-1830 English Concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Carla Mazzio (mazzio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What might it mean, in the realm of the early modern theater, to "act" shy, to seem genuine, to feel alone (on stage), to think aloud, to stage voyeurism, to insist – dramatically – on one's authenticity? Exploring a range of Renaissance dramas of yearning, deception, and loss, this course will examine, complicate, and historicize notions of interiority, authenticity, individuality, character, and personhood as they emerge on the early modern stage. By exploring critical vocabularies and theatrical modes of representing the insides of persons, we will consider the relationships between structures of affect and structures of theater, and work to develop a critical lexicon and analytic framework for discussing aspects of aloneness, selfhood, and authenticity in dramatic literature.

This course will have weekly writing assignments (2-3 pages) and reading quizzes; a midterm and final exam, a midterm paper (5-7 pages) and a longer final paper with a research component. This course is designed as a discussion course, so informed class participation is one of the most important requirements. The readings will include a range of Renaissance (mostly tragic) dramas and a range of primary and secondary readings each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 449.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 450. Medieval Drama.

Section 001 – Sex and Religion in Medieval Drama. This course satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for Englishconcentrators.

Instructor(s): Terry Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the varieties of medieval and early renaissance drama: ribald comedies, serious religious dramas, and combinations of the two. We will read many plays, and since plays exist partly in their production, we will watch modern productions of some plays and attempt to determine how they change our interpretations. Throughout the term, we will also try producing parts of plays to learn about how they were staged in their time, how special effects were achieved, and how performance can alter audience perceptions. This course will require active participation in group efforts and discussions, some guided research, two short essays incorporating the research, and a final exam (the format of which will be decided by the class).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 462. Victorian Literature.

Section 001 – Women in Victorian England.

Instructor(s): J Early

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines multiple genres – nonfiction, fiction, and poetry –by and about Victorian women to consider the Victorian 'Condition of England' debate by re-centering it in the hotly debated issue known as 'The Woman Question". Both men and women writers worked within and against the constraints of science, law, religion, and culture to consider 'woman's nature', woman's role, and the relation of those constructions to Victorian culture. The debate is richly varied with some of the most influential entries to it appearing in fictional representations of women and reviewer" responses to them. The diverse literature reflects often complex positions, inflected by gender, class, and race that confound attempts to place easy 20th century templates over this central Victorian discourse. We will work toward understanding how the Victorians represented, defined and understood the issues. We will read work by major and less well-known writers, primarily but not exclusively women. We will read three or four novels, selected from Eliot (Middlemarch or Mill on the Floss ); Brontë, (Jane Eyre or Villette), Thackery, (Vanity Fair), Braddon (Lady Audley's Secret ),; poetry by E.B. Browning, C. Rossetti, D.G. Rossetti, Tennyson, and others; essays by J.S. Mill, Cobbe, Oliphant, and others; short stories and ghost stories by assorted writers. Written work will include three papers and an exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 469. Milton.

Section 001 – This course satifies the PRE-1830 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Michael Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course fulfills the Pre-1830 requirement.

This course will be devoted to close reading of the works of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet. We will read some of the early poetry and prose, but the lion's share of our attention will be devoted to Samson Agonistes, Milton's closet drama of sexual and political treachery, and to Paradise Lost, Milton's retelling of the central Judeo-Christian myth about the origin of evil in the world. We will be particularly interested in the relationship between Milton's own career as a political revolutionary and his portrait of Satan's rebellion against God, and in his account of the origin of social and sexual difference. Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 – American Literature to 1830. Meets the Pre-1830 and American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Scottie Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the colonies, seduction novels by women, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations. As texts which you discover yourself are often the most compelling, you will pursue a subject of your own choosing through research in microfilm and rare books, present your finds to the class, and incorporate them into a final paper. There will also be a short paper, a reading journal, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 – North & South American Literature. Meets with American Culture 498.001. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): James McIntosh (jhmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will identify common cultural dilemmas and opportunities in the Americas and examine common themes and mutual influences in United States and Spanish-American literature. Topics include: (1) García Márquez as creator of an imaginary fictional country with its own American history; (2) Morrison's Beloved as African American history and as a home-grown example of magical realism; (3) Borges and Hawthorne as elaborate provincial artificers, cosmopolitan inventors bred in local American settings; (4) Neruda and Whitman as poets of the vast American landscape and of American sensuality, uncertainty, and fraternity; and (5) Erdrich and Arguedas as storytellers and mediators between native and Euro-American cultures. A reading knowledge of Spanish is desirable but not necessary. Students will be asked to contribute to discussions and write a short paper, a long paper, and a take-home exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 – Yeats, Joyce, and Ireland

Instructor(s): George Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will study the work of two major modern Irish writers, Yeats and Joyce. We will focus on Yeats' poetry and on Joyce's fiction (Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist, and Ulysses) in terms of the construction both of international modernism and of Irish cultural and political nationalism. Both aesthetic and cultural strategies will come up for discussion, and students should feel comfortable with poetry as well as with prose. Through both the literature itself and its contested receptions we will also examine notions of cultural hybridity, and will use the extraordinary controversies over recent editions of Joyce's Ulysses and of Yeats' poetry to explore how the often problematic editorial construction of texts shapes interpretation and theory. Besides reading and discussion, course work will include one-paragraph weekly responses, a brief group oral report (on Ulysses), a paper or two, and an exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 – William Faulkner and Robert Hayden. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The largest portion of the syllabus for this course will be given to William Faulkner, whose fiction has exerted a powerful influence on writers around the world. Likely texts are two of his most experimental and highly-orchestrated novels – The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom – and two of his most controversial popular works – Sanctuary and The Hamlet (the first volume of the Snopes trilogy), as well as several short stories. Robert Hayden's Collected Poems investigates some of the same history that Faulkner scrutinizes, but from an African-American perspective. Together the two authors carry forward themes central to American literature in the 20th century: region and nation, modern sexuality, racial and class identity. At the same time we shall consider questions of career-formation and canonization in these exemplary cases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 – Rhetoric and the Achievement of Women's Rights. Meets the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Alisse Theodore (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alisse/ENGL484f00/desc.html

Most nineteenth-century American women had little or no access to political leaders, higher education, or even the wages they earned; they were not allowed to vote, sign contracts, or own property in the United States. Despite these rigid constraints and tremendous opposition, over a span of eight decades American women generated massive social and political changes. How? By using the only tool available to them: language. Clearly, what we say, how we say it, and to whom it is said can – and does – change the world. In this class, you'll learn to use rhetorical theory as a way to critically examine persuasive appeals while we study speeches and other texts from the nineteenth-century woman's rights movement. Together, we will consider the power of language to define, reform, and even revolutionize politics and society. Students will participate in class discussions, write occasional brief responses to the readings, do a short project, and write one longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This will be an introductory survey of literary theory from the romantics to the present, but with emphasis on the exciting and absolutely fundamental changes that have taken place in the past twenty-five years. Major areas of study will include Romanticism, Modernism, New Criticism, Post-structuralism, New Historicism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism. We will be using various kinds of literary theory to help us answer basic questions about what and why we read, questions like: What gives us literary pleasure? Do authors determine the meaning of their texts, or do readers? How is literature related to society and politics? Can pornography be literature? Is there a difference between literature and propaganda? How are male readers/writers different from female readers/writers? On what principles was our literary canon established, and should it be revised? Mix of lecture/discussion, but with a strong emphasis on student participation. Two, possibly three short papers, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Rex

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Anne Gere

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 489/Education 440. Teaching of English.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): John Stratman

Prerequisites & Distribution: See School of Education Bulletin. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 001 – Honors

Instructor(s): Adela Pinch (apinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis – your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 492. Honors Colloquium: Drafting the Thesis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the English Honors Program and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course assists you in conceiving and writing an Honors thesis – your most important piece of work in English Honors. In the initial weeks we examine research methods in the humanities and clarify the nature of the Honors thesis (how it differs from a term paper, for example). The remainder of the course is devoted to nurturing and strengthening your individual project through a linked series of tasks (topic statements, notes on secondary sources, bibliographies, drafts of sections). You present your work in progress to the class, and read and critique your classmates' drafts. By the end of the academic term, you will have a 20- to 30-page draft of your thesis and a strongly focused sense of what changes and additions are needed before you turn in the final version in March. You should also have a clear sense of the demands and rewards of advanced work in literary studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 – The Great American Novel. (Honors). Meets the American Literature requirement.

Instructor(s): Sara Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the novel as a literary and cultural form, with specific attention to the ways in which that form has entered into larger debates about America as a nation, an ongoing social project, and a source of personal identity. Attending closely to matters of literary form, voice, and style, we'll also explore the cultural conditions under which these come into being. Texts will probably include Henry James' Daisy Miller, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, F. Scott Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, Toni Morrison's Beloved and Gish Jen's Mona in the Promised Land. Along with these novels, we'll also look at novelistic narratives offered in other media – notably, film and performance art – to think about the fate both of the novel as a genre and of the kinds of questions it has historically shaped and addressed in American modernity. Course work will include intensive reading, in-class presentations, and a final seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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