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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in French (Division 371)

This page was created at 3:57 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 – December 22)

Open courses in French

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for French.

To see what has been added to or changed in French this week go to What's New This Week.


Elementary Language Courses

Students who have begun language study in high school must take a placement test to determine whether they should enroll in a first-year (101), first-year review (103), or a second-year language course. We also recommend that students who began language study at another college or university take the placement test. Please check the Evaluations & Examinations website (http://www.umich.edu/~eande/place/sched.htm) for placement test dates and locations.

Demand for elementary language courses can be high, and students may not be able to enroll in the class of their choosing. Please see your general academic advisor for help in electing courses.

Attendance in elementary language courses is mandatory. Students who miss either of the first two meetings of the class may be dropped from the course by the department, to allow other students to register.


French 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

French 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/103/001.nsf

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are three hourly exams, a final, compositions, and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, computer-based writing programs, the web) will be used to aid in acquiring listening and writing skills, and cultural competency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. French 231 builds and expands upon the work done in French 101/102 or French 103. The primary goals of French 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In French 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos and songs to explore the history of France and several other francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 002 – Contextual Culture.

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Context dictates our communicative register: situation, interlocutor, and media all require understanding and an ability to adopt the necessary form of written, verbal, or listening communication. For example, when speaking during a job interview, would you use the same vocabulary, body language, tone of voice, or facial expressions that you would use with your best friend in a coffee shop? Definitely not, and neither would the French.

In this course, we will study a wide variety of communicative registers, ensuring that we can both understand and reproduce them in order to communicate efficiently and appropriately. As we will discover, a TV news presenter, for example, employs a precise set of vocabulary and communication techniques very different from a Music Video presenter; students will study the differences and recreate these examples with in-class skits.

During our studies, we will work to improve grammar by using Reprise, applying our knowledge in presentations and written texts within the registers we have studied. The Internet will an invaluable tool as we study its unique cyber-French. We will also study, discuss and produce our own versions of video, film, and TV clips.

The format will center around seven 2-week units:

Politics in France: history, current, recordings of speeches – students write and perform.
Business in France: etiquette, vocabulary, resume, job interview skits.
French Literature: short story/poem to study – students write in literary register.
Daily Life: food labels, operating instructions, recipes, schedules, etc.
Media: newspapers, magazines, radio, and TV.
Internet: Surfer le Web, discuss Americanization of French language.
Social Studies: religious language, entertainment industry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 013 – Social Issues Through French Film.

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This topics section of French 232 will focus on social issues in contemporary French society such as marriage, the family, racism, gender relations, AIDS, sexuality, social marginalization, and homelessness. Every two weeks, there will be a film screening which will serve as the starting point for class discussions. Students will also be asked to find articles in French newspapers to complement the screenings. An emphasis will be placed on improving writing skills (including grammar) as well as speaking skills through class discussion.

Requirements: one typed 1.5-page paper per film, regular tests, midterm, and final.

Films:

  • La cite des enfants perdus;
  • Sans toit ni loi;
  • La haine;
  • Trop belle pour toi;
  • J'ai pas sommeil;
  • Subway.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 015 – Cross-cultural Comparisons and Technology.

Instructor(s): Sabine Gabaron (sgabaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/232/015.nsf

What is culture? Where and how is it represented? How can the study of a foreign language help in the understanding of the culture it embodies?

The purpose of this technology based course is to confront students with the notions of culture both to appreciate the values of the foreign language even more and to develop cultural awareness and analysis. Via web activities, research on the Internet, videos, and movies students will first reflect on their own culture and then apprehend the foreign culture. We will address topics such as gender representation, interaction with people/the environment, politics, racism, and social issues.

Students will be asked to participate in class discussions and to be willing to use technology both in class and outside of class on a regular basis.

Requirements:

Four main projects: a comparison of a French movie and its adaptation in English; a comparison of French and American commercials; a cultural presentation on a topic of interest (technology based presentation); and a collaborative writing of a short story.

Two written tests, one final exam, and three speaking tests. We will use Reprise as a grammar tool and reference.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 – Advanced Practice in French Through Contemporary Social Issues

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the most recent issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

  • The "French Republic?"
  • Europe
    • – The European Union (EU)
    • – The European Monetary Union (EMU)
  • Transatlantic relations: Globalization/"Exception francaise"
  • Some crucial issues: Unemployment/Social exclusions/Violence/AIDS
  • "Liberty, Equality, Diversity": Families/PACS/Gay rights: Adoption and "PMA"
  • Women: "Parite politique" / "Excision"
  • "Black, Blanc, Beur": France's multicultural society – Colonization/Immigration/Islam – "Laicite"/Rai music.

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 50% and 50% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%) and a number of written exercises (20%). Active class participation and regular attendance (20%) are expected. Required texts: Course pack (French 235, Dollar Bill) and a French grammar book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Roger Butler-Borruat (rebb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/235/001.nsf

In this course we will be dealing with some of the most recent issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic?"
  2. Europe:
    • - The European Union (EU)
    • - The European Monetary Union (EMU)
  3. Transatlantic relations: Globalization/"Exception francaise"
  4. Some crucial issues: Unemployment/Social exclusions/Violence/AIDS
  5. "Liberty, Equality, Diversity": Families/PACS/Gay rights: Adoption and "PMA"
  6. Women: "Parite politique" / "Excision"
  7. "Black, Blanc, Beur": France's multicultural society
    • - Colonization/Immigration/Islam
    • - "Laicite"/Rai music.

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 50% and 50% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%) and a number of written exercises (20%). Active class participation and regular attendance (20%) are expected. Required texts: Course pack (French 235, Dollar Bill) and a French grammar book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 250. First-Year Seminar in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Questions de culture: Introduction to French and Francophone Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the cultural, economic, social, and political interconnections between Francophone and European literature and cinema. The course will provide an introduction to French Studies by examining several approaches or methods to the study of cultural production. A strong emphasis will be placed on student participation in class discussions, vocabulary development, and writing skills. We will study contemporary literary and filmic texts from French-speaking writers and filmmakers from Africa, the Maghreb, the Caribbean, Canada, and France. Required work: participation in class, short weekly papers, oral presentations, and one final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Disease and Community.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study how various concepts of health and disease have been used throughout French literary, social and political history. What is normal and what is deviant? What are the links between medical science and literature? How was medicine used to define race and sexuality? If disease can be used as exclusion, can it also be used in a positive way? What is the AIDS crisis telling us about French society?

Oral presentations and short papers.

Readings:

  • Montaigne, "D'un enfant monstrueux"
  • Chateaubriand, René.
  • Zola, Thérèse Raquin.
  • Maupassant, "Le Horla"
  • Excerpts from Drumont, La France juive, and Barrès on "the Orient" Gide, L'Immoraliste.
  • Alain Emmanuel Dreuilhe, Corps-à-corps: journal de sida.

FILM: La bête humaine

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – A Journey in French Literatures and Science

Instructor(s): Donald Maxwell (maxwelld@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~maxwelld/Fr2000-1.html

In this discussion course we will read some French texts of the 18th & 20th centuries as well as discuss some famous French scientific discoveries. One of the themes of the course will be "the voyage", journeys, both real and virtual, depicted in literature, and in science which may be portrayed as a voyage of discovery. In addition, we will discuss some of the fundamental differences between the culture of "science" and that of "literature". There is a greater linguistic barrier in literature than in science, which is virtually without a frontier. Literature creates something that might otherwise never have existed, while science discovers a reality that pre-existed its finding, a truth that always existed.

One of the goals of the course will be to improve your ability to express ideas verbally in French and you will be encouraged to participate in frequent open discussion, debate, and occasionally in acting out a text or illustration.

Your grade will be determined by your participation in class discussion, an oral presentation you make with a colleague and two short papers, one involving a virtual journey with the course web page.

Readings:

  • Dorothée Letessier, Le voyage à Paimpol.
  • Abbé Prévost, Manon Lescaut.
  • Albert Camus, L'étranger. Ed. Germaine Brée and Carlos Lynes Jr.
  • Alain-Fournier, Le grand Maulnes.
  • Course pack – Excerpts concerning French science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003 – 1789-1889: The Age of the Crowds

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Two symbolic dates in French history and one hundred years of monumental changes.

1789: Fall of the Bastille, followed by the abolition of the absolute monarchy and emergence of the democratic nation-state, the sovereign people, the First Republic.

1889: Rise of the Eiffel Tower, center piece of the (Third Republic's) World's Fair, enthronement of the industrial society and capitalist culture. And, (controversial) centenial of the French Revolution.

As divergent as they were, both moments share an urban space (Paris), as well as a modern social phenomena: crowds. In this course, we will study the following selection of artistic productions and cultural practices taken from the 1789-1889 period; in them urban multitudes played a visible part, or inscribed themselves implicitly. We will conclude with an approach of XIXth-century "crowd psychology."

1. Revolutionary Crowds/Revolutionary Women (Olympe de Gouges: "Declaration of the Rights of Woman and Citizeness").

2. Mass Readership: Novel, Newspaper and Lithography (Balzac, Daumier).

3. Social Classes: The Struggle (Marx).

4. Parisian Population: Centralized Bourgeoisie/Off-centred "Dangerous Classes" (Haussmann).

5. Multitude/Solitude: Arts of Modern Life.

a. Poetry: Modernity (Baudelaire).

b. Painting: Impressionism (Morisot: "Women Spaces". Manet. Caillebotte: "Men World").

c. Musicality: (Verlaine, Faure).

6. From "Flanerie" to Consumerism: Objects of Desire (Gautier, Eiffel, Benjamin).

7. Crowd Psychology (Le Bon, Freud).

Audiovisual documents will be presented in class. Required texts : a course pack and a French grammar book. Final grade : written and oral performances will each count for 50% of the final grade (two medium-length essays, a journal, written exercises; short oral presentations, regular and active participation).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Women Writers in French & Francophone Lit

Instructor(s): Alina Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the specificity, as well as diversity, of women's writing in 20th-century French and Francophone literature. The authors we shall study: Rachilde, Colette, Prassinos, de Beauvoir, Duras, Conde, Djebar, each offer – in one form or another – the example of a woman writer's emancipation from the shadow of a dominant male influence, or from patriarchal/colonial constraints. In their writings these women retell their struggle for an independent identity (in both artistic and sexual terms), and their efforts to find a voice of their own.

While focusing on the individual writers, we shall also have occasion to discuss their connection to wider trends in literary modernity: Fin-de-siècle aesthetics with Rachilde, Surrealism with Prassinos, Existentialism with de Beauvoir, the "Nouveau Roman" with Duras, and postcolonial writing strategies with Conde, and Djebar. No exams. Evaluation will be based on 4 short papers, and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 276. Spoken and Written Performance in French.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/276/001.nsf

This course is based on the idea that literature and culture in French are things that students should create and perform, not just learn or analyze. So literature will be treated not as a group of texts to be studied, but as something to be produced, transformed, read aloud, played with, and invented. The main activities will be creative writing, oral interpretation, and small-scale theatrical performances, all of which will provide diverse opportunities for using and practicing the French language. Writing projects will often involve pastiche, parody, and other forms that emphasize creative responses to readings, as well as techniques such as those of the French group OuLiPo for producing original writing when one is not necessarily inspired. There will also be Web-based projects, especially exchanges and collaborative activities on the course Web site (not yet open). Authors encountered, exploited, and performed, largely in brief works or excerpts, will include Molière, Diderot, Rousseau, Flaubert, Baudelaire, Queneau, Perec, and Pennac.

Assignments will be frequent and generally not long. Grading will be based on written work and on class participation, which is extremely important. No final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

French 367. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – The Jealous Imagination: Depicting an Unavowed Emotion.

Instructor(s): George Hoffmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For ages, writers have felt drawn to portraying this painful yet profoundly imaginative experience. Jealousy would almost seem intrinsically literary; what, after all, does the suspicious lover do but invent scenes, scrutinize character, and imagine scenarios? At the dawn of the Renaissance, Jean Lemaire compares with bittersweet playfulness the professional writer's dependency on sponsors to that of a jealous parakeet spurned by its mistress in the "Épître de l'amant verd." In a similar vein, Ronsard's anxiety over his beloved's faithfulness hides his nervousness concerning his audience and the attention his poetry will continue to enjoy.

What do we do, as readers, but examine motives and second-guess intent? Already in medieval times, Béroul exploits uncertainty over the plot in order to place his readers in the position of the jealous king: are Tristan and Iseult sleeping together, or not? We will examine a tradition of short fiction, from the fabliaux to the Heptaméron, which calls upon the reader to judge ambiguous gestures and acts in a way that parallels the hypotheses and deductions the jealous lover feels endlessly compelled to entertain.

Last but not least, the literary depiction of jealousy anticipates most the modern psychoanalytic findings concerning jealousy. From medieval times comes the key insight to the origins of jealousy, when the writer Thomas proposes that the jealous lover's frantic worrying stems from a crisis not over the beloved so much as over his or her own self image. Hélisenne de Crenne's Angoisses douleureuses complicates the triangular structure of jealousy by making the heroine simultaneously both the subject and the object of jealousy; and Racine builds his masterpiece, Andromaque, around the idea that we would rather be hated than ignored by the person in whom we have vested the power to see us as we wish we could really be. Finally, no study of the depiction of jealousy would be complete without Shakespeare's exposition of two different, fundamental types of jealousy in Othello.

We will trace how jealousy has acted as a topic, motive, and, ultimately, form for fiction from one of the first romances to one of France's first "psychological" novels, Lafayette's La Princesse de Montpensier.

Grades will reflect work on three papers, a short presentation, participation in class discussion and a few short assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 369. Literature, History, and Culture of Modernity.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Circulation and the City.

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the notions of circulation as they pertain to the specific phenomenon of urban Modernity in Paris from the mid-19th century (1848) through the 1930s.

  • What is Modernity and why is circulation a key concept?
  • What is the relationship between circulation and Modernity?
  • What links the notion of circulation to literature and painting?
  • What does the advent of photography and cinematography bring to this culture? What role will architecture and infrastructure of the city–above ground (boulevards) and below (subways, sewers) – play during this period?

We will examine the history and culture of Modernity through the study of literary texts; historical documents; architecture; urban development; photography; cinema; and the mutual influences of these forces on this culture.

Required work: two short papers, an oral presentation, a midterm, and a final paper. Students will also be asked to keep a journal of their studies.

Readings:

  • Louis Aragon, Le paysan de Paris;
  • Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du mal;
  • Charles Baudelaire, Le Spleen de Paris, Petits poêmes en prose;
  • Émile Zola, Le ventre de Paris.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 374. Problems in Society and Social Theory.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – The Extreme Right in France

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since the mid-1980s, the far-right Front National party has established itself as an important political force in France today. Its leader, Jean-Marie Le Pen, received 15% of the votes in the 1995 presidential election.

What exactly is the project of the FN? Why has the extreme right made such a dramatic come-back in France? And, most importantly, what are the historical and intellectual origins of the ideas it represents?

The purpose of this course is to discuss, through historical events as well as works of fiction, the ideas of the extreme right in several of its aspects and expressions.

Among the topics studied: the rise of nationalism in the 1880s, the Dreyfus Affair, French fascism, the Vichy government during WW II, the Algerian war, and finally the Front National. We will discuss issues such as antisemitism, gender, the body, esthetics, colonization, immigration, etc.

Literature: Maurice Barrès, Les déracinés (excerpt); Henry de Montherlant, Les olympiques (excerpts); Robert Brazillach, Les sept couleurs; Marcel Aymé, Uranus.

Course pack: various essays and articles, incl. Zola, Barrès, Le Pen, etc.

Films (tentative): Joseph Losey, Monsieur Klein; Marcel Ophuls, Le chagrin et la pitié; Leni Riefenstahl, excerpts from Triumph of the Will and Olympia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 378. Studies in Genre.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Poetry As You Like It

Instructor(s): Ross Chambers

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry, these days, tends to intimidate. Why? This course is partly about how modern French poetry has responded to its cultural marginalization in the modern world; and partly about why people who like poetry do like it. The assumption will be that there is no single correct way to read poetry but many different ways of enjoying it; and you will be invited to think about why and how you yourself derive pleasure from reading verse and poetic prose in French.

Rhyme and rhythm do not work the same in French as they do in English. There are also other structuring practices, in verse and in prose, that are common to poetry in all languages. It is helpful to have some understanding of how these work to make meanings, and we will begin by looking into them. Then we will try to put them into practice by writing some poetry of our own, individually and as a group; and finally we will read as much poetry together as we can, asking how and why it offers itself to us for our interest and pleasure. How does poetry enhance enjoyment of the world? But also: how does it express or imply criticism of a (disenchanted, unjust, alienating) modern world as it is?

Written work will consist of two papers of 3-5 pages in French: one appreciative of a poem, one discussing your own pleasure in poetry. The papers will be preceded by careful drafts. I'll ask you also to keep a diary in English of your poetry reading experiences. Grades will be based 50% on class participation and 50% on written work (diary and papers). Midterm by interview with instructor. The class is taught in French.

Textbooks (tentative list only):
Apollinaire, Alcools (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Claudel, Connaissance de l'Est (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Ponge, Le Parti pris des choses (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Réda, Les ruines de Paris (Gallimard: Coll. "Poésie".
Rimbaud, Poésies complètes (Livre de Poche).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – 20th Century French Feminist Thought. Meets with Women's Studies 483.004.

Instructor(s): Domna Stanton (dcs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the complex development of French feminism, from the socialist and pacifist conferences of the early 1900s to the existentialism of Simone de Beauvoir and to the legislative parité movement of today. In the process, we will consider why France was the last European country to give suffrage to women (in 1945); why feminism never became a national movement in France after the fight for abortion rights in 1974; and why feminism has become a dirty word in France, often conflated with Americanism. We will study a range of texts, including books, manifestos, magazine and newspaper articles as well as films that have conveyed feminist issues. We will not limit ourselves to continental France, but consider in our discussions, the particular cases of French Canada, the Caribbean and Africa since the 1960s.

Over and above active participation in class discussions of assignments, work for the course will include short presentations to the class, a research project on the web, and a critical analysis of one feminist writer or filmmaker.

Over the summer, a syllabus will be posted.

Any questions, contact Domna Stanton at dcs@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

French 438/Rom. Ling. 456/EducationD 456. Topics in Learning and Teaching French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alain Martinossi (alainm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/french/438/001.nsf

This course is specifically intended for prospective teachers of French. Although students will be introduced to theories which can be applied to the teaching of any language, practical applications of these theories will all be done in French.

The purpose of this course is to present methods of teaching secondary level foreign languages. The course is designed for prospective middle and high school teachers who are competent in their language skills and now seek to focus that competency into a personal teaching style in a foreign language classroom. Issues such as curriculum development and instructional models of teaching will be addressed. Throughout the course, student will actively and reflectively practice their teaching skills in preparation for effective student teaching. Please note that this course should be taken by students enrolled in the teacher certification program at the school of Education, and preferably the term just prior to student teaching.

This course is designed to provide students with opportunities to:

  • become familiar with the 5 goals of the standards for foreign language learning
  • become familiar with current theories of second language acquisition/teaching through readings and class discussions
  • participate in a range of activities (i.e., development of instructional material targeting various skills, teaching demonstrations, class observations) through which they will demonstrate their understanding of theoretical concepts discussed in class.
  • learn and apply various teaching techniques consistent with the current theories of second language acquisition and teaching
  • observe and critique teaching performances
  • become acquainted with technology for the foreign language classroom and implement it in their teaching
  • participate in professional electronic discussions in order to further explore issues discussed in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – The French New Novel and its Francophone Equivalents

Instructor(s): Jarrod Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the challenges the French New Novel (le nouveau roman) brought to novelistic conventions such as linear narrative, the distinction between characters and objects, narrative time, and the omniscient narrator who is able to authorize a "true" version of a novel's events. In particular, we will consider how Francophone novels incorporated similar challenges, often to more political ends. Rereading the French New Novel through its Francophone parallels also allows readers to better understand the New Novel's frequent reproduction of colonial discourse. This course will begin with an exemplary New Novel from France and then move on to one of the most intricate novels of each of the four major Francophone regions. Special attention will be devoted to the practical issues of reading through the difficulties of many contemporary novels. We will also consider how questioning more conventional models of narrativity brings about a reconceptualization of the notions of identity, history, nationality, and gender. Graduate students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course and will be asked to supplement the required readings with additional novels selected individually in consultation with the instructor.

Requirements: two papers, an on-going journal of reactions to the readings, a class presentation.

Novels:
La maison du rendez-vous, Alain Robbe-Grillet (France)
Nedjma, Kateb Yacine (Algeria)
La vie et demie, Sony Labou Tansi. (Congo)
L'isolé soleil, Daniel Maximin. (Guadeloupe)
French Kiss (in French), Nicole Brossard. (Quebec)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

French 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


French 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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