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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in History (Division 390)

This page was created at 3:59 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 – December 22)

Open courses in History

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for History.

To see what has been added to or changed in History this week go to What's New This Week.


History 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alan Stahl

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first half of the European history survey course covers a sweeping period of over a millennium. The course is designed to expose students to general outlines and chronology of European history and to encourage critical, skeptical analytical thinking. To anchor our flying coverage of this long and varied time, we will focus on developments in culture (art, architecture, literature), social organization (family, community, gender relations), and in political organization and theory. Readings will include a textbook, primary sources, challenging interpretive essays. Lecture time will be punctuated by small-group discussions, and active participation is strongly encouraged. Slides will frequently accompany lectures.

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History 121/Asian Studies 121. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): P. Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introduction to the civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, and Inner Asia. It aims to provide an overview of changing traditions from ancient to early modern times (ca. 1660 AD) by outlining broad trends which not only transformed each society, economy, and culture but also led to the development of this region into distinctly different modern nations. The development of state Confucianism, the spread of Buddhism, the functions of the scholar and the warrior, the impact of the military empires of Inner Asia, and the superiority of pre-modern Asian science and technology are some of the topics we will cover. In addition to the required textbooks, we will read contemporary accounts and view slides and films to acquire intimate appreciation of these cultures. Course requirements include successful completion of: quizzes given in sections; four major tests given in class; one report/project (5 pp. plus bibliography and notes).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

History 132/AAPTIS 100/ACABS 100/HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary Beckman (sidd@umich.edu) , Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nes100/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 144(249)/Korean 150/Asian Studies 154. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/korean/150/004.nsf

See Korean 150.001.

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History 151/Asian Studies 111. Indian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy (sumathi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the civilization of South Asia, the region of the world that is today constituted by the modern nation-states of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. The course begins with an analysis of the manner in which this "civilization" was first "discovered" by the modern West. We will then go on to consider the political history of the sub-continent from its earliest foundations in the Indus rule in the 13th c. C.E. Against this background, we will study the following themes: kingship and polity; social and religious identities; commercial relations with a wider world; and gender and sexuality. We will close with a review of India's encounter with modern Europe, the establishment of colonial rule in the subcontinent, and the formation of the nation-states of today.

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History 152/Asian Studies 112. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Muslim, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since 1945, the Vietnam War. Until recently it had the world's fastest growing regional economy, and it remains an area of great importance to Japan as well as the United States. This course offers an introduction (and thus assumes no prior knowledge) to Southeast Asian history from the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the indigenous political reaction – of which Vietnamese Communism and the Vietnam Wars were one expression – and the contemporary economic scene. The course seeks to define Southeast Asia's uniqueness as well as its evolving ties to the rest of the world. Midterm, final, and optional paper. Two lectures, one discussion section per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maris Vinovskis (vinovski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture/discussion course will examine central issues and events in the history of the territories that became the United States, and the peoples who lived there, from the late 16th to the middle of the 19th centuries. Among the topics that will be considered are the territorial expansions of Europeans into the Americas; the creation of Anglo-American colonies; the social, political, and cultural orders of British North America; the creation of an independent American republic in the Revolution; and the destruction of that first republic in the War Between the States. The required readings will include both primary and secondary sources, and will be examined in weekly discussion sections. There will be both a midterm and a final examination, and active class participation will be expected in the sections.

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History 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Fitzpatrick (fitzd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is the second half of the basic, introductory survey of American history. It addresses the development of the American nation from the end of the Civil War to the present day. The focal point of the course is the changing nature of the concept of freedom during this period. In this context the course will examine the evolution of the United States from an agrarian nation with little concern for foreign affairs to the world's preeminent power with self-defined global interests. This examination necessarily will focus on the lives of individual citizens, the transformation of the labor force and the workplace, and the role played by race, ethnicity, class, and gender in determining one's place within the greater society. In so doing the course will investigate the era's major reform movements as well as the reasons for and reaction to the nation's increased involvement in international affairs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 171/German 171. Coming to Terms with Germany.

Section 001 – Germany and Europe in the 1990s.

Instructor(s): Andrei Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 171.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 195. The Writing of History.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Writing of History" sections offer students the opportunity to learn writing through the study of historical texts, debates, and events. Each section will study a different era, region, and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians as well as documents and other source materials from the past, such as historical novels, letters, diaries, or memoirs. In each case the goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level analytic papers. History 195 satisfies the first-year writing requirement. Each section will enroll a maximum of twenty students.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 001 – Colonialism and Nationalism: Approaches in Comparative History.

Instructor(s): Mantena

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/195/001.nsf

The purpose of this first-year seminar will be to gain a broad understanding of colonialism as a world-historical phenomenon and to explore questions of why and how nationalism emerged in colonial societies as a response to European hegemony in the 20th century. The European discovery of a sea route around the southern tip of Africa in the late 15th century introduced new zones of interaction connecting the European world to the worlds of Africa and Asia and eventually lead to the European colonization of those new lands. The seminar will begin with the late eighteenth century, when Britain shifted its attention (after facing defeat in North America) to its interests in South Asia and embarked on an aggressive policy of conquering new territories. We will examine the consequences of this aggressive expansionist policy in South Asia and will also trace the rise of British interests on the coasts of Africa. The seminar will explore the ways in which political and cultural institutions of the colonial world have changed over the past two centuries through European intervention and domination. In particular, we will aim for a better understanding of the effects of colonialism on native peoples and cultures.

In order to attain a broad understanding of historical inquiry, the course will use a wide range of materials including works of contemporary African writers reflecting on the effects of colonialism on African society and culture, such as Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart and Ngugi wa Thiongo's Decolonizing the Mind, and films depicting the complexities of nationalism, for example Satyajit Ray's The Home and The World.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 002 – Hitler Youth, Hippies, and Punks: Youth and Youth Subcultures in 20th-Century Europe.

Instructor(s): Ettelson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the social positions and perceptions of youth in Europe from World War I to the present, with special attention devoted to Britain, France, and Germany. The pedagogical intent of the course is to explore the stability of youth as a category. Rather than assume specific age groups always have similar types of experiences, or that youth is always understood in the same way by different cultures and in different periods, we will analyze how experiences of youth and interpretations of those experiences transformed within broader social processes of the 20th century. These include the mobilization of European society during the two world wars, the rise of fascism, post-war transformations in class structures, the opening up of secondary education, the changing place of women in society, and decolonization and immigration. Considering these processes will assist us both in thinking through how the experiences of youth transformed and in examining how categories such as race, class, and gender intersected with the category of youth. We will also devote significant attention to how cultural phenomena such as music, fashion and style, sport, film, and television have inflected a range of youth subcultures (punks, skinheads, mods, etc.) and the "moral panics" which frequently accompanied them. The course is reading intensive and requires approximately 40 pages of writing during the academic term, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 003 – Evolutionary Theory in Science.

Instructor(s): A. Goss

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/195/003.nsf

For almost 200 years, scientists have turned to evolutionary theories to answer questions about biological change. Natural selection, genetics, eugenics, and sociobiology became, and some still are, explanations with scientific validity. This class will examine the development of evolutionary discourse within scientific thinking, from the 18th-century Great Chain of Being to the Human Genome Project of today. Using both original source material, such as Darwin's Origin of the Species, and current historical research, this seminar will study the rise of evolutionary thinking and its relationship to scientific paradigms. The latter part of the class will be devoted to examining the history of genetics. Students will learn the art of historical argumentation as they design a research project about genetics and science.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 004 – Behind Bars: Prison Writing Across Time and Space.

Instructor(s): K. Ward

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From convict transportation in the early American colonies to the rapidly expanding prison industrial complex in the contemporary U.S., prisons have been a significant component in American society. This course seeks to explore the nature of prison life in different historical contexts. By examining a variety of prison experiences across time and space this course will open up questions about the role of prisons in society. It will challenge students to think about the changing meanings of crime and punishment through the historical analysis of the 'birth of the prison'. The readings will focus on fictional or biographical accounts of prison life – from Dickens to Dostoevsky; Malcolm X to Mandela. Students will develop a research project on one of the case studies offered in the course.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 005 – The Ancient Greek Historians.

Instructor(s): A. Kaldellis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over a thousand years of ancient history separate the invasion of Greece by the Persians in 490 B.C. from the effort of the Roman Emperor Justinian to reconquer Europe from the barbarians in the 530's A.D. Those great events, as well as everything that transpired between them, are known to us primarily through the writings of the ancient Greek historians. Some of them were politicians or generals, others poets or philosophers. They traveled the known world, observing the different customs of mankind and witnessing important events. They wrote about politics and warfare, religion and culture. Modern historians still rely upon the techniques they created and employ the categories of historical analysis that they devised. In this course, we will read selections from a wide range of ancient historians, and focus on their different concerns, approaches, and interpretive techniques. In class discussion and written assignments these will be contrasted to the practices of modern scholars who write on the same events. It is a premise of this course that early familiarity with the themes, methods, and varieties of classical historiography can greatly enhance a student's appreciation of the discipline as a whole.

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History 195. The Writing of History.

Section 006 – Global History of the California Gold Rush, 1848-1860.

Instructor(s): Aims McGuinness

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/195/006.nsf

Mention the California Gold Rush and most people will think of "forty-niners," those hardy pioneers who made their way to California to seek their fortunes following the discovery of gold in 1848. As celebrated in countless histories, the "forty-niner" typically appears as a grizzled Anglo-American man, panning for gold in a stream or swinging a pick. Yet women also played a critical role in the Gold Rush, and those who labored in the rivers, mines, and saloons included native peoples, Spanish-speaking californios, African Americans, and emigrants from the South Pacific, China, and Chile. The great migration to the gold fields led to profound changes not only in California but also in places such as Panamá, Australia, and Hawai'i. This course will explore the global dimensions of the California Gold Rush through engagement with histories, fiction, and film, including works by U.S. historian Susan Johnson and Chilean novelist Isabel Allende. We will also consider a wide variety of primary sources, including letters, paintings, photographs, and eyewitness testimony from a bloody riot that took place in Panama City in 1856. Through regular writing assignments and a final paper, students will learn how to evaluate different forms of evidence, how to clarify their thinking, and how to construct convincing arguments. Students will read approximately fifty pages per week and will write a minimum of thirty pages during the academic term, including fifteen pages of revised, polished prose.

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History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 – World War II in Asia: Origins and Consequences.

Instructor(s): Ernest Young (epyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/HS196/index.html

The portion of World War II that was fought in Asia and the Pacific is still interpreted in widely divergent ways. This course will be concerned with both the origins and the consequences. We shall study texts from that time and examine subsequent interpretations (visual as well as verbal), in an effort to understand the various interpretive frameworks that have been applied to the events. Students will be asked to write short papers in response to the readings and other course materials. In addition, each student will pursue a research project and write a major paper.

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History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 004 – The Evangelical Subculture in America.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This first-year seminar explores the historical roots of the evangelical subculture in America, from its origins in colonial Puritanism through the impact of successive waves of religious revivals in the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. We will read a variety of books, including historical studies, personal memoirs, and popular fiction, that illuminate different aspects of the evangelical culture. The requirements include weekly readings and several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 005 – Japan in the Age of the Samurai.

Instructor(s): P. Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many of us have been exposed to images of samurai from movies, novels, popular history (e.g., Shogun, in both printed and video forms), and the like. One of the approaches we will utilize is to "test" the extent to which these popular images accord with the "reality" of samurai life and the role of samurai in Japanese history.

The basic emphasis of classes will be on discussion, not lecture. That means students are responsible for proper preparation for each class. In addition, I want to encourage discussion outside of class and will set up an e-mail reflector list for the class. All students are expected to participate in e-mail discussion. (More on this later.)

While some members of the class may have some general knowledge about samurai, I assume that many if not all of you have virtually no formal background in Japanese history. Nonetheless, we are going to start right out with some substantial works on the formation of samurai in Japanese history. So it is important for you to stay focused on the questions that I will give to guide your readings, and not to get tied down in insignificant details. If you have questions about what you are reading, you can deal with them either by raising them in the e-mail reflector list or by raising them in class. I guarantee that for 95% of the questions that will come up in these forums, you will not be the only person who has that question. Make sure the question gets asked, and don't hold back!

Academic Objectives:

I want you to develop the following skills and competencies:

  1. To develop the ability to assess and think critically about historical issues and how people interpret those issues. To focus on these skills we will analyze two different scholarly works that attempt to explain the origins of samurai.
  2. To develop skills in assessing the appropriateness of the ways in which an author uses historical materials to construct an interpretation. Two of our assignments will ask you to compare the adequacy of an author's treatment with translations of Japanese source materials, literary and historical, with their work. We will also devote attention to evaluation of materials available on the WWW.
  3. To develop skills in analyzing historical data and reaching informed conclusions about those data. Based on your readings of translated Japanese materials, you will be asked to analyze aspects of samurai values.
  4. To gain a basic factual knowledge of this period in Japanese history.

Examinations, Papers, and Evaluation:

  1. There will be no midterm examinations; I may, however, from time to time, give "pop" quizzes to be sure that everyone is mastering basic factual material in the course.
  2. There will be three papers based on materials presented in the course, the last of which will serve as a final.

  3. Class participation. Students are expected to attend all classes and to be prepared for and to participate in class discussion. This component also includes participation in discussion on the class web site.

  4. Expanding the Samurai web site: We will work together to develop additional materials for a web site on samurai. The core of this site has already been developed by a previous student.

Computation of the Final Grade:

  • 15% class/e-mail list participation
  • 60% short papers (3)
  • 10% written homework assignments
  • 15% web-related projects

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 – Epidemics in American History. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Markel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the social, medical, and cultural history of several major epidemics in American history from cholera to AIDS. Each week is an in-depth discussion of readings of historical studies and novels and plays about contagion. Weekly journal writing assignments, a term paper based on original research, and class participation constitute the final grade. All who take this course must be prepared to learn, read, think, and write a lot.

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History 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 – Africa: the Twentieth Century.

Instructor(s): Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/197/002.nsf

This first-year seminar, open to students interested in Africa and its twentieth-century past, is organized around the close reading and discussion of a series of novels by writers based on the African continent. The novels are extraordinary pieces of literature; they provide windows through which to view significant sections of life, community, culture, society, economy, and politics on the continent. And they offer the reader important and unique "moments" of interpretation and theorization of change on the continent across one of the most tumultuous centuries in human experience. While in part directed toward reading audiences outside the African continent, the novels provide an array, and diversity, of "insider" views and evaluations of experience: growing up, changes in the land, political resistance, shifting economies, violence, corruption, crises of identity, the impact of new and powerful forces on local communities, and the want of improvement and reform. The readings provide opportunities to think and rethink extant concepts through which a, or the, knowledge of Africa and of its past is, has been, and may yet be, organized.

Grades will be based on a combination of:

  1. discussion/participation in class;
  2. the satisfactory completion (with an expectation of increasing facility) of three 2-3 pages essays on reading or readings, the topics of which are to be set by the instructor (and given out early in the term);
  3. a 3 page proposal for a longer treatment of a theme drawn out of several of the novels; and
  4. a final 8-page essay based on the proposal, this final essay due at the close of the last meeting of the academic term.

The reading for each week should be completed before the seminar in which the novel is discussed is to meet. Essays should be handed in on the dates indicated, at the beginning of the seminar meeting.

Each week, the instructor will provide a brief background "lecture" as introduction to the next week's reading.

Members of the seminar should make appointments with the instructor to review "the proposal" for a final essay.

Members of the seminar should look around the library for the several atlases and helpful research tools relating to Africa and to these every week or two to get some background, context, and pictures, which should support the readings each week.

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History 200. Greece to 201 B.C.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beate Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Homer, Aristotle and Socrates, Odysseus, Pericles and Alexander the Great, Medea, Cassandra and Atigone, Athens, Sparta and Troy...names and places that pop up in many different contexts. Wouldn't it be great to know who and what they really were and why these names and places still carry meaning today? This survey course introduces participants to ancient Greece from the Mycenaean age to the end of the Hellenistic period. It covers ancient works of literature as well as inscriptions, papyri, coins, and archaeological evidence. Lectures and the section discussions focus on the development of Greek society, the role of the individual in Greek history and the dynamics of historical change. Throughout the term, corresponding and contrasting issues relevant to our own society and history will be addressed. There will be two exams. Each will include essay questions and also test knowledge of historical figures, places and events (2 x 30% of the grade). 20% of the grade will be based on contributions to discussions in sections, the remaining 20% on assignments and quizzes in sections. History 200 is the "prequel" to history 201 (The Roman Empire and Its Legacy). Textbook: R. Morkot, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece (1996). NO PREREQUISITES. EVERYBODY WELCOME.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 210/MEMS 210. Early Middle Ages, 300-1100.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alan Stahl

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the transformation of the Roman Empire into Byzantine, Islamic, and west European successor states between A.D. 300 and 1000. The course focuses on the social, cultural, and economic developments in the barbarian kingdoms of Europe. Lectures are integrated with weekly discussion of early medieval texts; two short papers and two tests are the basis of evaluation of performance.

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History 220. Survey of British History to 1688.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the sweep of English history from Roman times until the Glorious Revolution. The first half of it is devoted to the Middle Ages and focuses on the formation of the English monarchy, the role of the church in politics and culture, and basic social and economic structures. The second half treats the early modern period (c.1450-1700) and concentrates on the growth of the state, the Protestant Reformation, the English Revolution, and the social and economic changes that followed the Black Death and played themselves out during the reigns of the Tudor and Stuart monarchs. No prior knowledge of English history is assumed in this course, and it is intended to serve as the basis for more advanced work in British history and to provide background and comparisons for courses in English literature and European and American history.

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History 241. War and Society in the Modern Middle East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syl/war2000.htm

Covers the history of warfare since the 18th century from Algeria to Afghanistan. Examines imperial warfare and statemaking through Muhammad Ali Pasha (d. 1848), then the colonial wars of France, Great Britain, and Russia; the two world wars; and the subsequent Arab-Israeli, Gulf, and Afghanistan conflicts.

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History 250. China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chung-shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course consists of a survey of early Chinese history, with special emphasis on the origins and development of the political, social, and economic institutions and their intellectual foundations. Special features include class participation in performing a series of short dramas recreating critical issues and moments in Chinese history, slides especially prepared for the lectures, new views on race and gender in the making of China, intellectual and scientific revolutions in the seventeenth century, and literature and society in premodern China.

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History 263. Discovering America: Atlantic History I, 1492-1607.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the formation of the early Atlantic world from the voyages of Christopher Columbus to the expeditions of Walter Raleigh. This course compares English French, Spanish, Portuguese and native American experiences. Special attention is given to the letters and diaries of Columbus, Cortes, Cartier, Gilbert, Raleigh, and Champlain, as well as a selection of Indian texts. The course highlights integrative themes common to European, African and Indian encounters with and in the Americas, encounters that knit together a laarger, newer community: the exploring, mixing and settling of peoples and races; the emergence of viable transs-Atlantic commercial systems; a groping towards a balance of power among European states; and the exchange and advancement of knowledge. No prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 266(366). Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars – real and imagined – have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 274/AAS 230. Survey of Afro-American History I.

U.S. History

Section 001 – African American Literature in the U.S., from 1773 to 1912.

Instructor(s): Julius Scott (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 285. Science, Technology, and Society: 1940 to the Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Steneck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The enterprise of science changed dramatically after WWII, both intellectually and socially. The consequences of being able to split the atom and, more recently, to engineer biological blueprints have made science literally a life and death activity that touches every human. This course will explore the growth and implications of scientific and technological development from the end of WWII to the present. There will be two lectures and one discussion per week. Students will work in small groups on one problem during the term, e.g., energy, pollution, global warming, health care issues. Each group will hand in a jointly written report at the end of term and present a class report. Three or four books will be assigned reading. Students will be expected to make use of e-mail and conferencing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 286/Rel. 286. A History of Eastern Christianity from the 4th to the 18th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course traces Eastern Christianity from the 4th through the 18th century. A broad survey course aimed at undergraduates of all concentrations, there are no prerequisites; the course focuses on both Church history and theology. It begins with Constantine's conversion and traces the growth of the Church, the rise of monasticism, the creation of the creed (the Councils of Nicea and Chalcedon), and the secession of the Eastern churches (Coptic and Syriac), the role of religious pictures and the iconoclast dispute and relations with the West (Rome) which were frequently strained before the official break in the 11th century. We cover the conversion of the Slavs and the eventual formation of independent Slavic national churches. We treat the fall of the Byzantine and Medieval Slavic states to the Turks and the position of the Orthodox under the Turks. Attention is also given to the Russian Church from the 9th century to the Old Believer schism and Church reforms of Peter the Great. Readings are varied. There is no textbook. A relevant paper of the student's choice, an hour exam, and a final are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 318. Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl31800.html

In 1945 Europe lay in ruins. Entire cities had been leveled by the destructive powers of modern warfare, and the cultural, political, and social norms of the pre-war world had been shattered. What made such violence possible, and how did ordinary men and women experience it? History 318 will explore the ideological, political, economic, social, and cultural forces that both caused and were destroyed by the savagery of the early 20th century. We will not only study the origins and consequences of World Wars I and II, but also the ways in which everyday life was transformed during this turbulent era. We will look at Europe from the inside (by studying relations of class, gender, and nationality), and from the outside (by tracing the ideology and practice of imperialism). Grading will be based on a midterm and a final exam, on active participation in a discussion section, and on two take-home essay assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 320. Britain, 1901-1945: Culture and Politics.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria through the Second World War, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state; the First World War and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subjects; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist governments in Europe; and the experience of the Blitz and World War II. Students will be asked to think critically about the various means by which national and personal stories are constituted, repressed, re-imagined, and deployed in debates about the meaning and uses of the past. Readings and other course materials will include autobiographies, novels, films, and photographs, and class sessions will include extensive discussion. No previous knowledge of British history will be assumed or required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 332/REES 395/Poli. Sci. 395/Slavic 395/Soc. 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 346/NR&E 356. Environmental History and the Tropical World.

Section 001 – Meets with RC Social Science 306.001 and SNRE 556.001.

Instructor(s): Richard Tucker

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/snre/nre/356/001.nsf

Domestication of major ecosystems of the tropics and subtropics since 1500. Exploitation of natural resources and indigenous cultures by colonial regimes and local elites, linked with the global economy. Environmental change under post-independence governments, corporate capitalism, and the subsistence demands of rising populations. The environmental demands of affluent consumer cultures. The rise of modern systems of tropical resource conservation and wildlife protection.

We will survey major patterns of ecological change in the modern world, and the forces which have caused them. We will focus primarily on the tropical world, and the long-term impact of colonialism and the global economy of tropical natural resources. We will consider how the accelerating domestication of a formerly wild planet has depleted genetic resources and cultural diversity in the name of science and Progress. We will study the environmental impacts of consumer cultures and accelerating population, as two aspects of North/South relations. In the process we will discover various systems of resource management which have been relatively sustainable. An hour's discussion each week will give us the chance to examine the issues and materials critically, and relate them to our broader concerns as world citizens at the turn of the millennium.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 350/Great Books 350/Amer. Cult. 360. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mills Thornton (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 368/Amer. Cult. 342/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 370/WS 370. Women in American History to 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the history of American women – as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes, and racial, regional and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early seventeenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African-Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 374/Amer. Cult. 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Lassiter

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 379/RC Soc. Sci. 379. History of Computers and Networks.

U.S. History

Section 001 – Meets with Information 528.

Instructor(s): Paul Edwards (pne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. Familiarity with computer concepts helpful but not required. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.si.umich.edu/~pne/rc379.htm

See RC Social Science 379.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 382. History of the Jews from the Spanish Expulsion to the Eve of Enlightenment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey major trends in Jewish history in European and Mediterranean lands from c. 1450 to c. 1700. The themes of this course include: developments in Jewish communal structure, familial structure; the question of "marrano" or converso identity; the relationship of Jews and Judaism to the Catholic Church and to the events and ideas of the Reformation; the economic, political, and theoretical relationship between the Jews and developing European states and the Ottoman empire. Specific topics to be addressed include: the impact of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain and Portugal; the emergence and spread of Lurianic Kabbalah; the development of the ghetto in the Italian states; the emergence of Jewish mercantile communities in Northern Europe and in the "New World"; the "court Jews"; male and female expressions of Jewish piety and folk-religion; the Sabbatian movement; and rabbinic authority. Readings will include two seventeenth century Jewish autobiographies (of Leone Modena, a Venetian Rabbi) and of Gluckl of Hameln, a Jewish merchant woman of Hamburg); an early modern printed work describing the customs of the Jews of Italy, and other primary sources and selections from recent scholarship. Prerequisites: none, but Judaic Studies 205, History 110 or History 381 are advised.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 or 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 386. The Holocaust.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will attempt to answer some of the most vexing historical problems surrounding the Nazi regime's systematic extermination of six million Jews during World War II. For example: What role did Christian hostility to Judaism play in the growth of genocidal racism in Germany? How did German political traditions prepare the way for Nazi authoritarianism? Why did the German people acquiesce in the Nazi program of mass murder? Why did the American and British governments refuse to come to the aid of European Jews? How did European Jews behave in crisis and extremity? Was the Holocaust "unique"? There will be a midterm, a paper of 10 to 15 pages, and a comprehensive final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 391. Topics in European History.

Section 001 – Empire of Nations: The Soviet Nationality Problem, 1917-1991.

Instructor(s): Yekelchyk

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 001 – From Pan-Africanism to the Black Atlantic: What's in a Name. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001 and History 593.001

Instructor(s): Penny von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 002 – Urban Social Movements and the Pursuit of Racial Equality. Meets with American Culture 301.016.

Instructor(s): Scott Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/393/002.nsf

This course will focus on sources of urban protest and activism among African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos from World War II to the present. We will analyze the roots of structural inequality in American cities with particular emphasis on the study of race, class, and gender.

A combination of primary and secondary readings, as well as multimedia sources, will provide the bases for comparing strategies employed by different social movements and evaluating their impact upon history. Such historical knowledge will help students to better understand the significance of contemporary debates concerning affirmative action, hate crimes, immigration, and police abuse.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 003 – American Indians and Film. Meets with American Culture 496.005.

Instructor(s): Liz Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 496.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 004 – Culture and Power in Latin America: Civilization and Barbarism in Historical Consciousness. Meets with Cultural Anthropology 356.001.

Instructor(s): Julie Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 356.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 394. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

History 396. History Colloquium.

Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators by Override Only. Check for Override Information At History Dept. – 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 20.

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 – The Harlem Renaissance. Meets with American Culture 496.003.

Instructor(s): Anderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A writing intensive seminar aimed at senior History concentrators, this course will explore topics in African cultural history in the decades between the World Wars. The term "Harlem Renaissance" is most often used to refer to the explosion of African American literary, artistic, and musical activity in the 1920s. We will approach the Renaissance through recent historical scholarship but focus most of our attention on primary literary texts by Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and others, non-fiction by W.E.B. DuBois, Alain Locke, and others, and the music of Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, and others. After outlining the cultural and political roots of the 1920s Renaissance, we will study examples from literature, non-fiction, music, and art to retrace historic Renaissance debates about the battle against racism in literature and popular culture, competing visions of black nationalism, the legacies of folk expression and the African cultural inheritance, and the political function of African American art. We will also examine the aftermath of the Renaissance and the widespread radicalization of African American artists and intellectuals on the 1930s.

Requirements will include a total of at least 30 pages of writing (including revisions) and the timely reading of several hundred pages per week. It is expected that students will have done prior related coursework in twentieth-century African American cultural history or literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 – Disease in Medieval & Early Modern Europe.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This colloquium will consider the question of disease in premodern European history by focusing on the Black Death of 1347/8 but considering also the cycles of plague that then regularly struck Europe until the eighteenth century. Apart from the demographic and social effects of the plague, some of the questions to be considered are: (1) medical treatment and the state of medical knowledge during the period; (2) developing ideas of hygiene and public health, along with the policy and politics of quarantine; (3) posited relationships between diseases of the body and diseases of the soul; (4) artistic and cultural responses to plague. Readings will be a mix of original sources (e.g., plague chronicles and diaries, religious and medical tracts, public health legislation and debates) and of analytic works which try to assess the effects of terrifying cycles of plague on the society of Europe and upon its religious beliefs and cultural practices. During the course of the colloquium, students will write a number of short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 – Madness in Britain, 1400-1900.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ever since the publication of Michel Foucault's Madness and Civilization (1961), mental illness has been recognized as a subject of intense historical significance. Foucault demonstrated that it is not only fascinating initself but that it may be used as a mirror that reflects the most fundamental changes in culture and society in uniquely revealing ways. A mass of scholarship extending and challenging his conclusions has followed from Foucault's example. Paradoxically, even as Foucault's book has achieved almost Scriptural authority across several disciplines, the new historieis of mental illness has demolished the model of change that he proposed. His notion that madness is a uniquely revealing topic has beenamply confirmed, but almost al of his main generalizations about the phases of its development and their causes have been proven fundamentally wrong, despite the brilliance of his arguments. Much of the best of this new scholarship has concerned Britain, and it is evident that a new framework is necessary to synthesize its findings. This work raises fundamental new insights into the history of medicine, religion, magical beliefs, gender and social control as well as mental illness itself, and it also requires new thinking about historical methods and theories. This course will explore the history of madness in a post-Foucaultian context. It will concentrate on how mental illinesses were defined and how the mad were treated in Britain, for that is the nation aboutwhich we now possess the largest and most comprehensive collection of newer studies, but it will also integrate complementary new wowrk on Germany, France and America. Our aim will be to "rewrite" Madness and Civilization in the context of British history and to begin the process of revising it for other European nations. Students will be asked to read and discuss historical works by scholars such as Roy Porter, Andrew Scull, Erik Midelfort and Michael MacDonald. They will also write a term paper (of 20-30 pages) on an aspect of the history of mental illness in Britain based mainly on primary sources. The research and writing of these papers will be closely guided by the instructor and the GSI, so that students will be able to improve their skills in research and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 – Court Narratives: Gender and Justice in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on a series of trials and other matters of law that illuminate the history of women and gender relations in the United States. Beginning with prosecutions involving slander, rape, infanticide, illicit sex, heresy, and witchcraft in 17th-century British and Spanish colonies and ending with 20th-century legal battles over employment discrimination, reproductive rights, sexual harassment, and surrogate mothering, our approach will be to examine judicial proceedings as sites of competing "stories in the law" told about gender, race, class, and ethnicity. A primary concern will be how these stories have been narrated in and beyond the courtroom. We will also ask what they tell us about continuities and changes in constructions of womanhood and manhood, in the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and in the relations of power within families and among different groups of men and women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 – History and Memory in 20th Century Germany.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the interplay between historical events and the ways in which they were remembered, debated and memorialized in popular and political culture. Our time period begins with the end of the First World War and concludes with the fall of the Berlin wall and German reunification in 1989/90. The Nazi period and the Holocaust will define many of the crucial questions we explore: how, for example, were politicized memories of the First World War mobilized by the National Socialists, and by their opponents, during the 1920's and early 1930's? What place did the Third Reich and its crimes occupy in the national identities and political cultures of the two Germanies after the Second World War and in newly-reunified Germany since 1990?

Prerequisites: a basic familiarity with the historical events of these periods (History 419-421, History 386, History 318, History 111 or comparable courses.) History concentrators with background and in need of an ECB colloquium have priority in enrollment. Enrollment limited to 15. Three-hour weekly meeting includes two-hour group instruction and discussion, followed by writing workshop.

Course Requirements: include a series of short papers and one longer paper (12-15 pages) at the end of the term (no examinations); occasional oral presentations, regular participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 006 – Childhood and Society in Modern Europe, 1750-1980.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 397. History Colloquium.

Enrollment Limited to Senior History Concentrators by Override Only. Check For Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 26.

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 – History & Film: Reimaging Britain, 1945-2000.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to use British cinema between the 1960s and 1990s to explore changing ideas and representations of the national past. The most obvious vehicle for images of national history in this sense is a certain kind of British costume drama, either based on classical literary adaptations (Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, E.M. Forster) and sometimes literary lives (Oscar Wilde, T.S. Eliot, the Bloomsbury set), or else using past times (like the Victorian and Edwardian eras) for its settings. In the United States, PBS Masterpiece Theater has been a big outlet for British productions of that kind. Since the 1980s, this genre of "heritage films" has also made it onto the big screen. However, films don't need to be deliberately or self-consciously "about" the past, in terms of their direct subject matters and settings, in order to make an argument about history. Films set in the present can also be full of historical meanings and citations, constructing and reconstructing images of the more recent and deeper pasts while telling their stories.

During the past few decades, against the backcloth of the end of empire, industrial decline, and sweeping social and political changes, British public memory has been decisively remade. This began with the radicalisms of the 1960s and early 1970s, which undermined many of the existing images of national history; it continued through the right-wing patriotic backlash of Thatcherism (1979-97); and it was finally confirmed via the triumph of New Labour under Tony Blair. Through bitterly conducted political battles, as well as through the debates of historians, cultural critics and other intellectuals, British national history has been repeatedly drawn upon and fought over, becoming central to the languages of political debate. The national past served as an archive of images, arguments, prejudices and stories, whether in idealized or negative ways. The imperial past, particularly the British colonial presence in India; the Victorian era of British industrial strength and world dominance; the place of the Second World War; the social and cultural conservatism of the 1950s – all these periods have been drawn into the political fray.

Films, whether produced for TV or cinema, provide excellent opportunities for considering these matters. They provide one of the most important media bringing dominant ideas and assumptions into wider circulation. Films tell stories about the meanings of being British in the past and present, while simultaneously allowing different versions of those stories to be told. Many films deal directly with the major social, cultural and political issues. Perhaps more interestingly, however, films can also open windows onto the nature of contemporary longings and anxieties – about gender and sexualities; about families and childhood; about race, immigration and citizenship; about class, work and social inequalities; about the quality of everyday life; and about democracy, the nature of the state, and the changing shape of politics. Films make meanings in all of these ways. They make their own arguments, sometimes very deliberately and coherently. Through films, audiences can recognize themselves in familiar and conventional ways. But viewers can also make their own meanings and read films "against the grain" of the intended message. There can never be only a single or uncontested meaning in the images and stories presented by a particular film. In fact, the most interesting films – and perhaps the most successful ones – are often those opening the subtlest spaces for different meanings to be drawn.

This course will focus on the issue of the national past. We will explore the complex ways in which the chosen films construct particular images and arguments about the relationship between the British past and the British present. We will begin with four films from the 1960s (This Sporting Life, If…, Performance, and The Go-Between), which capture different aspects of the social, cultural and political changes of that time. We will continue with two films made in the mid 1980s in the early years of Margaret Thatcher's reign (Ploughman's Lunch and Mona Lisa), which present critiques of the kind of society Britain seemed to be becoming, in each case with strong references to the recent past. These will be followed by three films with explicitly historical perspectives on the early twentieth century (Howard's End), and the immediate postwar years (Plenty and Distant Voices, Still Lives), expressing mixtures of nostalgia, hostility, and regret. The course will end with three films set squarely in the "present" of the late 1980s and early 1990s (Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, The Crying Game, and Life is Sweet).

The films are as follows:

  • This Sporting Life (Lindsay Anderson, I. 1963)
  • If…. (Lindsay Anderson, 1968)
  • Performance (Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg, 1970)
  • The Go-Between (Joseph Losey, 1970)
  • The Ploughman's Lunch (Richard Eyre, 1983)
  • Mona Lisa (Neil Jordan, 1986)
  • Howard's End (James Ivory, 1990)
  • Plenty (Fred Schepisi, 1985)
Distant Voices, Still Lives (1988)

Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (Stephen Frears, 1988)

The Crying Game (Neil Jordan, 1992)

Life is Sweet (Mike Leigh, 1990)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 – Uncle Tom's Cabin in 19th Century America.

Instructor(s): Oz Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Published in 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin was arguably the most widely read novel in 19th century America. The notion that the book triggered the Civil War (so famously mused Abraham Lincoln when he greeted the author Harriet Beecher Stowe at the White House in 1863) was somewhat of an exaggeration. However, the novel certainly refashioned and intensified the debate over the institution of slavery, making the actual circumstances of slaves in the south a topic of a heated controversy throughout the 1850s. A great abolitionist asset, Uncle Tom also propagated its own set of racial prejudices. In addition, the books publication unsettled views regarding the relationship between authorship and authority, fact and fiction, truth and opinion. This seminar is dedicated to this singular book. We will examine its structure, language, and other literary devices employed by Stowe. But our main concern is to situate the making of the novel in the political, social and cultural environment of mid-19th century America and, conversely, to examine the book1s effects on American history. The book1s articulation of contemporary perceptions of race, work, gender and family will be explored as well as also its links to different works of fiction and non-fiction and to antebellum science, reform, journalism and religion. Finally, we will follow the novels lingering presence in American culture and race relations – the peculiar career of "Uncle Tom" himself and the latter-day reincarnations of Stowe's novel in the movies and other forms of popular culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 – The Mughal Empire.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

This course covers the history of the Mughal Empire in India from 1525 to 1856. It examines the military, economic, social, and cultural underpinnings of this Muslim-ruled state, which formed the background and context for the rise of modern Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan. Attention will be paid to the institutions of rule established by the Great Mughals, but also to the social history of the period, including peasant rebellions, village and urban life, Muslim movements, and Hindi-Muslim relations. The impact of Western trading companies, the rise of the British East India Company, and the supplanting of Mughal rule by British rule will be analyzed. The history of post-Mughal successor states, such as Awadh, which entered into a subsidiary alliance with the British, will also be examined. The course requires a weekly 2-page précis and participation in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 2 for history majors; 4 for all others.

History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 005 – The Gilded Age. Meets with American Culture 496.001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look at the Gilded Age (1877-1900) through the themes of industrialization, urbanization, and immigration. We will explore the rise of the city, the influx of immigrants into the U.S, Westward expansion, and U.S. imperialism. We will focus heavily on the themes of race, class, and gender in order to come to a more nuanced vision of this epoch in U.S. history. Reading will be heavy: one monograph a week (200-300 pages) and students will be asked to write weekly response papers as well as a longer paper towards the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 408. Byzantine Empire, 284-867.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A lecture course which provides a survey of the history of the later Roman Empire from the reforms of Diocletian that paved the way out of the crisis of the third century, through Constantine's move east and the conversion to Christianity (entering the Byzantine period), Justinian, Heraclius on through the Amorion Dynasty which came to a close with the murder of Michael the Sot in 867. The course will stress political history, giving considerable attention as well to religious history (conversion to Christianity, the great theological disputes over the relationship between God the Father and the son as well as the relationship between the human and divine natures in Christ culminating in the Church councils of Nicea and Chalcedon, the rise of monasticism and Iconoclasm), administrative reforms (Diocletian's and Constantine's reforms, the reforms of the seventh century culminating in the Theme system), demographic changes and foreign relations (Goths, the Slavic and Bulgar invasions, relations with the Bulgars, relations with the Persians and Arabs in the East and later with the Franks and Charlemagne). No background is assumed. Requirements: a midterm written hour-exam. One ten page paper and a final examination. Paper topics are tailored to individual interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 416/German 401. Nineteenth-Century German and European Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 401.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 433. Imperial Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Deborah Field (debfield@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/433/001.nsf

A history of Russia from Peter the Great to 1917, with emphasis on society – transformations and continuities in elite and popular cultures, autocratic and opposition politics, economic and social structures. Students will read and interpret political documents and fiction, in addition to secondary works. Requirements: participation in discussions, two short essays, midterm exam, final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 or 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 440/ACABS 413/Anthro. 442. Ancient Mesopotamia: History and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nyoffee/syllancient%20mesop-2000.htm

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 413.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 446/AAS 446. Africa to 1850.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/history/446/001.nsf

This course explores the pre-colonial African past, from the early prehistory of the human to the eve of Europe's second great wave of empire when Africans across most of the continent became the subjects of European colonies. The second European empires (from roughly the 1870s through the 1960s) have had profound influence on Africa, yet important global forces were affecting Africa long before the mid-nineteenth century. Moreover, the shapes that Africa would take under the influence of European empire would be strongly conditioned by the course of change on the continent before 1850 and by the nature of society and culture on the continent stretching back for more than a millennium.

The major objective of this course is to establish a deeper understanding of the forces, institutions, and processes that underlay the experiences of Africans and the African continent before 1850. The post-1850 history of Africa will be taken up by Professor Diouf during the second term, in History 448.

Over the past five decades, the reconstruction of the African past-from archaeological evidence, from oral testimonies, and from historical linguistics and from other methods and materials-has been one of the most remarkable departures in the historical sciences, taking the professional craft of history beyond its signature: the written document. Of course, the peoples of Africa long enjoyed a rich knowledge of their past and a deep engagement with history, well before the emergence of the professional practice of history on the continent. And a critical factor in the shaping of Africa's futures has been the production and control of histories for and about the continent.

Albeit the breakthroughs in the reconstruction of Africa's past, and albeit the importance of historical knowledge to Africans, Africa is substantially "known" today-by those outside Africa, by the international press, by the aid and development and the human rights communities-through a shallow and relatively presentist understanding, partially based on direct observation, partially based on persistent and pervading myths and fantasies about Africa, myths that have their own significant histories. The course will encourage a more complex understanding of Africa and a sense of African history as a work-in-progress.

The course will explore

  • Africa's earliest history
  • The histories and fates of pre-colonial empires, kingdoms, and states across the continent
  • The shapes of African culture and society
  • The Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on Africa
  • The rise of Islam in Africa
  • The relations of Europe and Africa before the second European empires
  • Basic conditions of life in pre-colonial Africa
  • African modernities before "modernity"

Among the main questions, the recurrent questions: Africa's Past: How has it come to be known, understood, comprehended, explained? Africa's Cultures: The utility of models of continuity and change? Africa's Civilizations: The ethics of autocracy and domination? Africa's Connections to the Wider World: Determined or negotiated? Africa's Economies: The fates of value and equity in extractive economies? Africa's Resources: Whose materials, to what use, to what effect?

The course will be organized around lectures, readings, discussions, the viewing of several films from Africa.

Course requirements:

  1. Participation in class discussion. 15%.
  2. A critical book review of a monograph from the "recommended list"-three to four pages. 25%.
  3. Midterm exam. 25%.
  4. Final exam constructed, in essay form, around the "recurrent questions" above. 35%.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 451. Japan Since 1700.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers: (1) the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere; (2) Japan's coerced entry into the world market; (3) the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia; (4) the rise of social protest and mass culture; (5) political reaction and militarism; (6) defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation; (7) postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony; (8) myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society." Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings, discussion panels, in-class midterm, final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

Section 001 – Modern Southeast Asia I: Colonialism.

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrazek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The major theme of this course will be "modernization" of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand,Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Burma) – a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources.

The emphasis, in the fall academic term, will be on the colonial period, 1870-1945. Students, in the next academic term, can choose to take a sequel to the course, which will deal with the period of post-colonialism and of independent Southeast Asian states since the Second World War to the present. Individual students' interest in particular region and period will be fully supported.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 455. Classical India and the Coming of Islam 320-1526 A.D.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Trautmann

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The greater part of this course concerns itself with the history of ancient India in its classical age beginning with the empire of the Guptas, and attempts to analyse the components of Indian civilization in its classical form (kinship, caste, political organization, religious institutions). It then examines the Turkish invasions and the challenges posed by Islamic rule. This is a lecture course, and it presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergrads and grad students are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 460. American Colonial History to 1776.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Colonial America" focuses on the people of the time, often encountered speaking in their own voices, and on their broad cultural characteristics and problems as settlers first encountered the New World and its inhabitants and matured into colonial societies. Through weekly discussion of primary documents and historical studies, we will explore some of the key themes of early American history from the vantage point of the historical actors themselves: the clash between Puritanism and capitalism; the confrontation between Native American and European cultures; the emergence of a native gentry in the colonial South; and the enslavement of Africans and their transportation to the New World. History 160, or a similar survey course in early American history, is strongly recommended thought not required. Students will be expected to read closely each week (average 150 pages/week), take a midterm exam, and write several short essays and a long research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 466. The United States, 1901-1933.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with the progressive era, the era of World War I, the 1920's, and the Great Depression. The emphasis is on political history and foreign relations, but considerable attention is given to social, cultural, and economic factors and to the position of minority groups and women in American society. There is no textbook for the course, but several paperbacks are assigned. Course requirements include a midterm, a final examination, and a paper. History 466 is a lecture/discussion course. Undergraduates electing this course must register for Section 001 and one discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 473/Asian Studies 473/Korean 473. Modern Korea.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry Em (henryem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/korean/473/001.nsf

See Korean 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 476/Anthro. 416. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Scott (rjscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the colonial period in Latin American history from the initial Spanish and Portuguese contact and conquest to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. It will focus on the process of interaction between Indians and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of colonial societies in the New World. Thus we will examine the indigenous background to conquest as well as the nature of the settler community. We will also look at the shifting uses of land and labor,and at the importance of class, race, gender, and ethnicity. The method of instruction is lecture and discussion. Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final. Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources. The text will be Burkholder and Johnson, COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 485/German 465/MEMS 475. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helmut Puff (puffh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 465.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 494/Econ. 494. Topics in Economic History.

Section 001 – Economic History of Japan

Instructor(s): Gary Saxonhouse (grsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 494.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 526. France Since 1870.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended as an introduction to the major themes and debates in the literature on contemporary France. We will give critical attention to a number of themes that have long shaped the literature on modern France – the paradox of chronic political upheaval in a context of apparently stable social structures, for example, or the vexed issue of France's economic "backwardness" and the particularities of industrial development in this (until recently) rural society. We will also consider some of the more recently popular themes – the social and political mobilization of economically and socially disadvantaged groups (peasants, women, workers, disgruntled strata of the middle classes), the ways in which various strands of the revolutionary tradition have shaped French politics on the right and on the left. Finally, we will give comparative attention to the different historiographical traditions that have organized research on the two sides of the Atlantic, of which the very different understandings of gender and women's history, or the very different approaches to colonial and post-colonial history, form but two of the most salient examples.

There are no prerequisites other than curiosity about France and things French. Open to undergraduate and graduate students alike, the course will mix lecture and discussion format. There will be two or three short (4-6 page) papers during the term and a take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 537/AAPTIS 463. The Near East in the Period of the Crusades, 945-1258.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adam Sabra

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

History 551. Social and Intellectual History of Modern China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ernest Young (epyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/HS551/index.html

In this course we will treat a selected set of major aspects of Chinese history from the 18th century to the present. A central task will be to sort out the roots, processes, and consequences of the Chinese revolution. We shall examine the testimony of conservatives as well as revolutionaries, of Confucians as well as Marxists. Among the topics will be: secret societies and religious cults; trends in Confucian thought and the role of popular culture; Christian missions and imperialism; nationalism and ethnicity; women's liberation; cultural iconoclasm and neotraditionalism; Marxism and the Chinese peasant, Maoism and its debunking. Previous familiarity with the broad outline of events will be useful but is not required. Readings will be drawn from analytical literature and translated documents. Participants will be asked to write two papers and take a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 – Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health. (2 credits). Meets with Women's Studies 698.002. Meeting Dates Are: Thursdays 9/28, 10/5, 10/12, 10/19, 11/16 At 2-5 p.m. and Tuesdays 10/3, 10/10 At 5-8 p.m. and Friday, 10/20 At 10 A.M.-1 p.m. (Drop/Add deadline=October 5).

Instructor(s): Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu) , Timothy Johnson (trbj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This one-credit mini-course will meet jointly with a one-month intensive rotation for fourth-year medical students, and these medical students will also be taking a Rackham Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Body entitled "The Body and Its Disciplines" (799.570, sec. 002/ German 379.499, sec. 001/ Comp. Lit. 354.750, sec. 001), taught by Prof. Silke-Maria Weineck. "Narrative, Case Files, and Women's Health" will consider issues of medical practitioners' stories and patients' illness narratives as revealed in diaries and ethnographic, medical, and social work case files. The approach will be historical, anthropological, multicultural, and biomedical. For each of the four weeks, we will consider a different body of doctor stories, illness narratives, and/or medical case files related to a particular theme in women's reproductive health. We will (1) go back in time to at least the 1920s through an Ann Arbor obstetrician's patient notes; (2) go explicitly transcultural by looking at women's health care among non-white, non-Anglo women in this country and/or to a non-Western region of the world; (3) have one session where we read recent social work and medical case files and discuss them with some of the health professionals who were involved; and (4) consider the new kinds of narratives and case files that will emerge as reproductive technologies continue to move in a high-tech direction.

This course is intended for Ph.D. students in LS&A, Nursing, and Public Health, especially those who are enrolled in the Rackham-sponsored seminar on the Body. Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with the permission of Prof. Nancy Hunt (nrhunt@umich.edu).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Upper-level undergraduates may enroll with the permission of Prof. Hunt

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 001 – Gender and Power: Historical and Comparative Perspectives. Meets with Sociology 495.001.

Instructor(s): Sonya Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 495.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 002 – Introduction to German Studies. Meets with German 540.001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 003 – Domination – Occupation – Collaboration: People's Everyday in NAZI-Germany and in Occupied Europe, 1939-45.

Instructor(s): Alf Luedtke

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Domination inside Nazi-Germany was not merely the result of SS terror and propaganda machinations by Dr. Goebbels or Leni Riefenstahl, for that matter. Across the board of society the vast majority of Germans accepted if not actively cooperated in racist political practices. They involved themselves in the brutal exclusion of "non-Aryans" as they actively fought the wars of expansion and extermination after 1939 across Europe.

While recent research has unravelled the web of "domination as social practice" inside Germany, a similar debate is only to begin as to occupied nations/societies in Europa. Here, Nazi approaches varied fundamentally. In Poland and the USSR the effort was to destroy national/cultural fabric (subsequently annihilating at least parts of the respective populations). In other parts of Europe, however, occupation aimed at eliciting cooperation.

To what extent did these policies work? When it comes to forms and degress of accomodation the specifices of the occupied societies are crucial. And: Where to draw the line between "structural accomodation" – in order to survive – and more "deliberate" ones (Ph.Burrin)? Or should one distinguish passive accomodation from more active collusion/cooperation/collaboration?

This course shall examine these questions focussing on Poland and the USSR, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, and Greece.

Literature: Philippe Burrin, France Under the Germans: Collaboration and Compromise (New York: New Press 1969).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 592. Topics in Asian History.

Section 001 – History of Burma.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the history of Burma, from the earliest times to the present day. It seeks to chronicle the origins of Burmese civilization and to identify elements of continuity and innovation during the long monarchical period, the colonial era, the post-war independence era, and the current period of political turmoil. The course will attempt to identify unique elements of Burma's remarkable Buddhist culture, but at the same time to place Burmese development in a Southeast Asian and Eurasian context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 – From Pan-Africanism to the Black Atlantic: what's in a Name. Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001 and History 393.001

Instructor(s): Penny von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 593. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 – Capialism, Industrialization, and Community Formation in Antebellum New England. Meets with American Culture 496.004 and 601.001.

Instructor(s): Francois Weil (fweil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on social change in antebellum New England. We shall examine the impact of capitalist development and industrialization on the region's social and cultural fabric. Among the topics will be : migrations (internal and international), gender relations, civic identities, and cultural tensions. The course will combine lectures and class discussions with a hands-on approach of primary sources. Attention will be paid to historiographical, theoretical, and methodological issues. Each participant will be asked to write a critical review and a final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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