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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars (Division 445)

This page was created at 4:04 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

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Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Goals and Objectives:

  • Development of team building skills through class participation in pre-organized group community building and community service activities.
  • Development of exemplary leadership skills through individual participation in community building and community service activities.
  • Learn how to navigate the university and academia by providing students an opportunity to develop professional relationships with RFs.

Student Responsibilities:

  • Participate in no less than seven hours of non-LHSP organized service activities.
  • Attend monthly LHSP 100 meetings.
  • Write weekly e-mail journal entries.
  • Fill out Student Evaluation Form.
  • Write 2-3 page essay describing non-LHSP organized service activity experience.
  • 42 hours of total work for LHSP 100.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 Halloween Party

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Think back to when you were 9 or 10 years old, and Halloween was approaching. Do you remember the thrill of planning your costume, and the excitement at the prospect of all that candy? This is your chance to help provide an amazing Halloween experience for elementary school kids. Students in this section will plan and host a Halloween party and a trick-or-treat session through Alice Lloyd Hall for children from nine local elementary schools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 002 Boar's Head Festival

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Boar's Head Festival is a medieval celebration of Winter Solstice and, in more modern parlance, a means of celebrating and rejoicing in the end of the term. The responsibility for maintaining this Lloyd Hall tradition is not taken lightly, so beware! Students in this section will plan the menu, decorations, and entertainment for the hall-wide dinner that takes place just before exams start.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 003 Habitat for Humanity

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever lain in bed on a stormy night and contemplated what your life would be like if you were homeless? Or thought about the issue of affordable housing in our society today? Or maybe just had a dream to wear a tool belt and really get to build something? Habitat for Humanity is an international, non-profit organization working with volunteer builders and donors to create decent and affordable houses for those in need of shelter. Students in this section will participate in the construction of a house in Washtenaw county under the guidance and leadership of Habitat for Humanity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 004 Northwood Elementary School.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever thought of yourself as a mentor? Here is an opportunity to make a difference in a child's life by volunteering at their school and effecting change through the provision of tutoring help, classroom mentoring, play, and friendship. This section will serve as role-model mentors to kids through participating in their school day experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 005 K-grams

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

K-grams (short for Kids Programs) is a completely student led and initiated volunteer program in its third year at the University of Michigan. The main vehicle is a pen pal program between elementary "little kid" students and college "big kid" students. Designated residence halls on the U-M campus are paired up with a local elementary school, with approximately 100-150 kids in each hall writing a letter once a month. You will engage with the younger kids as well as help plan a fun and educational project between college and elementary students. (This is a very simple yet rewarding way to be involved with Lloyd and the community.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 100(160). Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 006 Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 101. Academic and Professional Development.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP 101 is intended for first year students and is designed to prepare them for success both at the University and in the professional world. The focus of the course is upon the great variety of resources available at the University of Michigan for academic and professional growth and development, and its aim is to show students how to navigate the multitude of options available to them, and how to use them to best advantage. Examples of available resources include the library system, the Media Union, various advising and counseling services, museums, opportunity for internships and for study abroad, the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program, and the Office of Career Planning and Placement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course emphasizes argumentative writing and related skills that are needed for success in college work. Various themes are determined by the instructors who come from many different academic backgrounds. This course makes full use of the close living-learning environment of the Lloyd Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 001 You Don't Choose Your Family? Critical Perspectives on Families Past and Present.

Instructor(s): Natalie Rothman (nrothman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nrothman/LHSP125/

How do you feel about living with your parents in your thirties? What do you think of same-sex families? Do you want to have children? How would you balance career and homemaking? These are very personal questions. Yet our answers depend not only on personal inclinations, but also on values and customs shared by others in our society. What can different perspectives (economic, psychological, sociological) tell us about our personal experiences? What can different families teach us about the things we take for granted?

In this course we will discuss families using insights from different academic disciplines, such as anthropology, sociology, history and culture studies. We will also look at the ways other cultures have defined what is a family and what are its obligations to its members. Throughout the course you will write about topics such as the fate of love letters in the age of e-mail, state support to single mothers, and TV families and their relationship with reality. By the end of the course, after writing four papers and revising your drafts, you will develop both substantial writing skills and the theoretical tools that will allow you to examine your personal experience critically in the wider context of contemporary and historical societies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 002 Beyond O.J. and Nicole: The Realities of Sexual and Domestic Violence.

Instructor(s): Melissa Dreyling (mdreylin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Everyone has his or her opinion about the guilt or innocence of O.J., but how many have thought about the complicated dynamics of domestic violence that led to the trial of O.J. Simpson?

In this course we will examine the cultural and legal history of domestic and sexual violence and explore how this type of violence affects families, communities, and individuals. We will also explore a variety of issues that many people identify as the sources of sexual and domestic violence like pornography, prostitution, media representations of women, and gender roles of men and women.

Many sexual assaults that happen on college campuses involve acquaintances and go unreported. We will explore questions such as why women are not reporting assaults. We will also look at how other factors, like alcohol, play a role in campus assault and examine some of the myths about sexual assault. For example, is acquaintance rape just a matter of women not being forceful enough when saying no?

Assignments will include five papers and selected reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 003 The Sixties: Sex, Drugs, Rock-and-Roll... and Revolution.

Instructor(s): Joe Gonzalez (joegon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~joegon/thesixties/

What did your parents do in the Sixties? Did your father serve in Vietnam or dodge the draft? Did your mother take birth control pills? Did they experiment with drugs or go to Woodstock? In this course, you, a child of Baby Boomers, will explore the world your parents encountered when they were your age: the protests, the war... even the sex, drugs, and music of the Sixties.

People in the Sixties, however, did a lot more than smoke pot, have sex, and listen to The Doors. They also made a revolution. Women, African-Americans, Gays, Latinos, even college students just like you, organized and demanded the same rights as everyone else. We will read their stories to find out what it was like to be a man or woman fighting for equality. We will also listen to the experiences of real people who will come to our class.

We will also write. You will write five papers in two drafts. You will also be expected to participate in class discussions about the material and the writing of other students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 004 Money Grubbing or Tree Hugging: The Intersection of Business and the Environment.

Instructor(s): Teresa Buckwalter (tbuckwal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you want to make a lot of money in your lifetime? Do you also want to protect the world from deforestation, global warming and wildlife extinction? Are you afraid that you have to choose one path over the other: Scrooge or the unibomber? Well, you don't./

In this class we will explore the often-misunderstood relationship between our economy and the environment. You will come away with a better understanding of the economic system you life in, as well as a better understanding of how this system impacts the environment. Discover that you, as a consumer and moneymaker (eventually), have more power than you think. We will examine current ideas in the environmental movement, such as "sustainability," and find out the strengths and weaknesses of the sustainability movement that promises to create jobs, reduce taxes, increase social spending, AND restores the environment.

We will explore these ideas through writing, discussions and creative thinking. You will undertake your own study, evaluating to what degree a local business or organization is economically viable and environmentally sustainable. You will have the opportunity to create a business idea of your own and compose five essays. you will not only come away with better writing skills, but also better speaking and computer graphic skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 005 Personal Environmental Activism

Instructor(s): Lani Pascual (dpascual@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dpascual/lhsp125.005/

"On the morning of August 16, 1996, Greenpeace divers slipped into Seattle Harbour carrying chains to wrap around the propellers of five U.S. factory trawlers which fish off the northwestern shores of Washington State. While the divers were in place twelve more protesters atttched themselves to a floating boom and formed a human barricade."

In this course we will explore the personal reasons that inspire ordinary people to work on environmental causes from recycling to ecoterrorism. We will also discuss the many definitions of "environmentalism."

We begin by reading Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring," the book which launched the environmental movement, and end with a class survey project that explores why people do or do not consider themselves environmentalists. Not only will you leave the class with a greater understanding of how you can personally affect your relationship to the environment, but you will also leave with a strong understanding of college writing. We will compose five critical essays on the impact of environmentalism on policy, populations, groups, and individuals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 006 Rebellion, Reflection, and Revenge

Instructor(s): Cecilia Infante (ceciliai@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sometimes we feel so emotionally explosive about an issue that we find ourselves in the heat of discussion standing dumb and silent, while our mind privately races to defuse the opponent and defend our beliefs. And for some people, when words don't come and time and tempers are short, the only option is violence. If you've ever wished you could return to a moment in an argument you would have won if only you'd thought of the right counter-point; if you've ever been misunderstood and had no opportunity to explain yourself then you should know how powerful and satisfying the reflection and revenge of writing can be.

This class is for passionate people who want to defend their ideas but have difficulty finding the right words. Like any means of effective communication, it's the ability to forge our own language that translates into the political force of self-definition and self-defense. And writing is most effective when it violates the laws of time and space by continuing to champion our ideas long after we're dead and gone.

We will study a vast range of celebrated writers who use writing as a means of rebellion, reflection, and revenge. We'll also explore historical and contemporary uses of the essay to challenge status quo thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 007 "The Quest for a Real Tribe": Breaking Down Stereotypes about Africans

Instructor(s): Jordan Shapiro (jors@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you remember the mass slaughter in Rwanda when you were a kid? Did you see two primitive tribes with strange names, the Hutus and the Tutsis, killing each other? Maybe you learned that these two tribes have hated each other for centuries like the Serbs and the Croats, or the Israelies and the Palestinians? If that's how you remember things, you are not alone. When most Americans hear the word "tribe", they think of uncivilized, poor people living in villages without any clothes on. And, the logic goes, when you hear about "tribal warfare", it is just primitive people acting irrationally: there's nothing you can do about it, that's simply how "they" behave.

Our class will explore these Western stereotypes, which so many Americans have about Africans. Students will probe the assumptions most of us have about tribes and discover how weak a foundation they have in reality. We will draft and compose five essays, read various descriptions of African tribes, including depictions of village life and works about European colonization in Africa, and view coverage of the recent Rwandan tragedy. Armed with realistic, more complex understanding of the changing affairs that govern tribal definition and behavior, students will be able to think beyond the simplistic, popular representations of Africans we so often see in America. On a broader level, "The Quest for a Real Tribe" will provide students with tools for questioning accepted truths about the way any society or community works. Students will also discover how changing events and circumstances often determine the way people think about their own ethnic identity and affiliation including their own.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 008 Reasonable Doubt

Instructor(s): Jeremy Robinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"A recent survey indicates that 68% of all college freshmen have smoked marijuana."

"Polls indicate that George W. Bush has taken the lead in New Hampshire."

"Violence in schools has risen 1.3% since the Columbine shootings."

Every day we are assailed with information, from the news media, advertising even from professors. But what does it all mean? A survey of whom? How do the polls obtain thair data? How do you calculate the rate of violence in schools? Asking questions such as these is not simply blind rejection of authority. Educated skepticism is based on asking the right questions to recognize false arguments, identify meaningless statistics, and uncover biased information. It is a vital tool for analyzing and evaluating information effectively.

This course will introduce you to methods of critical thinking and show you how to apply them in a variety of situations in and out of the classroom. These methods will help you to become a better reader; one who knows how to pick out useful information, view it with a critical eye, and retain the most important points. They will help you become a better writer; one who can identify relevant information, decide what data to include, and present it convincingly. These are tools for survival, and will change the way you view information, both in college and in the world beyond it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 009 John Wayne meets GI Jane: How do we View the Military?

Instructor(s): Bjorn Hansen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Was World War II the last noble war the United States fought? Is today's military isolated and at odds with 21st century America? Was the draft a fair way to train an army?

In this class, we will look at four main issues regarding the military: women in the military, integration of the races, a draft versus volunteer military, and the potential split between military and civilian societies.

America has a military which was integrated racially a decade before the rest of the country, sent an entire generation to college, and offered a middle-class living to Americans deprived of economic opportunities. At the same time, it is said to breed an air of contempt for civilizian life and values. It is a culture where anti-gay rhetoric and violence are still tacitly endorsed among the ranks. The military, at one time or another, has been all this and more. How has the perspective of the military changed over the past fifty plus years?

Our class will learn about the changing perspectives of the military through assigned readings, class speakers, taped interviews, and moves like Born on the Fourth of July, Saving Private Ryan, Full Metal Jacket, and The Longest Day, among others.

The goal of this class is to gain an understanding of how society and the military interact and perceive one another. Grades will be based on five, five-page papers, including one revised paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 010 Writing for Life.

Instructor(s): Susan Bryan (sebryan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tired of writing what the teacher wants to hear? Wondering how writing skills will fit into the rest of your life? This class will focus on the roles writing will play through our lives. After writing for the workplace and the public realm, we will explore the more personal aspects of writing, where the processes of writing help us explore and articulate our own thoughts on the meaning of life. You will discover how writing helps us think; you will also explore, in an essay to future generations, how writing enables us to leave our legacy.

Writing is a personal endeavor, but it is also public, as the published ruminations of writings show us. We will read examples of each genre of writing, critique them, and then write five argumentative essays. Everyone will be expected to contribute to class discussions about assigned readings, and the work of other students. Critical and constructive critiquing skills will be emphasized. You will each develop an individual voice as you consider the multi-dimensionality of your life as you document through writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 Painting and Drawing.

Instructor(s): Anne O'Kane (okane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides you with two things: studio experience in drawing and painting, and an opportunity to explore the concepts and language of art criticism. Not only will you become familiar with the tools and techniques of painting, you will explore your thoughts and feelings about art in a series of art critiques designed to bolster your knowledge on the subject of art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 150. Focused Studies.

Section 001 You Are Getting Sleepy: Using Self-Hypnosis to Better Your Life. (One credit). (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Megan Spangler (maspangl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you remember those cartoons where the hero has a little angel and a little devil sitting on his shoulders telling him to do the exact opposite things? Whether you know it or not, that same conversation is going on around you quite a bit. This is what happens when your conscious brain and your sub-conscious mind can't agree on something.

This class in Hypnotherapy will help you listen in on those conversations so that you can make your choices with as much information as possible. Hypnotherapy is the art of using hypnotic trance to make changes for the better in one's behavior and outlook in life. Hypnotherapy does this by allowing your conscious and sub-conscious to talk to one another, in a way that you will remember both sides of the conversation.

This class will teach you the basic techniques of achieving the trance state for yourself, and how to build a trance experience to effect the specific changes you wish. These tools can be especially valuable in the high pressure University setting in which you now find yourself.

Learn easy stress management and relaxation; cure insomnia and test anxiety; boost your memory and study skills. These are only a few of the options at your command when you know the basics of Hypnotherapy. The interests of the class will determine most of the in-class examples, so come with your ideas and questions, and you can learn what you want to learn.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Into the Light: Black and White Phography Revealed. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Lisa Powers (lspowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Learn the basic concepts, as well as more in-depth techniques, involved in black and white photography, with the goal of enlivening student's personal vision. Students take photos on particular assignment themes and use various techniques to inspire them. Brief, in-class writing assignments based on photographs help foster discussions about photography and outlooks on the community. Artistic expression is emphasized along with technical mastery, but individuals decide the particular direction they wish their work to take.

Requirements: It is essential that you provide your own 35-mm camera, preferably a SLR (point-and-shoot cameras are NOT acceptable.) Flash optional but not necessary. If you have any questions about what is an acceptable camera, please email Lisa Powers, instructor, as soon as possible at lspowers@umich.edu or call (734) 996-3583.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Out of the Dark: Black-and-White Film Developing and Printing. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Lisa Powers (lspowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Learn the fine art of black and white film developing and printing in a darkroom. Basic concepts about film chemistry and development of film into negatives are covered, as well as how to make contact sheets and prints from those negatives. Refinement of skills involve dodging and burning prints, use of filters, and special effects such as solarization, double exposures, and hand-tinting photographs. Lab time assigned, for students to complete their work. The goal of the class is to create polished, professional, and display-quality artwork, which can then be exhibited in Lloyd Hall. Class will decide on topic or topics to explore.

Requirements: Photo assignments and attendance. Class time is more focused on darkroom results and thus students are required to have a solid understanding of photography concepts and practices as a prerequisite for this course.

It is essential that you provide your own 35-mm camera (flash optional but not necessary), preferably a SLR (point-and-shoot cameras are NOT acceptable.) If you have any questions about what is an acceptable camera, please email Lisa Powers, instructor, as soon as possible at lspowers@umich.edu or call (734) 996-3583.

Film, darkroom paper and chemicals included in the lab fee ($45.00): film (x3) ($14.00); paper ($16.00); chem/supplies ($15.00).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Experimental Art I. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Brian Tubbs (tubbsbl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to overcome our inhibitions to making art with creative energy. You will build your confidence to explore the unfamiliar and learn technical skills that will enable you to make unique works of art and to better understand others. Here you can open your imagination and learn to trust your creative intuition. We will investigate street art, performance art, mural painting, graffiti, and conceptual work. One paper will be required. Attendance is mandatory, and assignments will not be accepted late. Wear clothes you can get paint on so we can have some fun.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 004 Sex: What's your Position? (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Jonah Burakowski (jonahb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The last two decades have brought remarkable advances in our knowledge of human sexuality embrace this knowledge as our sexuality is one of the keys to the human condition. Preface to Masters and Johnson's report on human sexuality.

Few topics related to the issue of the human growth and development are more shrouded with mystery and curiosity than sexuality. Human sexuality is also often couched in terms of morality. The purpose of this class, however, is not to shape your morality but rather to increase your understanding of human sexuality, so you can make well-informed decisions concerning sexual behavior.

Because sexuality figures so prominently into our life cycle, the class will explore the historical roots of Western sexuality, from the Judeo-Christian tradition to U.S. sexual codes in the late twentieth century. We will consider the social basis of human sexuality by examining sexual learning and how sexual scripts vary across gender, as well as trends in sexual attitudes and behavior, including sexual orientation. In addition we will discuss physiological aspects of sexuality, such as human sexual response and expression, while looking at sexuality within the context of sexual responsibility and protecting oneself from AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 005 Jewelry Making and Metal Working. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Anne O'Kane (okane@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001 Advanced Leadership and Service Learning

Instructor(s): Cecilia Infante (ceciliai@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP 200 for sophomores invites students to consider the personal, political, and philosophical roles of community service today. Through a series of Sunday dinner discussions, analytical and reflective writing assignments, and exploratory community service, students will examine and assess the claims made by both advocates and detractors about the value of community services. Students will also perform and reflect upon a service activity of their choosing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 201. Advanced Academic and Professional Development.

Section 001 Advanced Academic and Professional Development

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. Required of all second-year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 101. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Whatever else four years in college seem to be, they resemble the experiences of immigrants. There is a new land, new customs, a language perhaps familiar but full of confusion (and on occasion betrayal), and frequent reminders of a lost past. In these meetings and projects we will use the idea of immigration into adulthood and explore some of the professional and personal routes through the maze. Because this is an election year, and because elections bring out both the ridiculous and the sublime in American society, politics and politicking will be important elements in our projects and explorations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 229/English 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Lloyd Hall Scholars 299(200). Independent Study.

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability

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