Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Fall '00 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session on wolverineacccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)

This page was created at 4:05 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Political Science

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Political Science.

To see what has been added to or changed in Political Science this week go to What's New This Week.


Poli. Sci. 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Wingrove (ewingrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to some classic accounts of politics in the Western tradition, and to some critiques thereof. Readings include: Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Arendt, and King. Among the themes to be addressed: What, if anything, makes state authority legitimate? Do people benefit from political participation, or is it inevitably corrupting, confusing, irritating, and/or tiresome? What constitutes a public, rather than a private, concern?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton (hantonjr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. The kinds of questions considered might include the following: What impact do interest groups have on governmental policy? Are there real differences between the two major political parties? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? How do members of Congress decide how to vote? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive.

We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria.

Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts and ideas central to social science efforts to understand politics in an international setting. As such, it stresses theory and inference and uses historical anecdote and contemporary events only as illustrations to illuminate behavior in larger classes of events. The course begins with consideration of who the actors in world politics are, and what the international system they interact within looks like. We then turn our attention to specific types of interactions between states. We will consider both economic interactions and military interactions. Grades will be based on written examinations, paper assignments and such additional assignments as may be made by individual section leaders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

Poli. Sci. 300. Contemporary Political Issues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/syllabus.html

Learn about: (1) important social, economic, and political issues of the day, including how an issue becomes "important". (2) the political values and attitudes of the American public; (3) the conduct of political campaigns and elections. Scholarly readings are intermixed with articles about current issues, and our discussions often move freely from assigned readings to the latest news.

Although intended primarily for non-political science concentrators, this is a serious course for serious students. If you'd prefer to slouch in the back of the room and observe the class disinterestedly, we'd prefer that you take some other course. The readings are extensive, and occasionally difficult. You will be expected to: stay current with the readings, attend lectures faithfully, participate in sections actively, and engage in additional learning activities outside the classroom. You will write papers and take essay-style exams. If you do all that, we're sure that you'll learn a lot about politics and policy in America.

Recommended: at least one prior political science course. Grades are based on a no-curve system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 312. Freedom of Speech and Press.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lee Bollinger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the constitutional right of freedom of speech and press in the United States. Various areas of law are examined in depth, including extremist or seditious speech, obscenity, libel, fighting words, the public forum doctrine, and public access to the mass media. Classes are conducted according to the law school model, with readings focused on actual judicial decisions and students expected to participate in discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Poli. Sci. 395/REES 395/Hist. 332/Slavic 395/Soc. 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 400. Development of Political Thought: To Modern Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is two-fold: (1) to give students a sense of the history of political philosophy from the ancient Greek period to the end of the sixteenth century; and (2) to help students become aware of the complexities and assumptions entailed in the articulation of a coherent political theory. We will be reading the works of such major political philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Thomas Aquinas, and Machiavelli. We will be concerned with such issues as the relation between nature and convention, the sources of legitimacy, the role of the individual in the political community and the value and purpose of political life. Readings will be from primary sources. Class meetings will include both lectures and discussions. Course requirements will include two exams during the term and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 Modern and Post-Modern Critique

Instructor(s): Claudia Ritter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Critique is a concept that profoundly shapes modern thought. It distinguishes modern from pre-modern theory and has become a central motive of postmodern approaches. With Kant and Marx modern theory took over the task to critically reflect society and politics, but also worldviews as well as scientific concepts and methods. After a brief introduction to the critique through Enlightenment, the critique of Enlightenment, and to Marxist theory and its revision, the course will focus on early and current critical theory and on postmodern concepts in the twentieth century. Readings will include, among others: Adorno, Horkheimer, Kirchheimer, Neumann, Habermas, Foucault, Leford, Mouffe. We will reconstruct how understandings of critique inform twentieth century social and political theory and consider implications for concepts of the state.

There will be an oral midterm and a written final exam. Requirements include several short written assignments, regular attendance, reading of the texts, and active discussion participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 406. American Political Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will take as its basis the study of canonical texts in American political thought. The ideas that have shaped American politics are heterogeneous and conflicting. We will analyze these tensions through the close reading of primary texts. We will consider the major conceptual foundations of American politics: democracy, freedom, limited government, individualism, toleration, and civil and political equality. These concepts will be considered in the light of other important traditions that have shaped American citizenship. These other traditions include the emphasis on local communities, the work ethic and capitalist labor market organization as the twin foundations of class mobility, race based oppression, and gender inequality in the public and private spheres.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to think, speak, and write critically about the core concepts that shape the American political system and make up the American tradition in political thought. They should have a good understanding of what these concepts are, where they orginated, and how the work together, and against each other, to form a dynamic, evolving national discourse. An analytic approach will be emphasized. By the end of the class, students should be able to discuss the nation's ongoing process of "re-founding", the often controversial process of national re-defining and re-imagining done in relation to national principles. Exploring contests, conversations, and debates within and about the texts we read, we will traverse the intellectual terrain that is the foundation of our national self-understanding.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 411. American Political Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Keep abreast of Campaign 2000: Take Political Science 411, American Political Processes. We will study U.S. campaigns and elections, public opinion, political parties, interest groups and the mass media. We will discuss how race, gender, education, and class affect our politics. If you have already taken PS 111, Introduction to American Politics, do *NOT* take this class. If you have not taken PS 111, then you should take this class, PS 411, and its companion course, PS 410, in winter 2001. PS 411 looks at American political behavior, while PS 410 is devoted to the study of the institutions of American government: Congress, the presidency, the courts and the federal bureaucracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 413. American Constitutional Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Engel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in political science and political theory concerned with law. The course focuses on one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental principles.

It addresses: (1) the role of language in grounding the legitimacy of the political order; (2) the ways (if any) in which that language is translated into reality; and (3) how those translations are justified. In connection with those general themes, we shall focus on three additional questions: (1) WHAT is the (or a) Constitution; (2) WHO are to be its authoritative interpreters; and (3) HOW are those interpreters to go about the business of interpreting? We shall take up topics such as judicial review, interdepartmental relations, federalism, the power to wage war, and constitutional crisis.

Assignments will include participation in a Moot Court. Some background in American history, American institutional politics, or political theory is desirable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 417. Legislative Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the legislative process, with special emphasis on the United States Congress. Among the major topics addressed will be: the theory and practice of representation; Legislative elections; coalition-building; committee policy making; floor voting decisions; Legislative-executive relations; legislative rules and procedures. Given that the course will be offered in an election year, one of our primary emphases will be on U.S. congressional elections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Young (mmyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 429. Seminar in Urban Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science (urban). (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The seminar in urban analysis will analyze and critique major issues in urban politics including but not limited to: African American and Latino political incorporation in cities, class and leadership in the South, coalition politics, mayoral leadership strategies, the politics of the sunbelt vs. the frostbelt, the presidency and urban policy, social programs and the urban crisis, urban immigration issues, machine politics. The class format will be a combination of both lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 440. Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with the tools necessary to design and conduct basic comparative research and an opportunity to complete an individual or group research project. In the first half of the semester we will explore the major questions in the field of comparative politics and examine several approaches that offer competing answers to these questions, including theories of political development, institutions, political culture and rational choice.

We will also study examples of empirical research that have utilized these theoretical approaches. In the second half of the course, students will design and execute a research project on a question of their own choice. Basic principles of research design, data acquisition, and methods of analysis will be covered. Students will also be introduced to a variety of major social science databases and instructed in the use of statistical software.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 441. Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/PS441F98.html

This course examines the politics of developed democracies: i.e., those where commitment to relatively free-market capitalism and to relatively liberal democracy are no longer the subject of any serious political debate or conflict. This is not a course in current or past events in these countries. Rather we analyze certain systematic, (social) scientific regularities which may be evidenced in the politics of advanced capitalist democracies. In this positive (not normative) analysis, the focus is on political parties, elections, patterns of participation and of political conflict, public policy, and political economy. Course grades will be based upon short-paper writing, a final examination, and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 444. Government and Politics of Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course is the politics of the states that emerged from the Soviet Union, especially Russia and the member nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Although the emphasis is thus on the present, the ongoing political and social transformation of the region will be examined within the broader context of Russian and Soviet history. We will explore how Gorbachev's attempt to restructure Soviet socialism was partially a consequence of the development of the Soviet system since the 1917 revolution, but also a response to mounting social, economic, and political problems. Many of the problems of communism that existed prior to 1985 political corruption, economic irrationality, and inter-ethnic conflict, to name only a few were not solved, but aggravated by Gorbachev's reforms.

The collapse of the Soviet Union initiated a second period of rapid change, in which the former republics have struggled to establish viable states and economies. Although several republics have made considerable progress toward democracy, continuity of Soviet institutions, behavioral patterns, and culture has impeded the performance of new democratic institutions, and continued economic decline threatens their existence. As a means of conceptualizing the dynamics of post-soviet politics and identifying possible solutions to ongoing crises, the course will draw upon comparative theories of democratization and institutional change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 445. Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course traces the political development of the socialist countries of Eastern Europe from revolution through reaction, to attempts at reform, and to the post-Communist period. After examining the political cultures of the region, the course analyzes the Stalinist period, attempts at de-Stalinization, and the search for political alternatives.

The interaction of rulers and the ruled is examined by studying the elites, ethnic and social groups, public opinion and dissent in the area. We study attempts at political and economic reform, the fundamental changes of 1989-1990, and the present state of politics in Eastern Europe. This lecture course requires a final examination, one or two short papers, and a choice of midterm examination or term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Poli. Sci. 448. Governments and Politics of Latin America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140 or 440; or a course on Latin America elected through another department. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/448/001.nsf

After an analysis of the common historical background, this course will consider the current characteristics of democratic government in Latin America, its achievements, shortcomings and perspectives. Particular attention will be paid to the effect of parties and other institutional factors on the stability and quality of democracy in the region. The cases of Argentina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Mexico, Colombia and Venezuela will be examined closely.

Evaluations will be based on one book report (about 2000 words long), one take home writing assignment, and one final paper (5000 words) analyzing the current state of democracy and elections in one Latin American country.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 451/Judaic Studies 451. The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in East European and/or Jewish history, and Comparative Politics is recommended. (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the political and cultural history of modern East European Jewry over the last hundred years. By doing so, we aim to illuminate interrelationships between ethnicity, politics and culture. We study how East European Jews developed means for dealing with states and societies that regarded them as alien; how states dealt with this ethno-religious minority; and, more generally, how states manage multiethnic societies. Ideologies, movements, parties and institutions are analyzed, partly through literature, folklore, music, and art. Requirements include midterm and final examinations and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 459/AAS 449. African Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the institutions, processes, and ideas that shape political life in Africa. The first part of the course provides some historical background and considers the effects of environment on political structure, the differences between segmentary societies and kingships, and the effects of international contact on the character of the state. The second part explores some of the bold initiatives of independence leaders and their consequences. The third part explores contemporary struggles for democracy and the management of elections. A final segment of the course addresses several important policy issues, including war-peace transitions and government effectiveness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Wayman (fwayman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fwayman/460f00.htm

This course will address a range of issues which confront state leaders as they seek to ensure their country's military security and economic development in a competitive international system. Special attention will be given to foreign policy problems confronting the U.S. in the Cold War and post-Cold War eras. The course will be conducted largely as a lecture with some opportunity for discussion. Students will be graded on the basis of three in-class exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 463. International Organization and Integration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Harold Jacobson (hkj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 160. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/ps463.html

This course deals with ways of managing issues arising from increasing interdependence among nation-states. It examines the role of international organizations in the contemporary global political system. It considers the historical development of international organizations, their political processes, and their activities. It explores the consequences of the growth of international organizations for the global political system, particularly the extent to which international integration is being achieved. Primary attention is devoted to international governmental organizations such as the agencies of the United Nations system and the European Union, but international non-governmental organizations are also considered. Responsibilities of students taking the course for credit include: (1) studying the assigned readings and participation in class discussions; (2) writing four papers of no more than 2,500 words in length; (3) writing a midterm examination; and (4) writing a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 or 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 465. Political Development and Dependence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dave Stuligross

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/465/001.nsf

This lecture course will expose students to some of the main debates in the field of economic and political development and underdevelopment. The emphasis is on the kinds of questions scholars have asked about economic and political development and the ways they have set about answering them. The reading covers many classic texts in the field but also gives students some ideas about the current frontiers of research on the political economy of development. The intellectual history of "development" as a field is explored through the origins and trasnformation of three key institutional ideas: the state, the national market, and the international economy. These general arguments will be applied to case material from South Asia, East Asia, Latin America, Africa, and the Middle East.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 469. Politics of International Economic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madeline Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 160. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course compares political and economic ways to understand international economic relations, and studies connections between domestic and international politics. It provides an overview of different theories of international political economy (IPE) and focuses on developments and institutions in the contemporary world. Among the subjects covered are the European Union and its new currency (the Euro), the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank, international trade relations and the World Trade Organization. We discuss several current developments in international economic relations, among them new protectionism, transatlantic trade relations, international monetary cooperation, and capital crises. There will be a total of three examinations (no final) and two short papers. Note that this class occasionally meets for double sessions on Fr (instead of M/W).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 475. Russian Foreign Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course focuses on the international behavior of the Soviet Union and its primary successor state, Russia. The course will cover U.S.-Soviet relations, the rise and fall of the Soviet empire in Europe, and contemporary Russian relations with the United States and Soviet successor states. Particular emphasis will be placed on the link between Russian elite and mass attitudes and foreign policy choices. Recommended as background: PS 160, CREES 395. There will be a take-home midterm paper that follows the format of review articles in the journal World Politics, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 476. International Relations of the Middle East.

Section 001 Middle Eastern and World Affairs.

Instructor(s): Aharon Kleiman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The ill-defined, expansive "Middle East" has served throughtout history as an important arena for balance-of-power politics, sometimes as a power center in its own right, but primarily as a subordinate regional sub-system in the the modern period inaugurated by Napoleon's short-lived occupation of Egypt in 1798. Notwithstanding the end of the Soviet-American struggle for mastery east of the Mediterranean, the Middle East remainis of major importance, both because of its negative potential for destabilization and its positive value as a source of world oil, strategic nexus and laboratory for modernization as well as democratization.

Class lectures and discussion are aimed at focusing upon these and other patterns, while analyzing such potent forces as political Islam, regional militarization, ethnic and interstate conflict, and the hegemonic role of the United States in Middle Eastern affairs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~yanchen/econ483/econ483.html

See Economics 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ted Brader

Prerequisites & Distribution: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/483/001.nsf

In this course we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. There will be two exams (short answer and essay), and one short paper. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 488. Political Dynamics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Will a single presidential candidate emerge from the primaries or will we have a brokered convention? Do arms races lead to war? Why do popular movements get started, grow, and then often subside without accomplishing their goals? Is the earth growing warmer and what should be done about it politically? Questions of this kind are not easily answered with unaided intuition. Social systems grow organically, and their parts interact in different ways at different times.

Feedback loops cause many reforms to have the opposite of the intended effect. The purpose of this course is to bring systems thinking to bear on political dynamics. A few simple but powerful mathematical ideas will be taught and applied to a variety of political issues. Students will learn to experiment with dynamics and forecasting on personal computers, using primarily graphical methods. The course is meant to be experimental and applied rather than theoretical. A prerequisite of one prior course in political science is suggested. (Achen)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 Conflict Resolution in the Middle East. (? credits.)

Instructor(s): Aharon Klieman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Prospects for averting, defusing and terminating intercommunal as well as interstate disputes depend upon understanding both the procedural and the substantive side of peacemaking, peacekeeping and post-settlement peace-building. Must all wars end? Just how indispensable are third-party intermediaries the so-called "honest brokers"? Is there a way of identifying "ripeness"? Are "hurting stalemates" the key to diplomatic breakthroughs? Exactly how many peace constructs, or conflict exit strategies are there?

These and other aspects of conflict resolution are discussed through reference to the theoretical literature, and by drawing upon the cumulative experience with war and peace in the conflictual Middle East region, ranging from Cyprus to the Palestine problem, and from Lebanon to the two Persian Gulf conflagrations (Iran-Iraq; Kuwait).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 003 The Third World Security Predicament (? credits).

Instructor(s): Dave Stuligross

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Theories of international politics have been informed primarily with reference to (and in an attempt to understand) developed countries. This seminar will focus directly on the ways in which the other 150 states perceive their security requirements, how they act on their perceptions, and why. It appears that, frequently, different states "similarly situated in the international political system" respond differently.

This seminar will develop comparative analytical tools institutional competition, resources, legitimacy, and more that will enable students to explain such variations. This kind of analysis requires deep research into one or a few countries; the geographic focus of the course will be determined largely by the interests of the seminar participants, whose research, presentations, and discussions will constitute a substantial portion of the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term with a supervising faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Poli. Sci. 493. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a seminar for seniors who are working on Honors theses. Students must be admitted to the Honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Section 001 Work Ideology and Citizenship in American Political Thought

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore the intersection of ideology on labor organization and democratic citizenship debates in America. One might argue that the course exists at the border of normative political theory and normative political economy. Students will be expected to seriously engage the reading material and come to class prepared to contribute to an analytic discussion. Students will write seminar papers based on the course readings. The texts we will read explore these central questions: Do earners make better citizens? Do particular forms of labor market organization and/or engagement in wage labor lead to enhanced citizenship and/or a more robust democracy? What is the role of the state in shaping labor market conditions? Can the state foster better, more democratic forms of citizenship through state intervention in the work-place?

We will begin with three framing texts: Judith Shklar's American Citizenship, Marx and Engles' Communist Manifesto, and Hannah Arendt's The Human Condition. These authors offer competing paradigms for understanding how labor market participation conditions political action.

Next, we will move to the American founding period and consider how Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson theorized the relationship between labor, economic organization, citizenship, and the role of the state.

Then, we will look at some American "outsider" voices: writings from the labor movement, William Julius Wilson on race, labor and citizenship in contemporary urban America, and Gwendolyn Mink and Nancy Fraser on the unpaid labor of care work.

Finally, we will explore several contemporary thinkers who advance arguments about labor force participation and citizenship. Specifically, we will look at writings by Lawrence Mead, Arlie Hochschild, Benjamin Barber, and a co-authored text by Harry Boyte and Nancy Kari.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 001 The Politics of Higher Education.

Instructor(s): Edie Goldenberg (edieg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will focus on selected topics of great concern to the U.S. higher education community today, such as public attitudes toward universities, sources of funding for higher education, athletics student athletes or pre-professionals in training, affirmative action in admissions and hiring, information technology and the virtual university. Students will be expected to participate actively in class discussion, write a series of short papers and one term paper, and make an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 002 Decision-Making in Organizations

Instructor(s): Martha Feldman (msfeldma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/496/002.nsf

This course presents and explores theories of organizational decision-making and various features of the context in which decision-making takes place. We start by considering the rational theory of decision-making and then several alternatives to this theory. We then consider the perception of risk (as influenced by individual cognition, cultural and structural features of the decision-making context), the effects of national and/or ethnic culture and organizational culture on decision-making and the effects of hierarchical and groups relations on information exchange and, ultimately on decision-making. At intervals throughout the course we discuss how the theories we are discussing play out in an actual situation. The Challenger Launch Decision by Diane Vaughan gives us a basis for such exploration. Excerpts from the book provide information about the case so that we can discuss the relationship between the theories we are learning and what happened in that case.

Assignments include reading several articles or book chapters per week, writing three short (500-1000 words) papers, one longer (2000-3000 words) paper and giving 1 oral presentation based on the longer paper. Activities in the course include discussion (readings and short discussion papers written by students will provide basis for discussion), one video-tape and two in-class exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 003 Women and the Law.

Instructor(s): Engel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will examine the legal status of American women from the adoption of the Constitution to the present. The course will analyze the ways in which law is used to construct gender and gender relationships. Some of the topics that will be discussed include equal protection, family law, sexual harassment, domestic violence, wage and employment discrimination, family planning as well as others.

Students will be required to read and analyze judicial opinions, statutory law, and scholarly commentaries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 004 Foreign Perspectives on American Politics: Ideology, Race, Class, and Mission.

Instructor(s): Brooks

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the earliest years of European colonization in what would become the United States, foreigners have read various meanings into the American experience. America and the American experience constitute one of the defining poles of modern history, a fact that is attested to by the enormous volume of writings on American politics and society by foreigners.

This course will examine foreign perspectives, past and present, on several important features of American politics. These include reace relations, wealth and class, political culture, and America's role in the world. We will cover some of the classic writings by foreigners on these themes, including observers of the first rank like Tockqueville, Bryce, Myrdal and those of the seond rank like Beauvoir, Martin Amis, Frederick Engels, Werner Sombart, and George Grant. This will be followed by an analysis of contemporary foreign perspectives on American politics, based on recent writings in Britain, Canada, Australia, and France.

Students will be required to write a 20-25 page paper related to one of the themes of this course, linked to an in-class presentation based on the paper. Weekly participation is an essential component of the course, worth 25% of the grade. There will be 40-50 pages of readings per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 Religion and Politics in the U.S. and Latin America

Instructor(s): Daniel Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar examines the workings of religion and politics in the United States and Latin America. The focus is on the ocmparative analysis of contemporary movements and issues. Specific topics will include the civil rights movement and liberation theology, religon and community action, religously inspired social movements, "cults" and the treatment of "cults", religious issues in political discourse, the emrgence of religious competition religion and democracy requirements include several short papers and a long paper which can be either an orignal research paper or a review essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 002 Topic?

Instructor(s): Jose Molina (jmolina@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Poli. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 001 The Global System

Instructor(s): J. David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/498/001.nsf

The objectives of this course are to provide the advanced undergraduate student with (a) an understanding of global, demographic, social, technological, economic, and political trends; (b) alternative interpretations of policies to deal with these trends; (c) methods by which these interpretations can be compared and tested against the empirical evidence; and (d) the ability to evaluate past policy decisions and propose future ones. We are also interested in our ability to express orally and on paper the concepts, hypotheses, realtionships, and methods used in pursuit of the substantial objectives; as a famous grammarian put it, "if you don't write, good, you don't think good!" It all goes together: careful conceptualization, close reasoning, procedural clarity, and effective communication. Course requirements include three papers and class participation. We will use two or three texts and read independently in the scholarly journals. There will be three written assignments and no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 002 The Laws of War

Instructor(s): James Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The laws of war are treaties and informal understandings that regulate conduct during wartime. The course will focus on the practical politics that such regulations create. To study such politics, we will cover some international law, a fair amount of history of what happens during wars, and analytical political science on why some agreements work and others do not. We will also discuss some political philosophy on conduct during war. As a seminar, the course requires participation in class discussions, several short papers, and one final research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 003 Political Economy

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Poli. Sci. 514. The Use of Social Science Computer Programs.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Won-Ho Park (wpark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 499. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/polsci/514/001.nsf

An introductory course that introduces new graduate students to the use of computing resources at Michigan, including discussing the statistical packages that are used in introductory methods courses. Topics considered include how the computer can be used to analyze social science data. Instruction will be provided in the use of statistical packages, conferencing, and electronic mail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 529/Public Policy 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stanley Sedo (sasedo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 529.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 585/Public Policy 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lin (annlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 585.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 585/Public Policy 585. Political Environment of Policy Analysis.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Dan Carpenter (dancarp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 585.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course. The form is available in 7609 or 7621 Haven Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 003 Topic? (?credits)

Instructor(s): Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

University of Michigan Political Science department invites junior and senior political science students to apply for placements with legislators (Democratic/Republican in Lansing), Michigan Senators and Representatives; the Michigan Executive, the Courts, the Bureaucracy; interest groups; legal profession; private sector (governmental affairs offices of the major auto companies); international (Ontario Provincial Legislature, Canadian Consulate); and the Media. Three hours of political science credit (involves 16 hours per week in placement, five seminar sessions with Director, journal assignment, and interview).

What do I get out of the Political Internship program? (1) Preview a career in the political world. (2) Visible, unique work experience for your résumé. (Job interviewers always take note of Political Internships.) (3) A letter of recommendation for Law/Graduate School or job. (4) Networking and leadership training experience. Personal interview is required, contact Helen M. Graves, Ph.D., 5629 Haven Hall, (734) 647-7995 (office) or call (734) 994-5563 (home). E-mail: hmgraves@umich.edu. First come, first serve basis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Page


This page was created at 4:05 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.