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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

This page was created at 4:05 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Psychology

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PSYCH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Psychology.

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The Department of Psychology offers four introductory courses: Psychology 111, Psychology 112, Psychology 114 and Psychology 115. Any of the four courses meets the prerequisite requirement for the concentration and serves as a prerequisite for the area introductory courses. Psychology 114 and Psychology 115 are Honors introductory courses open to Honors students and others with permission of the instructor.

Department of Psychology disenrollment policy for Psychology 111, 112, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, and 390. Students must attend discussion section by September 17 or contact the GSI, or they may be disenrolled from the course.


Psych. 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114 or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/111-001/

This course is a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover many topics, including perception, the nervous system, learning and memory, psychological development, intelligence, and psychopathology. There will be discussion sections offering students an opportunity to examine and discuss lecture material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Travis Seymour (nogard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114 or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/111-030/

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology. During the term we will cover such topics as perception, development, physiology and behavior, personality, and social psychology. In addition, we will look at some of the metaphors and principles that have guided research and theory within psychology (e.g., the mind as computer; the role of the unconscious; the person as pleasure seeking; and the role of nature and nurture). Grades are based on two exams, an optional final, and assignments in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 060.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114 or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 112. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Mind and Brain.

Instructor(s): John Jonides (jjonides@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for both Psych. 112 and 113; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 114, 115, or 116. (4). (NS). (BS). Psych. 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students interested in the relationship between behavior and brain (that is, between the functioning of the mind and the functioning of the brain). The course will focus on specific phenomena of the mind and examine the brain mechanisms that underlie those phenomena. The topics to be covered include memory, motor functions, perception, language function, hemispheric differences in the brain, and various pathologies of cognition. Note that the course expectation is that students will learn a good deal about the anatomy and functioning of normal and damaged brains. Evaluation will be based in part on weekly quizzes, an examination, and participation in discussion section activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Morris (tmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover such topics as physiology and behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, states of consciousness, learning and memory, thinking, intelligence, motivation and emotion, development across the life-span, personality, stress and adjustment, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy, and social psychology. The text for the course is Psychology: An Introduction (10th ed.); there is also an optional course pack. Grades are based primarily on three exams and an oral presentation, though consideration is also given to attendance at and participation in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Marita Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychology covers a tremendous variety of topics and that the approaches to studying these topics are equally numerous.

In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics: Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely on a biological level (the brain, evolution and the biological basis of behavior, behavioral genetics), a "basic processes" level (exploring research on perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), on a level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally on a "social" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and intergroup processes).

In Part 3, we will look at one specific problem, namely the student's transition from high school to college, and how this problem can be approached on a biological level (stress and infectious diseases), on a basic process level, on a level of looking at one person (the personality characteristics that might make an adjustment to a transition easier) and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to transitions in our life?).

The text used is Gleitman, Psychology Norton. Additional reading will be available on a course website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 115. Honors Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Theresa Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113 or 114. (4). (NS). (BS). Psych. 115 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 115 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a broad introduction to the study of modern Psychology through lecture and discussions, with an emphasis on the natural science approach to the study of behavior. This approach emphasizes the biological (genetics, evolution, and nervous system organization) underpinnings of behaviors ranging from learning and memory to the motivation to care for oneself (eating, sleeping, etc.) and engaging in social behaviors (finding mates, parenting, fighting, etc.). Grading is based on two hourly exams, a final exam, two written assignments, two critiques of reading assignments, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 I, too, sing America: A Psychology of Race and Racism.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am.. I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Diversity, Identity Development, and Change on American Campuses.

Instructor(s): Shari Saunders (sharisau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During your first academic term at the university, you are likely to interact with peers and instructors from social identity groups (age, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, nationality, race, religion, sexuality, etc.) with which you have had limited or no experience. These kinds of interactions can lead you to examine your beliefs, perspectives, and understanding of yourself and others.

This course offers the opportunity to explore these identity development processes using psychological theories and models. We will discuss sources of intergroup conflict linked to our different identities and how students' identity development and behaviors may influence and be influenced by involvement in formal campus groups and informal social interactions. We will also explore how your knowledge about diversity and identity development can facilitate your participation in coalition and/or community building on campus to help make the campus climate more responsive to your needs and the needs of students different from you. The social identity areas that we will focus on in this course are: gender, race, sexual orientation, and physical ability.

Grades will be based on: (a) written reflections on readings and videotape assignments; (b) a written autobiography; (c) a self-reflection paper or video; (d) individual and small group projects; and (e) class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Psychology and Law.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar studies issues in which law and psychology interact. We will examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the Simpson, Bobbit, and Menendez trials), as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's A Time to Kill and Dershowitz" The Advocate's Devil).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 Clinical Study of the Family.

Instructor(s): Eric Bermann (erbman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed primarily for first-year students who think they might be interested in pursuing careers that would involve work with families (e.g., social work, primary care medicine, clinical psychology, nursing, policy planning for families, family law, having a family of one's own, etc.). The emphasis in the course is decidedly clinical, which is to say strong on theory, case material, and research.

Attention will be given to the plight and history of the American family over the past 40 years. This includes the mounting divorce rate, the impact of divorce, the many alternative family forms that exist in the society, changing gender roles, reactive attempts to rescue "the family" (political, social, and clinical), the rise of family therapies, the politics of researching the family (past and present), and the evolution of "mental health" approaches to studying and intervening in families. These approaches will be contrasted with other approaches to the family (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive-behavioral).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 007 Negotiation and Conflict Resolution.

Instructor(s): Kim Leary (kimleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the psychology of negotiation, mediation and dispute resolution in a variety of professional (i.e., business, diplomacy and clinical practice) and personal contexts. Negotiation has traditionally been assumed to be a "zero-sum" game in which the winner takes all. Contemporary accounts stress that conflict is a social process in which the people in dispute shape the nature of the problem by the way they talk about it as well as by how they interact with each other. Successful negotiations require joint problem solving where, at its best, the interests of all parties may be represented in order to build lasting relationships and fair outcomes. The quality of those relationships depends on our ability to deal with differences and to manage conflict creatively. Over the course of the academic term, we will build a set of theories about the dialogic and narrative processes involved in negotiation. We will examine the way in which issues of self and identity are implicated in our efforts to communicate with one another. Our primary aim will be to look at the ways in which "difficult conversations" come to be transformed into occasions of effective talk. We will also look at instances of problematic discourse (e.g., "hate speech").

Students should be prepared to engage in classroom activities that will include role-plays and other conversational simulations. Some of these will be videotaped and be discussed in the seminar. The course will enable students to be more reflective about everyday experiences of conflict and to become familiar with the concepts and skills associated with more formal efforts to resolve disputes in communities, schools and workplaces.

The course will include one all-day Saturday meeting on November 4th, 2000. Please note that students electing this course must be prepared to attend this all day session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 008 The Future of Work and Your Work Future.

Instructor(s): Richard Price (ricprice@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to help students explore their future career goals and, at the same time, reflect on the future of work. Our emphasis will be on active learning and exploration. We will read, discuss, conduct small research projects, and work both individually and in teams. In the first part of the course, we learn what writers, psychologists, and experts on work and careers have to say about the psychological meaning of work, how you will cope with challenges, shape your future self, and choose your future work.

Next, we look to the future where emerging technology, rapid globalization, and cultural differences will play a major role in shaping working life. The authors we read ask whether work as we know it will disappear, how it will cross national boundaries, and if we can bridge the gap between dramatically different cultures in the global work of the future.

Then we ask how these global, technological, and cultural forces will actually shape future work. What is likely to happen to jobs and careers, and to the work organizations of the future? How will we experience the work itself, and how will the growing diversity of the workforce influence work and organizations?

Finally, how will the new work influence our values, our sense of family, and our sense of community? In the last part of the course, students will work in teams on small research projects that explore a topic of their own choosing on the future of work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 009 The Psychology of the African American Athlete and Society.

Instructor(s): Robert Sellers (rsellers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/120-009/

The purpose of this course is to provide a forum for discussion and analysis of the unique condition of the African American athlete in this society. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to examine historical and contemporary issues that face the African American athlete. Special emphasis is placed on the life experiences of certain African American athletes and the sociocultural climate in which they live. This course is taught as a seminar with class discussions as the primary modus of operation. Students are encouraged to integrate their personal experiences with course materials during class discussion. Students will be expected to work in groups extensively as part of the requirements of the course. Also, class attendance and participation in the discussion are mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Psychology and Non-Ordinary Experience.

Instructor(s): Richard Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions.

However, it is only recently that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. Lastly, we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 011 The Psychology of Culture, Power, and Human Relations.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will look at what cultural diversity is and the impact it has on human relations in different environmental contexts. We will review the old adage of the American Culture as a "Melting Pot" of a plethora of European cultures and the ensuing criteria for full membership. We will examine the new order thinking, also known as the paradigm shift (though still not an equitable behavioral shift), encouraging the American Culture to become more global, embracing pluralism and forming the "Salad Bowl" approach to multiculturalism which values and includes all cultures in the world. This shift or change has presented opportunities, challenges and conflicts within/for American Society that warrants some examination. We will discuss interesting readings, participate in class exercises/simulations, view films, brainstorm ideas, identify experiences, and develop approaches that can empower individuals, groups and organizations in the change process to act with agency and progress towards an equitable and well-functioning multicultural society. Psychological theories will be emphasized and the seminar will draw heavily on interdisciplinary perspectives. Cultural diversity in the seminar participants themselves, faculty, and guests will be an important resource for the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 012, 013 Leadership: Theory and Practice.

Instructor(s): Charles Morris (tmorris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a multidisciplinary seminar for first-year students that explores the questions: What is leadership? What are some styles of leadership and traits of effective leaders? What essential tasks must leaders perform? We will examine both classical and contemporary views of leadership. This is not a "how to do it" course in leadership, though students will learn a great deal about how to be an effective leader. Core readings consist of Gardner On Leadership, and McFarland et al. 21st Century Leadership.

Each student will lead at least one class discussion on a chapter from the readings. Small groups of students will also prepare an oral and written report on one outstanding leader of their choice. The course requires a great deal of writing and active participation in class. Course grades will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, a reading log or journal, position papers for the class discussions, an end-of-class essay, and the oral and written leader reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 014 Health & Healing: Mind & Body.

Instructor(s): J. Ann Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore conceptions of health and healing within a broad range of traditions, from conventional allopathic medicine to shamanism. We will study the mind/body relation within these traditions as well as consider current scientific studies that elucidate how the mind-body connection impacts on health. This seminar will encourage a broadening of our conception of health to include physical, mental as well as spiritual well-being. Students will examine their personal beliefs and understanding of health as well as study the influence of culture on medical practices.

Other topics will include stress, pain, addiction, and depression. Grades will be based on short written assignments, class participation, and a small self-designed project. There will be some choice in determining the basis for the grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 015 The Psychology of Children and Violence.

Instructor(s): Sandra Graham-Bermann (sandragb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This first-year seminar presents an introduction to understanding violence in the lives of children. Methods of instruction are varied and include reading novels, reports of research findings, films, lectures, and the presentation of clinical case material.

The course begins with an articulation of the prevalence and incidence of seven kinds of violence against children, moves on to present a number of theoretical models that have been used to explain violence against children, and reviews the specific effects of various kinds of violence on children's adjustment. The course concludes with a discussion of prevention programs and interventions designed to help children in the wake of violence exposure.

There are required weekly reaction papers (short essays) and a final paper (approximately 10-12 pages). Grades are based on the quality of the reaction papers and the final paper as well as class participation and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 016 Racism Underground: Hidden and Not-So-Hidden Prejudice in America.

Instructor(s): Denise Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Public opinion surveys suggest that prejudice and racism have declined dramatically since the 1940s. Has racism really declined, or simply gone underground? In this seminar we will learn about such "hidden" or covert forms of prejudice, as well as some not-so-hidden, more overt forms of prejudice. The seminar will focus primarily on Black-white intergroup relations, but issues involving other ethnic groups (e.g., Asian-Americans, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, Latino/a Americans) and people of different sexual orientations will be included as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Consciousness.

Instructor(s): William Gehring (wgehring@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/121/001.nsf

Consciousness is perhaps the greatest challenge still facing science. In this course we shall examine some of the most influential thinking about consciousness and the findings from neuroscience and psychology that shed light on it. In doing this, we shall ask a number of questions: Just what is consciousness? Can brain scans and studies of the effects of brain injuries tell us where in the brain consciousness is located? Can computers (or animals) be conscious? How can you know whether someone else is conscious? What happens to consciousness in dreams, hypnosis, meditation, and drug-altered mental states? Does mental telepathy really exist? What about near-death experiences? Is the mind distinct from the body?

Reading assignments, discussions, written exercises, and other in-class activities will help you to consider, challenge, and possibly change your own perspective on consciousness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 122/Soc. 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu), Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 204. Individual Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the faculty. Students are provided with the proper section number by the faculty member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course after receiving instructor permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 206. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the faculty. Students are provided with the proper section number by the faculty member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course after receiving instructor permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Outreach includes approximately 45 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children in day care settings, schools in the community, adolescents in school and after-school programs, physically ill adults and children, and persons legally confined to criminal institutions. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, readings, papers; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Undergraduate Office at 1044 East Hall beginning November 15, 2000 to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Fall Term 2000. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 001 Working with Preschool Children. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit of Project Outreach if they have already taken the same section in a previous term )

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

In the Working with School-Aged Children and Teens section, students will volunteer at a community preschool or childcare center with infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children (ages 0-6). The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as physical, cognitive, or emotional difficulties, low family income or poverty, parental unemployment, lack of health insurance and single-parent headed households.

Lectures and discussion groups will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture. Students will volunteer a total of 40 hours and complete regular journal assignments, a midterm project, and a brief final paper. Negative TB tests are required in order to volunteer at most sites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 002 Big Sibs: Community and Opportunity. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit of Project Outreach if they have already taken the same section in a previous term )

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Through the Big Sibs program, you will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood, including poverty, racism, and divorce.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 003 Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit if they have already taken the same section of Project Outreach in a previous term)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

The Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice section of Project Outreach is designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The course consists of a field placement, a lecture series, and group discussions. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. These include Maxey Boys Training School, Arbor Heights, Boysville, the Forensics Center, Adrian Training School, and COPE Alternative.

The lecture series is intended to expose students to issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality such as the influences of sexism and racism in the criminal justice system, the antecedents of delinquent and criminal behavior, the effects of child abuse, the intersection of substance abuse and mental illness with criminality, and the treatment programs available in institutions. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 004 Working with School-Age Children and Teens. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit if they have already taken the same section of Project Outreach in a prior term)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

The Working with School-Aged Children and Teens section of Project Outreach provides students with an opportunity to work with children and adolescents in both school and community settings. These children and teens come from a variety of family and socio-economic backgrounds. You can serve as a mentor, tutor, or friend. Learn about developmental issues in children and the stresses that affect them. Finally, you can learn about the wide range of career opportunities that involve working with youth.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 005 Health, Illness, and Society. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit if they have already taken the same section of Project Outreach in a prior term)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Students in the Health, Illness, and Society section or Project Outreach help patients and families in medical and other health care settings by offering empathy, emotional and practical support in waiting rooms, at bedside, in community health clinics and in other settings. Provide supervised occupational, physical, rehabilitative, educational, and recreational therapy and support for people with special physical or health needs: senior citizens; children who are physically impaired; people who are HIV-positive; and people with chemical dependency problems, or work with groups trying to prevent particular health problems, to promote health education, or those that are advocating for improved health services. Learn about health care, health promotion, and how people cope with stress.

This course will have two major components: classroom and fieldwork. These components will interface so that the student has an opportunity to do direct work with patients, family/friends, and staff in a medical setting or with groups working on issues in the health field and then consider the experience within the framework of a series of lectures that are presented in class. Class time will be divided between a Presentation Series including lectures, films, guest presentations, and small discussion groups with students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 006 Exploring Careers. (A student can only enroll for 1 credit if they have already taken the same section of Project Outreach in a prior term)

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

The Exploring Careers section of Project Outreach will help students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes, and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

Topics for lectures and discussions will include career decision making, self-assessment and exploration, social and cultural issues that affect people's career paths, job search strategies, and how to make the most of available resources at Career Planning and Placement. In addition, students will have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers and panel members from a variety of occupations who will share information and discuss their own experiences.

Exploring Careers is structured so that students will benefit from attending and participating in all sessions and completing assignments based on personal goals. The instructors encourage a friendly, open atmosphere where students can actively explore areas of interest and discuss the challenges and hurdles along the way.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 302. Special Problems Lab in Psychology/Natural Science.

Section 001 Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Hutsler (hutsler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 330 or 340. (3-4). (Excl). (BS). May be used as a lab in the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration with advisor approval. May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/302/001.nsf

This computer-based laboratory course focuses on several research paradigms in biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience. With the help of computer-based simulations, students will be introduced to neuronal electrophysiology, neural network modeling, simple learing paradigms and behavioral psychology. Through hands-on experience with these topics, students will gain practical knowledge about research design and methodology, data analysis, and the written preparation of research findings. Grading will be based upon in-class laboratory exercises as well as written lab reports, research papers, and examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001, 002 Michigan Mentorship Program. (3-4 Credits). Admission by Application & Interview. For Information on Registration, contact equart@umich.edu.

Instructor(s): Ellen Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper. Students will meet in seminar, weekly (Tuesday or Wednesday evening) to discuss relevant issues. Students must have Junior standing. Admission is by application only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 003 Child Care Practicum at Pound House. Contact Carolyn Tyson (998-8399) for application information.

Instructor(s): Brenda Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Practicum in Child Development and Child Care. (2-4 credits). Prerequisite: Psychology 350. This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as write papers integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. For more information, contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House, 998-8399.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 004 Women in Prison. (3 credits). Meets with Women's Studies 483.002.

Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will learn about women in prison. The course will focus on the issues that these women experience before, during, and after incarceration. A variety of experience will be used: The first approach will be the history of punishment, how punishment was used through history to punish those that are "deviants". The second tool will be to understand the experience and life history of women in prison, as told by them. Finally, we will visit the jail and work with women in prison and their children.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings I I. (3 Credits). Call 998-7952 for Registration Information.

Instructor(s): Robert Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Fredric Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; and (c) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, and conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Furthermore, students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, Psychology 211, and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two projects, a number of other regular written assignments, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Section 001 Working with Children At UM Children's Center. To Apply Call 998-8070.

Instructor(s): Karey Leach (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (3-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 7 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with 2-6 year old children in the UM Children's Centers laboratory preschool programs. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations). Together the teaching staff and university students work as a team in each classroom. This is an excellent opportunity for hands-on work with young children with the support of professional teachers. A seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites are required; this course meets required laboratory credits. It also introduces students to children in a setting specifically designed for observation, participation, and research, while providing young children with an exemplary preschool experience. The Children's Centers are open to the public. Please call 998-8070 for further information regarding availability.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Admission is by Application & Interview. Applications Can be Obtained in the Peer Advising Office (1044 EH, 647-3711) 11 A.M. 4 p.m. Weekdays Sept 9 At 5 p.m.

Instructor(s): Lisa Damour (ldamour@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psychology 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. (2-3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/peeradvising/

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising/counseling. Students are selected by application (available in the Peer Advising office, 1044 East Hall, and due on March 31, 2000) and interview for the training and supervised practicum.

Required training in peer facilitation and Psychology concentration requirements is scheduled on Sunday, September 10 and Sunday, September 17, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. A two-hour, faculty-supervised weekly class is required. Required also are weekly journals and a final research paper. The purchase of one paperback text and a course pack are necessary.

In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course may elect to help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The class is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum. For further information, please call Dr. Lisa Damour at 647-3920 or send e-mail to ldamour@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 310/Soc. 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/soc/320/001.nsf

This course is designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; the nature of social oppression; facilitation of intergroup communication; conflict intervention skills; techniques of community building; and surveys of some contemporary intergroup topic areas (e.g., affirmative action, sexual assault, separation/self-segregation). Students who successfully complete this training may apply to act as peer facilitators for the course Psychology 122/Sociology 122, "Intergroup Dialogues." Recent trainees have facilitated dialogues with groups such as Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 311/Soc. 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu), Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/

This practicuum follows Psychology 310/Soc 320 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 315/AAS 327. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Section 001 Race and Social Identity.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Cole

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/caas/327/001.nsf

See Afroamerican and African Studies 327.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 319. Empowering Families and Communities.

Section 001 Students in 319 Must Also Enroll in 320. Meets with American Culture 309.

Instructor(s): Melissa Farr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 320. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of community psychology by focusing around the themes of empowerment and prevention. The influences of social context, racism, culture, and inequality in shaping behavior and attitudes in community settings are emphasized. Through readings, lectures, and simulations, students will deepen their understanding of how families and communities function and how communities can be involved in program development and delivery. Students must enroll concurrently in Psychology 320: Laboratory in Community Intervention. The course will meet once a week for three hours. Each class section will involve both lecture and discussion. Readings will consist of two books and four to six additional readings each week. Students will complete a journal that is a synthesis and integration of the readings, an in-class midterm, and a group research paper. Students will present their research paper in a poster session. The course is designed for third- and fourth-year students in psychology and other social sciences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 319. Empowering Families and Communities.

Section 002 Students in 319 Must Also Enroll in 320. Meets with Psychology 319.001

Instructor(s): Lara Kohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 320. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 320. Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Section 001 Students in Psych. 320 Must Also Elect Psych 319. Meets with American Culture 309.

Instructor(s): Melissa Karr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 319. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This experiential lab involves one visit per week to an African American, Arab American, or Latino community in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well being of children and families. Projects involve such activities as tutoring, developing outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects. Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Students must be enrolled concurrently in Psychology 319: Empowering Families and Communities. This type of direct experience will provide for a better understanding of course concepts and more in-depth learning. This lab requires attendance at training sessions or community participation three hours a week. Students will turn in weekly attendance sheets that document their work. Transportation will be provided. An experiential journal, readings, and group project reflecting this experience will be completed for Psychology 319.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 320. Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Section 002 Students in Psych. 320 Must Also Elect Psych 319. Meets with Psychology 320.001.

Instructor(s): Lara Kohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 319. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 330. Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Seema Bhatnagar (bhatnags@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/330/001.nsf

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology. It introduces the kinds of questions traditionally addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is the study of how psychological processes relate to the brain and evolution. A major focus is on how brain processes cause psychological events and behavior, and how psychological events are encoded in the brain (physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience). Another focus is on how psychological processes (e.g., perception, cognition) differ across different species, and on how psychological processes have been shaped by evolutionary pressures (comparative or evolutionary psychology).

Topics will include: principles of behavioral evolution that have shaped current behavior and physiological processes; the anatomy and operation of brain systems relevant to mind and behavior, and their relation to psychoactive drugs; neural mechanisms of normal action, perception, motivation, learning, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and for one discussion/practicum section.

NOTE: This course is intended primarily for sophomores and second-term first-year students who have ALREADY taken a course in introductory psychology. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jill Becker (jbbecker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/331/

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) It provides students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the biopsychology program with his/her on-going research. (2) It introduces students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior). (3) It provides practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists in laboratory research.

Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1044 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall.) Students concentrating in 'Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences' will receive priority.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 335(430). Introduction to Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology or Biol. 162. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/335/001.nsf

This course presents a broad introduction to animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology (sociobiology). The class is open to sophomores and is appropriate for any students interested in animal behavior, biological psychology, or the relationship between evolution and social behavior. Introductory lectures present the basic principles of organic evolution so that all students have the same foundation of knowledge from which other course topics can be examined. Course topics include, among others, the relationship between genes and behavior, kin selection and social interactions among genetic relatives, aggression, parent-offspring relations, sex differences in behavior, mating systems and their ecological correlates, sexual selection (competition for mates and mate choice), affiliation, communication, and animal emotion and cognition. These and other behaviors will be considered in light of how they have evolved by natural selection and how they contribute to daily survival and reproductive success. Examples will be drawn primarily from "case studies" on selected mammals and birds. Each case study will focus on social behavior in one well-studied species, such as: lions, zebras, wolves, spotted hyenas, savanna baboons, chimpanzees, bonobos, bottlenose dolphins, acorn woodpeckers and African bee eaters (two communally-living birds).

Case study readings, as well as videos shown in class, will provide students with an in-depth feeling for the behavior of selected species. We will also briefly consider the evolution of human social behavior. Grading is based on weekly problem sets, 2-3 short-answer exams, an exercise involving observations of animal behavior, and a 10-page research proposal on a topic of your choice. There is no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 340. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001 There will be Two Evening Exams: Tues, Oct 17 and Tues Nov 14 from 6:00-8:00 p.m.

Instructor(s): Thad Polk (tpolk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psych340/index.html

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation.

Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Sections 001 through 003 meet the Upper-Level Writing requirement.

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing."

In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research.

The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software; regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields.

Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises. Psychology 340 is recommended as a prerequisite, along with Stats 402.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 350. Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001 Evening Exams Oct. 9 and Nov. 13, 7-9 p.m.

Instructor(s): Scott Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 255. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/350/

This course provides an introduction to the milestones of human development from conception to death. We describe physical, cognitive, and social growth of normal children with special attention to various cultural contexts of development and the rich diversity of individuals. The content is primarily drawn from research and theories in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. In addition, we will discuss implications for child-rearing, education, and social policy-making so that you can apply the knowledge to meaningful problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 350. Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Schreier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 255. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Sections 001 through 004 meet the Upper-Level Writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. Students are evaluated based on their performance on quizzes, two smaller paper assignments, two major paper assignments and a group project/presentation. The class meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement and satisfies the junior/senior writing requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 360. Introduction to Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lance Sandelands (lsandel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Organizational psychology is the subfield of psychology devoted to the human behavior in organizations. This course offers a broad-ranging introduction to the field focusing particularly on the problems of understanding behavior that is in some respects governed by psychological principles and laws and in some respects by sociological principles and laws. Topics in the course include individuation and socialization, motivation in organizations, group psychology, sociology, role relations, organizational dynamics, and problems of management. The course will consist of a combination of lecture, discussion, and group work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Sections 001-002 may be elected to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Richard Saavedra (saavedra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience, (2) to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research), and (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing. Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute your effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5: There is no waitlist; students should attend the first class to check on availability, but should not expect to be allowed into the course if it has reached its maximum.

Psych. 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward Chang (changec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Abnormal psychology entails the scientific study of aberrant behaviors, broadly defined. However, there is no universal consensus on the definition, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. As we shall quickly see, what is deemed abnormal and how it develops or is treated will partly depend on the particular perspective taken. Hence, a key goal of this course is to guide students toward a broad and critical understanding of "abnormal behavior" from a number of different perspectives. We will accomplish this by exploring, evaluating, and discussing various strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives for understanding psychopathology based on the theoretical and empirical literature. Films will be used to illustrate some of the important concepts mentioned in the lecture and in the readings. Grading will be based on exams, pop quizzes, and a term paper. This is a lecture class only (there are no discussion sections). Students are expected to attend all lectures and participate in class discussions. Information regarding required textbook and readings will be added soon.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): James Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/370-010/

This course is an introduction to the clinical, theoretical, and research literature on psychopathology. We will explore the concept of "mental illness," existing systems of classifying behavior deemed to be dysfunctional ( i.e., DSM-IV) and methods typically employed to treat forms of psychological suffering. The emphasis will be on understanding what psychopathology is at the level of the individual struggling with it as well as exploring what existing norms of illness and health tell us about human culture at the present time. Students are expected to attend lecture and discussion section regularly and will be evaluated on examinations, short papers, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 001 ONLY Sections 002-007 may be elected to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Instructor(s): Ann Shields (shieldsa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stat 402) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/372/

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on psychopathology. Lectures will cover research design, current studies in clinical psychology, methods of assessing psychiatric symptoms and disorders, and research tools for evaluating psychotherapy outcomes. Lab sessions will encourage students to pursue an area of interest while learning how to design assessments, collect and analyze data, and report findings in a written report that meets APA guidelines. Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended.

Class format: A weekly lecture and weekly lab meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, I. Call 998-7952 for Registration Information. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Robert Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Fredric Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stat 402) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; and (c) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and remediation of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, and conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study. Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Furthermore, students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression and behavioral health screening. This course is the first term of a two-term practicum sequence. In addition to 1.5 hours of class time each week, work involves participation in aspects of the data collection phases of the project(s), requiring approximately nine hours of time commitment per week. Ideally, students involved in this work should be able to enroll for a two-term sequence, taking Psychology 372 in one term and Psychology 305 in a later, preferably the next term. Completion of both 372 and 305 will satisfy the lab requirement in the Psychology concentration. For further information, contact Dr. Zucker, Dr. Blow or Dr. Flynn (the course coordinator) at 998-7952.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 380. Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001 Evening Exams on Oct. 9, Nov. 8, and Dec 13 from 7-8:30 p.m.

Instructor(s): Serena Chen (serena@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/380/

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such topics as: social inference, schemas, attribution, conformity and obedience, altruism, emotions, stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, and attitudes and persuasion.

Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through short papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 381/Soc. 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Eugene Burnstein (geneburn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/381/

Students explore many aspects of social psychology research methods in this hands-on course. In the first half, issues around research methods are discussed in depth, utilizing survey data students collect to illustrate concepts. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 383/Soc. 383. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regula Herzog (rherzog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory and practice of survey research methods, broadly defined as research methods that rely upon questionnaires or personal interviews as a primary means of data collection and upon multivariate techniques for data analysis in order to study properly sampled populations. Survey research methods have become an important tool for learning about society and social processes and should be of interest to students interested in basic social science fields as well as applied fields such as marketing, social work, or epidemiology. Familiarity with survey research methods should also be helpful to students expecting to interpret and utilize results from surveys in such fields as communication, advertising, or urban planning.

The course will provide a rigorous introduction into the major stages of a survey, including survey design, survey sampling, questionnaire development and index construction, pretesting, techniques of interviewing, code development and production coding, data cleaning and data management, data analysis, and report writing. The course involves lectures, discussions, exercises, and reading and practical assignments. Students will gain some experience in all stages by working with examples from real surveys. A textbook and a course pack will be used. Grading is based on homework assignments, exams, and class participation. The course can be used for a research lab in the Psychology concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 390. Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oliver Schultheiss (oschult@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/390/

This course is intended to be a general overview of the contemporary study of personality and its theoretical background. Great emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with current research and theory on specific personality topics. Examples of some of the topics covered in this course are: personality research methods and assessment; cybernetic and neurobiological approaches to personality; motivation and emotion; learning theory; units of personality (traits, motives, and cognitions); personality development; personality and health; and sociocultural context and personality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Psych. 390. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Personality research methods will be explored in detail in this course. Techniques involved in assessing personality will be introduced, including attention to social and ethical issues. These may include scale construction, content analysis, interviewing, and observation. Issues of experimental design will be discussed and students will gain experience administering, coding, and evaluating personality measures. In addition, individually and in groups, students will plan and execute analyses of data drawn from one or more of ten different samples (students, midlife adults, Presidents of the U.S., survivors of an earthquake, musicians, etc.) contained in the Personality Data Archive at the University of Michigan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Health Psychology. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Randy Roth (randyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will describe the expanding role of psychology in health care. The major topic areas will include the contribution of personality, mood, and socio-cultural factors in medical illness; behavioral approaches to the treatment of medical disorders and chronic physical disability; psychoneuroimmunology; health beliefs and behaviors; and the integration of biological and psychological processes to promote a biopsychosocial model of health care. Specific content areas will further include the prevalence of psychological disturbance among medically ill populations and the effect of psychological intervention on health care utilization. A wide range of medical disorders will be reviewed including heart disease, cancer, stress-related illness, chronic diseases, and pain. This course is intended to broaden the student's view of the role of psychology in health care. Student's will be exposed to the growing impact of psychology on conceptualizations of disease and illness and the application of psychological concepts and behavioral therapies in the investigation and remediation of physical illness. Student evaluation will include three noncumulative multiple choice and esssay examinations and a ten-page research paper on a topic of the student's choice in health psychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Emotional Development. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Ann Shields (shieldsa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of children's emotions has increased dramatically during the past ten years, shedding new light on the importance of emotional experiences in individuals' adjustment and well-being. This course provides an overview of this dynamic new field, examining both normal and abnormal emotional development from infancy through adolescence. Course materials will examine how individuals learn to recognize, regulate, understand, communicate about, and cope with different emotional experiences. The socializing influences of the family, peers, and culture also will be covered. We also will discuss how problems with emotional development can place children at risk for such difficulties as aggression, depression, delinquency, and social deficits. Grades will be based on a class presentation, short quizzes, and a paper covering a topic of each student's interest. Prior coursework in developmental psychology (psych 350) is recommended.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Psychology of Career Choice. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Sharon Vaughters

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the complexity of career choice and development in college students. Topics including psychosocial and cognitive factors in career decision-making and career development will lay the theoretical groundwork. An overview of psychological career assessments (e.g., interest inventories and personality assessments) and decision-making strategies (e.g., self-assessment, individual and group counseling interventions) will bridge career theory into practice. Lectures, discussions and readings will explore historical research on career choice and development.

Information on employment trends and transition to work issues will place career decisions into a current context. A focus socioeconomic, multicultural, familial, popular influences will increase students' awareness of diversity issues in career decision making and the workplace. The course will include course pack readings, guest speakers, films, written assignments, a group project, a midterm, and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 004 The Management of Work in African Organizations. (3 credits). Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 358.004.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 358.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 Social Psychology of the African Family. (3 credits). Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 458.006.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 458.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 404. Field Practicum.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register. Further information about procedures for electing Psychology 404, 405, 408, and 409 is obtained at 1044 East Hall (764-2580).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 405. Field Practicum.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register. Further information about procedures for electing Psychology 404, 405, 408 and 409 is obtained at 1044 East Hall (764-2580).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 408. Field Practicum in Research Techniques/Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 330 or 340 or 350 or 360 or 370 or 380 or 390. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits do not count for the concentration, but the course may be used for an experiential lab if taken for three credits. (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psychology 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for Psychology 211, 404, 405, 408 and 409. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process. Students may obtain a list of faculty sponsors offering research experience in the Undergraduate Office, 1044 East Hall. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 409. Field Practicum in Research Techniques.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psychology 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of Psychology 211, 404, 405, 408, and 409. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process. Students may obtain a list of faculty sponsors offering research experience in the Undergraduate Office, 1044 East Hall. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 411/WS 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Quay (nquay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~womenstd/419.htm

See Women's Studies 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 418/Religion 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rdmann/

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are: (1) the spiritual seeker's experience of "little death," the mode of apparent discontinuity when the "old life" is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living; (2) times of crisis, adaptation, and "the dark night". and (3) the experience of "physical death," as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Jung, Hillesum, Feild, Lessing, Soygal Rimpoche, Wilber, and others will form the basis of three short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 436. Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior.

Instructor(s): Terry Robinson (ter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. Biol. 162 and chemistry are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/courses/2000-fall/436/

This course provides a basic introduction to the neuropsychopharmacology of drug abuse and addiction, and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. Prerequisites include Psychology 330 (Introduction to Biopsychology) and an interest in biological approaches to the study of behavior. Introductory Biology and Chemistry are also recommended. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behavior, mood, cognition and neuronal function are discussed, and material from studies with humans is integrated with basic studies on the neurobiological basis of drug action and drug abuse including detailed coverage of synaptic transmission and the distribution, regulation and integration of brain neurotransmitter systems. The focus is on addictive or illicit drugs, and all the major classes are discussed, including: opiates (heroin, morphine, opium), sedative hypnotics (alcohol, barbituates, chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline), hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA), and dissociative anaesthetics (PCP).

A lecture format is used, with required readings from a text. The class is intended primarily for juniors or seniors concentrating in biopsychology, biology or the biomedical sciences (e.g., pre-med).

Required Text: R.S. Feldman, J.S. Meyer & L.F. Quenzer, Principles of Neuropsychopharmacology, Sinauer, 1997.

Exams and Grading: The course grade will be based on the outcome of three multiple choice/short answer type exams. The first exam will be on Feb. 1 and will cover material presented up to that time. The first exam will be worth 30% of the final grade. The second exam will be on Mar. 14 and will cover material presented since the first exam. The second exam will be worth 35% of the final grade. The final exam will be on the regularly scheduled date for the final, which is on Wed. April 26 at 8:00 am. The final exam also will be worth 35% of the final grade and will cover material presented since the second exam (i.e., it will not be cumulative). Grades will be based only on performance on the exams. There will be NO opportunity to re-take an exam or to write a paper to "improve" a grade. In past years the average grade in this class always has been B-.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 437/Anthro. 368. Primate Social Behavior I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/anthrbio/368/001.nsf

See Biological Anthropology 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/442/

This course carries concentration credit for psychology concentrators and natural science credit for non-psychology concentrators. The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (each worth 30% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 40% of the grade). Questions concerning this class can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 444. Perception.

Section 001 This course satisfies an advanced course requirement for Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentrators.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Hutsler (hutsler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/444/001.nsf

The course focuses on sensory systems and their relationship to perceptual phenomenon. Topics to be covered in the course include sensory transduction, and processing as well as the relationship of perceptual phenomenon, and cognitive theories of perceptual phenomenon to these physiological processes. The physiological basis of common illusions and perceptual phenomenon will be discussed. Grades will be determined on the basis of three examinations and a final course paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 445/Ling. 447. Psychology of Language.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 745.001

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/445/001.nsf

This course will have a combined lecture and seminar format. We will read about and discuss a number of issues in the psychology of language. Topics include speech perception, the perceptual and cognitive processes in spoken and written word recognition, sentence comprehension and production, and models of discourse. Other topics will also include research on language acquisition, both in normals and in special populations, the relationship of language and thought, language universals, and the neural basis of language. Grading will be based on class participation, writing assignments, and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 447. Psychology of Thinking.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Priti Shah (priti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/447/

This course reviews our knowledge about higher-level cognition, including thinking, reasoning, decision-making, and problem solving. Multiple approaches to these topics will be considered, including laboratory research, computational models, and developmental, individual differences, and cross-cultural perspectives. Readings will include a textbook as well as original research reports. The course will involve a combination of lectures, discussions, and some hands-on activities including conducting mini in-class experiments and developing computational models. The class will involve regular homework assignments (either problem-solving activities or writing assignments), a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 453. Socialization of the Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa Damour (ldamour@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the social and emotional development of children with particular emphasis on the various influences on children*s socialization such as family, peers, schools, and the society at large. A partial list of topics includes: biological influences on development; infant-caregiver attachments; the development of children*s friendships; parental beliefs and behaviors; the role of fathers in child development; sex-role development; the development of prosocial behavior; the development of the self; the media as a socialization agent; schools as socialization agents; day care and maternal employment; and divorce and single-parenthood.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 455. Cognitive Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry Wellman (hmw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do children think, remember and learn? What do they know about the world of objects, of people, of TV? Are thinking and learning fundamentally different for babies in comparison to children and in comparison to adults? This course tackles these questions, examining children's thinking and intellectual growth from infancy to adulthood.

Topics covered include: concepts, memory, language, math and number, literacy, problem solving, and childrens' understanding of the social world (social cognition). We will consider different theories of how mental abilities develop, and pay particular attention to recent psychological research (experimental, observational, and even cross-cultural) on these topics. The course includes lectures, but since enrollment is limited to 30 or fewer it also includes considerable in-class discussion in a seminar format. Students will be evaluated by exams and one term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 456. Human Infancy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brenda Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/456/001.nsf

This course will cover the social, emotional, and cognitive development of infants over the first three years of life, with an emphasis on children's development in context. We will also focus on the interface between social policy and issues relevant to infant development. Student's performance on exams, a research paper, and class presentations will serve as the means for evaluation. The class will meet twice weekly for lecture and discussion sessions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 459. Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/psych/459/001.nsf

This undergraduate course is designed to familiarize students with current knowledge about the constancies and changes that occur across adulthood, as well as with conceptual and research issues relevant to understanding the future of aging. Discussions will focus on plasticity of the aging process, and likely causes of age differences and age change. Our goal will be to understand the implications of age patterns for individuals, as well as for societies. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the typical, as well as range of possible, trajectories of adult development and aging. They should gain insights about the changes they can expect as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain understanding of the needs of older persons, as well as an appreciation of the tremendous potential resource they offer.

The course will cover theory, methods, data, and controversies relevant to age in adulthood. We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S. today, including discussions of attitudes about aging, and demographics of it. Then we will consider theories about aging, and methods of studying it. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be covered include changes in: physical capacities, health, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, creativity, wisdom, personality, emotion, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address societal issues, including gender, ethnic, cultural, and historical diversity in aging, services, policies, and careers relevant to the old.

A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with daily reading and written assignments. In addition, there will be several short reports, group projects, exams, and a final exam. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Monique Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will utilize principles and concepts from organizational psychology to understand the nature of group behavior in organized work settings. A major goal is to discern fundamental determinants of group effectiveness by placing a greater emphasis on textual influences than on intragroup factors. The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, and discussion) with skill development through participation in structured exercises. The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on two exams, class participation, group projects, and peer ratings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Richard Saavedra (saavedra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will utilize principles and concepts from organizational psychology to understand the nature of group behavior in organized work settings. A major goal is to discern fundamental determinants of group effectiveness by placing a greater emphasis on contextual influences than on intragroup factors. The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, and discussion) with skill development through participation in structured exercises. Several videos are used to explain, amplify, or illustrate particular features of groups at work.

The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on three exams, one group project, and on peer ratings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: There is no waitlist; students should attend the first class to check availability, but should not expect to be allowed into the course if it has reached its maximum.

Psych. 488/Soc. 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andy Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/F00/SC465/index.html

See Sociology 465.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Left Brain, Right Brain. (3 credits). Prerequisites: Psychology 330 or Psychology 340 and 345.

Instructor(s): Patricia Reuter-Lorenz (parl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/500/

This course will examine the neuropsychological differences between the left and right sides of the human brain by considering studies of brain-damaged and split-brain patients, as well as behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from neurologically intact individuals. We will review major theories about handedness, gender differences, and lifespan changes in brain asymmetry, as well as the evolutionary origins and functional significance of lateralization in the nervous system. Prerequisites: Psychology 330 or Psychology 340 and 345.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 002 Mind and Brain: Memory and Higher Cognitive Processes. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Edward Smith (eesmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Mind and Brain: Memory and Higher Cognitive Processes. The course will be concerned with the relation between brain and cognition, specifically with how the brain implements higher-level cognitive functions. Such higher-level functions include: long-term memory, working memory, concepts and categorization, reasoning, and problem solving. We will consider each of these psychological functions in turn, focusing on: (1) how the function breaks down under certain forms of brain damage; and (2) how the function is neurally implemented in normal participants, as revealed by neuroimaging techniques. The primary goal of the course is to introduce students to the interdisciplinary area called Cognitive Neuroscience. Material will be presented through a mix of lecture, class discussions, and student presentations. In addition to exams, there will be group projects that require students to explore a topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 003 Biochemical Theories of Mental Illness: Their historical roots, the evidence for them, and their social implications. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Elliot Valenstein (esv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Appropriate Students: This 500 level course will be limited to 30 students who are either junior/senior undergraduates or graduate students. There are no prerequisites for the course. Any technical material that is included will be explained at a level that does not assume any technical knowledge.

Course Format : There will be two 1 and1/2 hr. meetings each week. The first meeting will be an informal lecture by the instructor. The second meeting will be a seminar led by several students who will be responsible for leading a 20-30 minute discussion of an issue relevant to some topic covered in the lecture.

Requirements: Students will be expected to lead two discussions and to write two short papers (less than 10 pages) summarizing the main arguments and any data relevant to the issues they covered.

Course Content: The first section of the course will cover the historical roots of our present biochemical theories of mental disorders. Included among other topics to be discussed will be: how the major classes of psychotropic drugs were discovered; the prevailing ideas about mental disorders at the time; how the theories about what the drugs were doing emerged and how this changed the views of the origin of mental disorders.

The second section will discuss and evaluate the scientific evidence and the logic of the arguments claimed to support the view that depression, schizophrenia, and anxiety disorders are caused by either excesses or deficiencies of particular neurotransmitters. This section will include some of the more recent modifications of the earlier biochemical explanations of mental disorders.

The last section of the course will discuss the many different ways that special interest groups promote drug treatment and the biochemical theories on which they are based.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 502. Special Problems in Psychology.

Section 001 Big Questions for a Small Planet: Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 credits). Meets with Environmental Studies 240.

Instructor(s): Barbara Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu) , Catherine Badgley (cbadgley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/502/

This course is an introduction to the environmental crises and challenges of our time, from the perspectives of the natural and social sciences. The natural-science perspective will be presented through a survey of geological, ecological, and evolutionary processes which support the earth's natural resources. The social science perspective will be presented through an evolutionary and behavioral approach to the customs, attitudes, and behaviors toward nature, resources, and the quality of life in contemporary western and non-western cultures. These perspectives will be integrated to demonstrate that we have substantially different choices about how to live, with different consequences in terms of ecological and social impact as well as personal satisfaction. Linking these viewpoints is the outlook for a sustainable future, in terms of the quality of life for the global human population, the status of other species, and the integrity of physical systems. Sections involve discussions, field trips to local natural areas and businesses, and exercises in systems thinking. Students will keep a journal, write several essays, prepare several quantitative reports, and conduct a group project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after receiving permission to register from the undergraduate office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after receiving permission to register from the undergraduate office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Psych. 510. Senior Honors Research, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert Cain

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 312 and permission of the Psychology Honors concentration advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary focus in Senior Honors is implementation of your research design culminating in your final, acceptable thesis and poster preparation for our year-end poster session. (Previously summarized as Get thee to your tutor, Progress steadily, and Conclude well). The goal is a thesis that makes one justifiably proud, and enhanced grounded understanding of research methods. Early on, each student will present the scholarly background and specific research design of their study to the class, and we will sporadically return to brief design and implementation presentations by each student. Drafts of segments of ongoing work that can later be incorporated into the final thesis are to be submitted periodically.

Other class session topics will include: special current issues and models of research, e.g., meta-analyses, integration of quantitative and qualitative data, evaluation research, etc. Our primary focus, again, will be the conduct and successful completion of your thesis and the enrichment of your research competence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 001 Biopsychology of Learning and Memory. Meets with Psychology 831.002.

Instructor(s): Steve Maren (maren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://maren1.psych.lsa.umich.edu/psych531/

In this course, the molecular, synaptic, and neural mechanisms of learning and memory will be examined. Topics will include: mechanisms of both associative and nonassociative learning in vertebrate and invertebrate animal models. Levels of analysis will range from molecular (e.g., cellular mechanisms of long-term potentiation and depression; learning and memory in transgenic animals) to molar (e.g., neurobiology systems of aversive learning; functional imaging in humans). In all cases, an effort will be made to integrate current conceptions of learning and memory derived from the behavioral literature with underlying neural events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 542. Decision Processes.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 722.001.

Instructor(s): Frank Yates (jfyates@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in statistics is recommended but not required. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/542/

Consider the following:

  • "Should I take Psychology 542 or Art History 477?"
  • "I'm not really good at chemistry and things like that; my grades in those courses stink. So should I give up on my dream of becoming a doctor?"
  • "Other companies, especially Chrysler, are making tons of money selling sport utility vehicles. But they seem to have the business locked up. Should we enter that market anyway?"
  • "My client, Mr. Thomas, thinks that Consolidated is responsible for his injuries and thus he wants to sue them. Should I advise that he go through with that plan?"
  • "Floyd and I have been going together for several years, and now he wants to get married. Should I give in and do that, despite my misgivings?"
  • "As alderman for the fifth ward, should I vote for this legislation that would change the zoning rules for the city?"

Questions like these illustrate the kinds of decision problems people confront all the time, in their personal and professional lives. They provide the ultimate focus of Psychology 542, "Decision Processes." Specifically, my primary aims in this course are to help the student do two things: (a) achieve an understanding of how people individually and collectively actually solve decision problems; and (b) develop an understanding of how people including the student him- or herself could decide better than they would be inclined to decide naturally.

Should you elect Psychology 542? One consideration you should take into account is whether the aims described above fit with your interests. That is, do the aims excite you? Another consideration pertains to your future plans. Psychology 542 would be good preparation if your plans include either:

  • scholarship (e.g., in graduate school and thereafter) on basic processes in cognitive, social psychology, or organizational psychology, or related areas, e.g., political science, economics, marketing

or

  • professional practice (either immediately after college or after professional school) in areas where decision making is critical, e.g., business, law, health care, counseling, operations engineering.

How is Psychology 542 organized? What happens in a typical day in the course? What would you be required to do as a student in Psychology 542? These remarks provide answers to such questions:

Psychology 542 is built around what I call the "cardinal issue perspective" on decision making. This is a way of thinking about decision problems which focuses on things like: what decisions really are, what it ought to mean to say that a decision is "good" or "bad", and the kinds of questions that must be answered for virtually any decision problem that arises. The specific topics we will address are organized according to the categories distinguished in the cardinal issue perspective. And one of my major goals is to have you develop a deep appreciation for the perspective, since it can help you think through the problems you will face as a student of decision making and as a decision maker.

Our treatment of a given topic typically proceeds as follows: First, students do the reading for the given topic. Then the key questions surrounding the topic are illustrated through demonstrations or exercises. We next have structured discussions of the readings, demonstrations, and exercises where everyone in the class participates actively. Finally, I, as the instructor, offer a class-interactive presentation in which I (a) introduce essential ideas not covered in the readings, demonstrations, and exercises, (b) highlight key points that were covered, and (c) try to integrate everything we considered, to help students make sense of it all. Normally, our treatment of a broad topic spans 2-3 class sessions.

The requirements of the course include:

  1. attendance and active participation in class;
  2. exercises;
  3. small quizzes; and
  4. a final, integrative examination.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001 Conflict and Negotiation. Meets with Psychology 581.002

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Conflict is a natural result of being social beings. People many times differ in their interests, beliefs, and goals, among other things. When people with divergent interests interact or have a relation with each other, conflict is a likely outcome. Conflicts can involve a variety of people, such as siblings, parents, romantic interests, employers, salespeople, colleagues, etc.

To say the least, conflict is a ubiquitous social occurrence. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand what conflict is and the kinds of factors that give rise to it, the factors that are involved in its resolution, and the kinds of skills people can use to help resolve conflicts effectively.

To this end, the goals of this course will include: (1) studying the nature of conflict; (2) studying the nature of negotiation in social conflict; and (3) performing exercises to start to develop students' skills in understanding and managing conflict.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 002 Schools As Organizations.

Instructor(s): Tabbye Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/561/

In this course we will explore the impact that schools as organizations have on students, teachers, and other school personnel. We will pay particular attention to role that school organizational structures and characteristics pay in shaping life course development. We will also explore the ways in which school cultures influence the motivation and psychological well-being of its members. Under this topic, we will focus on the fit between the individual and the school, particularly for minority groups, women, and students from cultures that are different from the dominant ethnic/national culture at the institution. Finally, we will explore international differences in school organizational characteristics as one way to investigate the impact of schools as organizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 003 Topic?

Instructor(s): Margaret Shih

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 573. Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert Cain

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350 or 390, and Psych. 370. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on childrens' developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field as a possible profession, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Self and Self-esteem: Social Psychological Perspectives

Instructor(s): Jennifer Crocker (jcrocker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an overview of classic and contemporary research on the self and self-esteem. There will be both a lecture/discussion component and a research component. Participants will read original scientific articles and chapters by leading researchers in the field, write a weekly one-page reaction paper to the readings, and come to class prepared to discuss the readings. Students in the class will also collectively design a research project in which they will serve as the research participants and write a research report on the results.

Grades will be based on participation in discussions (10%), reaction papers (30%), and two additional writing projects (one of which is the research report) (30% each). Prerequistes: Introduction to Psychology and either Introduction to Social Psychology or Introduction to Personality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 002 Conflict and Negotiation. Meets with Psych 561.001

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 561.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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