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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

This page was created at 4:08 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in Spanish

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SPANISH

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for Spanish.

To see what has been added to or changed in Spanish this week go to What's New This Week.


Elementary Language Courses

Students who have begun language study in high school must take a placement test to determine whether they should enroll in a first-year (101), first-year review (103), or a second-year language course. We also recommend that students who began language study at another college or university take the placement test. Please check the Evaluations & Examinations website (http://www.umich.edu/~eande/place/sched.htm) for placement test dates and locations.

Demand for elementary language courses can be high, and students may not be able to enroll in the class of their choosing. Please see your general academic advisor for help in electing courses.

Attendance in elementary language courses is mandatory. Students who miss either of the first two meetings of the class may be dropped from the course by the department, to allow other students to register.


Spanish 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 016, 017 Permission of Comprehensive Studies Program required.

Instructor(s): Karen Primorac (kjprim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a Final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 111. First Special Reading Course.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 102, or 103. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 111 and 112 are designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students a grade of B or better in Spanish 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 010 Introduction to Hispanic Culture.

Instructor(s): Ivan Martinez (idmartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world by studying various aspects of its history, social issues/problems, current and past customs. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience with Hispanic culture that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time, students will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate levels of proficiency, that is, participants will:

  1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events; and
  3. hypothesize about the future and present.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments are required: three exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentation, final paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 027, 031, 035 Latino Culture Through Community Service.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Latino Culture through Community Service.

This course will be a query into the nature of the Latino community through the topic of culture. Not only will we be discussing Latino culture in a seminar setting, but we will be providing two hours a week of community service in after-school tutoring to the Latino community in southwest Detroit. The goals of this course, then, are two-fold, and encompass the objectives of both a service-learning course and a fourth-term Spanish language course. You will be exploring and "testing" different cultural understandings of service, including, and especially, your own. This class is not just about providing a service in terms of logging hours, but to go beyond, through analysis, reflection and evaluation to address the variety of needs of the Latino culture in our community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 250. First-Year Humanities Seminar in Hispanic Studies.

Literature

Section 001 Storytelling and the Construction of Race & Ethnicity in the Americas.

Instructor(s): Lucia Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

R&E First-year seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will explore key stories and novels that have shaped our perception of race and ethnicity in the 20th century. Particular attention will be placed on Caribbean and Latino/a literatures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennisdp/Spanish.275.html

Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Section 003, 005, 007.

Instructor(s): Linda Grabner-Coronel (lgrabner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennisdp/Spanish.275.html

This is a transition course between elementary Spanish language classes and upper level classes for concentrators. For this reason, the class will be conducted entirely in Spanish.

The principal aim of the course is to review elements of Spanish grammar. Because it is expected that students will already have a fairly firm grasp of the mechanics of using the language, we will conduct our review from a less mechanically prescriptive and more linguistically theoretical perspective. Thus, by the end of the term, students will not only have reviewed *how* to manipulate the various elements of the language, but will also understand *why* those elements interact the way they do, and *what* can be accomplished by manipulating those elements in certain ways. Students will be able to meaningfully discuss basic issues of semantics, syntax and pragmatics, and apply their understanding to the analysis of written discourses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Section 002 Tecnología y la interpretación literaria (Technology and Literary Interpretation).

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/276/002.nsf

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students? ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students are presented with a variety of materials to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. A major component of this course is an interactive computer program based on a movie version of the short story "Instrucciones para John Howell." This computer application is designed to improve students? ability to read and interpret fiction. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required, as well. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams and participation in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Michael Millar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of two courses of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/276/001.nsf

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students are presented with a variety of materials to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required, as well. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, presentations, exams and participation in class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 Spanish for the Medical Professions.

Instructor(s): Ivan Martinez (idmartin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course's objective is to prepare students who will be working in medical fields to interact with the Spanish speaking population. Students will build up their Spanish vocabulary and will hone their linguistic skills to prepare them to communicate effectively in Spanish in situations relating to the medical professions. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish and will require active daily participation on the part of the students as great emphasis will be placed on pair work and small group work. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a written midterm exam, and an oral final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/interpretive approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introduction to the study of literature, specifically literature written in Spanish, we will consider topics of literary study and methods of analysis. We shall examine three of the most commonly-taught literary genres prose fiction, lyric poetry, and drama. In addition, we will study the essay. The discussion of each reading will focus on one or more specific aspects of literary style appropriate to the genre under consideration. The principal text for the course, Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, will be supplemented by other readings from the four literary modes. The basic class format is discussion, with very few lectures, so regular attendance and participation will be critical. Students will make presentations on readings during the term. Each student will complete written projects of approximately five pages on each of the genres. Each paper will be read and commented on by fellow students as well as the instructor. There will be two exams on material covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/320/002.nsf

In this course we will consider topics of literary study and methods of analysis, specifically of literature written in Spanish. We will examine three of the most commonly-taught literary genres, prose fiction, lyric poetry and theater. The discussion of each reading will focus on one or more specific aspects of literary style appropriate to the genre under consideration. The principal text for the course, Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, will be supplemented by other readings.

The basic class format is discussion, with very few lectures, so regular attendance and participation will be crucial. Each student will complete several written projects on the three literary genres. Papers may be read and commented on by fellow students as well as by the instructor. Students will make presentations on readings during the semester and there will also be exams on the material covered. 3 credits

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain.

Literature

Section 001 Short Narratives of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Herrero-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El curso presta atención a los aspectos más relevantes de la ficción corta y del cuento hispanoamericano de acuerdo a las lecturas en detalle (close readings) propuestas en el programa. Dichas lecturas en su mayoría de autores contemporáneos se completan con textos secundarios que aportan un diálogo crítico con respecto a las clasificaciones (tradicionales) del cuento/relato (short story) como una revisión terminológica e histórica de las aproximaciones críticas a la cuentística hispanoamericana y a la presencia de formas narrativas breves. LECTURAS PROVISIONALES: Seymour Menton. El cuento hispanoamericano (selección). Borges, Jorge Luis. Obras completas (selección). Cortázar, Julio. Un tal Lucas. Donoso, José. Cuentos. García Márquez, Gabriel. Eréndira. Quiroga, Horacio. Cuentos de amor, locura y muerte.

EVALUACION: Tres ensayos cortos (3 x 20%= 60%), un diario (20%), participación (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 332. Short Narrative in Latin America/Spain.

Literature

Section 002 20th-Century Short Narrative of Spain.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billat (abillat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we will focus on 20th Century short narratives of Spain. Although we will read narratives from different periods of the century, our emphasis will mostly be on post Franco short narrative (1975-present). This course will offer the student the opportunity to acquire the necessary tools in order to analyze a short narrative. Moreover, through readings, written assignments and daily class discussions, the student will be able to strengthen his/her reading, writing and speaking skills in Spanish.

We will read stories by: Miguel de Unamuno, Ana María Matute, Mercedes Abad, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Antonio Gala, Ignacio Martínez de Pisón, Almudena Grandes. All readings will be in the class course pack.

There will be a midterm and a final exam. The student is expected to participate daily in the class discussions as well as write short papers. There will also be a final paper. The course will be entirely in Spanish (reading, writing and speaking).

Prerequisites: Spanish 276 and 276.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 Testimony and Human Tradition in Latin America

Instructor(s): Javier Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introductory course to Latin American culture and civilization during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By concentrating on the lives of ordinary people, the purpose of the course is to approach Latin America without the dreary high seriousness of history.The course will focus on stories and living testimonies of how people face the difficulties of everyday life in Latin America with hope and great determination.

Active participation of students is required. Grades will be based on short essay presentations, class discussions, and a final take-home.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literature

Section 002.

Instructor(s): John McKay

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Spanish 350. Independent Studies.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 20th-Century Spanish and Latin American Theatre.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billat (abillat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer to the student the opportunity to become familiar with the literary works of many contemporary Latin American and Spanish playwrights, some, more famous than others. Moreover, the student will receive the necessary tools in order to comment on and analyze a play. In every class period, there will be discussions about the readings, both in groups and with the whole class. This course will give to the student the opportunity to strengthen his/her reading, writing as well as speaking skills in Spanish.

We will read plays from the following playwrights: Gloria Parrado, Cristina Fernández Cubas, Pilar Pombo, Paloma Pedrero, Buero Vallejo, Roberto Arlt, Concha Romero, Griselda Gámbaro, Teresa Marichal, Florencio Sánchez, Fernando Arrabal y José Ruibal. (Argentina, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Spain, México, Uruguay). This list might be modified.

The student is expected to participate during class discussions, as well as, write short papers and a final essay. There will also be a midterm and a final exam. All readings will be in course pack created for the course. The reading and writing assignments as well as the class discussions and the exams will entirely be in Spanish.

Prerequisites: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300 level course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 002 History of the Spanish Short Narrative: Structure and Content

Instructor(s): Ana Montero (ammon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Some of the best short stories written in Spanish from the medieval period to the twentieth century will be discussed in this class, as well as some of the criticism that the practice of short story writing has engendered. The goal is to analyze how the structure and content of the short story have evolved through time. By examining short stories, we will see how this kind of narratives conveys ideas concerning: objective depiction of reality, Spanish national identity, historical interpretation, social criticism, feminism, epistemology, etc.

We will read stories written by: don Juan Manuel, Gustavo A. Becquer, Emilia Pardo Bazan, Miguel de Unamuno, Horacio Quiroga, Ignacio Aldecoa, Francisco Ayala and Julio Cortazar.

Students are expected to participate during class discussions and to write three papers throughout the term. There will be two exams and a final project. Classes are wholly conducted in Spanish. This course will help students to improve their oral and writing skills in Spanish, as well as their ability to comment on a literary work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 002 History of the Spanish Short Narrative: Stucture and Content.

Instructor(s): Ana Montero

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Spanish 381. Survey of Latin American Literature, I.

Literature

Section 001 Colonial Latin American Literature

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/381/001.nsf

This course is an overview of Colonial Latin American literature. Because it is impossible to exhaustively cover the whole literary corpus of this historical period in an academic term, we will rather focus on the canonical texts that have been (and still are) fundamental for the understanding of the cultural development of the continent. We will read some texts produced by precolombian cultures fist. We will later move to Columbus, Cortés and other early Conquistadors and discoverers that provides us with the first images of America. In this way, we will cover almost three centuries of literary textual production, until we reach the time when the Spanish colonies are preparing to fight for their independence. Students will see how closely related literary practice and socio-political and economic issues have been throughout the colonial period. The readings will be supplemented by the viewing of films that deal with some of the issues discussed in the texts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 387. Social Forces and Literary Expression in Golden Age Spain.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El presente curso examinará el período comúnmente llamado Siglo de Oro desde una perspectiva cultural que abordará el estudio de los siglos XVI y XVII en España desde un amplio número de perspectivas (histórica, sociológica, política, artística), y en donde se estudiará la historia intelectual de estos años a través de documentos primarios y lecturas asignadas, así como ciertos materiales audiovisuales. Algunos de los temas de debate serán, por ejemplo, el de la Inquisición y la famosa "leyenda negra", las minorías culturales y raciales en la Península, o los movimientos artísticos y su relación con el momento histórico (Garcilaso, Don Quijote, Quevedo, el mito de don Juan, etc.). La clase y lecturas serán en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 391. Junior Honors Course.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 411. Advanced Syntax.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Spanish 405 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the analysis of the major morphological and syntactic structures of Spanish. The course begins with a consideration of morphology, with topics such as the function of inflexional suffixes, the role of derivational suffixes, word order rules, verb morphology, etc. and then moves to the description and analysis of the simple and complex sentence, their syntax and their use. The course will be complemented by practical exercises, and the identification, segmentation and analysis of the various types of sentences studied. There will be a midterm, a final exam, and a required research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 413/Rom. Ling. 413/EducationD 455. Teaching Spanish/Applications of Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will assist teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, and students interested in language learning in the process of clarifying their own beliefs about language learning and teaching, both in terms of theoretical issues and practical implications for classroom instruction. The course will review second/foreign language acquisition theories and examine their pedagogical application of the classroom. Students will become familiar with different methodologies and teaching techniques. Emphasis will be given to curriculum design and material development for teaching and testing all four skills within a student-centered philosophy of teaching. A portion of each class session will be devoted to microteaching sessions as a means of providing students with hands-on teaching experience and concrete input on their teaching techniques, allowing students to gain a better understanding of what is needed to become an effective teacher of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 414/Rom. Ling. 414. Background of Modern Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Dworkin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course surveys the historical, social, cultural, and literary background against which the spoken Latin of the Iberian Peninsula evolved into Spanish. The emphasis is on the external rather than the internal history of Spanish. Topics covered include the influence on the development of Spanish of such diverse languages as Basque, Gothic, Arabic, French, Italian, and Literary Latin, the role of the Reconquest (Reconquista) in shaping the linguistic map of Spain, and the circumstances leading to the rise of the Castilian dialect as the national standard. The course will be taught in Spanish. The textbook will be made available in a course pack. In addition, graduate students will be required to read the chapters dealing with Spain in Roger Wright, Late Latin and Early Romance. There will be a midterm and final exams, and a written report. Prerequisite: Good reading knowledge of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 435. Independent Study.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Spanish 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literature

Section 001 Representations, Histories, and Future, Repercussions of Latino/a Literatures

Instructor(s): Lucia Suarez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the growing importance of Latino/a literatures and the dichotomies and intersections between Latin America, the United States, and the myriad borders implied. Questions of constructions of ethnicity, interpolations of race, and conflictual stereotyping will be carefully analyzed. Authors whose works will be studied include Cristina García, Julia Alvarez, Junot Díaz, Ana Castillo, Cherrie Morraga, José David Saldivar, Stuart Hall, and Judith Butler. Students will be expected to keep journals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Adriana Kampfner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students interested in using the Spanish language within a social context and in interacting with local Latino/a communities. It integrates work within a Spanish-speaking community with academic readings and learning about U.S. Latino or Hispanic culture. Students go once a week to the community site and also attend a weekly class seminar where they reflect on the theoretical, cultural, linguistic and practical issues regarding their service experience.

Students can complete this course by working as peer mentors for community-service learning courses in Spanish or by enrolling in a community-service learning course within a Hispanic/Latino community setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 459. Don Quijote.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El presente seminario estudiará este texto canónico desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando en su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adaptan a la sensibilidad moderna. Se prestará atención a aspectos tales como la naturaleza del texto (posibles receptores, género y clase), su consideración narratológica como lectura frente al género popular y auditivo del teatro, su carácter innovador frente a la novela clásica y su lugar dentro de la escena cultural barroca. Simultáneamente, se analizarán aspectos estrictamente literarios como la coherencia textual, personajes y marginalidad, espacios urbanos y rurales, sexualidad latente o abierta, violencia y cuerpo, paradigmas de subversión ideológica, subtradiciones literarias en juego o espacios míticos y simbólicos. La clase y lecturas asignadas serán en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 465. The Modern Spanish Novel I.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Galdós' novel, Fortunata y Jacinta, like other realist novels of the nineteenth century, displays a vast and complex social world. The voyeuristic narrator surveys the neighborhoods of Madrid and peers into the homes of diverse character types: the newly rich bourgeois, the slum-dweller, the fallen woman, the charity worker, the parasite, the usurer, the consumptive, the free-thinker. But however empirical its aims this novelistic observatory is of course a fictional construction that produces a real-life effect. Moreover, in its time, Fortunata y Jacinta participated in an entertainment industry through which serial novels precursors to television soap operas were avidly consumed by middle-class readers. In this course we will examine the contradictions of Galdós' realist enterprise as revealed in his novel, essays, and speeches. Additional readings include historical documents, critical, and theoretical essays. Assignments include two essays (7-8 pages each), two exams, and a class presentation (in groups).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain.

Literature

Section 001 Literary and Artistic Movements in Modern Spain: Writing Under the Regime

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine literature and film produced in totalitarian and post-totalitarian Spain (1938 1985). As a point of departure, we will survey recent Spanish history: the Republic, the Civil War, the Franco regime, and the transition to democracy. We will address the effects of censorship, in particular, the strategies and tactics developed by writers to evade prohibition. We will also examine how the Franco regime is represented in literature and films, and how characters struggle to maneuver within repressive fictional societies. Taking a broad definition of regimes, as "systems of rule," we will consider the interrelationships among types of regimes political, economic, religious, familial, literary, and linguistic. To what extent do literary texts function as "regimes of sense," structured by patterns of meaning and sustained by cultural belief systems? To what extent do writing and reading function as "sense-making enterprises," governed by rules, conventions, and beliefs? What degree of expressive and interpretive freedom is possible within this rule-bound activity? Readings: novels, poetry, plays, historical writings (25-35 pp. of careful reading per class). Assignments: two essays (8 10 pp. each), occasional one-page reaction papers, oral class presentation (in pairs or groups), two exams. Note that Spanish 467 is a topics course which can be repeated for up to nine credits. Graduate students taking the course will complete additional readings and reaction papers, to be decided based on their interests and my recommendations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 470. Latin-American Literature, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries.

Literature

Section 001 First Images of America: the Early Chroniclers

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/fall/lsa/spanish/470/001.nsf

The objective of this course is to study some of the stages of the long process best defined as the intellectual (and/or ideological) creation of America by the European subject. The course will focus on the culture specific ways in which European subjects confronted the new as well as on the ways they produced knowledge about the unknown. In order to do so, we will read the first text written by a European explorer, the Diary of Columbus (a paradigmatic narrative that served as a model for other texts), where the author gives an account of the new lands and their inhabitants. Next, we will read E. O'Gorman, who advances a theory about America as an entity or concept created by the European imagination (with the help of Columbus' Diary as a point of departure). After O'Gorman, we will study the Letters of Vespucci, the man after whom America was named and from whom a good number of myths about the New World started to gain currency. Another text to be analyzed is Pigafetta's account of Magellan's voyage of circumnavegation. Pedro Mártir will give us the chance to study an early encyclopedic summa of knowledge about the new lands. The last author to be studied, Ulric Schmidel, produced a little known narrative that shows the other side of the Conquest: a failed enterprise (the first foundation of Buenos Aires).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Section 001 Testimonial Narratives of Latin America.

Instructor(s): Alejandro Hererro-Olaizola (aherrero@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The historical representation of Latin America from Colonial texts emphasized the remarkable qualities of this newly discovered world. These early accounts were often conditioned by the need to justify the activities undertaken by the conquerors, and resulted in the blending of supposedly objective historical discourse with literary and personal accounts. This intertwining of the literary and the personal in historical accounts persists as a significant mode of contemporary expression in Latin America. This course will examine the writing of personal accounts and witnessing (testimonios) in the construction of historical discourse. We will pay particular attention to the significance of this documentary trend in relation to the socioeconomic and ideological conflicts endemic in today's Latin America.

TENTATIVE READING LIST:

García Márquez. La aventura de Miguel Littín clandestino en Chile
. Relato de un náufrago.
Elena Poniatowska. Hasta no verte Jesus mío.
Elizabeth Burgos. Me llamo Rigoberta Menchú.
Miguel Barnet. Biografía de un cimarrón.
Barrios de Chungara, Domitila. Si me permiten hablar.

GRADING: Active participation (20%), Midterm paper (30%), Final paper (30%), Oral Reports (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 001 XIXth Century Foundational Fictions: The Andean Case

Instructor(s): Javier Sanjines (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will study three novels of the period. We will do a comparative study of the Chilean Alberto Blest Gana's "Martin Rivas," the Peruvian Clorinda Matto de Turner's "Aves sin nido," and the Bolivian Nataniel Aguirre's "Juan de la Rosa." Through the study of these three novels, we will see the similarities and also the differences in the socio-historical development of the three Andean nations.

Students are expected to participate very actively in class discussions. There will be a midterm exam and a final take-home.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 002 Topic?

Instructor(s): María Soledad Barbón (mbarbon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

En el centro de este curso está la obra literaria en español del escritor y etnólogo peruano José María Arguedas. En orden cronológico se analizarán sus cuentos Agua (1935), su novela Yawar Fiesta (1941) y su más conocida obra Los ríos profundos (1958), todas narraciones cuyo núcleo fundamental es la sociedad tradicional andina.

A través de una lectura cronológica se enfocarán los mundos cada vez más complejos que se trazan en estos textos, y las implicaciones ideológicas que esa evolución conlleva. Se prestará especial atención al problema del lenguaje, clave fundamental para la comprensión de la obra arguediana, y a su "filiación" con el movimiento indigenista.

Estas lecturas se complementarán con ensayos crítico-literarios del autor y en lo posible, con algunos de sus -generalmente menos conocidos- trabajos etnográficos que él realizó en las regiones descritas en sus novelas.

El curso se dictará en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literature

Section 003 Case Studies in Andean Sociolinguistics. Meets with Latin American and Caribbean Studies 455.001.

Instructor(s): Serafin Coronel-Molina (scoronel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers graduate and advanced undergraduate students with strong competency in Spanish the opportunity to focus their studies on a specific sociolinguistic situation: that of the Andean region, which extends from southern Colombia through Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. While the main emphasis of the course will be on the effects of languages in contact, it is also beneficial to study social and cultural aspects to gain a fuller understanding of the sociolinguistic situation in this region. Given this broad-based approach, the course will be useful for students from a wide range of disciplines, such as linguistics, literature, anthropology, sociology, history and education, among others.

Students will gain an overview of the theoretical foundations of many of the areas within sociolinguistics in general that are specifically relevant to a study of Andean sociolinguistics. The tentative outline of topics includes: languages, dialects and varieties; language contact; bilingualism and bilingual education; code switching and code mixing; language ideologies and attitudes; language maintenance and shift; revitalization and reversing language shift; language and culture; language and gender; language policy and planning; and aspects of multilingualism in cyberspace. The course will take a case-study approach. Students will apply some aspect(s) of the sociolinguistic theory studied in class to a specific case on an Andean country of their choice, and write a research paper on it in Spanish. The class itself will also be conducted in Spanish, although readings will be in both English and Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literature

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level Spanish literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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