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Fall '00 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Core (Division 863)

This page was created at 4:11 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in RC Core

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCCORE

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Core.

To see what has been added to or changed in RC Core this week go to What's New This Week.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.

Intensive Language Courses

Intensive language courses meet in lecture and discussion twice a day four days a week. The language programs have language lunch tables, coffee hours, and other social events. There is a language laboratory in the College, and the language teachers are available for counseling and additional help. If a student begins a new language, proficiency is usually attained in one year through the Residential College program.

FLAIR: Foreign Language Applied to Independent Readings.

To provide more opportunities for the use of foreign language skills, one-hour Independent Studies can be arranged for the following purposes:

  1. Completion of supplementary readings in a foreign language for a class taught in English
  2. Completion of readings assigned in English in the original foreign language.

Students enrolling in FLAIR should discuss the proposed readings with the course instructor. The Independent Study proposal should then be presented to either Mireille Belloni (French), Janet Shier (German), or Eliana Moya-Raggio (Spanish) for further suggestions and approval. The course should then be elected through the RC Counseling Office and an Independent Study number (Core 205, 305, or 405) assigned. Upon completion of the project, the work will be evaluated and credit granted by the sponsoring foreign language coordinator.


RC Core 105. Logic and Language.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carl Cohen (ccohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (MSA).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Argument is the focus of this course, both in symbols and in language. We deal with the forms of arguments, the application of them, what makes them valid or invalid, weak or strong. We do this in two concurrent ways: (a) Microcosmically and (b) Macro-cosmically. Microcosmically, we examine the structure of arguments, what makes them tick. In the deductive sphere we deal with the relations of truth and validity to develop the logic of propositions, and enter the logic of quantification. In the inductive sphere, we deal with argument by analogy, and causal analysis, and with elementary probability theory. Macro-cosmically, we do the analysis of real arguments in controversial contexts, as they are presented in classical and contemporary philosophical writing: ethical arguments (in Plato); political arguments (in J.S. Mill); and legal arguments as they appear in Supreme Court decisions. In all cases, both substance and form are grist for our mill.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 190. Intensive French I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anderson-Burack

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 191. Intensive German I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 193/Russian 103. Intensive First-Year Russian.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 101, 102, 111, or 112. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/services.html

See Russian 103.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

RC Core 194. Intensive Spanish I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cornejo-Krohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 290. Intensive French II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 291. Intensive German II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.rc.lsa.umich.edu/programs/german/index.html

Intensive German II covers second-year German in one term. The goals of the course include review and expansion of the grammar and vocabulary presented in Core 191 and further development of student's reading, writing, and speaking skills. As in the other RC German courses, all instruction is conducted in German. Classroom instruction includes discussions, impromptu speaking exercises, performance of skits, numerous writing assignments, and listening and reading exercises. Reading materials include short prose, fairy tales, poetry, and magazine and newspaper articles. A primary objective which Core 291 students strive to meet is "passing proficiency". Achieving this goal gives students a sense of pride and accomplishment. The proficiency exam serves as a qualifying exam for the next required course in the sequence, RC Core 321 (German Readings).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 310. Accelerated Review-French.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pires

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of Proficiency defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College", in the four linguistic skills. Students who take 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course 290 to do so. "Accelerated Review 310" is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students.

In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style. In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Core 311. Accelerated Review-German.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students who have not yet passed the German proficiency exam, but who do not require the 8-credit RC Core 291 to prepare themselves for it. Assignment develop students' mastery of the 4 skills and improve facility and accuracy of grammar and vocabulary. The goals of this course are to lead student to an advanced intermediate level of proficiency and prepare them for RC Core 321.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Core 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four academic terms of language but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this class is the discussion of primary source materials of literary, cultural, and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency with several listening and reading comprehension exercises, grammar tests, and weekly written assignments evaluated for accuracy of expression.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Existentialism

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Burruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Far from being a doctrine, Existentialism is fundamentally a philosophical tendency. Born of a reaction against Hegelian rationalism, the different existentialist tendencies come together in the rehabilitation of freedom, subjectivity and individual existence. In this course, we will attempt, through our readings, to discern the characteristics of various existentialist concepts. After a brief survey of the precursors and the "founders" of existentialism, we will focus on two members of what has been called the Philosophical School of Paris, namely Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. The study of Albert Camus' conception of the human condition and the absurd will lead us to the "Théâtre de l'Absurde" which we will approach through plays by Eugène Ionesco. Concepts such as, among others, suicide, "engagement", and the Other will be emphasized according to student interests.

Students will be asked to write short essays on the readings and to participate actively in class discussions.

Assigned works:
Jean-Paul Sartre: L'Existentialisme est un humanisme, La Nausée (excerpts), Les Mouches, Le Mur.
Albert Camus: Le Myth de Sisyphe (excerpts), Caligula, L'Étranger.
Simone de Beauvoir: Les Bouches inutiles, excerpts from Le Sang des autres from Tous les hommes sont mortels.
Eugène Ionesco: La Cantatrice chauve.

Film:
Luis Puenzo: La Peste

Audio-visual materials:
Interviews with Sartre, Camus and de Beauvoir.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Presse et Television en France

Instructor(s): Pires

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will focus on the cultural and social analysis of the two major media in France, popular press and television, to get an insight into French society. We will also look at the way the French consider their media. The analysis will be basically conducted according to the following pattern: Who says What to Whom through Which Channel.

We will start with an overall study of the press and television landscape to draw out an image of the average French, their behavior (voyeurism) and habits (channel surfing); "Tell me which newspaper or magazine you read or which channel you watch, and I will tell you who you are!" Other issues addressed: Do the French trust their media? Do they feel manipulated? If yes, how? How is violence in the media dealt with? How is advertising on TV revealing of a French liberalism? Are the media always telling the truth? What are now their responsibilities towards the people? Can we still talk about communication and information at a time when developing electronic media, of which the ownership is concentrated within the hands of a few giants, have the power to address the bigger number of citizens? Course evaluation will be based on both creative and critical papers, oral presentation, active class participation and preparation and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Modern German Prose and Poetry

Instructor(s): Erica Paslick (ekp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will begin with two short stories by Musil and Kaschnitz, and then read Kafka's Die Verwandlung, and Andersch's Sansibar oder der letzte Grund, followed by a selection of poetry from Hölderlin, Rilke, Celan, Trakl, and Eich. As a term project, all participants will be asked to read one additional short story not included in the general curriculum and prepare a carefully written analysis of it for presentation in class during the last three weeks of the term. Each student will join a study group and work regularly with that group to prepare assignments. Taking turns, these groups will initiate and lead class discussions. Simultaneously we will endeavor to refine our use of German through frequent short writing assignments, poetry recitations, lexical drills, and stylistic exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 323. Russian Readings.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Russian Fairy Tales

Instructor(s): Naroditskaya

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency in Russian (by RC standards). (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our reading course will immerse students into the enchanting world of fairy tales, the earliest form of narrative, that holds a very special place in Russian culture and discloses Russian customs, sayings, idiomatic expressions, rituals, and beliefs. Story telling and class discussions will be accompanied with visual illustration including master pieces of Russian art and video recordings of fairy tales and folk rituals.

Russian fairy tales were typically improvised, enacted, performed with music and dances, and written down. All these creative activities will be experienced by the students in our class. They will read folk tales and poetic fairy tales by Russian writers such as A. Pushkin, A. Ostrovsky, and A. Tolstoy. Analyzing and discussing these tales in class, students will write their own "magic stories," which by the end of the academic term will be collected in an illustrated book. Reading tales aloud and in roles will culminate in a class theatrical production of a chosen tale.

Work with this rich artistic material significantly expand students' vocabulary, ability to comment on various subjects, and freedom of verbal expression in Russian. This course engages students in study of language, creative writing familiarizes them with the roots and significance of Russian culture.

Requirements: Reading encompasses 8-11 short tales; about 25 pages weekly; memorization of short poetic excerpts. All material is incorporated in the course pack. Writing assignments includes two fairy tales and one play created by every student, as well as weekly dairy, editing and vocabulary exercises. Performance involves individual creativity, ability to edit and improvise roles and participate in all aspects of theatricals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001 La Familia y el Drama Hispanoamericano.

Instructor(s): Cornejo-Krohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore family systems (structure, dynamics, function/dysfunction, and communication) as they are presented in Spanish and Latin American dramas. We will consider traditional family structures, gender roles, and restrictive demands placed on each family member. The conflict between child and parent will be studied as an oppressive patriarchal structure for the child as well as a challenging and often unfulfilling responsibility for the parent. Likewise, we will look at the relationship between wife and husband as a source of frustration for both sexes confined by rigidly defined roles in the family unit. The family as a subsystem will also lead us to a discussion of the larger systems of class and culture. Students will keep a journal, write a brief dramatic piece based a short narrative, and write two comparative essays.

Tentative reading list includes: La casa de Bernarda Alba and Yerma , Federico García Lorca; El rastro, Elena Garro; El gesticulador and El niño y la niebla, Rodolfo Usigli; Y nos dijeron que éramos inmortales, Osvaldo Dragún; Historia de una escalera, Antonio Buero Vallejo ; La mordaza, Alfonso Sastre; La noche de los asesinos, José Triana.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Bilingualism: Linguistic Competence vs Linguistic Culture

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide a global understanding of bilingualism, one that is not limited to the acquisition of linguistic competence, but rather a view that recognizes bilingualism as a means for the development of linguistic culture. Initial exploration into the topic will focus on linguistic aspects of bilingualism, such as bilingual types, patterns of language acquisition, features of bilingual speech, among others. Afterwards, we will examine the sociocultural value associated to bilingualism. What is the relevance of bilingual education in our society? What myths and beliefs are associated with bilingual education? How do these beliefs reflect the relationship between the majority language and national identity? How do they affect language policy? How do they affect the education of linguistic-minority students? How do they affect the development of a linguistic cultural identity? The latter part of the course will analyze how bilingual programs address both the development of linguistic competence and linguistic culture and, more importantly, what is the linguistic competence and culture being promoted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 003 Race, Ethnicity, Class, and Gender in 20th Century Mexico

Instructor(s): Hempel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class proposes to examine the intersections of Race, ethnicity, class, and gender in Mexico throughout the 20th century. We will study the manifestations of such elements in the literary genres of essay and short story as well as the visual arts, film, and music. The interdisciplinary approach of the course is designed to provide a multifaceted image of the complex topic at hand. In addition to tracing the evolution of concepts and movements such as mestizaje, malinchismo, indigenismo, and feminism, this course aims to problematize the possibility of a truly integrated study of ethnicity, class, and gender. As part of said aim, students will analyze various works in three essays of 3-5 pages each. In addition, students will express their ideas and perspectives )in writing, visually, or through other creative means) in several reaction papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 The City Observed: Through the Eyes of the Flaneur, Voyeur, and Voyageur.

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

PARIS, BERLIN, LONDON and NEW YORK. Cities have been continuous subjects and objects of literary and cinematic exploration. These "landscapes built out of people" are places of constant change and dense activity offering seemingly endless possibility; adventure and self-discovery, but also anonymity and alienation. The particular filters of the meandering flaneur, the goal-oriented tourist and the eternal traveler offer different perspectives on the city and on the writer's relationship with, experience and reinvention of the city. Through these observer's eyes, we will explore the relationship between insider and outsider, physical place and the imagination. Our explorations will draw on literature and film and will encompass modern, postmodern and futuristic perspectives on cities in Europe and North America.

Tentative Reading List:
Rilke, The Notebooks of Malte Laurid Brigge; Calvino, Invisible Cities; Kerouac, Visions of Cody Doctorow Ragtime; Baudelaire, Appollinaire; Rimbaud, select poems; Tester The Flaneur; Benjamin, One Way Street; Poe, Man of the Crowd; Certeau, Walking the City."

Films will include:
The Cruise, Metropolis, Bladerunner, Run Lola Run, Modern Times, Paris Was a Woman, The Fifth Element, Lisbon Story, Wings of Desire.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 Women's Health Awareness Collaboration. Meets with RC Social Science 360.002.

Instructor(s): Janet Shier (jshie@umich.edu), Jennifer Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, students will examine issues and attitudes about women's health through assignments, discussions with visiting guest lecturers, and outreach interviews with women who have acute, chronic, and terminal illnesses. They will also explore the impact of illness from a developmental perspective; i.e., how does the presence of an illness affect family life (marital relationships, children) and the attainment/fulfillment of educational and career goals?

Through theater improvisation exercises (what works on stage) and creative writing assignments, students will gain insight into issues raised in class or in outreach interviews (what works in the outside world). In exploring their own and other's attitudes towards illness as physical reality and as metaphor, students will use their findings as a basis to create and develop material for a multi-media workshop performance, to be presented in December 2000.

This course is open to any U-M students who desire to expand their academic experience and who wish to learn more about human health through readings, discussion, outreach, and theater improvisation and performance. Previous experience with theater is NOT a pre-requisite for participation. Students interested in careers in health care are encouraged to enroll.

Students should expect to spend some additional time outside of class (i.e., rehearsal time) as necessary, the two weeks leading up to the workshop performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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This page was created at 4:11 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.


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