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Fall '00 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session on wolverineacccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Interdivisional (Division 867)

This page was created at 4:11 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Open courses in RC Interdivisional

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCIDIV

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Interdivisional.

To see what has been added to or changed in RC Interdivisional this week go to What's New This Week.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Interdiv. 240/Environ. Studies 240. Big Questions for a Small Planet: Introduction to Environmental Studies.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 502.001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu) , Catherine Badgley (cbadgley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/502/

See Psychology 502.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 001 Frankenfoods: The science and politics of genetically engineered crops. Meets October 1-17. (Drop/Add deadline=October 5).

Instructor(s): John Vandermeer (jvander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will address the issue of genetic engineering in food. Currently one-third to one-half of the U.S. corn and soybean crop is planted with genetically modified varieties. An equal proportion of dairy cows are injected with genetically engineered bovine growth hormone. This course will give an overview of the biology and discuss the social, economic, environmental, and health implications of this new technology. The format of the course will include both lectures and small group discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 003 Partnership in Academic Learning through Service. Course meets Sept. 18, Oct. 2, 16, Nov. 6, 20, and Dec. 4. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.rc.lsa.umich.edu/programs/palsindex.htm

Each student is expected to put in at least 10 hours during the semester in Wayne Westland Schools, working with either a 9:30-10:30 class or a 1:00-2:00 class. (Plan on 30 minutes travel time each way.) Transportation will be discussed at the first class session. (Arrangements for travel are the responsibility of students in the class; some travel funds will be available.)

The main objectives of this course are four-fold:

  1. To establish a strong partnership between the RC and Wayne Westland schools
  2. To provide opportunities for RC students to gain practical experience working with at-risk students and their teachers (through cooperation with Wayne Westland project partners)
  3. To design and implement an ongoing service learning project involving college (RC), high school, and elementary students, working in tandem
  4. To positively influence learning outcomes of at risk students in Wayne Westland schools through joint cooperation in a Literacy Corps.

RC students in the course will participate in the design and implementation of a service learning project (or projects), with cooperation of and guidance from project partners. Projects may include, but are not limited to, participation in the development of an ongoing Literacy Corps at Roosevelt Elementary, activities involving learning through engagement with the arts, and development of a www-based project. Course participants are encouraged to bring their own experiences and ideas to the course as they will get involved at the ground level of what promises to be a series of very exciting and promising projects. In the course we will discover ways to bring about a change in education systems (through theory and practice).

Readings and discussions will focus, in part, on the following questions:

  • What factors put students at risk (e.g., generational poverty, drug and alcohol addiction), and how can these be addressed?

  • What are the advantages of teaching to multiple intelligences and learning styles?

  • What is an effective service learning project?

At least one class session may be held at Wayne Memorial High School. One class session may be dropped in lieu of an appointment with a project partner. This will be determined on the first day of class.

Course Requirements:

  • Attendance and participation at Monday evening class sessions (dates listed above);
  • Appointments with project partners, as necessary, at times to be arranged (explanation the first day of class);
  • At least 10 hours "service" with Wayne Westland partners (further description of this, including transportation issues, to be discussed Sept. 18);
  • Documentation of the project through portfolio assignments (including reflections) and any student work (e.g., writings, photos, art, video, web site design) generated during the project.

Contributions of "best reflections" and a two-page summary reflection for a class book and end-of-semester celebration. Students are encouraged to submit writings, photos, and artwork by elementary or high school students, as well as their own work.

NB: This course will build on the discussions from last year's PALS. Students who participated in PALS last year are welcome to participate again for credit. Students who took the mini-course in Fall 1999 will not be required to attend Monday night sessions, although they are invited to do so.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Interdiv. 350. Special Topics.

Section 004 Household Things. Meets 9/22-9/24. (Drop/Add deadline=September 26).

Instructor(s): William Christian

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ann Arbor households as changing and accumulating landscapes of memory and affect. After an introductory session on Friday, on Saturday students will observe and participate in a demonstration conversation, then go out in pairs and ask people in two different households about specific kinds of things. The households have been contacted and have agreed to be tape-recorded. Students will compare their interviews in a Saturday supper class, and Sunday morning will talk to people at yard sales, before a final lunch class. Each pair of students will be responsible for transcribing interviews, and each student must submit a short analysis or insights based on the interviews.

The papers and interviews should focus on a particular aspect for comparison, such as: what is in the attic, and why; divinity in pictures, statues, and books; the bedroom decorations of two twelve-year-olds, girl and boy; the automobile(s); tools and tool benches; "art" on the walls; the arrangement of objects meant for display; collections; souvenirs; choices in landscaping. Students interested in literature might want to consider the narratives themselves as a genre of stories that adhere to objects, and compare them as oral literature.

This course may be especially rewarding for students interested for a personal reason (they like gardens or cars, they love their grandmother, their parents have just gotten divorced and their household has gotten dispersed) and those who have never done anything like this before.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 005 Job Search Strategies for Residential College Students. Course meets Oct. 25-Dec. 6. (Drop/Add deadline=November 8).

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This new mini-course will assist RC students in identifying and marketing their liberal arts skills to potential employers. Students interested in learning how to find internships and/or full-time jobs will engage in steps and strategies to organize, implement and sustain a job search. RC alumni/ae will serve as guest speakers to provide insight on how they translated their education and experiences into the workplace. Topics and assignments will include resume and cover letter writing, interviewing skills and practice, and developing and utilizing multiple job search strategies. Each student will have the opportunity to tailor their individual goals for the course to target fields and geographic areas of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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This page was created at 4:11 PM on Wed, Dec 13, 2000.


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