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Fall '00 Course Guide

Courses in German (Division 379)

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

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German 101. Elementary Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focussing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science, to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 101. Elementary Course.

Section 007 Music Students Only.

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section is intended specifically for Music students and is open to others only by permission of the instructor. It will follow the same basic syllabus and philosophie described above for the "regular" 101 sections, but we will take advantage of every opportunity to set the course in a musical context and take advantage of students' musical abilities.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 101. Elementary Course.

Section 100.

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focussing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science, to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 101. Elementary Course.

Section 200 Music Students Only.

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 102. Elementary Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 102 is the continuation of German 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 103. Review of Elementary German.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 100 or 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

German 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 111. First Special Reading Course.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The class is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This is a fast-paced course with a substantial workload, intended for students with some experience in language learning, and is therefore recommended only to graduate students who wish to meet a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates who have already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 171/Hist. 171. Coming to Terms with Germany.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Germany and Europe in the 1990s.

Instructor(s): Andrei Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look at the problems and politics of contemporary Germany through the prism of history. By looking at previous political regimes which governed Germany just in the 20th century absolute monarchy, unstable liberal democracy, totalitarian fascism, stable liberal democracy, bureaucratic communism the course will shed light on the vicissitudes of the "German Question" and its importance for European politics as a whole.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 172. History of German Cinema.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Film Screenings Thursdays, 4-6 p.m.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 180. First Year Seminar.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 The German Language and Culture in the United States.

Instructor(s): Robin Queen (rqueen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. Taught in English. Taught in English(3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Between 1700 and 1950 over 7 million German-speaking immigrants came to the United States. What happened to their culture and language once they got here? In this seminar, we will explore the experience of German immigrants to the United States, looking especially at the social, political and historical processes that affected the maintenance and loss of the German language and German culture in the United States. The seminar will include fieldtrips to towns such as Frankenmuth, MI. The course will be based primarily on discussion and brief lectures. Students will produce regular short written assignments and two 6 page essays. No knowledge of German is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 180. First Year Seminar.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 Literature and Culture of War in Germany.

Instructor(s): Timothy Bahti (timbahti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. Taught in English. Taught in English(3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 205. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level conversation course may not register for 205 or 206. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to overcome the silence which you may experience when attempting to articulate everyday needs in German. In this course, you will hone your German conversation skills by learning basic idiomatic expressions and by building a fundamental vocabulary. In-class and out-of-class exercises will place you inside a bank where you may open an account or order checks (without financial allowances); you will find victuals on the food market or an apartment on the housing market; you will learn both to describe physical discomfort and to get your hair trimmed without physical discomfort.

In addition, newspaper or magazine articles along with films and music segments may illustrate the German cultural landscape at large. Active class participation, occasional vocabulary quizzes, and short oral presentations establish the course requirements.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 221. Accelerated Third Semester German.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed 230 or 231. Four credits granted to those who have completed German 102 or 103. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course combines an intensive review of basic grammar with more advanced practice in the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking). Substantial emphasis will be placed on providing a firm grammatical base, and on reading, discussing, and writing about authentic German texts from a variety of fields ranging from natural and social science to history, literature, and the arts. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and from classic texts by Nietzsche and others independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 231. Second-Year Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 221. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts.

By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and classic texts by Nietzsche and others, independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in German 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.) regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes.

Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. By the end of the course, students should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and converse fairly comfortably in a German-speaking country. In particular, they should be ready to embark on an introduction to the study in German of an academic discipline of their choice in one of the specialty 232 courses.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 001 Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm: Their Lives, Scholarship, and Collection of Fairy Tales.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the lives of the nineteenth-century scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm and their ever-popular collection of fairy tales. The primary goal of the course will be to situate the most famous work of the Brothers Grimm into their wide-ranging scholarly interests. The course will include an introduction to their lives and scholarship. Both the intellectual motivations behind the fairy tale project and the manner in which the tales were collected will be explored in depth. The course will devote significant time to the tales themselves, including many that are not well-known in the U.S. A wide range of materials and assignments will be employed in the course. Required texts include an edition of the tales and a course pack containing excerpts from biographies of the Brothers Grimm, passages from the Grimms' scholarly publications and personal correspondence, and exercises to improve students' reading and writing skills.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 002 Contemporary German Society & Business Culture.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 003, 004 Mathematical and Scientific German.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course serves as an excellent introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields. In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc. In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 005 Resistance in Nazi Germany.

Instructor(s): Puff

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 236. (4). (LR). All sections of German 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 300. German Grammar and Composition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kalli Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 305. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level conversation course may not register for 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 310. Readings in German Culture.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Residence in Max Kade German House; others by permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 325. Intermediate German.

Section 001 Legal German.

Instructor(s): Rast

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for credit, provided the topic is different, with permission of department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 325. Intermediate German.

Section 002 Intro to German Lit.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for credit, provided the topic is different, with permission of department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 325. Intermediate German.

Section 003 The German Language Through Space and Time.

Instructor(s): Robert Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for credit, provided the topic is different, with permission of department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this section of German 325 is to acquaint students with the discourse and methods of German dialectology and language history. We shall survey the historical development of German and its dialects from the beginnings to the present day, in the context of changing sociological, political, economic, and cultural environments. As we study the changes in vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar of German, we shall also examine illustrative texts from a variety of genres, translate the older ones into modern German, and compare their features with those of modern German.

Toward the end of the course, we shall turn our attention to East and West, political Left and Right, generations, and genders, and how those divisions are reflected in language behavior. Class discussions will be based primarily on assigned readings in Stedje, Die deutsche Sprache gestern und heute, on the illustrative texts in the course pack, and on homework problems. Grammar will be reviewed as required. Students will present several oral reports in class and write approximately one short essay every second week. Active participation in class discussions is expected. The language of instruction, discussion, class presentations and essays is German.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

German 325. Intermediate German.

Section 004 The Bauhaus and Its Public.

Instructor(s): Michael Latham (mrlatham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for credit, provided the topic is different, with permission of department.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the often vexed relationship between the Bauhaus and its respective publics in Weimar, Dessau and Berlin, as well as the broader German public outside of its various host cities. Using as our textbooks, the series of Bauhausbuecher published between 1925 and 1931 which were understood to serve as a form of public outreach as much as a pedagogical program we will also consider other dimensions of the relationship between the Bauahus and the public: from performances and festivals in Weimar and Dessau to the experimental "Haus am Horn" in Weimar and the Toerten-Settlement in a working-class suburb of Dessau.

We will give particular attention to the changing pedagogical and socio-political objectives of the school, and to its relationship with the German Communist Party and the National Socialist government that would close the school and drive most of its masters and students out of Germany. Readings by Walter Gropius, Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Laszls Moholy-Nagy, Kasimir Malevich, Theo van Doesburg, Piet Mondrian, others. All readings in German; discussions in German and English.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 329. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

German 350. Business German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. While covering topics which are necessary and appropriate for students planning a career in international business, the course also teaches and practices the skills essential to function proficiently and appropriately in the world of German business. After an introduction to the geography and economics of the 16 German states, students concentrate on such areas of interest as: company structure and practices, finance and banking, industry, communication and transportation, ecology, and Germany in the European and global business worlds. Emphasis is placed on cultural aspects of Business German. Students are encouraged to understand and function appropriately within the framework and culture of the German business world.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 351. Practice in Business German.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 349 or 350, and internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to receive credit for an internship in a German-speaking country completed previous to registering for the course. During the term, the student will complete and turn in a three part report written in German. Part one will be a research paper on the city, area, and country where the student completed the internship. Part two will be a research paper on the company or business which provided the internship. Part three will be a longer journal concerning the daily conduct of the internship and the living situation. Finally, the student will make an oral presentation concerning the internship to either the 350 or the 430 Business German Class.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

German 375/MEMS 375/Rel. 375. Celtic and Nordic Mythology.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Astrid Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will deal with several cycles of myths and sagas, including Beowulf in the Anglo-Saxon literature; the Nibelungenlied in the Germanic literature; Tristan and Isolde, the Mabinogi tale of Pwyll, Branwen, Culwch & Olwen, Gwion Bach & Taliesin, and the Arthurian tales in the Welsh cycles; the Tain in the Irish cycle; and the sagas of the Prose Edda in the world of the Nordic gods. Readings will incorporate other literature based on these myths, such as Gray's ode The Fatal Sisters, which deals with the Valkyries as messengers of Odin, Longfellow's poem Tegner's Drapa which bemoans Balder's death, and perhaps also the Erlkönig or Wagner's Ring Cycle in music and literature. Grades will be based on several exams and a paper.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

German 382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Weineck

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 384. Short Fiction: Romanticism to Realism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hermann Weiss (hfweiss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 232. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to some of the major figures and movements in German literature from the end of the eighteenth to the second half of the nineteenth century through the study of selected masterworks of short fiction. Furthermore, it offers the students the opportunity to gain some insight into the cultural as well as the social and political trends of this period. The readings consist of short works of fiction by such authors as L. Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, J.v. Eichendorff, H.v. Kleist, G. Büchner, A.v. Droste-Hülshoff, F. Grillparzer, and G. Keller, G. Hauptmann. German will be used as much as possible in this course. The course grade will be based on class participation and two papers.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 401/Hist. 416. Nineteenth-Century German and European Thought.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German concentrators must be concurrently enrolled in German 403. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 405. Conversation Practice.

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 425. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hermann Weiss (hfweiss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: German 325/326. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. German 426 may be taken independently of German 425.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 449. Special Topics in English Translation.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 The Emigration of German Modernism.

Instructor(s): Michael Latham

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did New York become the center of modern art in the post-war years? Chicago the center of international architecture? What did the Container Corporation of America have to do with the arranging the marriage of commerce and modernism, and with promoting the concept of corporate culture? How did significant holdings in 20th century European art end up in such unlikely places as Detroit, Minneapolis and St. Louis? This course follows the emigration of artists associated with German Expressionism and the Bauhaus into exile from Hitler's Germany and relocation in the United States. We will direct particular attention to the development of new institutions for instruction in art and design; mass production and industrial design, and the uneasy relationship of commerce and culture at mid-century. Readings, artworks, architecture and design by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Marcel Breuer, Laszls Moholy-Nagy, Herbert Bayer, Josef and Anni Albers, Max Beckmann, Oskar Kokoschka, others. All readings and discussions in English.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 465/MEMS 475/Hist. 485. Marriage and Marital Life in History: Medieval and Early Modern Germany.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Puff

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 491. German Honors Proseminar.

Section Topic?

Instructor(s): Rast

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


German 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 Management and Marketing.

Instructor(s): Janet Van Valkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers authentic information and terminology as they apply to professional practices in the fields of company structure, management and marketing in the German-speaking world. Using authentic situations and materials, the students become acquainted with the forms, roles and related organizations of German companies. These are followed by management and manager skills, marketing and advertising in German companies. The course includes the essential cross-cultural aspects of doing business in/with Germany and is interactive. German is the language of instruction.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 503/EducationD 500. Teaching German/Applied Linguistics.

Section 001 Applied Linguistics for Teachers of German.

Instructor(s): Robert Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If one source of difficulty in the acquisition of a foreign language is the structure of the foreign language itself, especially where it differs significantly from the structure of one's native language, then the teacher of the foreign language should be aware of those differences and be prepared to address them directly or indirectly in the classroom.

The primary goal of the course will be to undertake a systematic comparison of the structures of American English and German in order to identify these areas of potential difficulty for the American learner of German, and to devise approaches for dealing with them. We shall focus on the structures of pronunciation, word formation and inflection, sentence formation, discourse, and semantics. Going beyond a simple contrastive analysis, however, we shall also consider learner-strategies that are independent of structural discrepancies between first language and second language.

Our approach will be eclectic, touching upon several models of linguistic description structural linguistics, cognitive grammar, dependency grammar, developmental linguistics, etc. and will not be keyed to any single theoretical dogma. We shall consider several relevant issues: children's acquisition of language, circumstances prohibiting children's acquisition of language, adult acquisition strategies, Gastarbeiterdeutsch, language contact phenomena in general, and especially the social implications of adherence/non-adherence to the perceived Standard.

Students should have a good command of English and German. Previous coursework in linguistics is not required. There will be homework problems, frequent short written exercises, a short mid-way paper, a final paper of approximately 20 pages, and an oral presentation of the final paper. Students will also be asked to lead discussions on topics of special interest to them.

German 503 is open to graduates and undergraduates, and counts toward the 30-hour German concentration as well as the 18-hour German minor. It also counts toward the Education School's requirements for Teaching Certificate candidates in German.

The required text is Anthony Fox, The Structure of German (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990), plus a course pack (at Accucopy). Additional articles and book-chapters will be available in the Department Seminar Library.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

German 540. Introduction to German Studies.

Section 001 Meets with History 591.002.

Instructor(s): Scott Spector (spec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


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