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Fall '00 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

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History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 101. Near Eastern and European Art from the Stone Age to the End of the Middle Ages.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Maxwell (maxwell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/

This course offers an introduction to major monuments and periods of art from antiquity through the Middle Ages. Its purpose is not only to acquaint students with key works of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine, Islamic, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture, but also to help them develop a vocabulary for the description and analysis of works of art, and to provide them with a basic understanding of the methods and aims of art historical study. Lectures will be supplemented by weekly discussion sections on readings drawn from a general art historical survey and a course pack. Written work will consist of two short papers on objects in the Kelsey Museum and the Museum of Art; there will be a midterm and a final exam.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 108/CAAS 108. Introduction to African Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dana Rush (danarush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/

This course is a one-term introductory survey of the arts of Africa. Sculpture, pottery, textiles, architecture, body adornment, and performance will be examined and discussed on the basis of aesthetic, religious, political, and social contexts. Although the main emphasis of the course will be on "traditional art," we will discuss many changes and continuities within African artistic traditions as evidenced in late twentieth century African art. The course is arranged geographically from western through central to eastern and southern Africa, and will conclude across the Atlantic Ocean with a brief investigation of African visual traditions in the Caribbean and the Americas. Weekly discussion sections, movies and videos, and museum visits will complement the lecture.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 112/Art and Design 112. History of Photography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol Jacobsen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/

This course will explore the history of photography in the 19th and 20th century through a comparative study of photographs, photographers, and theories about the nature of photography. The goal is to create an understanding of the themes and issues, concepts and contexts associated with photographic image-making from American and international perspectives. One intent is that at the end of the study the student should be aware of some of the diverse concerns in present day photography and be able to identify their origins and influences. The class should interest students from a wide range of disciplines. Class structure combines three hours of lecture sessions a week for general structured presentation of material, with one hour of discussion section that meets weekly for deeper study of the main theories about the nature of photography and its role in shaping our understanding of the world. Assignments will include readings from course texts and completion of some computer-based tasks using special programs developed for use with this program. Grades will be based on participation in discussion sections, three essays, and a final exam.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001, 002 Sex, Politics, and Visuality in Chinese Cinema.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

This course introduces and interprets Chinese cinema by focusing on three themes: "the color of sex, violence and revolution (Red Series);" "the symbol of women (Water Series);" and "the dream of a strong China (Modernity Series)." Varying methods of cinematic analysis will be introduced with case studies. The goal is to explore the issues of gender, politics, and visuality in Chinese films and society. Requirement: weekly readings, class participation, multiple writing assignments, and a final paper.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 221/Class. Arch. 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

See Classical Archaeology 221.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 230/Amer. Cult. 230. Art and Life in 19th-Century America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

This course asks what the study of art history and American history can tell us about each other through a survey of art, architecture, and material culture produced during the nineteenth century. This complex period saw the transformation of the United States from a rural to an industrial, urban nation; a Civil War that divided the country, Westward expansion that enlarged it, and waves of immigration and border movement that changed its population; the rise of a middle class; and the emergence of women into public and professional life. American artists and architects sought to rival their European contemporaries and eventually produced distinctive works that responded to national trends.

Through lectures, discussion, and visits to see original works of art in museums and libraries, along with readings in primary-source documents and recent critical interpretations, we will examine both developments in the fine arts and the impact of historical change on the material and popular culture of everyday life in America. Among the topics to be investigated are: the role of art in creating an image of America as "nature's nation"; machine-made art and machines as art; the West as viewed from the painter's easel, the photographer's lens, and the frontier homestead; the interaction of Native American artists, Anglo settlers, and the tourist trade; the creation of Civil War monuments; parlors and the ideology of the Victorian home; mass-produced images and the dissemination of art for middle-class taste; the brooding psychology in the Gilded-Age paintings of Eakins, Homer, and Cassatt.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 250/MEMS 250. Italian Renaissance Art, I.

Section 001 The Art of Florence and Northern Italy, 1300-1490.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

How did the works of Giotto, Donatello, Masaccio, Mantegna, and Leonardo come to be regarded as so important in the history of western art? Why, even within the artists' lifetimes, was their art regarded as signaling a "rebirth" of painting and sculpture? To what extent was their legendary reputation seen to serve other social and political interests? This course aims at an understanding of early Renaissance art by seeing it in relation to broader transformations in the culture of the Italian city in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The city will be viewed as the site of divergent uses of art by different communities and interests, who employed images for the expression of identity and status and as a strategic means of producing consensus or exploiting social division. Lectures and sections will be organized around the exploration of particular genres of visual media the altarpiece, mural painting, the multimedia chapel, portraiture, and monumental public sculpture. All of these forms are explored as modes of argument and as points of interaction among networks of clients, artists, social groups and institutions (guilds, family associations, courts, confraternities), and figures of authority (saints, mystics, Popes, rulers). From this multiplicity of uses and responses emerged highly varied conceptions of the nature of the image and the role of the artist, which in turn influenced artistic performance.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 271. Origins of Modernism: Nineteenth Century Visual Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Howard Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, State-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Neo-Impressionism that emerged in opposition to official art. The Nineteenth Century is the period during which modern art developed its characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns: an insistence on innovation, originality, and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a somewhat strained allegiance with radical politics and alternative subcultures. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of visual representation, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting. The course is designed to encourage close readings of images (by David, Gericault, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Cezanne, et al.) within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debate

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 341. The Gothic Age.

Section 001 The Art of Medieval Paris.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

During the 13th and 14th centuries, the city of Paris was pre-eminent in the arts. Parisian artisans, serving a broad urban clientele, created trend-setting works of art that exerted an influence in all parts of Europe. The first part of this course which offers a basic introduction to Gothic art and architecture will be devoted to reconstructing the medieval city and to becoming acquainted with surviving architectural monuments (e.g., The Cathedral of Notre-Dame, the Sainte-Chapelle). The second part will concern the making and marketing of precious objects in all media: illuminated manuscripts, ivories, works in gold, silver and enamel, tapestries. Issues of royal, aristocratic, and bourgeois patronage will frequently come to the fore.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 Visual Arts of Medicine.

Instructor(s): Pat Simons

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

When most of us look at an anatomical illustration, we think we are seeing an unmediated report of physical "truth", whereas the viscera and other parts of an actual body are not so neatly arranged. What even constitutes an "interior" of a body varies in different cultures. Different cultural systems have produced visual records of their "truths" about the body. Medicine increasingly relies on visual technologies like MRI and CT scans for diagnosis, but many cultures have long depended on the visual mapping of medical knowledge. This visual ordering in places like Assyria, Egypt, China, India, the Middle East, Europe, and North America has produced a vast array of material artifacts and practices, including acupuncture or bleeding charts, anatomical diagrams, illustrated textbooks, herbals, figurines of the female body used by patients whose modesty was protected through these surrogates, mummification, magic amulets, photographic records of "hysterics", art therapy techniques, advertisements for Prozac presenting metaphors for a "healthy mind", or the design of hospitals and asylums. In particular, the course will focus on ways in which social assumptions regarding gender and race have informed the visual reporting of medical "fact". The aim of this course is to better understand our own assumptions and visual practices by placing forms of medical knowledge in an historical and cross-cultural context. Thereby, we will learn not only more about medicine but also about the ways in which visual literacy both shapes the very formation of knowledge and assists in the dissemination and codification of a culturally specific sense of "the body". We will work closely with the themes and objects of a concurrent exhibition, Seeing is Healing? The Visual Arts of Medicine held at the UMMA. Classroom work and student projects will focus on using, and adding to, entries on an associated Web site.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 Displaying African Culture in the West. Meets with CAAS 358.002. Prerequisite: History of Art 108 or 360

Instructor(s): Dana Rush (danarush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

The first part of this course will be a critical analysis of the history of the display of African art in the West from the "curiosity cabinets" of Europe to the contemporary exhibitions of African art in the United States. We will analyze pivotal shows of African art in the United States, and based on our conclusions we will curate a show of African art in the University of Michigan Museum of Art. The class will be responsible for devising a theme for the show; choosing the objects from the 300 + objects in storage; panels to accompany them; writing a gallery guide; and choosing other elements to include in the show such as enlarged photographs, music, and/or video to contextualize the objects. There will be no exams or research papers, but dedication to the show and cooperation with class members will be key. Prerequisite: HA 108, or permission of instructor. Register via override only

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 The Avant-Garde.

Instructor(s): Maria Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

No Description Provided


Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 The Art of China. Meets with Asian Studies 380.001

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

An introduction and analysis of Chinese art from the beginning to the modern era. Instead of giving a simple survey, this course is designed as a series of "talks," summarizing the development of Chinese art and highlighting crucial problems in studying this art. Monumental works and key artists are analyzed in Chinese political, religious, ritual, and artistic contexts. Special attention will be paid to the interplay between social changes and artistic changes. Requirements: Students who take the course must attend all the lectures and should read assigned materials before each class; one 5-page written assignment based on an analysis of original works of art is required. Examinations include a one-hour midterm and a two-hour final examination. The midterm exam will include identification and comparison of visual materials (slides). The final exam will include (1) identification and comparison of visual materials (slides) and (2) a one-hour prepared essay on a topic selected from a list compiled by the instructor.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 396. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual Honors research.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Hist. Art 411. Interpretations of Landscape.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102 or 103. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

This course examines the evolution of the taste for landscape painting as a special topic in art history. The taste for landscape painting evolved both in China and in Europe under social circumstances which, though hardly identical, are open to historical comparison. The course centers around essays on the problem of landscape painting by historians of Chinese and European art history as well as translated readings from early treatises on landscape, East and West. We shall discuss problems such as the types of patron groups that foster landscape painting, relations between economic development, tourism and landscape painting, the rhetorical uses of landscape painting, the relationship between landscape painting and practices of land ownership, the transferal of social values onto the landscape and critical terms employed in discourses of landscape painting. Readings include essays by John Barrell, Ann Bermingham, James Cahill, E.H. Gombrich, Joseph Koerner, Richard Vinograd, and others. There will be a midterm during which passages from the assigned reading will be presented for interpretation. There will also be a final and a term project focusing on a specific Chinese landscape painting, preferably one in local collections.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 415/WS 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 Women and Gender in Roman Art and Cult: the Villa of the Mysteries At Pompeii.

Instructor(s): Elaine Gazda (gazda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or history of art. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

This course will examine issues that relate to the social roles, religious practices and personal aspirations of the women of Roman Italy, especially those who lived in the multicultural region of the Bay of Naples. The famous painting cycle in the Villa of the Mysteries at Pompeii will serve as a point of departure for class discussions and research projects. The imagery of this cycle raises questions about the construction of gender in the realms of real life and mythology to be addressed by the class as well. This course will make extensive use of a special exhibition at the Kelsey Museum and the Museum of Art, "The Villa of the Mysteries in Pompeii: Ancient Ritual, Modern Muse," which will provide an opportunity to consider issues of concern to the women of antiquity in relation to those that concern women today. The catalog of the exhibition will serve as a textbook for the course. It will be supplemented by a course pack and reserve readings. Class presentations, a research project, and attendance at a weekend conference on the exhibition are required. There will be an optional final examination.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 433/Class. Arch. 433. Greek Sculpture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 433.001.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 440/Class. Arch. 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece.

Section 001 The Topography of Athens

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in archaeology. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 440.001.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 442/Class. Arch. 442. Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy Papalexandrou (Apapalex@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


Hist. Art 463. Varieties of Dutch and Flemish Painting.

Section 001 Pictorial Art and Visual Culture in the Dutch Republic.

Instructor(s): Celeste Brusati (cbrusati@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102 and 260. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course deals with the pictorial art and visual culture of the Netherlands during the seventeenth century. We will be looking primarily at painting, but also at drawings and prints, to examine the diversity and types of images produced, and to situate them within their historical and cultural circumstances. The course will give special emphasis to the illusionistic and descriptive artistry for which Dutch and Flemish artists were justly famous. It will explore the character and meanings of this art's celebrated naturalism, and will consider the social, political, and ideological functions of pictures, the status of art and artists, and the conditions of artistic production and consumption in the Dutch Republic.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 481/Class. Arch. 481. Art of Ancient Iran.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 101. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~histart/hartspc

This course explores the visual arts of ancient Iran from late prehistoric times to the Islamic conquest. It offers students a broad overview of Iranian cultural heritage emphasizing major trends in art and architecture, tied closely to exploration of some of the most spectacular and intriguing sites of antiquity including Susa, Persepolis, and Bishapur. The course pays special attention to studies of seals, luxury vessels, and programs of palace sculpture and rock relief. Using these categories of art production, we will analyze what they can tell us about social, spiritual, economic, and political messages of the visual environment of Iran across successive eras. While the material has a great intrinsic integrity and importance, it is also useful for students of, e.g., Greek and Roman studies or Islamic studies as a backdrop for comparative purposes on a variety of agendas (e.g., problems in the art and archaeology of empire).

This is a slide-lecture course which also features in-class group work and discussion around actual artifacts. An optional but highly recommended class trip to Chicago's famed Oriental Institute (which excavated Persepolis in the 1930s) is planned. Course requirements: one brief (2 pp. max., double-spaced) descriptive paper on an artifact, one 2 pp. project proposal for term paper, one term paper (12-15 pp.), two in-class quizzes, attendance and participation in class discussion of weekly class readings.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 514. Spanish Art: El Greco to Goya.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/

Beginning with lectures that formulate a notion of the spiritual bond between apparently dissimilar works of Spanish art, the course passes to in-depth analyses of selected major Spanish painters from the late 16th to the early 19th C. Religious imagery, genre, still life, portraits, mythology, and landscapes by such masters as El Greco, Ribalta, Ribera, Velázquez, Zurbaran, Murillo, and Goya will be featured. Along the way we will confront and attempt to explain extraordinary expressive extremes, from the explosively passionate to the dream-like, from the brutal to the graceful, from the chaste to the decorative, from realism to idealism. The cultural/historical situations, the creative uniqueness, and yet the essential "Spanishness" of each of these artists will be explored. The text (J. Brown, The Golden Age of Painting in Spain, 1991) will be supplemented by other readings, and students will be evaluated on the bases of midterm and final exams of essay type.

Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

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