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Fall '00 Course Guide

Courses in University Courses (Division 495)

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

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University Courses are sponsored by the College or University rather than by individual departments or programs and may be taught by members of the faculty in any academic unit on the Ann Arbor campus. The College offers as University Courses both full-term courses and mini-courses.

The University Courses Division sponsors a number of First-Year Seminars (UC 150, 151, 152, 153) that provide a unique small-class educational experience open to all first-year students. (A complete list of seminars offered this term by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts can be found in the first section of this Course Guide.) These seminars are taught on a variety of topics by regular and emeritus faculty from many different departments. The small-class size (approximately 18-20 students) facilitates deeper learning through more active participation and increased opportunities for interaction between student and teacher as well as dialogue among students. First-Year Seminars provide a stimulating introduction to the intellectual life of the University by exposing new students to engaging subject matter; some may discover a subject to pursue in further courses. It is hoped that students who take a seminar will find in it a sense of intellectual and social community that will ease the transition to a large university.

All First-Year Seminars can be used to complete part of the College's general requirements. UC 153 meets the Introductory Composition requirement. Other seminars count toward satisfying the Area Distribution requirements: Humanities (UC 150); Social Sciences (UC 151); Natural Sciences (UC 152), Quantitative Reasoning or Race & Ethnicity.

The University Courses Division occasionally offers Collegiate Seminars, open to any student who has completed the Introductory Composition requirement. Intended especially for lower-division students and taught by regular professorial faculty members, Collegiate Seminars provide additional opportunities for first- and second-year students to personalize their education through a small-group course.

All Collegiate Seminars count toward satisfaction of the College's Area Distribution requirements in one of the three major divisions: Humanities (UC 250); Social Sciences (UC 251); Natural Sciences (UC 252). All emphasize critical thinking about important and central topics and feature further instruction in writing.

University mini-courses are one-credit, special interest offerings that center upon a conference, group of lectures, or special exhibit, appear on short notice in a term, and are usually of 2-to-8-weeks duration. Mini-courses are offered mandatory credit/no credit and are normally excluded from area distribution and concentration credits. Information about upcoming UC mini-courses is available by dialing POINT 10 (764-6810). No more than two University mini-courses may be elected in one term.


UCourses 102. The Student in the University.

Section 001 Enrollment Limited to Participants in Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Instructor(s): Penny Pasque (pasque@umich.edu) , David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review their role in the university. It will allow students to consider the expectations of their experience at the university within a framework of theoretical perspectives. It is hoped that students will develop a broad understanding of what their university experience may include and how they may shape this experience to realize their academic potential and intellectual development. The course will focus on the transition from high school to college, critical thinking, intergroup relations, social change, and community service. The issues and challenges of living and working in a multicultural society will be examined. The large group discussions will focus on student perceptions, relevant research, and university resources. The small discussion groups will focus on the readings and areas of practical concern. This course is open only to participants in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 104. Introduction to Research.

Section 001 Enrollment Restricted to Participants in UROP In-Residence Program.

Instructor(s): Sandra Gregerman (sgreger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participant in UROP-in-Residence Program. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide students with an overview of important topics related to research. This course is designed to help students: (1) understand the history of the research university; (2) explore different questions and modes of inquiry researchers use in different academic disciplines; (3) learn about ethical issues in research, including the responsible conduct of research, the use of animals in research, data ownership and interpretation; (4) explore issues of creativity, risk-taking, and critical thinking in research; (5) discover the importance of multiculturalism in research across academic disciplines and some of the controversy of breaking new ground; and (6) develop a student's research skills through workshops. Researchers will visit the class and share their perspectives on research, their educational and professional pathways, research interests, and related topics. Librarians will conduct workshops for the class on advanced library searches, Internet exploration, and research as a process. Students will be asked to: (1) keep a research journal to include both reflections on their own research projects and reactions to assigned readings; (2) read an article on one of the proposed topics and write a critical review; and (3) give a 15-minute presentation on their own research project. Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation in and completion of all tasks including a research journal, article review, and presentation about their research. A course pack of reading related to the topics listed above will serve as the required text for the course. Lecture and discussion.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 110/AOSS 171/Biol. 110/Geol. 171/NR&E 110. Introduction to Global Change I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Timothy Killeen (tkilleen@umich.edu) , Ben Van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu) , James Teeri (jateeri@umich.edu), Allan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 Fictional World of Ernest Hemingway.

Instructor(s): Edward Shafter (eshafter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"All stories, if continued long enough, end in death, and he is no true storyteller who would keep that from you." This stark observation by Ernest Hemingway pinpoints his basic pessimism regarding the human condition. For him, the harsh realities of that condition are violence, suffering, absurdity, disorder, and, finally, death. Nevertheless, despite its tragic nature, life still can often be a delight love and friends are especially rewarding. You will enter this compelling Hemingway world through the reading of short stories plus such longer works as, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls. Since this course is discussion and not lecture, your active oral participation at each meeting is a non-negotiable expectation. There will be in-class impromptu writing as well as several outside papers.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 The Arts and Community.

Instructor(s): Susan Nisbett (snisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Arts and Community" is an introduction to art, architecture, and the performing arts in Ann Arbor for first-year students. Given the tools for appreciating the arts, students feel empowered to hold opinions about the arts and entitled to access. They no longer find going to a play, a dance concert, or an art exhibit scary because they no longer feel ignorant of what to look for. By making this a first-year class, the University can give students four years and then a lifetime of arts access. Through class discussion, attendance at performances, tours, visits with artists and critics, and post-performance debriefings, students sharpen their eyes, ears, and critical acumen as they think and write about the arts. As students prepare for each event of the term they read relevant critical works and discuss what to look and listen for. Then, through essays on what they have seen and heard, students put these critical principles to work themselves, as they ponder the issues aesthetic, ethical, economic affecting artist and audience. The class' activities also permit students to become part of Ann Arbor's broad arts community.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 005 Hopes and Fears of the Modern Self.

Instructor(s): Paul Sunstein (sunstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Is the modern individual one who is self-determining, self-aware, compassionate and freed from comforting myths, or rather a member of a "lonely crowd," self-involved, without grand passion, and disenchanted? We will consider this enigmatic self in its pronounced contrast to the two most significant traditions that have shaped it, the Judeo-Christian tradition and Greek antiquity.

This great books course aims to make classical understandings of freedom, happiness, and misery come alive for today's students. The course begins by an examination of the Biblical background and a brief selection from St. Augustine's Confessions. We then consider a few classic statements from the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke, thinkers who first conceived the hopes and desires of the modern self as an expression of secularized Christianity. Next comes Rousseau's anti-Augustinian Confessions, designed to lead readers to a new level of honesty and liberating self-knowledge. We will see how Rousseau constructs the paradigmatic life history of the creative and dynamic "modern individual."

We will next see how Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground deconstructs this individual, and displays the ambivalence and anguish of the modern anti-hero in an era in which, as Nietzsche declared, "God is dead." We will read classic statements of "the crisis of modernity" in Marx, Nietzsche, and T.S. Eliot. Finally, in order to stand outside of the entire Biblical/anti-Biblical configuration of modern thought and examine the Greek alternative, we will turn to Aristotle's Ethics. We will debate the merits of Aristotle's understanding of freedom, happiness, and misery against its modern counterparts. Selections from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America will help us to analyze modern democratic man and society as Aristotle might have done.

The overall aim of this seminar is to promote self-reflection by understanding ourselves in light of the above mentioned authors. With this goal in mind, students are encouraged to continue our discussions by meeting together outside of class. More practically, this course is designed to teach students to read closely and patiently, both critically and appreciatively. Paper topics are formulated with this purpose in mind, the goal being to produce two short gems. Students are expected to read and assimilate some lessons from The Elements of Style. and are also required to meet with the instructor to discuss their written work. Course requirements include two papers, midterm and final exams, and occasional quizzes.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code:

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 A Sense of Place: An Inquiry into Geographic and Virtual Community.

Instructor(s): Holland

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities: an Historic Perspective.

Instructor(s): Warren Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be focused on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of the classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered upon one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 Environment, Sustainability, and Social Change.

Instructor(s): Jim Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand at both the global and local levels emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will learn about the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Seminar members over the course of the academic term will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be mostly individual but some will involve groups.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code:

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 004 Health and Medicine A Broad Perspective.

Instructor(s): Ronald Cyr (rcyr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is health? How healthy are we? How do we measure health outcomes? How is health care organized in the USA and in other countries of the world? These are some of the topics that will be addressed in this seminar. An experienced clinician will introduce students to some principles of epidemiology, public health, medical ethics, and preventive medicine all from a global perspective. There will be minimal lecturing and no textbook. Assigned readings will form the basis for class discussion. In the latter half of the academic term, each student will make a presentation to the class and submit a term-paper based on the same topic.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 Poetry in the City.

Instructor(s): Murray Jackson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study city life and explore how literature reflects the rhythm of cities. Our reading, discussions, and guest speakers will focus on historical views of cities in general and on specific writings about the troubles and promise of contemporary cities. Students will read literature that reflects attitudes and values about cities and examine how different authors have expressed conflicting views. We will analyze specific poetry, novels, plays and critiques set in or about Detroit, with the possibility of field trips into Detroit. Certainly Detroit's proximity to Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan makes it doubly important from the course's perspective. Students will be expected to keep a log of their readings and to spend time in individual discussion with the professor. Grades will be based on one shorter paper, one final paper, an essay, and a take-home exam at midterm; class participation is required.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 Public Policy and Science.

Instructor(s): Martin Gold (mgold@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar aims to help you become a better consumer of scientific research so that you will become a better informed citizen and, if you have the opportunity, a more effective maker and implementer of public policy in the future. The seminar will consider the general nature of science, public problems, and public policy, and their relationships. Questions will be raised about the reliability and validity of scientific findings, their relevance to public problems, and their implications for personal and societal values. Together with a sub-group of your classmates, you will formulate public policy on specific problems of interest to you, after consulting the literature and local experts. The seminar will hear and discuss presentations by the instructor, guests, and students.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 007 The Psychiatric Patient.

Instructor(s): Robert McCullum (smithrob@umich.edu), Andrew Aldridge (amaldrid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course will be a patient-oriented presentation of psychiatric illness in a discussion/small group format. Live patient interviews, as well as other forms of media such as video, art, music, poetry, and literature, will be utilized as starting points for discussion of psychiatric and mental health issues. An example of the questions which will be presented for discussion includes: What is normal behavior and who decided that it is normal? Instructors will have office hours at least twice per week. Evaluation will be roughly divided between participation (33%), midterm and final (33%), and two short essays (<5 pages, double-spaced, 33%). Exams will be essay, short-answer essay, and some multiple choice. Weekly assigned readings of 15-20 pages in length will be drawn from various fiction and non-fiction books, such as A Confederacy of Dunces, Achilles in Vietnam, and Asylum.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code:

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 008 The Social and Ethical Context of Medical Practice.

Instructor(s): Stephen Swisher (swisher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The scope and nature of medical practice has been an intense topic of debate in the popular media as well as academic circles. Terms such as "autonomy", "principles", and "rights" are frequently used in discussions without a common understanding as to what those terms might mean. Participants in this course will attempt to analyze current medical practice and medical controversies through the context of ethical and social philosophy and the historical meanings of medical practice. To this end, selected readings in social and ethical philosophy will be combined with current academic and popular articles. Readings will include the works of Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Mill, Dewey, and Foucault. Current social and ethical issues in medicine will be reviewed from within the perspective of individual philosophers as well as contemporary thought. Local hospital ethicists and physicians will be brought in for their perspectives. The opportunity will exist for individual students to spend time in local and inner-city hospital emergency departments. Classes will meet twice a week. A one-page analysis of the current reading (s) will be required at the beginning of each class. A higher level of class participation is expected. A midterm paper and a written final examination are also required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 010 War, Nationalism, and Development in 20th Century Asia.

Instructor(s): Rhoads Murphey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the rise of nationalism in India, China, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Korea, from the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95 to the ordeal in Vietnam. The course material also includes: the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05; the First and Second World Wars; the Chinese Revolution of 1911; the warlord years in China; the independence movement in India; the rise of the military in Japan; the triumph of Communism in China; independence and partition in India; and the Korean War. Most readings will be contained in a course pack, and class sessions will focus on discussion of the readings. Four short essays take the place of exams. Student presentations are encouraged.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 011 Medicine and the Media from Hippocrates Through ER.

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs (rhobbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., Saint Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of the students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 152. First-Year Natural Science Seminar.

Section 001 Clinical Psychobiology.

Instructor(s): Oliver Cameron (ocameron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Mental disorders are far more common in the general population than is usually appreciated, and often produce as much or more disability than do most medical disorders. The nature of these disorders is poorly understood by individuals who are not trained in the mental health fields. While mental disorders are usually defined simply on the basis of symptoms and behavioral manifestations, a great deal more is known about them, including many of the biological and behavioral processes underlying them. This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of mental health and mental disorders, and describe the basic natural and social science areas related to understanding brain function and mental disorders, with an emphasis on the biological processes. The course would be appropriate for anyone interested in neuroscience or mental processes.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 152. First-Year Natural Science Seminar.

Section 002 Engineering and Environmental Geology.

Instructor(s): Donald Gray (dhgray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Engineering geology is the application of geological data, techniques, and principles to the study and interpretation of materials and land forms comprising the earth's surface. The main goal of the seminar is to introduce students to some of these principles and techniques and to discuss the relevance of engineering geology in environmental issues and concerns. Topics covered in the seminar include: geologic origin and properties of rocks and soil; geologic processes (with emphasis on glacial land form development, seismic activity, subsidence, surficial erosion, and mass wasting); geologic structures and their engineering significance; interpretation of geologic, soil, and topographic maps; terrain analysis; identification and evaluation of geologic hazards; geologic considerations affecting facility siting; engineering geology aspects of waste disposal in the ground. Students will have hands on opportunities to conduct terrain analyses using air photos and topographic and geologic maps; to conduct a geological field reconnaissance of different areas of campus; to prepare engineering geology use suitability maps for proposed land uses; and to visit USGS and other selected Web sites to obtain specific geological information.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 153. First-Year Composition Seminar.

Section 001 Black Multiculturalism.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided


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