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Fall '00 Course Guide

Courses in RC Humanities (Division 865)

Fall Term, 2000 (September 6 December 22)

Take me to the Fall Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.

To see what has been added to or changed in RC Humanities this week go to What's New This Week.

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Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Hum. 214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Goodenough

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have human beings in our civilization chosen to present themselves and the stories of their lives? What motivates a person to tell his or her story? This course examines a variety of short narratives and novels from acknowledged classics of historical fiction and the bildungsroman to such popular forms as Westerns and mysteries, romances and children's fables to look at story-telling as a reflection of social values and as a mode of seeing, thinking, being, and becoming. What stage of development or type of experience is formative and which provide the most useful lens from which to view the whole? What is the impact of gender, nationality and race on the cultural construction of selfhood? How do writers invent the impossible? Why must they lie to tell the truth, write beyond the ending, and make up stories about stories within stories? How do we decide what these stories mean?

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week. Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 222. Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individualized instruction, group discussion, and readings aim at the development of original story ideas and the perfection of narrative techniques relevant to the authorship of children's books. Preliminary assignments picture book, folklore-narrative, and media prepare each student for a self-directed final project.

No prerequisites necessary. However, a thorough reading background in children's books or the willingness to compensate for its lack is presumed. Please do not take this course expecting "lectures" about children's books or child development. This is a writing course emphasizing story-writing skills and aesthetics.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 236/Film-Video 236. The Art of the Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Required Film Viewing on Tuesday 7-11 p.m., with an Alternate Screening On Thursday 7-11 p.m.

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 236.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Course may be used to meet the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement.

Instructor(s): Weckstrom

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours of credit. The second hour of credit is at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must elect section 001 for one hour; those students who will fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also elect Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit students must participate in two ensembles; for two credit hours, students must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice and rehearsal for 2 credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate.

Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; intermediate recorders; string quartet; woodwind quintet; and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord. This is not a mini-course.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Music, War, and Propaganda.

Instructor(s): Smaill

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During the twentieth century the manipulation of public opinion through propaganda has become an increasingly important component in successful war efforts. Journalism, literature, art, film, and music are among the cultural media used to maintain or undermine civilian support. Considering several different conflicts, we will investigate the use of music in wartime as entertainment, as a response to grief and loss, and above all, as propaganda created by both proponents and opponents of war for the purpose of swaying popular opinion. We will draw connections between such music and other forms of cultural expression produced in times of war, including poetry, posters, diaries, newspaper reporting and film.

Specific topics to be explored include the role of many women musicians as supporters of the British war effort during World War I; the use of swing music by musicians such as Glenn Miller, Count Basie, and Duke Ellington, as propaganda by the United States in World War II; the incorporation of music within the anti-war movement during the Vietnam War; and censorship practices in popular music during the Gulf War. We will also investigate the use of music in films about war and the military, such as "Casablanca" and "Top Gun."

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 002 Musical Expressions of Ghana: Palmwine Guitar and Ashanti Drum Ensemble

Instructor(s): Nimo

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This hands on music course, which requires no prior musical training, will explore several musical styles of West Africa, specifically the royal drumming ensemble and guitar traditions of the Ashanti people of Ghana.

The course will consist of a one hour private lesson per week in either Ashante drumming or palm wine guitar (to be chosen by the student), and two one and 1/2 hour ensemble sessions in the mixed Ghanaian Palm Wine Guitar and Ashante Drumming ensemble.

The one hour weekly lesson will prepare the student for the rudimentary musical roles that will be further developed in the ensemble class. The two one and 1/2 hour weekly ensemble sessions will generally consist of a half hour lecture on the topic of Ghanaian and Ashante proverbs and song texts, in order to familiarize the student with the cultural background of the music that they will be learning. The remaining hour will be devoted to the mixed Ghanaian palm wine guitar and Ashante drumming. At the end of the term, the ensemble will perform a recital open to the public. It is important to emphasize however that this course requires no previous musical experience, and will be a wonderful opportunity for anyone wanting to learn to play guitar, to learn Ghanaian drumming, or to learn about West African music expressions from a master musician.

Koo Nimo is a world-class musician from Ghana. He is Ghana's foremost exponent of acoustic guitar 'high-life", or palm-wine guitar music. He was trained in Ashanti drumming from an early age as he grew up in the royal Ashanti court. His impact on West African popular music has been acknowledged by a lifetime award from the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, and in 1997 he was the recipient of the Grand Medal for Lifetime Service to Ghana from the Head of State of that country. His guitar playing is a unique blend of several village string traditions with American jazz and Western Classical guitar styles.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Mixed Choral Ensemble. This course meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s): Fitzgibbon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Four-part works from a variety of musical styles are rehearsed and prepared for performance in concert. This course meets twice weekly. Vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship and ensemble singing are stressed. No prerequisites necessary. However, a commitment to the group and musical growth within the academic term is required. No audition necessary.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument.

Music

Section 001 Basic Technique for Singers and Actors and the Alexander Technique. Meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s): Jane Heirich (jheirich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is open to students who want to develop their voices for speaking and singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed towards singers (with or without previous vocal training), speech and acting students, and those who want to find out if they can sing. Most voices are undeveloped (or under-developed), and we can learn how to develop our vocal equipment for whatever our own purpose. Because our voices are housed within us, we must consider the whole voice-body-mind as the subject of our study. Ms. Heirich is a STAT and NASTAT certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, and this work will inform all that we do in the course. The class meets together on Mondays and Fridays from 1-3 P.M. Your schedules should TEMPORARILY remain flexible between 12-5 on Wednesdays for scheduling of small group sessions. This scheduling will be completed by the end of the first class meeting Friday, September 8.

There will be one required text, some optional readings, daily preparation, and an individual or team project required. LSA guidelines for 4-credit courses expect 3 hours of work per credit hour, hence, you should be prepared accordingly. With more than 4 hours in "class" (a weekly average of 6.25 hours, which includes the small group and individual lessons), there will be proportionally less expected of you outside of class.

The required reading will be Miracles Usually Can't Be Learned, a basic vocal text by Jane Heirich, available as a course pack.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 260/Dance 220 (Music). The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history, criticism and aesthetics. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth- and twentieth-century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film.

Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris.

Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet and we will also read some dance critics including Gautier, Levinson, Martin, and Croce. No prerequisites.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bert Cardullo

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 Image of the American Family

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This text based performance course will focus on one of the central themes in American Drama the relationship of the family. In doing so we will not only look at some of the major plays of the century by writers like Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Eugene and O'Neill, but we will also go on to look at more contemporary playwrights and more current issues in American playwriting the perspectives of women writers, African American, Asian and Hispanic writers, writers from the Gay and Lesbian community. The emphasis will be on the exploration of these texts through extensive scene study. No prerequisite is required but previous active experience is recommended. Students who have already taken Actor and Text I may enroll and receive credit, as the syllabus is substantially different.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 290. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Twentieth Century.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Defamiliarization, the Uncanny, and the Search for the Self.

Instructor(s): Matthew Biro

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the twentieth century, many artists, writers, and filmmakers have attempted to defamiliarize everyday reality make it strange or "uncanny." Often, their justification for this defamiliarization practice was that it was a means to get audiences to think about the changeable nature of both the audience's world and themselves.

After examining the concept of defamiliarization in the formalist criticism of Victor Shklovsky and the idea of the uncanny in the psychoanalytic theory of Sigmund Freud, this seminar will explore the development of an aesthetics of the uncanny in European art, literature, and film between 1916 and 1939. In its second half, this seminar will explore the reception of uncanny aesthetics in European and American culture since the 1980s.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 305(RC IDiv 257). Cultural Confrontation in the Arts.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Minorities are subjected to misrepresentation, efforts to rob them of their cultural identity, internal colonization and racial prejudice. This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of different minority groups when they come into contact with the dominant culture.

The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with representative texts or visual images that are produced at such "moments" of confrontation. Minority responses to the confrontation include conflict, compromise, assimilation and resistance. Examples of fiction, film, music, dance, paintings, and poetry will be presented in order to encourage an awareness of cultures other than one's own.

Guest speakers from a variety of academic departments in LS&A will give many of the lectures. The course focuses on minorities in the U.S. (Asian-Americans, Latino-Americans and African-Americans), with a few lectures devoted to minorities in other areas of the world. Course objectives include: (1) to foster an awareness of the cultures of others by letting them speak in their own voices and by learning to listen carefully both to what is said and how it is said; (2) to understand that the responses of these cultures to the impact of the dominant culture have to be explored through questions of form and language, and that these questions are often related to the undermining of tradition and the crisis of cultural identity; (3) to help students refine their skills in verbal and textual analysis; and (4) to encourage students to reflect on how the issues of the course are played out in their own lives.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 313/Slavic Film 313. Russian Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Required Film Screenings Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m.

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 313.001.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

RC Hum. 315. Representations of History in the Literature and Visual Arts of Rome.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

T.S. Eliot begins The Wasteland with this quotation from Petronius in order to ground his representation of the 20th century in the despair of the great ancient prophetess.

The Cumaean Sybil, voice of Apollo, once spoke from the earth and foresaw the founding of Rome; but for Petronius and Eliot alike, she is no more than a vestige, a freak, who has come to the end of her own history. Her spiraling visions, once inscribed on laurel leaves, have narrowed to a point of emptiness, and scattered.
This course will examine the relation between history and prophecy in the literature and the visual arts of Rome. We will study not only the ways in which Romans wrote and represented their own history, but also how they figured that history through myth, and shaped it as oracular utterance.

The histories of Rome, its myths and oracles, were imbued with the sacred. But they were also (even in their own time) subject to skeptical deconstruction. Petronius was not alone in his wry and melancholy assessment. Indeed, the Roman muse is at once the voice of grandeur and the impresario of the profane. This unsettling tension creates what is sometimes called "Roman realism" a mode of representation which was, as we shall see, far from objective, documentary, or empirical, and closer to the irony and betrayal of the mask.

  1. Inventing Myth
    Cicero On the Nature of the Gods
    Virgil The Aeneid
    The Roman appropriation of Greek art: sculpture and painting
  2. Staging History
    Suetonius The Lives of the Caesars
    Roman portrait sculpture
    1. Flavius Josephus The Jewish War
      The Arch of Titus
      The Sebasteion of Aphrodisias
    2. Tacitus Agricola and Germania
      Roman battle sarcophagi
    3. Marcus Aurelius The Meditations
      The columns of Trajan and Marcus Aurelius
  3. A Theater of Desire
    Petronius The Satyricon
    Roman wall painting
  4. Prophecy and Pastoral
    Virgil The Fourth Eclogue
    The Passion of St. Perpetua and St. Felicitas
    Vergilius Romanus

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 321. Advanced Poetry Writing.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 221 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced poetry writing workshop. Students must be willing to read their poems in class and actively participate in the critical evaluation of other students' work. A finished manuscript of 25-30 poems is a course requirement. Permission of instructor is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.006.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him."
(Nietzsche)

"If there is not God, then everything is permitted."
(Dostoevsky)

"Everything that exists is born without reason, Continues to live out of weakness, And dies by chance."
(Sartre)

Existentialism combines the investigation of major issues in the history of Western philosophy with daily problems of intense personal concern. In this course, existentialism will be viewed as a literary as well as philosophical movement united by a number of recurrent and loosely related themes:

  1. Theological: the disappearance of God; the condition of being "thrown" into an indifferent and ultimately absurd universe; man's encounter with nothingness beneath the floor of everyday reality revealed when familiar objects and language drop away.
  2. Psychological: man's imperfection, fragility, and loneliness; the feeling of anxiety and despair over the emptiness of life and the terror of death; arguments for and against suicide; human nature as fundamentally ambiguous and hence not explicable in scientific thought or in any metaphysical system; the absence of a universally valid morality; and human nature as undetermined and free.
  3. Social: man's rebellion against the inhumanity of social institutions that suffocate the "authentic self"; the escape from individual responsibility into the "untruth of the crowd."
  4. Finally, man's various attempts to transform nihilistic despair into a creative affirmation of life.

Philosophic texts by Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Buber; fiction by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Camus, Sartre, and Kafka. Two examinations and one term paper required. Permission of the instructor is NOT required for this course.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 372. The Subject in the Aftermath of Revolution.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sowers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many people are accustomed to thinking about their identities in terms of individual selfhood, a category assumed to be natural, interior and realized in authenticity. Recent critical theory employs instead the term "subject," a term that questions notions of authentic selfhood. This course will outline the shift from "selfhood" to "subject," situating the change in the context of revolutions and their aftermath, when conceptions of identity are severely disrupted. The problem will be approached through sets or groupings in literature and the visual arts, each set accompanied by a reading in theory or philosophy.

We will begin from a position at once topical and drastic, the notion of the radically constructed subject of 20th century revolutionary utopia -the subject conceived as a work of art. This subject is situated in a history believed to be inevitable, oriented towards an attainable future of social justice, requiring only the overcoming of reactionary obstacles to be realized. The "new man or woman" of this project operates both as the engine and the index of historical fulfillment. The course will then backtrack to trace the paradoxical geneologies of the revolutionary subject through the stages of essentialist romanticism; the willed, but "natural" self of 18th and 19th century progressive/enlightenment models; the ethical self of free choice; the arbitrary or semiotic subject of post-structuralism; and finally a return to the ethical subject, face to face with the Other that has emerged with special power at the end of this history of restless revision and reconstruction.

  1. Introduction: Totalitarian Aesthetics
    Boris Groys The Total Art of Stalin
  2. The Gesture of Longing for Immortality
    Goethe The Sorrows of Young Werther
    Caspar David Friedrich paintings
    Edmund Burke A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origins of our
    Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful.

  3. The Aftermath of Revolution
    Georg Buchner Danton' Death
    G.W.F. Hegel selections from the Phenomenology of Spirit.
    Theodore Gericault paintings
  4. A Mirror of the Social Order
    Henry James The Portrait of a Lady
    Edgar Degas Portraits
    Joseph Conrad The Secret Agent
  5. Beautiful Souls
    Milan Kundera Immortality
  6. The Ethical Subject Face to Face with the Other
    Magdalena Abakanowicz sculpture

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 387. Renaissance Drama.

Drama

Section 001 Meets with Theatre 322.001

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course involves intensive study of Shakespeare's plays as performed events. Students will read, discuss, analyze, and explore through performance outstanding scenes from nine major plays, representing all genres Shakespeare practiced, in order to discover how Shakespeare's drama communicates it meaning to an audience in a theatre. Attention to the conventions and conditions of the Elizabethan stage, the shape of Shakespeare's career as a whole, and modern interpretations of the plays will supplement this activity.

Requirements: two fully prepared scenes and one monologue; four short "precept papers," or quizzes; required play-viewing (which may be accomplished by an optional field-trip to the Stratford Festival); and an End-of-Term presentation cum Final. The principal plays covered will be:

  • Comedies: Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night
  • Histories: Henry IV, Parts 1 & 2
  • Tragedies: Julius Ceasar, Hamlet, King Lear
  • "Problem Plays" (Tragicomedies): Much Ado About Nothing
  • Romances: The Tempest

No prerequisites. Although some previous experience as theatre-goer/actor/student of Shakespeare is advisable. First year students may consider this an entry level course for the RC Drama Concentration and the equivalent of Intro. To Theatre and Drama. For more advanced Theater students there will be ample opportunities for directing scenes and developing Shakespearean/Elizabethan audition pieces as part of one's requirements.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 The Hero as Outsider, Outcast, or Outlaw.

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we try to define the human need for heroes and the (changing) character of heroism by examining the eccentric hero that mainstream society attempts to suppress, dismiss, ignore, or condemn because it regards him or her as perverse, subversive, vicious, or beyond the pale of tolerance: the saint, criminal, psychotic, visionary, egoist, pervert, or monster.

Some of the works we may read or see are Cormac McCarthy's All the Pretty Horses; St. Exupery's Night Flight; E. Baine's A Lesson Before Dying; J. Conrad's Heart of Darkness; Kurt Vonnegut's Mother Night; F. Dostoyevsky's Notes from the Underground; Bertolt Brecht's Galileo; Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood; Martin Ritt's The Front (with Woody Allen); Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.005.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.005.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

RC Hum. 451/Russian 451. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Russian Fiction, 1820-1870.

Instructor(s): Andreas Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 451.001.

Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 476/Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 476.001.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 481. Play Production Seminar.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is built around the research and rehearsal towards production of a major play. Students will learn the dramaturgical background of the playwright and the world of the play. They will have the opportunity to have an extended rehearsal process over the course of the academic term resulting in a fully realized workshop production in the RC Auditorium. The emphasis will be on building an ensemble process in rehearsal and developing the students skills as actors and students of drama. There will be opportunities for students to work on the process as directors and designers as well as actors. The play under consideration is Ibsen's Peer Gynt. Admission to the course is by interview or audition. Contact Kate Mendeloff at 647-4354 or e-mail: mendelof@umich.edu.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Mime Workshop on Beckett's Acts Without Words.

Instructor(s): Tulip

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to contemporary mime performance through a recreation of Beckett's Act Without Words 1 and Act Without Words 2 in conjunction with the Gate Theatre of Dublin's Beckett season in October. The instructor, Martin Tulip, will perform the solo in Act Without Words 1 and members of the course will perform (possibly in multiple casts) and the duet of Act Without Words 2 as well as develop the props, sound effects, and other technical aspects of the mini-production. September 13 to November 1. Interview/audition required.

Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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