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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture


This page was created at 6:47 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in American Culture
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for American Culture.

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AMCULT 100. What is an American?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vicente Diaz (vdiaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is an American, and Who Gets to Say So? For what purposes, motives, interests? How do we make sense of American Identity (identities), and why should we try anyway? This course, "What is an American?" encapsulates these and many other questions. Asking a series of questions about American identity through history and region, this course also raises methodological and political questions about cultural inquiry and criticism in the American context. This course combines a brief survey of classical and marginal(ized) views on American identity, with a jaunt across the contested landscapes of contemporary American culture through critical readings on select institutions and practices (like shopping malls, sports, food, to name a few).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 102. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 Politics of Race Since WWII. Meets With History 196.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 The Culture of Jazz

Instructor(s): Anderson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 The Sexual Revolution.

Instructor(s): Charlotte Fay Pagni (pagni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the 1960s Sexual Revolution as a historical phenomenon that resonates in contemporary American culture. After World War II, social, economic, and political conditions facilitated a wave of liberalism in sexual matters. An unprecedented frankness toward sex pervaded the mass media, revealing a widening gap between official dogma and actual practices. From an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective, this course considers the historical context, manifestations, and public reception of cultural changes associated with the Sexual Revolution. Topics include: second-wave feminism and the crisis in masculinity; the gay, lesbian, and bisexual movements; racial, ethnic, and religious differences; youth culture; sexuality as commodity; sex and class distinction; sex in the media; popular sex manuals; the Pill and reproductive choice; the declining "double standard"; alternative sexual practices and lifestyles; sex activism; conservative backlash; and the limitations of sexual liberalism.

Readings, screenings, and class discussions provide a foundation for three engaging research projects: an interview of a "baby boomer" about coming of age during the Sexual Revolution; a critical essay about a movie, TV show, book, music, or other pop culture artifact from 1955-75; and an analytical paper examining a current sexuality issue in historical perspective.

Note: Some course materials are sexually explicit.

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AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 Women's Health in 19th and 20th Century America

Instructor(s): Christine Kae Bass (cbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will use women's health in 19th- and 20th-century America as a lens through which to view women's history, social history, and medical history. We will explore a wide range of topics, including: sexuality, abortion, birth control, childbirth, women's diseases, women as health care reformers, and women as health care professionals. In particular, we will look at how women's diseases are socially constructed and how they often reflect society's views of women. We will also look at how gender, race, and class impact access to medical care and research on women's health. The course will be a seminar with discussion based upon close reading of the assigned texts. There will be several short papers, a class presentation, and a final examination.

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AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 002 AIDS in America

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/206/002.nsf

The American response to the AIDS epidemic is important in itself and also provides a window into important aspects of our values and culture. These involve the place in our social world of sexuality, gender and sexual orientation; scientific and medical knowledge; poverty; homelessness; health care, prevention, pharmaceuticals, and the financing of all of these fields; privacy rights; incarceration; racial and cultural diversity; the law and the legal system; artistic responses to a social crisis; policy issues in all of these fields; and public health efforts.

This course will be an interdisciplinary exploration of all of these phenomena as they bear on the AIDS crisis. Some field work a practicum experience will be involved in parts of the community where the impacts of the epidemics may be observed and engaged.

Scientific knowledge of HIV/AIDS presented for a nonscientific audience will be a required part of the course curriculum. Other parts of the course will involve studying research results in the social sciences and engaging with artistic work memoirs, fiction, film, poetry, fine arts, music concerning AIDS.

Although the focus of the course is AIDS and America, the global context of the AIDS epidemic will be studied to provide a context for the American experience. Special attention will be given, in this part of the course, to AIDS in Africa.

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AMCULT 213. Introduction to Latino Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jorge Duany

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an overview of the historical and contemporary situation of Latino communities in the United States. It focuses on the construction and transformation of ethnic and national identities amont immigrants from Latin America. It also deals with issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality as they inform the making of Latino cultures. Finally, the course examines the role of wider economic and political forces in the structuring of Latino communities.

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AMCULT 214. Introduction to Asian American Studies Social Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phillip D Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/214/001.nsf

This course will examine the long and diverse history and experiences of Asian Americans (Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans, South Asians, and Southeast Asians) in the United States. Migrating "east" from Asian countries since the mid-1800s, Asian Americans represent a significant part of America's history and culture. However, individuals from this multiethnic community continue to be viewed as "exotic strangers" in transit. This course provides an introduction to the study of the experiences of Asian immigrants and their citizen descendants in the United States from the mid-nineteenth century to the present as well as a critical analysis of Asian American contributions to historical, scientific, political, and cultural developments in the United States.

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AMCULT 217. Introduction to Native American Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an introductory course to the historical and literary cultures of Native America. We will trace the evolution of the indigenous cultures of the United States through pre-contact oral literature, tribal colonization, and removal to the reservation, the creation of the Native American as American citizen, and explore native identity as conceived by native writers and American popular culture at the end of the 20th century. We will rely, when possible, on the words of Native Americans to discuss "contact" between tribal peoples and EuroAmericans and the resulting "adaptations" in tribal culture and identity. In addition to literature, we will reply on film, documentary and popular, for the representation of native experience and to chart images of the American Indian. Students are not expected to have knowledge of native history or literature; the course is designed to provide an introduction to both. An advanced course, English 382, will be taught in Winter Term. There will be two lecture sessions and one discussion section per week. Students will be required to keep a journal of their readings, to participate in discussion groups, and take a midterm and final.

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AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to give the conversational and cultural skills necessary to enable students to use Ojibwa in real life situations. The teaching methods are entirely inductive, and the role of writing is downplayed. There is considerable emphasis on teaching culturally appropriate behavior, and the simple conversational patterns of greetings, leave takings, introductions, table talk, etc.

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AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 224 / SPANISH 290. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Courses in Spanish

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Spanish 290.001.

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AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidonie A Smith (sidsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/womenstd/240/001.nsf

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 243 / WOMENSTD 243. Introduction to Study of Latinas in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera (mcotera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/womenstd/243/001.nsf

For over a century Latinas have been writing themselves into U.S. history, continuously redefining their political, cultural, and social locations within the discourses of American identity. Their refusal to remain silent observers of? history? has resulted in a body of work poems, essays, novels, and short stories that reveals the ways in which ethnic, racial, class, gender, and sexual differences shape our conceptions of American identity. In this class we will explore the narrative practices of Latinas, paying special attention to the ways in which their poems, short stories, novels, and theoretical essays have given voice to their differential locations within the discourses of American identity and culture.

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AMCULT 260 / HISTORY 260. Religion in America.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 160 and 161 are recommended but not required. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 260.001.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Asian Pacific American Women. (3 Credits). Meets With Women's Studies 253.004

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the conception that individual Asian American and Pacific Islander women have of themselves. The class focuses on oral histories and autobiographies of Asian Pacific American (APA) women, providing a forum to discuss their consciousness of gender, race, and class. The texts might include an introduction to narratives, for example, by Chinese, Japanese, Native Hawaiian, Korean, South Asian, Southeast Asian, and/or Filipina American women; thereby allowing students to compare and contrast the experiences of different APA ethnicities and generations. We will examine how these women became agents of social change, both publicly and privately, at home and in their communities. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussion, exams, as well as a final project, such as an oral history of an Asian American or Pacific Islander woman. By gathering new histories, students will contribute to the research on APA women, and in themselves become agents of change.

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Photography: The Photo Essay. (3 Credits). Meets With Art and Design 362.001. Not open to freshmen.

Instructor(s): Leonard

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/artdes/362/001.nsf

This course will offer students an approach to thinking about and using photographs in sequence and photographs with text in constructing blended narratives. Students come from LSA and The School of Art and Design. Students will complete approximately 5 photo assignments in the term, each designed to explore various critical and theoretical frameworks related to The Photo Essay in historical and contemporary usage. Students must own an adjustable still photographic camera, any format (35mm, 2 1/4, or 4 x 5). Black and white photographic materials are stressed, and darkrooms for black and white work are available for students of this class. Basic photo knowledge is desirable, but every effort will be made to support LSA students with less photo experience than the art students in the class. Students may work in color if they are involved in a color photo class at the School of Art or otherwise have means of color processing and printing available to them. Digital and medium format cameras will be introduced. Classes meet twice a week for three hours each meeting. Some classes are lecture, demonstration, discussion, and/or critique. Other class meeting times will be used for in-class lab time. There are readings required

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AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 U.S. Intellectual History, 1750-1940. (3 credits). Meets with History 361.001

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jscarson/Hist361.html

See History 631.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 Meets with Psych 319/320. Students will choose a 4-hour meeting on Mon, Tues, Weds., Thurs. from 2-6pm.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 319.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 002 Empowering Families & Communities. (4 credits). Meets With Psych 320.001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 320.001.

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AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Race, Politics, and Activism in Detroit. Meets with History 393.002.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/310/001.nsf

This interdisciplinary course is designed to link the study of Detroit's past, present, and future. It offers students an opportunity to gain an in-depth perspective on the issues of racism, poverty, political activism, and community organizing among African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos. First, we will study what historian Thomas Sugrue has called the "origins of the urban crisis." We will examine the effects of deindustrialization and racism in the post-World War II era alongside the emergence of protest movements which sought to promote social justice. Second, we will study electoral campaigns for local office (as they are in process during the academic term) in order to analyze the different ways Detroit politicians interpret the "urban crisis" and critique the solutions they propose. Third, we will investigate the grassroots solutions to the "crisis" being enacted by community organizations in the city. This is a non-traditional course which is part of the university's Detroit Theme Semester. In addition to reading books and articles, students will be required to conduct primary research and work collaboratively to generate knowledge to be shared with classmates. Most importantly, in order to facilitate deeper engagement with course materials and themes, we will be taking field trips to sites in Detroit which will require the devotion of at least several Friday and/or Saturday afternoons over the course of the academic term.

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AMCULT 311. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 002 Filipino American Experience.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an upper-division interdisciplinary course on the experience of Filipinos in America. We will examine Filipina Americans' role in historical events, contemporary issues, and how these affect community formation and life in America. By looking at the different waves of Filipina/o migration to the U.S., we will see the Pinoy & Pinay experience in various regions and sectors of American society: education, labor, family, politics, and communities, to name a few. A large focus will be on Filipinos of the midwest. We will also determine how Filipina/o American issues are reflected through historical, sociological, psychological, autobiographical, and literary texts, answering such questions as: Who/What is a Filipino American? What makes the Filipino's experience in America unique from that of other Asian Pacific Americans? How does the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality affect Filipina/os? How are Filipino Americans "positioned" in the society? What are some of the current issues facing Filipinos? How do cultural spaces create strategies of resistance? What roles have Filipina/os played in civil rights and social activism? Overall, how have Filipino Americans strategized their changing places within this society? As we examine these issues, we will also attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local Filipina/o American community. Students will launch a new UM project of collecting oral histories of Filipinos of Michigan, with a special emphasis on the Detroit area, in conjunction with the 300 year founding of the city of Detroit. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussions, exams, as well as final project that uncovers the history of Filipinos in Michigan.

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AMCULT 313 / ANTHRCUL 314. Cuba and its Diaspora.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 314.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to improve the basic conversational skills of the student who knows some Ojibwa. The emphasis in class is on increasing the range of situations in which the student can use Ojibwa in real life. Some emphasis is placed on teaching the students to be able to learn more Ojibwa outside of the classroom, by talking and using the language with native speakers.

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AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

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AMCULT 335. Arts and Culture in American Life.

Section 001 Black and White Images.

Instructor(s): James Cook

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How have racialized images served to define social and cultural difference in American history? And how have different groups of Americans challenged and re-presented these images? This course explores the long and complex relationship between race and representation from Shakespeare's seventeenth-century images of Caliban and Prospero to the current fads on MTV. Our weekly topics will include a wide range of cultural forms (folk tales, literature, theater, museum exhibitions, music, and film) and a variety of social perspectives on the contested terrain of image-making. Course requirements include a midterm paper, a comprehensive final exam, short quizzes, and regular participation in our weekly discussions.

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AMCULT 342 / HISTORY 368 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 368.001.

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AMCULT 345. American Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard A Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/345/001.nsf

This course will explore the interaction of politics and society in America, struggling to keep both aspects in view. We will look closely at major social issues in contemporary America and the manner in which they are treated in the political arena. The issues and the political debates will be approached through a variety of disciplines. We will strive to understand underlying questions of race, gender, ethnicity, and class. Examples: contemporary immigration; dealing with historical evils reparations, collective guilt, etc.; alcohol and tobacco in American life; sports and athletics in our society; commercial sex and pornography; American politics in American songs; the distribution of wealth.

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AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip J Deloria

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 351. Race and American Cinema.

Section 003 only satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/351/001.nsf

In this course, we will explore the social and creative processes whereby ideas and images of race and ethnicity have been produced, circulated, and contested in U.S. cinema from the silent period to the year 2001. In addition to analyzing the thematic and stylistic content of films produced both inside and outside of the Hollywood studio system, we will consider the historical factors that have tended to affect racial and ethnic representation, such as the implementation of censorship, foreign policy, technological change, and social movements. Group discussion in both section and lecture will be emphasized, as well as critical writing exercises for all students. Using the resources provided, students will be expected to familiarize themselves with the critical vocabulary and historical background needed to carefully examine, compare, and critique the construction of race and ethnicity in and through U.S. film. Throughout the course, we will discuss: (1) the changing definition of "race" and "ethnicity" on the Hollywood screen; (2) the social barriers variously experienced by African-, Arab, Asian, and Native Americans as well as Latino/as in gaining access to the film industry; (3) the intersection of racial and ethnic representation with issues of class, gender, and sexual identity; (4) historical parallels and differences between the experiences and treatment of people of color with members of "white" ethnic groups in the Hollywood film industry; and (5) oppositional strategies used by filmmakers, performers, and viewers to combat racism and discrimination in U.S. cinema. Mandatory weekly screenings will feature mainstream and independent feature films, as well as experimental shorts and documentaries by directors of diverse social and ethnic backgrounds. A $35 lab fee will be charged to cover audiovisual expenses.

ASSIGNMENTS AND GRADING: ECB: class participation: 20%, quiz: 5%, 2 short revised essays: 40%, final paper: 35%; Non-ECB: class participation: 20%, quiz: 5%, film diary: 25%, midterm exam: 25%, final essay: 25%.

ASSIGNED TEXTS: At University bookstores and on library reserve: REQUIRED: Jesse Algernon Rhines, Black Film, White Money (Rutgers University Press, 1996); Clara E. Rodríguez, ed., Latin Looks: Images of Latinas and Latinos in the U.S. Media (Westview Press, 1997); Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor, eds., Hollywood's Indian: The Portrayal of the Native American in Film (University Press of Kentucky, 1998); Jun Xing, Asian America Through the Lens (Altamira Press, 1998). Coursepak (C) is available at Ulrich's and at Dollar Bill 611 Church St. OPTIONAL: Robert Kolker, Film, Form and Culture (McGraw-Hill, 2001).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 351. Race and American Cinema.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benamou

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 360 / GTBOOKS 350 / HISTORY 350. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

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AMCULT 367 / HISTORY 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza E Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/367/001.nsf

We will engage in the various sub-disciplines of American Indian history at an introductory level. We will consider works in social, cultural, and political history. Throughout the course, we will consider how Indians were invented by the colonial process, by other tribes, and by Europeans. Some of the themes we will emphasize will include: gender, identity, rebellion, education, war and treaties.

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AMCULT 373 / HISTORY 373. History of the U.S. West.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/373/001.nsf

See History 373.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

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AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 399. Race, Racism, and Ethnicity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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AMCULT 406 / ENGLISH 384 / CAAS 384. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Section 001 Life and Literature in the Contemporary Caribbean Diaspora.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 410. Hispanics in the United States.

Section 001 Music of Hispanic Southwest.

Instructor(s): Manuel Pena

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will undertake a social and cultural study of the popular music of the Hispanic Southwest. We will use music as a "key" to arrive at a better understanding of both the music itself and the people who produce it. To do this, we will look at the music (and dance) of the Hispanic Southwest as artistic expression that reflects universal processes such as sociocultural continuity, change, conflict, and adaptation. Thus, after a short introduction to the basic concept of music-as-culture, we will survey antecedents of the music of the Hispanic Southwest, particularly those that originate in Mexico during the nineteenth century. We will then shift our attention to the emergence of regional forms in the Southwest, keeping in mind the crosscultural influences exerted by Greater Mexican, Latino (particularly Afro-Latino) and American musical cultures on that of the Southwest. We will explore such forms as the canción and corrido (narrative ballad), the Texas-Mexican conjunto, the Mexican American orquesta, Tejano, and the "East-L.A." sound. All of these musical developments will be studied within the framework of changes induced by such forces as immigration (and migration), ethnic resistance, acculturation, urbanization, and the emergence of class differences among Mexicans of the Southwest.

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AMCULT 410. Hispanics in the United States.

Section 002 The Anthropology of Puerto Ricans on the Island and in the Continental U.S. Meets with Anthropology 458.004.

Instructor(s): Jorge Duany

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is aimed at giving students with conversational ability in Ojibwa the opportunity to both improve their speaking and listening skills and to introduce them to Ojibwa literature, and the various dialects represented in the literature. Students will work with the original, unedited texts, as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials, and thus learn about the problems of working in a language without a standard widely accepted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 430 / WOMENSTD 430. Feminist Thought.

Section 001 A Critique of Western Feminism. Meets With CAAS 458.004.

Instructor(s): Nesha Z Haniff (nzh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 240 and one 340-level WS course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/caas/458/004.nsf

See Women's Studies 430.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Harlem Renaissance. (3 Credits). Meets with CAAS 458.005.

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 American Indians & Film. (3 Credits). Meets With History 468.002.

Instructor(s): Liza E Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will consider films made by American Indians, the constructions of Indians in film, and the ways in which European Americans have constructed themselves in relationship to American Indians, especially in terms of cultural borrowing. We will use films and literature to explore these phenomena. In terms of film, we will use classic Westerns, comedies, and modern-day commentaries on Indians.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 20TH Century Writing Women of Color. (3 credits). Meets With Women's Studies 483.004.

Instructor(s): Maria E Cotera (mcotera@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1979 Chicana feminists Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa drafted a proposal for a book that would "express to all women especially to white middle-class women the experiences which divide us as feminists; we want to examine incidents of intolerance, prejudice, and denial of differences within the feminist movement. We intend to explore the causes and sources of, and solutions to, these divisions. We want to create a definition that expands what 'feminist' means to us." This Bridge Called My Back gave voice to a generation of Black, Latina, American Indian and Asian American feminists, who questioned the racist and classist assumptions of mainstream feminists. But what began as "a reaction to the racism of white feminists" soon evolved into a new feminist theoretical practice that sought to define the differential location of women of color within multiple and sometimes competing emancipatory discourses. In this class we will explore the connections between expressions of U.S. third world feminism in the "post-This Bridge Called My Back moment" and those evident in earlier writings by women of color. The purpose of this class is to provide students with a wide-ranging and historically-grounded overview of the ways in which women of color have defined themselves both within and against the intersecting discourses of American identity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 004 History of Latinos in the U.S. (4 Credits). Meets with History 397.002.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/397/002.nsf

This is a readings course that will broadly cover the experience of Latinos Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans in the United States. We will look at the period from contact and conquest up until the activism of the 1970's. As we cover this broad period, we will focus on such issues as imperialism, manifest destiny, the construction of gender roles, and the formation of ethnic identities. The course will have a substantial reading load (200 pages per week) and a weekly paper assignment. This course may also be used to cover the AC312 requirement for Latino Studies concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 005 Detroit in the Era of Industrialization. (4 credits). Meets with History 396.006.

Instructor(s): Francis X Blouin Jr (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 396.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 006 Diasporic Cultures: Transnational Communities from the Hispanic Caribbean in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Jorge Duany

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Comparative analysis of the migratory experiences of Cubans, Dominicans, and Puerto Ricans in the United States, particularly in Miami and New York City. Examination of the migrants' historical background, settlement patterns, and socioeconomic characteristics. Discussion of the rise of transnational identities, especially as expressed in literature and music. Emphasis on the maintenance of social, cultural, and political ties between diasporic communities and their home countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Dickinson & Whitman. (3 credits). Meets With English 482.002.

Instructor(s): James H Mcintosh (ihmci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See English 482.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 Pacific Literary And Cultural Studies. (4 credits). Meets With English 417.006.

Instructor(s): Susan Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the recent outpouring of literatures (poetry, fiction, drama, film) in English from the Pacific, including Hawai'i, Western Samoa, Fiji, and New Zealand. We shall examine, for example, how texts by Maori authors Keri Hulme, Patricia Grace, Witi Ihimaera, and Alan Duff engage with historical, social, political, and cultural contexts in New Zealand and how their writings interrogate previous literary, anthropological, and historical representations of Pacific peoples. In addition to becoming familiar with the historically significant moments of contact with Europeans, we will also look at how the aesthetic politics of these writers may enact a cultural decolonization even as many of these places remain colonized and neo-colonized locations. Additional authors and texts to be studied include Albert Wendt, John Dominis Holt, Gary Pak, Epeli Hau'ofa, Vilsoni Hereniko, Teresia Teaiwa, and films Once Were Warriors and The Piano. Writing requirements include several short 1-2 page response papers, a presentation, a midterm paper (5-7 pp.), and a final paper (10 pp.). As this course is a seminar, your presence and initiative in discussion is of great importance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 003 Music & Dance. (3 credits). Meets with Musicology 470.001 and Musicology 570.001.

Instructor(s): Amy K Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/musicol/470/001.nsf

This course examines relationships among music and dance as they structure each other in composition, performance, and transmission. This term case studies will be drawn from the Americas, and will include participatory social dancing, ritual dance, ballet, modern dance, and musical theater. Special attention will be given to "ethnic traditions" and how they are situated within "American" cultural discourse. There will be a course pack of readings, and assigned listening and video viewing outside of class. Course requirements will include three short essays, a midterm, and an essay final exam. One goal of this course is to explore vocabulary available for analyzing musical sound and dance movement; thus there are no prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 499 / HISTART 499. The Arts in American Life.

Section 001 Detroit, A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American history; and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History of Art 499.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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