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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in Cultural Anthropology


This page was created at 6:47 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
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Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

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ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/101/001.nsf

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and, perhaps a short paper.

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ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 150.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden (hollypet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically.

Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and globalization. Required readings may include an introductory text and various paperbacks. Lectures and discussion/recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and one or two brief writing assignments.

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ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 002 Secrecy & Lying.

Instructor(s): Stefan J Senders (ssenders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will investigate the role of secrecy and lying in our lives and in the lives of others. Our readings will include psychoanalytic theories of memory, repression, and recall; sociological and anthropological accounts of secret societies; and investigations into institutionalized secret keeping in modern state societies, particularly Germany and the United States. We'll also be asking about the role of lying in our everyday lives; how do we make sense of our experiences as liars, and how do we interpret the lying of others? What role have secrecy and lying in a democracy? How does lying influence "identify"? And what do we mean when we talk about "telling the truth"?

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ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 003 Anthropology Of The Bible.

Instructor(s): Gillian Feeley-Harnik (gfharnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the Bible and biblically inspired religions for the comparative perspective of anthropology. We will examine case studies of archaeological, historical, and contemporary societies in which biblical books were and are read, exploring how key themes are expressed, translated, reinterpreted and relived in new social, cultural, and material circumstances. In the process, students will become acquainted with anthropological methods of documentation and analysis used in cross-cultural research.

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ANTHRCUL 256 / NRE 256. Culture, Adaptation, and Environment.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Akin (dwakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to anthropological perspectives on the relationships of human societies to their environments. The methods and perspectives of ethnology, systems ecology and behavioral ecology will be explored through the use of case studies. Topics include the behavioral ecology of Homo sapiens; comparative studies of foraging, tribal, etc...

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ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Culture & Medicine.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden (hollypet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this seminar, we will examine the ways in which health and illness are both constructed out of, and interpreted within, cultural settings. Focusing on Western biomedicine, we will discuss a broad range of illness experiences from schizophrenia to cancer, post-traumatic stress disorder to asthma, Tourette's to Alzheimer's, among others to address a number of questions currently central to medical anthropology. Topics may include (but will not be limited to) the meaning and alteration of self and personhood in illness; the ways in which medical knowledge is produced and imagined, the culture of science and technology, immunity and risk, illness narrative, and social and historical views of the body. Classes will be largely discussion based, with students expected to prepare for active participation and leadership in discussion. By keeping enrollment small, I hope we will be able to include students' suggestions for additional topics to explore.

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ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 World's First Cities.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar introduces students to the archaeological study of the world's first cities. Many of the first states (and civilizations: the distinction between the two terms is reviewed in the seminar) are in fact cities: in Mesopotamia, Indus Valley, north China, the Maya there are not large, stable territorial states but city-states, some of which try to effect hegemony over the countryside and other city-states. In other areas of the world, cities are the "primate" governmental and ceremonial centers of early states, e.g., Teotihuacan in Mexico, Huari and Chan Chan in Peru, Jerusalem in ancient Israel, Axum and Zimbabwe in east Africa. Of course, Greek city-states are independent political entities. The importance of urbanism in the evolution of ancient states and civilizations is undeniable and a matter of systematic investigation by anthropological archaeologists (and ancient historians). The seminar introduces students to the comparative study of the world's first cities. Requirements include participation in seminar discussions, two take-home exams, one term paper. Term-paper assignment: "The term paper is a creative project in which you will pretend to be a citizen of an ancient city. Based on your reading of books/articles you will describe your life. What does your city look like? What kind of job do you have? Who are your kinsmen, friends? To whom do you pay taxes? How has life changed for you and your group? How do you regard your past and what do you think of your future? You may be a king/queen, noble or commoner, male or female; you choose your place, time, personal circumstances. However, your project should NOT be wholly imaginary. You must write an appendix to your paper in which you list your sources and justify the statements you make by reference to scholarly literature."

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ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 003 Culture & the Production of History.

Instructor(s): Ann L Stoler (astoler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the ways in which people imagine they can know the past, the techniques they use to remember it and how the past is made usable to speak to contemporary concerns in different societies. History is not just something that happened but something produced, crafted, contested, and recorded differently throughout the world. This course explores that production process, its practitioners, and what counts as evidence and proof. It will look at the ways in which a variety of material objects monuments, photographs, tree stumps, letters, trails, home furnishings mat reflect notions of a "usable" past, and different cultural and political criteria for what is worth remembering.

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ANTHRCUL 282. Introduction to Prehistoric Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course combines a presentation of the techniques, methods, and theories of anthropological archaeology with a general survey of world prehistory. Discussion of method and theory will cover field and laboratory techniques for acquiring information about past cultures, methods for using that information to test ideas about past cultural organization and evolution, and current theoretical developments in anthropological archaeology. The survey of world prehistory will focus on four major topics: (1) the emergence in Africa of the first proto-humans, between two and six million years ago; (2) the appearance of the first anatomically and behaviorally "modern" humans; (3) the origins of domesticated plants and animals, and the development of the first village farming communities; and (4) the rise of more complex stratified "state-level" societies. The course will be oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators. There will be three one-hour lectures plus one discussion section per week. Requirements: three in-class hourly exams and a final examination, plus 3-4 take-home exercises that give students firsthand experience with the analysis and interpretation of archaeological data. Required readings: Archaeology: Down to Earth, by David Hurst Thomas and Images of the Past, by G. Feinman and D. Price.

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ANTHRCUL 314 / AMCULT 313. Cuba and its Diaspora.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines Cuban history, literature, and culture since the Revolution both on the island and in the United States Diaspora. In political and cultural essays, personal narratives, fiction, poetry, drama, visual art and film, we will seek a comprehensive and diverse view of how Cubans and Cuban-Americans understand their situation as people of the same nation divided for thirty-five years by the Cold War, revolution, and exile. Topics will include: discussions of race, ethnicity, and intolerance in the context of Cuba and the Diaspora, the meaning of diasporas in the twentieth century, Fidel Castro and the making of the Cuban Revolution, masculinity and gay sexuality in the Revolution and Cuban Diaspora, women's dreams, everyday life under communism, Afrocuban culture and religion, the Cuban arts movement, and construction and deconstruction of exile identity. We will read and discuss the writings of Fidel Castro, Oscar Hijuelos, Edmundo Desnoes, Reinaldo Arenas, Lourdes Casal, Senel Paz, Dolores Prida, and Carmelita Tropicana, among others, and view major Cuban feature and documentary films. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussions and do independent research for a final essay as well as write two short essays and maintain a film journal. Each student will sign up for an oral presentation for one week of the course and will lead the discussion for that day's reading. The class will meet for four hours per week, 3 hours lecture and 1 hour of discussion. There will be additional time (1 to 1-1/2 hours per week) to view documentary films. The intended audience is undergraduates of all levels.

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ANTHRCUL 315. Native American Peoples of North America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Native American communities, often deeply rooted in traditional places and voices despite relocations and losses of native languages all involve strong family ties and histories of local and regional power struggles. In this course, we look at cross cultural dynamics and tribal identities in political encounters between Native American peoples and various others: developers, environmentalists, educators, other governmental authorities, poets, and social scientists, to name a few. Key issues include land rights, family relations, alcoholism, and freedom of religion. We also look at contemporary Native American fiction, non-fiction, and film documentaries as cultural forces which challenge others' constructions of who Native American peoples are. A recurrent question: what are the limits and possibilities of self-definition for Native American peoples, in what circumstances?

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ANTHRCUL 329 / PSYCH 415. The Anthropology of Childhood: Growing Up in Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld (lhirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/329/001.nsf

Children don't speak, think, and behave like adults. Nor do people everywhere share the same ideas about what childhood is or should be. Anthropology is largely the enterprise of documenting and interpreting what differences in speech, thought, and behavior mean. How has childhood been conceived in different ways within different cultures and historical epochs? What implications do different notions of childhood have for the developmental pathways of children themselves? To what extent do children resemble each other across cultural and historical divides? How do children acquire knowledge of the cultures in which they live? This lecture/discussion course draws on anthropological research, from Mead's work in the South Pacific to contemporary studies in both complex and small-scale societies, that permits us to formulate answers to these and related questions. Course requirements: weekly journal of notes and queries, active classroom participation, two exams (short answer/essay).

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ANTHRCUL 333. Non-Western Legal Systems, I.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The nature, function, and development of law. Law and society. Problems of social control: why is law obeyed in societies without courts and in societies with courts. Dispute settlement procedures and the judicial process; civil and criminal law; principles of liability for legal wrongs; women, class and community; the impact of Western law on customary, tribal, or aboriginal law. Case studies from Africa, Middle East, Asia, Europe, the Americas. A good introduction to comparative law from an anthropological perspective. Requirements: four 3-5 page papers, or three 6-8 page student papers. Lecture/discussion format.

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ANTHRCUL 346(416) / HISTORY 347. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dfrye/h347.htm

See History 347.001.

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ANTHRCUL 370(474) / LING 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Ling. 210 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/ling/370/001.nsf

See Linguistics 370.001.

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ANTHRCUL 374(472) / LING 374. Language and Culture.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/374/001.nsf

The study of the ways various cultural patterns and values are reflected in language.

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ANTHRCUL 383. Prehistory of Africa.

Archaeology

Section 001 Meets with Afroamerican and African Studies 358.001.

Instructor(s): Augustin Holl (holla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the development of cultures in Subsaharan Africa from the first emergence of human-like bipeds more than 5 million years ago to the rise of states and urban centers during the Iron Age. The requirement of the course include a midterm (take-home) and either an in-class final exam or a research paper.

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ANTHRCUL 385. The Archaeology of Early Humans.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the many exciting new discoveries in the archaeology of our earliest human ancestors, tracing what we know of human cultural and biological evolution from the first appearance of upright, small-brained, tool-making humans, 2.0 to 2.5 million years ago, to the appearance of fully modern humans in the last 30,000 to 40,000 years. The course is divided into two segments. The first briefly surveys the techniques and methods used by archaeologists to find ancient archaeological sites, and how they go about studying the fossil human remains, animal bones, and stone tools from these sites to learn about ancient lifeways. This section also looks at how studies of living primates in the wild, such as chimpanzees, as well as modern hunter-gatherers, such as the Bushmen and Australian Aborigines, can help us to interpret the distant past. The second segment of the course turns to the actual archaeological record, looking at some of the most important finds from Africa, Asia, and Europe. In this segment, the course follows the accelerating developmental trajectory of our ancestors from the simplest tool-makers, who lacked any sign of art or religion, to humans much like ourselves, who began to bury their dead with clear displays of ritual and who adorned the walls of their caves and their own bodies with art. The course is oriented as much toward students with a general curiosity and interest in the human past as toward students who will become eventual concentrators in anthropology. Requirements include three in-class hourly exams. Required readings: a text and course pack with articles supplementing the lectures.

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ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Honors Ethnology

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

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ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 Honors Archaeology

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is the first term of the Honors sequence in archaeology. We will briefly discuss the history of American archaeology and then focus on topics essential for conducting Honors thesis research and writing. The class format will be discussion and presentation by students. Students will begin collecting information for their thesis by preparing an annotated bibliography of background materials and then writing a research design on their thesis topic.

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ANTHRCUL 407. Archaeology of South Asia.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an overview of South Asian Archaeology from the earliest evidence for hominids at c. 1.5 million years ago through the emergence of early historic states and empires. Discusses major cultural transitions and important sites in several regions of South Asia, in the context of the history of archaeological research in this area.

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ANTHRCUL 414 / CAAS 444. Introduction to Caribbean Societies and Cultures, I.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics covered include: the historical origins of the social structure and social organization of contemporary Caribbean states; family and kinship; religion, race, class, ethnicity, and national identity; Caribbean immigration; politics and policies of socioeconomic change. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Films and videos on the Caribbean will be shown when available. Requirements: four 3-5 page typewritten papers, which ask students to synthesize reading and lecture materials; participation in class discussions; regular class attendance.

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ANTHRCUL 416 / HBEHED 516. Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Inhorn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ANTHRCUL 425. Evolution of War and Peace in Unstratified Societies.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond C Kelly (rck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the origins of war and the early evolutionary development of war alliance and peace-making. It examines the conditions under which warfare is initiated in sociocultural contexts where it did not previously exist and elucidates the origin of war in that sense. The course begins with a delineation of the distinctive characteristics of peaceful (or warless) societies that represent both a prior sociocultural disposition and the context in which primal warfare arises and takes shape. Consideration of peaceful societies illuminates certain key features of the transition from warlessness to warfare and provides a basis for identifying transitional cases. These sociocultural systems exemplify the causes, conduct, and consequences of nascent and early warfare. The subsequent co-evolution of war and pre-state societies is traced, including the development of alliance and peacemaking. Format: lecture and discussion. Requirements: substantial term paper and presentation.

Texts:

  • L. Keley, War Before Civilization 1996. Chapters 1-5 pp. 3-71.
  • T. Hobbes, Leviathan 1651. Part One Chapter 13 pp. 104-109, Of the Natural Conditions of Mankind...
  • K. Otterbein, Capital Punishment Defined in The Ultimate Coercive Sanction 1986, pp. 9-13.
  • M. Roper, Evidence of Warfare in the Near East from 10,000-4,300 BC, in War: Its Causes and Correlates M.A. Nettleship, et al., eds. 1975, pp. 299-343.
  • mber, Myths about Hunter-Gatrs in Ethnology 1978, Vol. 17(4), pp. 439-448.
  • D. Fabbro, Peaceful Societies in Journal of Peace Research 1978, XV(1), pp. 67-83.
  • E. Service, Profiles in Ethnology 1978, pp. 35-110 (providing brief sketches of the Yahgan Andaman Islanders Copper Eskimo and !Kung Bushman).
  • R. Lee, Conflict and Violence in The !Kung San 1979 Chapter 13, pp. 370-400.
  • B. Knauft, Reconsidering Violence in Simple Human Societies in Current Anthropology 1987, 28(4), pp. 457-500.
  • J. Manson and R. Wrangham, Intergroup Aggression in Chimpanzees and Humans in Current Anthropology 1991, 32(4), pp. 369-390.
  • B. Knauft, Violence and Sociality in Human Evolution in Current Anthropology 1991, 32(4), pp. 391-428.
  • A. Balikci, Conflict and Society in The Netsilik Eskimo 1989 Chapter 9, pp. 172-193.
  • C. Boehm, Feuding in the Nonliterate World in Blood Revenge 1984, Chapter 11, pp. 191-227.
  • K. Koch, An Anthropological View of Conflict in War and Peace in Jalemo 1974, Chapter 1, pp. 26.35.
  • A. Radcliffe-Brown, Primitive Law in Structure and Function Primitive Society 1965, Chapter 12, pp. 212-219.
  • B. Spencer and F.J. Gillen, The Avenging Party in Central Australia in Native Tribes of Central Australia 1899, Chapter 13, pp. 476-496.

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ANTHRCUL 440. Cultural Adaptation.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Environmental anthropology. This course considers a range of theoretical perspectives on human-environmental relations. Topics will most likely include: perceptions of the environment, rethinking the nature/culture dichotomy, ritual regulation of natural resources, ethnoecologies and traditional ecological knowledge, debates about common property regimes, environmental history, political ecology, the concept of risk society and contemporary environmental movements. The course format is lecture and discussion. Requirements include class participation, several short essays, a class presentation and a take-home final. The readings include ethnographies, theoretical monographs, edited collections and a course pack.

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ANTHRCUL 455 / WOMENSTD 455. Feminist Theory and Gender Studies in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How are gender and power related? What does gender have to do with racial, sexual, or national identities? This course shows that feminist anthropology offers an important perspective for analyzing gender as an integral part of the organization and representation of social life. It examines the conditions within which women and men act, and focuses on how gender is historically constructed and embedded within institutions and beliefs in different social strata and cultures. It relates feminist anthropology to issues of contemporary concern and to problems addressed by other disciplines. The class will combine lecture, discussion, and student presentation. It will draw on a variety of theoretical, ethnographic, biographical, and visual materials. Students will write several short commentaries on readings and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Language, Culture & Society Of Former USSR.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores uses of language in Soviet and post-Soviet societies as well as understandings of what language is and does. We will explore familiar political themes (such as the ways both Tsarist and Stalinist regimes assigned textual language real-world force, as in censorship even of poetry). But we will also take up approaches that analyze ways language is used, whether in media or in conversation, and the ways such uses of language reproduce social hierarchies. Our readings will include works from anthropology, linguistics, political science and literature, to be supplemented by occasional film viewings. It is recommended that students have at least one course in linguistic anthrpology, linguistics, slavics, or CREES at or above the 200-level.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 The Social Contexts Of Language Development.

Instructor(s): Barbara A Meek (bameek@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Topics such as children, education, bilingualism and endangerment are ever present in public discourse. Underlying these popular foci exist issues regarding language development, i.e., how do children learn language? Or, more exactly, how does any individual acquire and learn to use one or more languages? Also, what happens and what does it mean if he or she doesn't? This course focuses on the complexity of these questions by examining various contexts of language use and their impact on language development. This entails variables such as linguistic diversity and multilingual enviornments, cultural practices and social relations, and linguistic and cultural ideologies. We will also consider how different methods used to study language development inform our understanding of this process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Ethnicity And Culture In Latin America: Mestizaje And Nation. Meets With LACS 400.001 & History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski (skurski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Conceptions of race are at the heart of Latin American nationalisms yet they have received limited analytical attention. Concealed by the equalizing language of republican statehood, these concepts of race are intertwined with ethnic, gender and class hierarchies having colonial foundations and legitimized as bringing "civilization" to a "barbarous" people. In this course we will focus on the idealized and yet inherently violent process of "mestizaje" (racial mixing) and its relationship to projects of nation formation and imperial expansion. Our readings will discuss elite discourses as well as responses by non-elites to racialized structures of exclusion in cases including Cuba, Nicaragua, Mexico and Venezuela. We will use a variety of materials, including film and novels; students will write two papers and short commentaries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Puerto Ricans on the Island and in the Continental U.S. Meets with American Culture 410.002.

Instructor(s): Jorge Duany

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the most important trends in ethnographic research on Puerto Rican culture throughout the twentieth century. Students will discuss the recurrent themes, conceptual problems, academic debates, and forms of representing Puerto Ricans in anthropological texts, photographs, museum collections, and fairs. Particular emphasis will be given to transformations in colonial, nationalist, and transnational discourses on Puerto Rican cultural identity. The fieldwork of such major scholars as Franz Boas, Julian Steward, Sidney Mintz, Oscar Lewis, Helen Safa, and Philippe Bourgois will be studied in the Puerot Rican context.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 483. Near Eastern Prehistory.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent V Flannery (kflanner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the evolution of culture and society in Israel, Jordan, Syria, Iraq, and Iran, from the earliest evidence for humans in the region (over 1,000,000 years ago) until the rise of Mesopotamian civilization (around 2500 B.C.) Topics include the origins of agriculture and animal domestication, the establishment of village and town life, and the rise of cities in the Tigris-Euphrates lowlands.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 494. Introduction to Analytical Methods in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert E Whallon Jr (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in statistics and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the major methods of statistical analysis used in archaeological research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 519 / LING 517 / GERMAN 517. Principles and Methods of Historical Linguistics.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sarah G Thomason (thomason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing, or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Linguistics 517.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 553. Blurred Genres: Autobiography, Fiction & Ethnography.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: 400-level coursework in Anthropology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Where does the story of the observer end and the story of the observed begin? Autobiography, ethnography, and fiction share a concern with constructing meaningful representations of the self and of the other in narrative form. This course will focus on the history, politics, and possibilities of interconnecting autobiography, ethnography, and fiction. We will read widely in a variety of ethnographic, fictional, and autobiographic genres, including literary journalism, autobiographic ethnography, feminist ethnography, fieldwork accounts, the memoir, autobiographical criticism, family stories, and fiction that uses first-person voices. Our theoretical aim will be to gain an understanding of our current historical moment as one in which writers both inside and outside of the academy are pursuing intersecting trajectories in their use of the personal voice to explore the social world. We will consider the recent "memoir boom" and its impact on the academy as well as the academy's impact on its flourishing. We will also consider gender differences in the use of the personal voice, exploring the fine line that distinguishes "reflexive" (often coded as "male") and "confessional" (often coded as "female") writing within anthropology. And we will ask what anthropology, as a personal act of witnessing scripted in diverse genres, means at the end of the century. Our practical aim will be to gain expertise in the analysis and use of a range of textual strategies, including monologue, dialogue, first person narrative, third person narrative, flashback, different methods of quoting or paraphrasing "informants," and descriptive accounts of other places, times, and subjectivities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 576. Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology or biology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/576/001.nsf

In introduction to language and linguistics for anthropologists. The nature of language as a sign activity, the status of linguistic representations and semiotic and biological bases of linguistic universals are explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 578. Monographs in the Ethnography of Speaking.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 576. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with major works in the ethnography of speaking, ranging from studies that approach language ethnographically to those that approach ethnography through language. It considers ways in which ethnographers have used linguistic evidence to draw inferences about social relations and cultural patterns, and consider the methodological insights and problems raised by these studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 587 / CLARCH 531 / HISTART 531. Aegean Art and Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Class. Arch. 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 531.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 589. Neutron Activation Analysis in Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leah Delia Minc (leahminc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) is a highly sensitive and accurate technique for measuring the concentrations of major, minor, and trace elements in archaeological and historical materials. Researchers employ the technique to determine the provenience of raw materials and artifacts, to trace patterns of trade and exchange, to investigate palaeodiet and nutrition, and to authenticate antiquities and works of art. This course (conducted in cooperation with the University's research reactor) provides students with the fundamental principles and methods of NAA, along with hands-on experience in utilizing this technique to determine the elemental composition of archaeological materials. The course focuses on three areas: (1) the technical and practical aspects of NAA, including irradiation procedures, gamma-ray spectrometry, and the determination of trace-element concentrations; (2) the quantitative methods for analyzing and utilizing NAA data; and (3) the anthropological interpretation of NAA data, through an introduction to the natural and cultural factors affecting trace-element concentrations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 593. Archaeological Systematics.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrators, graduates, with permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed principally for graduate students in anthropology. It examines the epistemological basis for archaeology, major theoretical frameworks for reconstructing past human organization and studying its change, and methodological approaches appropriate for such investigations. The course is designed as a seminar, with strong emphasis on active student participation. There are no exams, but a paper is required at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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