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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Astronomy


This page was created at 6:49 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Astronomy
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ASTRO

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Astronomy.

What's New This Week in Astronomy.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Introductory Courses and Courses for Non-Concentrators.

Astronomy 101/111 discusses our explorations of the solar system. Astronomy 102/112 deals with stars and the rest of the Universe beyond the solar system. Students in Astronomy 101 and 102 attend a weekly discussion section. Students in Astronomy 111 and 112 actively participate in a laboratory which meets in the evening each week. None of these courses is a prerequisite for any of the others. High school mathematics through plane geometry is useful. All students in each course will have opportunities for a planetarium visit and for evening observations with telescopes.


ASTRO 101. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System.

Section 001 Meets with Astronomy 111.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 115, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Astronomy 101 students attend the same lectures as Astronomy 111 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 101. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System.

Section 006 Meets with Astronomy 111.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 115, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Astronomy 101 students attend the same lectures as Astronomy 111 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 102. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe.

Section 001 Meets with Astronomy 112.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Astronomy 102 students attend the same lectures as Astronomy 112 students. Instead of laboratory sections, Astronomy 102 incorporates weekly one-hour discussions and associated exercises, which is considered along with examinations and quizzes for course grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 102. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe.

Section 006 Meets with Astronomy 112.006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Astronomy 102 students attend the same lectures as Astronomy 112 students. Instead of laboratory sections, Astronomy 102 incorporates weekly one-hour discussions and associated exercises, which is considered along with examinations and quizzes for course grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 111. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 115, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ASTRO 111. Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System.

Section 004 Meets with Astronomy 101.006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101, 115, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ASTRO 112. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe.

Section 001 Meets with Astronomy 102.001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended primarily for non-science concentrators, who wish to understand the phenomena and properties of the universe beyond our solar system. There are no astronomy prerequisites, and a basic high school math background (e.g., not calculus) will suffice. Students examine the widest possible range of interrelated natural phenomena, from sub-atomic particles to the Universe as a whole. Lectures inventory the different types of stars and examine how red giants, white dwarfs, black holes, supernovae, and people all fit together in one grand, remarkable scheme. The larger picture includes our Milky Way galaxy, less hospitable exploding galaxies, and enigmatic quasars. The present state of knowledge or speculation regarding the origin and ultimate fate of our universe will also receive special attention. It all came from somewhere, but where...and why? Course grades will be derived from scheduled quizzes or exams, and laboratory exercises. Laboratory sections, which meet for two evening hours each week, will include planetarium demonstrations and observations with telescopes (weather permitting).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 112. Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe.

Section 006 Meets with Astronomy 102.006.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: A basic high school math and science background. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102, 130, or 160. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended primarily for non-science concentrators, who wish to understand the phenomena and properties of the universe beyond our solar system. There are no astronomy prerequisites, and a basic high school math background (e.g., not calculus) will suffice. Students examine the widest possible range of interrelated natural phenomena, from sub-atomic particles to the Universe as a whole. Lectures inventory the different types of stars and examine how red giants, white dwarfs, black holes, supernovae, and people all fit together in one grand, remarkable scheme. The larger picture includes our Milky Way galaxy, less hospitable exploding galaxies, and enigmatic quasars. The present state of knowledge or speculation regarding the origin and ultimate fate of our universe will also receive special attention. It all came from somewhere, but where...and why? Course grades will be derived from scheduled quizzes or exams, and laboratory exercises. Laboratory sections, which meet for two evening hours each week, will include planetarium demonstrations and observations with telescopes (weather permitting).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 120. Frontiers of Astronomy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Astro. 125. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Astronomy is one of the most visible sciences, and regularly captures the public's attention. This course will overview our current understanding of the Universe, stressing discoveries of the last few years made with the new generation of Earth-based telescopes, and orbiting observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope and high-energy satellites. From this we will see how astronomers can probe the Universe, using only the stray light and particles from distant objects, and how the need to explain these data enriches our understanding of the physical world. The course will emphasize how scientific discoveries are made, the results circulated, and then popularized. By focusing on such recent discoveries as planetary systems, black hole candidates, 'dark matter' and the large scale structure of the Universe we will learn to examine critically astronomers' claims of exciting new results. The grade will be based on writing assignments, class participation, and quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 122. The Origin of the Elements and the History of Matter.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://astro.lsa.umich.edu/users/cowley/index.html#course information

Our study of the history of matter in the Universe will take us from the beginnings of time to the present, and from the smallest elementary particles to massive stars and galaxies. This seminar will focus on the creation and evolution of the elements, which originated in the Big Bang and are still being made today in the centers of stars and in the explosive deaths of the most massive stars. The course will begin with a survey of the astronomical universe, from our planet Earth out to the farthest quasars and beyond. From there we will begin our study of the beginning of the matter in the Universe as we know it, following the evolution of the elements as we return to the present day, and investigating how we can determine the chemical composition of matter in space. Grading will be based on written assignments, quizzes, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 125. Observational Astronomy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Some knowledge of basic physics is helpful but not necessary. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Astro. 120. (4). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ASTRO 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 001 Meets Sept. 5 To Oct. 22. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons, phases of the moon, solar and lunar eclipses, and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A Planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 002 Meets Sept. 5 To Oct. 22. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to examine and understand the observational phenomena that everyone has observed and become familiar with. Students will learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, and the stars. Students will come to understand astronomical phenomena such as the motion of these objects on the sky and their implications: seasons, phases of the moon, solar and lunar eclipses, and the perplexing motions of the planets. Another important topic is the changing stellar sky, including the identification of the brighter stars and constellations during the different seasons. Transient objects such as comets and meteors will be discussed and a meteorite shower will be observed. The course will conclude with a discussion of ancient observatories and the historical efforts by humanity to measure important astronomical phenomena. A Planetarium will be one of the primary teaching facilities, but students will make their own observations and also work with computer programs, such as "The Sky." There will be homework assignments and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 003 Meets Oct. 24 To Dec. 12. (Drop/Add deadline=November 6).

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Astronomy 127.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 127. Naked Eye Astronomy.

Section 004 Meets Oct. 24 To Dec. 12. (Drop/Add deadline=November 6).

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (NS).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Astronomy 127.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 160. Introduction to Astrophysics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 140 or 160. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102, 112, or 130. (4). (NS). (BS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Some of the most exciting phenomena and concepts in astronomy and astrophysics are explored in this survey course. One major theme is the structure and evolution of stars from their birth in giant molecular clouds through their death as white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes. Another important theme is galaxies, with discussions about the missing or dark matter in galaxies, galaxy-galaxy interactions, and the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe. We conclude with an examination of the Big Bang, the Inflationary Universe, and the Cosmic Background radiation. This course is directed toward students with an interest in science and mathematics. There are problem sets and a weekly two-hour laboratory using telescopes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 204 / AOSS 204 / GEOSCI 204. The Planets: Their Geology and Climates.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry N Pollack (hpollack@umich.edu), Sushil K Atreya (atreya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: High school mathematics through plane geometry and trigonometry. Those with credit for GS 113 may only elect Astro. 204 for 2 credits. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Geological Sciences 204.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 261 / NAVSCI 301. Navigation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to educate students in all aspects of marine navigation, from getting a vessel underway from port through open ocean navigation using both celestial and electronic means. The content of the course is divided into three major areas. The first section focuses on piloting, emphasizing the safe navigation of vessels in coastal waters. This section provides an introduction to navigational instruments and aids to navigation. The second section concerns celestial navigation, the ability to determine position through observation of celestial bodies. Students learn how to determine position based on the use of the sextant and various almanacs and mathematical tables. The third section of the course considers electronic navigation. The course consists of two ninety minute lectures a week. Grading is done on the basis of homework, quizzes, a project, and examinations. The primary textbooks for the course are Marine Navigation I and Marine Navigation II by Richard R. Hobbs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 389. Individual Studies in Astronomy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of individual reading and study in astronomy under the guidance of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ASTRO 399. Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students in Astronomy who are prepared to undertake a limited research project under the guidance of a member of the staff of the Department of Astronomy. Astronomy 399 is open to qualified students in other departments and is subject to approval by concentration advisors and members of the staff of the Department of Astronomy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ASTRO 402. Stellar Astrophysics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 340. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://astro.lsa.umich.edu/users/cowley/a402f2001.html

This course is a survey of stellar astronomy and astrophysics, building upon an elementary background of basic physics: mechanics; and interaction of radiation and matter (atomic spectra). No astronomy course is a prerequisite, although students who have not had any astronomy may find it helpful to read an introductory text book for overviews. Course topics: basic stellar data; celestial mechanics and binary stars; stellar atmospheres and abundances of the chemical elements; stellar interiors, evolution, and nucleosynthesis; space distributions and motions of stars in the Galaxy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 403. Astrophysics of the Interstellar Medium.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Math. 216, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys. 240 (or 260). (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the various types of gaseous components and their interaction with stars through the processes of star formation, stellar mass loss, photoionization of gas by hot stars, and supernova explosions. The interstellar medium (the gas between stars) comprises a wide variety of material that interacts closely, and often violently, with individual stars and the host galaxy. First, the underlying atomic and molecular physics is developed and then we examine how gas is ionized by hot stars and by supernova remnants. We analyze the content of the cold pervasive atomic and molecular gas in the galaxy, how it often lies in spiral arms, and why giant molecular clouds are the most active sites of star formation. Finally, recent discoveries are highlighted, such as the presence of galactic "cirrus" as seen from the dust distribution.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASTRO 429. Senior Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior concentrators. Astro. 401, 402, and 404. (2). (Excl). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Student-faculty discussion of selected problems in two or three currently active areas. This is also the Astronomy Department's senior writing course. Attendance at weekly department colloquia is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ASTRO.


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