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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 6:52 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 – December 21)

Open courses in Comparative Literature
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMPLIT

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Comparative Literature.

What's New This Week in Comparative Literature.

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COMPLIT 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 – Visible and the Invisible: Science and Imagination in the 19th Century.

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The 19th century saw the rise of new sciences claiming to reveal the truths and secrets of things near and far, visible and invisible. In this course we will read several novels and scientific treatises dating from the period between the late 18th century and the early 20th century with an eye to understanding something of the excitement, hope, fear, and anxiety that the possibility of such new knowledge presented to the people of the time. We will pay particular attention to their views and speculations on the phenomena supposedly caused or influenced by some invisible material entities, such as electricity, psychical forces, and wealth and economic value.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 240. Introduction to Comparative Literature.

Section 001 – Reading to Live.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why Read? Why Live? Do the two questions have the same answers? What does reading have to do with living? In this course, we will take these questions as a framework through which to approach comparative literature as something people study and as a way they study it. But wait, there's more! The books you read, the thoughts you think, and the words you hear, speak, and write will slip under your skin with excruciating sweetness. They might make you feel itchy and uncomfortable. It may be difficult to walk and talk normally. You may begin to hear voices and to tell stories. I promise… But only if you do the reading (which will include work by authors such as McCullers, Kafka, Puig, Achebe, Shelley, Cortazar, Freud, Nietzsche, Marx, and Deleuze), writing (weekly short papers, one or two longer essays,) talking, and thinking (constantly).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 372. Literature and Identity.

Section 001 – South Asian Travels – Narrative Identity in Displacement. Meets with Asian Studies 380.001.

Instructor(s): Christi Merrill

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students will read 20th century works of literary nonfiction by writers with South Asian links who write about a different place than they write from. We will begin by comparing five short accounts of Mumbai/Bombay to see how much narrative personality affects the portrait of a place, then in subsequent weeks develop a critical vocabulary for discussing these rhetorical decisions by pairing travel writing with travel theory. We will consider Santa Rama Rau and George Orwell writing about colonial India, self-identified postcolonials Amitav Ghosh and Amit Chaudhuri writing about "videsh," diasporic writers Meena Alexander, Sara Suleri and Michael Ondaatje describing a return to South Asia, as well as writers like Pico Iyer, V.S. Naipaul and Ruth Prawar Jhabvala whose identities on and off the page are even more complicated. How do their identities impact the way they construct a narrative "I" as their traveling selves and as their writing selves? What do they assume they have in common with their readers and what do they assume their readers won't share with them? What preconceptions of "here" and "there" do they rely on to construct their narrative authority? Students will be expected to make a class presentation on one of the assigned readings and to prepare a reading response for each class session. Instead of an examination, there will be a final paper investigating questions raised in the readings.

Books to be purchased:

V.S. Naipaul, An Area of Darkness; Santa Rama Rau, Home to India; Amitav Ghosh, In an Antique Land; Sara Suleri, Meatless Days; Amit Chaudhuri, Afternoon Raag; Michael Ondaatje, Running in the Family

A course pack will include the following essays and excerpts: Suketu Mehta, "Mumbai"; Octavio Paz, "Bombay"; Pico Iyer, "Bombay: Hobson-Jobson on the Streets"; Ardashir Vakil, from Beach Boy; Sara Suleri, from The Rhetoric of English India; Caren Kaplan, from Questions of Travel: Postmodern Discourses of Displacement; Rob Nixon "London Calling: V.S. Naipaul and the License of Exile"; George Orwell, "Shooting an Elephant"; Mary Louise Pratt, from Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation; Inderpal Grewal, from Home and Harem: Nation, Gender, Empire, and the Cultures of Travel; James Clifford, from Routes, Travel and Translation; Meena Alexander, from Fault Lines; Ruth Prawar Jhabvala, "Myself in India."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 382(422). Literature and the Other Arts.

Section 001 – The Ghost in the Machine.

Instructor(s): Chris Luebbe (auster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From the invention of writing to that of the cotton gin and the computer, machines have altered the physical and mental environments that we inhabit in ways both obvious and subtle, intentional and unforeseen. Some see technology as panacea, others as society's bane, leading inexorably toward a dystopic future. In this course we will examine novels and films that present a variety of perspectives on technology, its functions, and its effects. We will begin with a consideration of possible meanings of the term through readings of Heidegger, Neil Postman, and Donna Haraway among others, and then reflect on the multiple intersections of man, machine, and society. Texts under discussion will include J.G. Ballard's Crash, several novels by William Gibson, The Matrix, Blade Runner, and issues of Wired.

Requirements: One 6-page paper and one 12-page paper, as well as a series of informal response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 001 – The Arabian Nights.

Instructor(s): Anton Shammas (antons@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer a reading of The Book of A Thousand and One Nights, its histories, traditions, translations, adaptations, transmutations and violations, throughout the second millennium, from the tenth century Middle East to the twentieth century Hollywood. It will follow the emergence of the frame story, and the formation of some of the basic tales, through an astonishing interaction between the Arabic "original" and the French "translation" of Galland in the beginning of the eighteenth century. Discussions will revolve around a selection of English translations of different tales; issues of cross-cultural translation; ways in which different translators from different cultures and persuasions dealt with violence, desire and gender in the Nights; the appropriations of the book in the East and West: in film, theater, music, literature, etc. A special attention will be paid to Borges, Barth, and Rushdie, while comparatively exploring issues of narrative strategies, intertextual mappings, migratory motifs, and Orientalism. Students will be evaluated through class performance, two short essays presented in class, and a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

COMPLIT 430. Comparative Studies in Fiction.

Section 002 – Intersections of Life and Art: Impressions of a Turkish Author. Meets with MENAS 490.001.

Instructor(s): Ahmet Husrev Altan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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COMPLIT 495. Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 – Critical Concepts in Comparative Literature

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and concentration in Comp. Lit. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the most important concepts used in contemporary literary theory and cultural studies today. We'll explore in turn such notions as the "literary canon," and its feminist and post-colonial challenges; the concepts of "author," and "authority" in relation to "power," and "gender;" the function of "writing" and "textuality" in cultural practices; "interpretive strategies" and their ideological underpinnings, and modalities of "reading" and "reception." Theoretical readings will include texts by: Bakhtin, Barthes, Kristeva, Derrida, Foucault, Bourdieu, Sedgwick, Butler, Eagleton, Jameson, Gates, Said, Bhabha. Students are invited to explore (and question) key critical concepts through analysis of examples from literature, as well as from visual and popular culture, where relevant.

Evaluation will be based on two short papers, and an oral presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 496. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comp. Lit. 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 498. Directed Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

Graduate Course Listings for COMPLIT.


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