Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 6:56 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in History
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTORY

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for History.

What's New This Week in History.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

HISTORY 110 / MEMS 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liz Horodowich

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/110/001.nsf

The first half of the European history survey course covers a sweeping period of over a millennium. The course is designed to expose students to general outlines and chronology of European history and to encourage critical, skeptical analytical thinking. To anchor our flying coverage of this long and varied time, we will focus on developments in culture (art, architecture, literature), social organization (family, community, gender relations), and in political organization and theory. Readings will include a textbook, primary sources, challenging interpretive essays. Lecture time will be punctuated by small-group discussions, and active participation is strongly encouraged. Slides will frequently accompany lectures.
Books: available at Shaman Drum bookstore, 313 State St.
-C. Hollister, Medieval Europe (eighth edition)
-P. Geary, Readings in Medieval History (second edition)
-M. Luther, On Christian Liberty
-N. Machiavelli, The Prince
-J. Tolkien (trans.) Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
C. Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms
There will also be a course pack available from Accu-Copy, 518 E. William St., and some on-line readings will be assigned as noted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 121 / ASIAN 121. East Asia: Early Transformations.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an introduction to the civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, and Inner Asia. It aims to provide an overview of changing traditions from ancient to early modern times (ca. 1660 AD) by outlining broad trends which not only transformed each society, economy, and culture but also led to the development of this region into distinctly different modern nations. The development of state Confucianism, the spread of Buddhism, the functions of the scholar and the warrior, the impact of the military empires of Inner Asia, and the superiority of pre-modern Asian science and technology are some of the topics we will cover. In addition to the required textbooks, we will read contemporary accounts and view slides and films to acquire intimate appreciation of these cultures. Course requirements include successful completion of: quizzes given in sections; four major tests given in class; one report/project (5 pp. plus bibliography and notes).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 132 / AAPTIS 100 / ACABS 100 / HJCS 100. Peoples of the Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu) , Gary M Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://cgi.www.umich.edu/~nes100/F01/

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 100.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 144(249) / KOREAN 150 / ASIAN 154. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eun-Su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Korean 150.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 151 / ASIAN 111. Indian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stewart N. Gordon (sngordon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/151/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the civilization of India, that is, the region of South Asia consisting of the modern countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka. We will begin with the first Indian civilization, that of the Indus Valley, and go on to the Vedic age, the formation of empires and the classical civilization of India, its social organization, arts, and sciences. We will then examine the encounter of India with Islamic and European civilization, and the formation of the independent nation-states of today. Course requirements include short papers, midterm, and final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 152 / ASIAN 112. Southeast Asian Civilization.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most culturally diverse regions, home to Buddhist, Muslim, Confucian, and Christian civilizations. It boasts ancient monuments of surpassing grandeur and symbolic complexity. It was the scene of the bloodiest conflict since 1945, the Vietnam War. Until recently it had the world's fastest growing regional economy, and it remains an area of great importance to Japan as well as the United States. This course offers an introduction (and thus assumes no prior knowledge) to Southeast Asian history from the earliest civilizations, through the colonial conquest, the indigenous political reaction of which Vietnamese Communism and the Vietnam Wars were one expression and the contemporary economic scene. The course seeks to define Southeast Asia's uniqueness as well as its evolving ties to the rest of the world. Midterm, final, and optional paper. Two lectures, one discussion section per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan M Juster

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of early American history from the period of initial colonization through the Civil War. The course will be organized around the interactions of the three dominant cultures which came together in early America: Native American, European, and African. We will explore the internal dynamics of each culture (family life, religious beliefs, political system, labor arrangements, gender roles) and how the clash of cultures shaped the experience of Americans in the colonial and national periods. Specific topics will include the problems of forming communities in an alien environment, the transition to slave labor and the origins of an African-American society, the American Revolution and the creation of the republic, the emergence of sectionalism, and the impact of early industrialism. Students will attend two lectures each week, and read a series of monographs and primary documents. A short paper and a final exam are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terrence J McDonald

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Can a market economy support a moral community? Can a society divided along the lines of class, ethnicity, race and gender develop a unifying national citizenship and ideology? Can a nation with abundant resources distribute them fairly at home and deploy them humanely abroad? Can American politics be democratic, pluralistic, inclusive efficient, and meaningful? These are the themes that will follow through this survey of American social, cultural, and political history. Students will attend two lectures and two section meetings each week, take midterm and final examinations, and write an account of how their lives and those of their families have encountered modern American history. Readings will include a textbook, a course pack of American autobiographical writings, and about half a dozen other paperbacks.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"The Writing of History" sections offer students the opportunity to learn writing through the study of historical texts, debates, and events. Each section will study a different era, region, and topic in the past, for the common purpose of learning how history is written and how to write about it. Students will read the work of modern historians as well as documents and other source materials from the past, such as historical novels, letters, diaries, or memoirs. In each case the goal will be to learn how to construct effective arguments, and how to write college-level analytic papers. History 195 satisfies the first-year writing requirement. Each section will enroll a maximum of eighteen students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 001 U.S. Cities in the Twentieth Century

Instructor(s): Karen Miller (enzyme@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/195/001.nsf

This seminar will consider the evolution of cities and of metropolitan areas in the United States over the course of the twentieth century. It will examine the political, cultural and demographic shifts that have shaped American cities and will explore how popular myths about cities have helped shape urban politics and culture. Students will analyze the causes and consequences of urbanization, exploring the roles of residents, migrants, planners, activists, industrialists, government officials (both local and national), and other actors in building cities and in producing meanings about them. They will also discuss how cities have been represented in cultural works and how the idea of "the city" in America has changed over time. Instead of assuming that cities are knowable areas with clear geographic boundaries, we will explore how cities take on meaning through a multiplicity of different "texts." These texts will include maps, novels, movies, oral testimony, fine art, newspaper accounts, and archived documents as well as historical writing. Over the course of the term, students will read and critique each other's work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 002 The Body Beautiful: Beauty and American Culture in the 19th & 20th Centuries

Instructor(s): Alyssa Picard

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, you will examine the history of the concept of beauty, and the history of the male and female beauty norms of the 19th and 20th century United States, with an eye towards understanding both the historical construction of beauty and the social construction of today's ideals about personal appearance. We will be trying to discern where conceptions of beauty have come from, how they have changed over time, and who has participated in the creation and alteration of ideas about personal appearance. We will also be exploring the history of historians' interest in personal beauty, seeking to discern what the academic study of beauty has to offer to our understanding of American culture and American history. The major purpose of the course is to prepare you for the academic study of history: to initiate you into the academic languages of historians, to cultivate in you the habits of reading and writing essential to the study of history (and to many other disciplines), and, specifically, to prepare you to independently plan and write papers of increasing length and scope, culminating in a seven- to ten-page research paper based on primary sources. Class activities will include weekly journal writings, biweekly writing workshops, an extensive orientation to the University of Michigan library system, and trips to beauty pageants or bodybuilding contests as we are able to locate them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 003 Rebels, Reformers, & Reactionaries: 19th-Century American Social Movements

Instructor(s): Barbara Berglund

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The same issues that moved nineteenth-century Americans to collective acts of rebellion, reform, and reaction racial and gender inequality, drugs, labor relations, immigration, and indigenous rights continue to play a critical role in present-day America.

This course explores six nineteenth-century American social movements abolitionists' fight to end slavery, women's struggles for economic and political rights, temperance advocates' efforts to promote moral living by restricting alcohol consumption, the Knights of Labor's attempts to secure better conditions for workers, the anti-Chinese movement's opposition to Chinese immigration, and Native American's search for community in the midst of dislocation through the Ghost Dance.

It examines how in each of these movements different groups of people organized in varying ways to improve their lives and their society. It also investigates the power relations, inequalities, hopes, and fears that catalyzed them.

It seeks to inform the present and the future by learning from the past.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 004 Women and Fascism: Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy

Instructor(s): Julie Stubbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Fascism often brings to mind masculine images crisp uniforms, goose-stepping soldiers, military aggression, and in the case of Nazi Germany, racial genocide. This class, in contrast, explores women and fascism, focusing on Germany and Italy. Nazism and Italian Fascism embraced biologically determined roles for women, relegating them to the home, where they were encouraged to pursue motherhood as a duty to State and nation. Both regimes have been characterized as anti-feminist and misogynistic. Yet, many German and Italian women, as beneficiaries of social policies and members of State-sponsored mass organizations for women, fondly recall life in Hitler's Germany and Mussolini's Italy. Others remember brutality and repression. In this course students will examine women as historical actors, who actively participated in, benefited from, or resisted fascist policies. We will investigate women's varied experiences of life under a fascist regime, paying special attention to differences among groups of women-bourgeois, working class, urban, rural, "Aryan," Jewish, Catholic, Protestant. We will study similarities in Nazi and Italian Fascist gender ideology, pronatalist initiatives and other social policies directed at women. We also will analyze differences between the two regimes, namely the role of anti-Semitism and racial policies in Nazi Germany, and how these affected women. In addition, the course addresses questions of historiography; the arguments and interpretations put forth by historians. Students will have the opportunity to analyze the various types of sources (evidence) historians use to write history, including primary documents and first person accounts, such as oral histories and memoirs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 195. The Writing of History.

Section 006 Encounter, Crime, and Revolution: The People and the Press in Early America

Instructor(s): Ellen Hartigan-O'Connor

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). This course may not be included in a history concentration.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/195/006.nsf

The early printing presses of Europe and North America produced tracts, newspapers, pamphlets, and scandal sheets that played active roles in shaping and reflecting the social atmosphere and political thought of their time. This course explores the relationship between these printed documents and society in North America prior to the Civil War in three areas: European-Indian encounters, Revolutionary writings, and crime literature. Reading the early accounts of North America written by Europeans, we will explore the conditions under which printed accounts were written and circulated, the importance of point of view and tone, and the relationship between writers and the represented. We will study the American Revolution through its political writings to understand the interaction of political words and actions, the concept of a "free press," and how ideas about the press have changed over time. Finally, we will turn to true crime literature the sermons and sensationalistic tales of murder that reveal how the buying public influenced print culture and how technological changes in printing and marketing influenced its use and meanings. Through short weekly papers and a longer, revised paper students will learn to evaluate evidence, make convincing arguments, and assist their peers in revising their writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Politics of Race Since WWII. Meets with American Culture 102.001.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 102.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 1945: Japan's Defeat and Renewal

Instructor(s): Sidney Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will focus on Japan's defeat in the Pacific War (1941-1945) and its renewal under the American Occupation (1945-1952). Topics considered in weekly sessions will include: social change in wartime, Hiroshima and its legacy, the decision to surrender, emperor system and its modification, the peace constitution of 1947, land reform, a new deal for labor, new rights for women, zaibatsu dissolution and beginnings of high-speed growth, cultural change: the golden age of jazz, and the reverse course. The main reading will be John T. Dower, Embracing Defeat (1999), a Pulitzer prize-winning book. Four short papers of analysis of particular problems will be assigned. One written essay examination. Student oral reports.
Required Readings:
-John Dower, Imbracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II, ISBN: 0-393-32027-8
-Kazuo Kawai, Japan's American Interlude, ISBN: 0-226-42775-7
-Jiro Osaragi, The Journey. ISBN: 0-8048-3255-2
-Beate Sirota Gordon, The Only Woman in the Room, Oxford Univ. Press, ISBN: na.
OPTIONAL BOOK:
-Herbert P. Bix, Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan, ISBN: 0-06-093130-2

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 005 Epidemics in American History. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Howard Markel

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will study the social, medical, and cultural history of several major epidemics in American history from cholera to AIDS. Each week is an in-depth discussion of readings of historical studies and novels and plays about contagion. Weekly journal writing assignments, a term paper based on original research, and class participation constitute the final grade. All who take this course must be prepared to learn, read, think, and write a lot.

Required readings are as follows.

  • The Plague (Vintage/Random House Books) by Albert Camus
  • An Enemy of the People (Oxford Classics) by Henrik Ibsen
  • The Cholera Years (University of Chicago Press) by Charles E. Rosenberg
  • Arrowsmith (Signet) by Sinclair Lewis
  • How the Other Half Lives (Penguin) by Jacob Riis
  • Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892 (Johns Hopkins University Press) by Howard Markel
  • And the Band Played On (St. Martin's Press) by Randy Shilts
  • The Hot Zone (Bantam) by Richard Preston
  • Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public's Health (Beacon) by Judith W. Leavitt
  • A Summer Plague (Yale University Press) by Tony Gould.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Let the Shadow Warrior Speak.

Instructor(s): Hitomi Tonomura (tomitono@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Rescued at an execution ground, the deceased overlord's look-alike was fitted into the role of "kagemusha" (Shadow Warrior). Now the pillar of the Takeda house and guardian of its strength and honor, the former thief viewed the world from new heights. We will see the film, KAGEMUSHA, and explore the historical time and place in which this shadow warrior found himself. The course investigates the social and political meanings of the "country-at-war (sengoku)," Japan's age of turmoil (16th C) which continues to stimulate the creative imagination of film directors, novelists, and tour organizers. The course also examines the evolution of the samurai class over a millennium before and after our Shadow Warrior's time. Aspects to be considered include technology and social meanings of wars and battles, economic development and classes, education and cultural accomplishments, gender relations, and the movement toward pacification. Students are evaluated on the basis of: class attendance and participation, occasional quizzes, and five three-page papers.
Cost: approximately $100.00
Required texts:
-Catharina Blomberg, The Heart of the Warrior: Origins and Religious Background of the Samurai System in Feudal Japan (Kent, England: Curzon, 1994)
-H. Paul Varley, Warriors of Japan (Univeristy of Hawaii Press, 1994)
-George Elison and Bardwell Smith, Warlords, Artists, and Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century (The University Press of Hawaii, 1981)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Ordering Knowledge: Human Sciences

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The nineteenth century saw the emergence of a variety of new fields of knowledge. Philosophy, archaeology, anthropology, and comparative religion were among such new fields, and part of what has come to be known collectively as "human sciences." Meanwhile, "history" also became an academic discipline; it was no longer an incidental gathering of anecdotal knowledge about the past, but instead, a rigorous and methodic form of research purporting to establish certain facts about the past. It was also during this period that the university became "modern," as it became the quintessential abode and superlative organ of science, research, and scholarship. In this seminar we will study the historical processes that shaped these and other modern institutions of knowledge, in part in order to reflect on the nature and the purposes of the university education today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 200. Greece to 201 B.C.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Schmalz

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Homer, Aristotle and Socrates, Odysseus, Pericles and Alexander the Great, Medea, Cassandra and Atigone, Athens, Sparta and Troy...names and places that pop up in many different contexts. Wouldn't it be great to know who and what they really were and why these names and places still carry meaning today? This survey course introduces participants to ancient Greece from the Mycenaean age to the end of the Hellenistic period. It covers ancient works of literature as well as inscriptions, papyri, coins, and archaeological evidence. Lectures and the section discussions focus on the development of Greek society, the role of the individual in Greek history, and the dynamics of historical change. Throughout the term, corresponding and contrasting issues relevant to our own society and history will be addressed. There will be two exams. Each will include essay questions and also test knowledge of historical figures, places and events (2 x 30% of the grade). 20% of the grade will be based on contributions to discussions in sections, the remaining 20% on assignments and quizzes in sections. History 200 is the "prequel" to History 201 (The Roman Empire and Its Legacy). Textbook: R. Morkot, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Greece (1996). NO PREREQUISITES. EVERYBODY WELCOME.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 210 / MEMS 210. Early Middle Ages, 300-1100.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paolo Squatriti (pasqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the transformation of the Roman Empire into Byzantine, Islamic, and west European successor states between A.D. 300 and 1000. The course focuses on the social, cultural, and economic developments in the barbarian kingdoms of Europe. Lectures are integrated with weekly discussion of early medieval texts; two short papers and two tests are the basis of evaluation of performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 241. War in the Twentieth Century Middle East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

Covers the history of warfare since the 18th century from Algeria to Afghanistan. Examines imperial warfare and statemaking through Muhammad Ali Pasha (d. 1848), then the colonial wars of France, Great Britain, and Russia; the two world wars; and the subsequent Arab-Israeli, Gulf, and Afghanistan conflicts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 246(446) / CAAS 246. Africa to 1850.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Africa to 1850

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the pre-colonial African past, from the early prehistory of the human to the eve of Europe's second great wave of empire when Africans across most of the continent became the subjects of European colonies. The second European empires (from roughly the 1870s through the 1960s) have had profound influence on Africa, yet important global forces were affecting Africa long before the mid-nineteenth century. Moreover, the shapes that Africa would take under the influence of European empire would be strongly conditioned by the course of change on the continent before 1850 and by the nature of society and culture on the continent stretching back for more than a millennium.

The major objective of this course is to establish a deeper understanding of the forces, institutions, and processes that underlay the experiences of Africans and the African continent before 1850. The post-1850 history of Africa will be taken up by Professor Diouf during the second term, in History 247.

Over the past five decades, the reconstruction of the African past from archaeological evidence, from oral testimonies, and from historical linguistics and from other methods and materials has been one of the most remarkable departures in the historical sciences, taking the professional craft of history beyond its signature: the written document. Of course, the peoples of Africa long enjoyed a rich knowledge of their past and a deep engagement with history, well before the emergence of the professional practice of history on the continent. And a critical factor in the shaping of Africa's futures has been the production and control of histories for and about the continent.

Albeit the breakthroughs in the reconstruction of Africa's past, and albeit the importance of historical knowledge to Africans, Africa is substantially "known" today by those outside Africa, by the international press, by the aid and development and the human rights communities through a shallow and relatively presentist understanding, partially based on direct observation, partially based on persistent and pervading myths and fantasies about Africa, myths that have their own significant histories. The course will encourage a more complex understanding of Africa and a sense of African history as a work-in-progress.

The course will explore:

  • Africa's earliest history
  • The histories and fates of pre-colonial empires, kingdoms, and states across the continent
  • The shapes of African culture and society
  • The Atlantic slave trade and its impacts on Africa
  • The rise of Islam in Africa
  • The relations of Europe and Africa before the second European empires
  • Basic conditions of life in pre-colonial Africa
  • African modernities before "modernity"

Among the main questions, the recurrent questions:

  • Africa's Past: How has it come to be known, understood, comprehended, explained?
  • Africa's Cultures: The utility of models of continuity and change?
  • Africa's Civilizations: The ethics of autocracy and domination?
  • Africa's Connections to the Wider World: Determined or negotiated?
  • Africa's Economies: The fates of value and equity in extractive economies?
  • Africa's Resources: Whose materials, to what use, to what effect?

The course will be organized around lectures, readings, discussions, the viewing of several films from Africa.

Course requirements:

  1. Participation in class discussion. 15%.
  2. A critical book review of a monograph from the "recommended list" three to four pages. 25%.
  3. Midterm exam. 25%.
  4. Final exam constructed, in essay form, around the "recurrent questions" above. 35%.


Reading List:
-Boubacar Barry, Senegambia and the Atlantic Trade Slave, Cambridge University Press, 1998
-Maryse Conde, Segu, London, Penguin Books
-John K. Thornton, Africa and Africans in the Makings of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800, (2nd edition), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1998
and The Kongolese Saint Anthony. Dona Beatriz Kimpa and The Antonian 1684-1706 Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1999
-Kevin Shillington, History of Africa, New York, Saint Martin's Press (Revised Edition), 1995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 250. China from the Oracle Bones to the Opium War.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course consists of a survey of early Chinese history, with special emphasis on the origins and development of the political, social, and economic institutions and their intellectual foundations. Special features include class participation in performing a series of short dramas recreating critical issues and moments in Chinese history, slides especially prepared for the lectures, new views on race and gender in the making of China, intellectual and scientific revolutions in the seventeenth century, and literature and society in premodern China.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 260 / AMCULT 260. Religion in America.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas Curlew

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 160 and 161 are recommended but not required. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the study of American religion from colonial times to the present. The emphasis will be on religion as a cultural system and as a social and political institution, rather than as a set of formal beliefs. We will explore the rise of revivalism as a major cultural force in colonial America, the place of women in the major religious traditions, the synthesis of African and Christian belief systems in the slave community, the role of religion in social reform movements, the rise of fundamentalism as a political force in the 20th century, and the wide diversity of sectarian beliefs in all eras of American history. Students will be expected to read both primary documents and historical studies, participate in class discussions, and write two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 263. Discovering America: Atlantic History I, 1492-1607.

Other History Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the formation of the early Atlantic world from the voyages of Christopher Columbus to the expeditions of Walter Raleigh. This course compares English French, Spanish, Portuguese and Native American experiences. Special attention is given to the letters and diaries of Columbus, Cortes, Cartier, Gilbert, Raleigh, and Champlain, as well as a selection of Indian texts. The course highlights integrative themes common to European, African and Indian encounters with and in the Americas, encounters that knit together a larger, newer community: the exploring, mixing, and settling of peoples and races; the emergence of viable trans-Atlantic commercial systems; a groping towards a balance of power among European states; and the exchange and advancement of knowledge. No prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 265. A History of the University of Michigan.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steneck

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist265/

History 265 presents a broad overview of the history of the University of Michigan from its founding in Detroit in 1817 to the Present

The course also explores a wide range of topics of importance in the history of higher education and in the history of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and the United States more generally.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 266. Twentieth-Century American Wars as Social and Personal Experience.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the American experience of war in this century. Lectures, readings, films, and discussions will focus not only on the military experience itself, but on how America's wars real and imagined have shaped the country's economy, politics, and culture. The course will also examine the processes of transmission and memory: how Americans who did not fight learned about those who did, and what all Americans have remembered or have been taught to remember about the wars of this century. Finally, we will consider how the nation's wartime conduct, at home and on the battlefield, has fit into long-standing social patterns and behavior such as our alleged propensity for violence. In brief, we will be looking at the American experience of war as inclusively as a term will allow.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 274 / CAAS 230. Survey of Afro-American History I.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 230.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 278 / AAPTIS 269. Introduction to Turkish Civilizations.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gottfried J Hagen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 269.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001 (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Pernick Martin S. (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits). (SS).

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From devastating infectious epidemics to the quiet suffering of malnutrition, health problems have both affected and reflected the evolution of modern society. The course will study four different historical periods, exploring such issues as: the effects of individual habits, environmental conditions, and medical innovation on public health; the role of ethics, economics, and politics in medical decision making; the changing health problems of the disadvantaged, including Native Americans, women, Blacks, immigrants, and workers; the changing meaning of concepts like "health," "disease," "cause," and "cure"; the dissemination and impact of medical discoveries; and the changing organization and power of the healing professions. We will focus on American history, although comparisons will be drawn to other societies. The course is a basic introduction, however, first-year students must obtain permission of the professor to enroll. Classes are taught in lecture format, and will include a variety of audio-visual sources. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to poetry and old medical journals. There will be two essay-style examinations, and frequent short quizzes. This is a challenging and demanding course. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course. Required purchases cost $15, but additional required reading assignments, available on reserve or for optional purchase, cost up to $110 additional if bought.

Students interested in also registering into a discussion section and receiving 4 credits for this course should see additional comments for History 284 section 002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 284. Sickness and Health in Society: 1492 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 002 (4 credits). Lecture, with discussions.

Instructor(s): Pernick Martin S. (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year students must obtain permission of the instructor. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits). (SS).

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and discussion: 4 credits; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 284.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 285. Science, Technology, and Society: 1940 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hist285/

The enterprise of science changed dramatically after WWII, both intellectually and socially. The consequences of being able to split the atom and, more recently, to engineer biological blueprints have made science literally a life and death activity that touches every human. This course will explore the growth and implications of scientific and technological development from the end of WWII to the present. There will be two lectures and one discussion per week. Students will work in small groups on one problem during the term, e.g., energy, pollution, global warming, health care issues. Each group will hand in a jointly written report at the end of term and present a class report. Three or four books will be assigned reading. Students will be expected to make use of e-mail and conferencing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 286 / RELIGION 286. A History of Eastern Christianity from the 4th to the 18th Century.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces Eastern Christianity from the 4th through the 18th century. A broad survey course aimed at undergraduates of all concentrations, there are no prerequisites; the course focuses on both Church history and theology. It begins with Constantine's conversion and traces the growth of the Church, the rise of monasticism, the creation of the creed (the Councils of Nicea and Chalcedon), and the secession of the Eastern churches (Coptic and Syriac), the role of religious pictures and the iconoclast dispute and relations with the West (Rome) which were frequently strained before the official break in the 11th century. We cover the conversion of the Slavs and the eventual formation of independent Slavic national churches. We treat the fall of the Byzantine and Medieval Slavic states to the Turks and the position of the Orthodox under the Turks. Attention is also given to the Russian Church from the 9th century to the Old Believer schism and Church reforms of Peter the Great. Readings are varied. There is no textbook. A relevant paper of the student's choice, an hour exam, and a final are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 301. Discovery of the Universe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did we get here? What's going on? Where are we going with this? These questions define the physical sciences, and this course examines the history of the ways and means, human, observational, experimental, and theoretical, that astronomers and physicists have used to answer them. The course begins with what has been called the "Scientific Revolution," with Galileo and the Inquisition, but quite rapidly we come to the nineteenth century, and the heart of the course is on the development of our study of the universe, its origin, structure, and future, during the last few generations. Among topics we shall consider are the financing of science, the politics and security implications of modern research, history of computers, the roles of women, the geographical and cultural spread of research, popularization and demonization of science, pseudo-science, and the various contexts of science, in addition to the development of research and thought. So this is a history, and not a science, course, although many of the readings will come from scientists themselves, and our discussions will be centered on the human history rather than on the science itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 318. Europe in the Era of Total War, 1870-1945.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl31801.html

In 1945 Europe lay in ruins. Entire cities had been leveled by the destructive powers of modern warfare, and the cultural, political, and social norms of the pre-war world had been shattered. What made such violence possible, and how did ordinary men and women experience it? History 318 will explore the ideological, political, economic, social, and cultural forces that both caused and were destroyed by the savagery of the early 20th century. We will not only study the origins and consequences of World Wars I and II, but also the ways in which everyday life was transformed during this turbulent era. We will look at Europe from the inside (by studying relations of class, gender, and nationality), and from the outside (by tracing the ideology and practice of imperialism). Grading will be based on a midterm and a final exam, on active participation in a discussion section, and on two take-home essay assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 320. Britain, 1901-1945: Culture and Politics.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kali A K Israel (kisrael@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine British culture and politics from the death of Queen Victoria through the Second World War, with particular attention to the nature and structure of politics and the state; the First World War and the processes through which the war experience of mass participation and trauma were understood; cultural and political debates in the interwar years; the growth of mass media; gender; the empire and colonial subjects; the Great Depression; British politics during the rise of Nazi and fascist governments in Europe; and the experience of the Blitz and World War II. Students will be asked to think critically about the various means by which national and personal stories are constituted, repressed, re-imagined, and deployed in debates about the meaning and uses of the past. Readings and other course materials will include autobiographies, novels, films, and photographs, and class sessions will include extensive discussion. No previous knowledge of British history will be assumed or required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 332 / REES 395 / SLAVIC 395 / POLSCI 395 / SOC 392. Survey of Russia: The Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the Successor States.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 395.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 336 / CAAS 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in America.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 336.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 347(476) / ANTHRCUL 346. Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dfrye/h347.htm

This course will examine the colonial period in Latin American history from the initial Spanish and Portuguese contact and conquest to the nineteenth-century wars of independence. It will focus on the process of interaction between Indians and Europeans, tracing the evolution of a range of colonial societies in the New World. Thus we will examine the indigenous background to conquest as well as the nature of the settler community. We will also look at the shifting uses of land and labor,and at the importance of class, race, gender, and ethnicity. The method of instruction is lecture and discussion. Each student will write a short critical review and a final paper of approximately 10 to 12 pages. There will be a midterm and a final. Readings will include works by Inga Clendinnen, Nancy Farris, Karen Spalding and Charles Gibson, as well as primary materials from Aztec and Spanish sources. The text will be Burkholder and Johnson, COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 350 / GTBOOKS 350 / AMCULT 360. Debates of the Founding Fathers.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Great Books 350.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 357(392). Topics in African History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 South Africa Since 1989. Meets with RC Social Science 360.003.

Instructor(s): Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rcssci/360/003.nsf

See RC Social Science 360.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 361. U.S. Intellectual History, 1750-1940.

U.S. History

Section 001 Meets with American Culture 301.003.

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jscarson/Hist361.html

America, one historian has remarked, is a nation of words. In this lecture course we will examine some of the words and concepts that have been central within American culture from the Enlightenment to World War II and how they have been articulated, debated, instantiated, and used at a variety of times and by a variety of people. Our approach, derived from the cultural history of ideas, will examine not just the world of thinking, but how those thoughts get translated into doing and making, and in the process are themselves transformed.

Our reading will include such major figures as Thomas Jefferson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, William James, and Langston Hughes, as well as a host of less well known writers, scientists, political thinkers, popular commentators and the like. We will focus throughout, however, as much on how the words are used in producing arguments, laws, social movements, consumer goods, and machines and on the technologies that make them available, as on the language itself.

Required readings include the following:

  • Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward, (New York: Dover, 1997); ISBN 0486290387
  • W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk, (New York: Dover, 1994); ISBN 0486280411
  • Eric Foner, The Story of American Freedom, (New York: Norton, 1998); ISBN 0393319628
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland, (New York: Dover, 1998); ISBN 0486404293
  • David Hollinger and Charles Capper, The American Intellectual Tradition, 4th ed., vols. 1-2 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2001); ISBN 0195137205 (vol. 1); 0195137221 (vol.2)
  • Daniel T. Rodgers, Contested Truths: Keywords in American Politics Since Independence, (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997); ISBN 0674167112
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin, (New York: Bantam Books, 1981); ISBN 0553212184
  • Frederick Winslow Taylor, The Principles of Scientific Management, (New York: Dover, 1998); ISBN 0486299880
  • Henry David Thoreau, Walden, (New York: Dover, 1995); ISBN 0486284956
  • Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America (NY: Random House, 2000); ISBN 0553214640.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 363. U.S. Foreign Policy and International Politics Since World War II.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Connelly

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 367 / AMCULT 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza E Black (lizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/367/001.nsf

See American Culture 367.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 368 / AMCULT 342 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Mead

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 370 / WOMENSTD 370. Women in American History to 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the history of American women as a group, as individuals, and as members of different classes, and racial, regional and ethnic communities. Using work, politics, and sexuality as organizing concepts, it focuses particularly on the significance of gender in determining women's experiences from the early seventeenth century to 1870. Special attention is paid to initial and continuing encounters of Native Americans, Euro-Americans, and African-Americans; to evolving constructions of "womanhood" and their significance for different groups of women; to the meaning of religious movements, wars, economic transformations, and demographic shifts for women's individual and collective efforts to determine the course of their own histories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 372 / WOMENSTD 372. Women in European History, 1750 to the Present.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laura Lee Downs (bombe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course analyzes women's work and political activity in modern Europe. We will focus primarily on Britain, France and Germany, and will examine such issues as the nature of women's work, how continued industrial development has changed that work, the effect of popular notions like "separate spheres" on the sexual division of labor, forms of women's collective action, and the impact of the welfare state on women's lives. The success of the course rests on active class participation. Students should come to class prepared with questions and comments on each week's reading. In addition, students will be expected to prepare a brief (5-7 pp.) midterm essay and a final, 12-15 page research paper, due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 373 / AMCULT 373. History of the U.S. West.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/373/001.nsf

This is a one term course which examines the History of the American West from before European contact through the Cold War. Because of the long time period, there will be an emphasis on the themes and patterns that have shaped the American West. Topics will include Native American societies, European contact, settlement, and environmental impact. We will pay particular attention to issues surrounding ethnicity, gender, class, and labor. No previous knowledge is required, but a general background in American history will be helpful. There will also be an emphasis on reading and analyzing primary documents.
Required books found at Shaman Drum.
-White, Richard, It's Your Misfortune and None of Mine Own, ISBN ? (University of Oklahoma)
-Milner, Clyde, ed., Major Problems in the History of the American West, ISBN 0-669-41580-4 (Houghton-Mifflin)
-Schlissel, Lillian, ed., The Western Women's Reader, ISBN 0-06-095337-3 (Harper-Perennial)
-Deverell, William, ed., The West in the History of the Nation, vol. 1, ISBN 0-312-19171-5 (Bedford/St. Martin's)
-Deverell, William, ed., The West in the History of the Nation, vol.2, ISBN 0-312-19211-8 (Bedford, St. Martin's)
The following book is recommended but not required.
Lamar, Howard R., ed., The Readers Encyclopedia of the American West, (Yale, 1999)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 381 / MEMS 381. History of the Jews from the Muslim Conquests to the Spanish Expulsion.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey major historic developments in medieval Jewish society under both Islam and western Christendom. Broadly, the course will look at the divergence of Judaism and Christianity, the rise of the Babylonian geonim, the social and cultural history of Jews in the Arab Mediterranean world, the emergence of Jewish communities in Medieval Ashkenaz, and the impact on Jewish society of the Crusades, the Reconquista, the emergence of the mendicant orders, and the Black Death. The course will examine the interaction of Jews with the majority culture, political structure, and economy, as well as changing cultural trends within Jewish society. The distinctive religious climate of the medieval period will serve as a unifying theme throughout. We will study primary sources as well as recent historical scholarship, and our focus will include the history of women as well as that of men. Class is conducted as lecture and discussion of texts with an occasional film or slide lecture. Requirements for the course: several short written and oral assignments, tests, and final examination. Prerequisites: None. History 110 and some familiarity with Judaism or Jewish civilization (Religion 201, Judaic Studies 379/HJCS 379, or similar) is recommended background.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 383. Modern Jewish History to 1880.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd M Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys Jewish history in Europe, America, and the Middle East from the mid-seventeenth century to the 1870s. It begins with the emergence of West European Jews from cultural and social isolation, discusses their political emancipation, and traces their efforts to modernize Jewish ritual and belief. The focus then shifts to Eastern Europe, where the world of tradition persisted much longer. The lectures on Eastern Europe will focus on the religious and social character of Jewish life in Poland and Russia, the development of Hasidism, and the first glimmerings of enlightenment in the mid-nineteenth century. The course will conclude with a look at the Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East. There will be an essay-type midterm, a 10-12 page paper, and a comprehensive final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 The Holocaust Through Film.

Instructor(s): Weckel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In the face of the difficulties of adequately speaking and writing about the Holocaust, photographs and films are often believed to be more convincing, appealing not only to people's mind but also to their senses. The earliest example of this was an "atrocity film" planned by the western allies already in fall 1944. This film took footage of the liberation of the concentration camps and was shown not only to the public at home, but especially to German prisoners of war and later to the German people in the American occupation zone. Since then the Holocaust has been represented in very different ways in documentary as well as in feature films. Not until 1978 the NBC television series "Holocaust" brought the topic to the conscience of mass audiences in the U.S. and abroad, and at the same time made the extermination of the European Jews a subject of such popular genres as melodrama, family saga and in the late 90s even comedy.

In this lecture course we will watch several different films, discuss our impressions, analyze significant sequences, learn about their varied and controversial reception in the U.S. and elsewhere (especially in Germany and Israel), and think about the implications and effects of the different strategies of representing the Holocaust.
Required Readings:
-David Bordwell /Kristin Thompson, Film Art, New York (newest edition)
-Ilan Avisar, Screening the Holocaust: Cinema's Images of the Unimaginable, Bloomington, Indianapolis (Indiana University Press) 1988
-Claude Lanzman, Shoah: An Oral History of the Holocaust
-Yosefa Loshitzky, ed., Spielberg's Holocaust: Critical Perspectives on Schindler's List (Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press)
-Wolfgang Benz, The Holocaust: A German Historian examines the Genocide

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 002 Modern Italy: 1815-Present.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the history of the Italian peninsula from 1815 to the present. Modern Italy has been a laboratory for the social and political change of western Europe. Nationalism, fascism, and social democracy all have found in Italy an ideal terrain for their conceptual and historical development. We will focus on the unification process, on the strategies implemented by the post-unification State to forge a national identity, on the politics of fascism, and on the contradictory nature of the Italian democracy in the post-W.W.II decades. A variety of media (historical texts, works of fiction, and films) will provide an introduction to the complex and often dramatic history of the Italian people. Moreover, an interdisciplinary perspective will allow us to go beyond the level of state policies and explore the profound transformation of Italian society and culture over the last two centuries. Teaching method and evaluation: Lectures and discussion. There will be a midterm exam and a final paper (10-12 pages).

Tentative reading list: John Davis (ed.), Italy in the Nineteenth Century; Patrick McCarthy, The Crisis of the Italian State; Sibilla Aleramo, A Woman; Carlo Levi, Christ Stopped at Eboli; Italo Calvino, The Path to the Spiders' Nests; Sergio Atzeni, Bakunin's Son; course packet.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Social Protest in Japan. Meets with History 592.001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 592.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Modern South Asian Diasporas.

Instructor(s): Sturman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the histories of South Asian communities that have formed outside the Indian subcontinent in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. In the nineteenth century, we will consider the colonial policies and ideaologies and the political-economic regimes that brought South Asians to places as diverse as the Caribbean, Fiji, Madagascar, South and East Africa and also to Great Britain. In the twentieth century, we will consider the emergence of large communities of South Asians in Great Britain, the United States and Canada, making extensive use of the rich materials available in the form of novels, short stories, and film. Throughout our study of these multiple and changing communities, we will consider questions of nationalism, transnationality, community, identity, politics, and belonging that have shaped the modern experience of diaspora.

Required Readings:

  • Gandhi, M.K. Satyagraha in South Africa. (not sure of publisher
  • Gillespie, Marie. Television, Ethnicity and Cultural Change. New York: Routledge, 1995.
  • Kumar, Amitava. Passport Photos. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000.
  • Lahiri, Jhumpa. Interpreter of Maladies. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1999.
  • Leonard, Karen. Making Ethnic Choices. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992.
  • Mintz, Sidney. Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin Books, 1985.
  • Prashad, Vijay. The Karma of Brown Folk. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2000.
  • van der Veer, Peter, ed. Nation and Migration: The Politics of Space in the South Asian Diaspora. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 U.S. Imperialism 1891-Present:

Instructor(s): Penny M Von Eschen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers the rise of the United States as a world power through focusing on the policies and projects of a wide variety of actors from U.S. Presidents and their administrations to missionaries, film-makers and writers. In addition to focusing on pivotal political moments such as the wars of 1898, World War I and II, the Cold War and the U.S. in Vietnam, we will keep an eye on the ongoing political, economic and cultural interventions of U.S. government, corporate, and other private interests in Central America, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Through examining such issues as the export of Disney and prostitution and the U.S. military, we will also examine the ways in which the interlocking idealogies of imperialism, race, and gender animated U.S. expansion and shaped the political culture and consciousness of American society. Finally, we will view U.S./global relations throught the lens of material culture, focusing on the production, use and control of commodities such as aluminum, oil, and uranium.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 Race, Politics, and Activism in Detroit. Meets with American Culture 310.001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/amcult/310/001.nsf

See American Culture 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 394. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through History 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course 396 Enrollment Limited To Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check For Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 20.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 The Magical Renaissance in England.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, just as the discoveries of Copernicus and Galileo were inaugurating the Scientific Revolution, there was a parallel rise of intellectual interest in magic. This 'Magical Renaissance' was far removed from the older and widespread folk beliefs in magic. It was one of the distinguishing intellectual trends of the age. This class examines the 'occult philosophy' in England and its leading practitioners, setting them in their European context. It will focus on angelic magic, astrology, and alchemy and on such figures as John Dee, Simon Forman, and Robert Fludd. It will investigate the connections between their magical pursuits and contemporary science, including the alchemical interests of Isaac Newton. Finally, it will try to determine why these systems of thought in the later seventeenth and eighteenth centuries became unfashionable, branded as superstition by polite society and practiced only by eccentric groups and by people pandering to popular tastes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Race, Gender, and Empire in the Nuclear Age. Meets with RC Social Science 374.001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rcssci/374/001.nsf

See RC Social Science 374.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 The Ends of the Earth in History and Cinema.

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How have explorers, men and women, found their way to the ends of the earth? What do their "exploits" tell us about their societies, the politics of exploration, and the exploitation of notions of adventure? And how do they explain what they have done to others and themselves, in their own accounts, in the literature about them, and in films they have shot? In this seminar we shall examine the minds and souls of explorers through their words and images. Among the topics will be the controversies about the "discovery" of the North Pole, women's expeditions, and the storm over the Everest tragedy in 1996.
**PLEASE DO NOT PURCHASE ANY BOOKS BEFORE THE FIRST CLASS MEETING.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 From Social Contract to Oedipus Complex: Social Science Theory in Bourgeoisie Europe. Meets with RC Social Science 301.001.

Instructor(s): Jane R Burbank (jburbank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Social Science 301.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 005 History, Memory, and Identity.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Memories and interpretations of the past figure prominently in most peoples' understandings of "who they are" and "how they came to be" that way. Yet accounts of the past whether personal or popular, individual or collective are inevitably selective. How are narratives of the past formed, how do they figure in the practice of daily life, how are they used or politicized by individuals, groups, and nations, and how are people influenced by them? Using Armenian historical consciousness in the late twentieth century as a case study to be explored in depth, this course will also examine in theoretical and comparative perspective the ways in which accounts of history can circumscribe or interact dynamically with conceptions of personal, ethnic, or national identity. In readings and class discussion, particular attention will be paid to approaches to ethnicity and the relationships among history and territoriality; historiography, political philosophy, and nationalism; historical narratives and state-building; and ideologies of tradition and modernity.

Students will write and revise two short (5-8 page) papers, and will write and revise one longer (10-15 page) final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 006 Detroit in the Era of Industrialization. Meets with American Culture 496.005.

Instructor(s): Francis X Blouin Jr (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the period in Michigan history from 1880-1930. It will examine several themes in that period including immigration, industrialization, settlement patterns, etc. A general familiarity with United States history is required. History colloquia are conducted in the seminar format and are limited to a small number of students. As a result, emphasis is placed on student participation in discussions. Each student will be required to write a major research paper that will draw on the resources of the Bentley Historical Library, which contains original manuscripts and archives relating to the history of the state. The course provides an opportunity for students to gain familiarity with a critical period in the industrial and social history of the U.S. and do original historical research. Grades will be based on a midterm exam, class discussion, and a seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 007 American Lives, American History: Writing the Twentieth Century through Biography

Instructor(s): Robert Self (rself@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course that asks students to consider twentieth-century U.S. history through the lives of individual people. We will read historical biographies and learn how historians contextualize the lives of their subjects. Students will grapple with the relationship between the historical record, historical memory, and the subjective trajectory of an individual human life. Indeed, in constructing a narrative from the twentieth century through the biography of a single person (the objective of the course), students must confront questions about the nature of historical writing, the dilemmas of historical evidence, and the tension between history and memory.

We will read several biographies, a more traditional historical monograph, and a collection of oral histories, all of which deal with major issues and developments in the 20th century: the civil rights movement; the rise of feminism; the labor movement; suburbanization. Students will choose freely but with guidance from the instructor and the teaching assistant their own subject to research during the academic term. Final essays should be based on both primary and secondary sources. Our collective reading, weekly discussion sessions, and individual historical research will occupy the greater part of the academic term.

Required Reading:

  • Alice Wexler. Emma Goldman in America
  • Chana Kai Lee. For Freedom's Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer
  • Jervis Anderson. Bayard Rustin: Troubles I've Seen
  • Betty Friedan. The Feminine Mystique
  • Elaine Tyler May. Homeward Bound: American Families and the Cold War Era
  • Studs Terkel. My American Century

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

Section 008 Fascism.

Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Between the two world wars, many European countries most notably Italy and Germany saw the emergence of authoritarian and charismatic forms of government. Although there were significant differences between these regimes, many still refer to them as 'fascist' or 'para-fascist.' Is fascism a useful historical category, and can comparative analysis help us understand the nature of these regimes and the causes of their success and eventual failure? Were these regimes "modern" or reactionary? What is the relationship between fascism, nationalism, and racism? This course will address these questions by exploring first the two principal examples, Italian Fascism and German Nazism, as political, social, and cultural systems. We'll then extend our analysis to other authoritarian regimes, including Franco's Spain and Salazar's Portugal. Finally, we will examine the politics of neo-Fascism in the post-WWII period.

Teaching Method and Evaluation This course will be taught as a seminar. Students' active participation will be strongly encouraged. After setting a calendar on our first meeting, students will be asked to present a class and propose an agenda for discussion. There will be two short papers (5 pages each) and two drafts of a final paper of 10-12 pages on a comparative topic.

Reading List TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course 397 Enrollment Limited To Senior History Concentrators By Override Only. Check For Override Information At History Dept. 1029 Tisch Hall Before March 26.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 History of Latinos in the U.S. Meets with American Culture 496.004

Instructor(s): Maria E Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/397/002.nsf

See American Culture 496.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Hist& Politics of Human Science

Instructor(s): John S Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This undergraduate seminar will explore some of the ways in which knowledge about human beings and their behavior has been made from the late eighteenth century to the present. Looking across a range of academic disciplines including anthropology, sociology, psychology, psychiatry, and economics we will focus particularly on how human beings, considered individually or collectively, have become objects of scientific investigation. We will also query the social and political implications of this move. Starting with various attempts to understand the human sciences theoretically, we will address such topics as the construction of the notion of normality, the making and re-making of hysteria as a mental pathology, the development of the sciences of race and gender, the human being as an experimental object, and state power and human individuality. We will be concerned throughout with understanding the cultural embeddedness and political ramifications of the various ways in which human beings have been constituted within the human sciences. This seminar counts as an elective toward the new academic minor in Science, Technology & Society (http://www.umich.edu/~umsts).
Required texts:
-Foucault, Michel, The History of Sexuality, vol. 1, ISBN: 0679724699
-Foucault, Michel, Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, ISBN: 0679752552
-Smith, Roger The Norton History of the Human Sciences, ISBN: 0393317331
-Degler, Carl, In Search of Human Nature: The Decline and Revival of Darwinism in American Social Thought, ISBN: 0195077075
-Herman, Ellen, The Romance of American Psychology: Political Culture in the Age of Experts, ISBN:0520207033
-Gould, Stephen Jay, Mismeasure of Man, ISBN: 0393314251
-Mead, Margaret, Coming of Age in Samoa: A Psychological Study of Primitive Youth for Western Civilization, ISBN: 0688050336

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Religion & Rebellion in Modern Iran

Instructor(s): Juan R Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

This course covers the intersection of dissident religion with political upheavals during the past two centuries in Iran. We will look at the esoteric Shaykhi movement, the millenarian Babis and Baha'is, the Constitutional Revolution of 1905-1911 and the involvement in it of religious institutions. Then we will examine the oil nationalization crisis of the 1950s and the Islamic Revolution of 1978-79. Students will write a precis of 2-3 pages on the assigned class reading each week, and will be expected to be active participants in the class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 403. Problems in Roman History II.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Roman Imperialism&Frontier Soc

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a study of Roman colonialism during the late Republic and early empire, ca. 100 B.C. to ca. 100 A.D. Topics to be discussed will include the conquest of the provinces, the survival of local cultures in the provinces, the imposition of a Latin culture in the western provinces, the promotion of Greek culture in the eastern provinces, the clash between Mediterranean and non-Mediterranean societies, and the interactions along the frontiers between Romans and barbarians. Readings will consist of translations of ancient texts, including Sallust's Jugurthine War, Julius Caesar's Gallic Wars, and Tacitus' Agricola and Germania, as well as modern scholarship about ancient imperialism and frontier societies. All classes will be discussions of the reading material. Requirements include three papers based on the readings and discussions, and participation in all discussions.
No prerequisites; everyone welcome.
C.R. Whittaker, Frontiers of the Roman Empire. A Social and Economic Study (1994),
Sallust, The Jugurthine War / Conspiracy of Caitline Penguin pb.
Caesar, The Conquest of Gaul Penguin pb.
Suetonius, The Twelve Caesars Penguin pb.
Tacitus, The Annals of Imperial Rome Penguin pb.
Tacitus, The Agricola and the Germania Penguin pb.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 412 / MEMS 414. Social and Intellectual History of the Florentine Renaissance.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hughes

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did a medieval city of bankers and cloth merchants become, in the fifteenth century, the center of an original humanist culture that offered Europeans new ways of seeing and portraying themselves and their society from artistic perspective to the writing of history? The course will trace the history of renaissance Florence not only as a chronicle of its development but also as the process by which it self-consciously constituted itself as a society and a history. Among the topics taken up will be the reshaping of the city, both physically and constitutionally; the transformation of the Medici from bankers to humanist rulers; the development of humanism into an enabling code for civil life; the new valuation of wealth and the civic use of magnificence (from palaces to wedding and funeral processions); social organization and changing attitudes toward the disempowered (slaves, Jews, the poor, women); and forms of religious expression, from confronternal devotions and processions to the fire and brimstone of prophetic preachers (e.g., Savonarola). Considerable use will be made of original sources (historical, literary, and visual). This is designed as a lecture course, but there will be ample time allotted for discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 425. French Revolution.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/history/425/001.nsf

The French consider the Revolution of 1789 to be the turning point in their national history; others outside France have called this moment the birthplace of modern political culture and looked to it as the model for all subsequent revolutions. In this course we will study the events of the Revolution and their political, social, and cultural import, as well as their legacies both within France and beyond. Particular attention will be paid to the experience of revolution and the different ways in which the revolution was experienced and made sense of by women and men, Parisians and provincials, revolutionaries and opponents of the Revolution. Readings will include primary documents and recent work by historians. Class format includes both lecture and discussion.

Required readings include the following:

  1. Laura Mason and Tracey Rizzo; The French Revolution: A Document Collection; Houghton-Mifflin, 1999; ISBN 0-669-41780-7
  2. Gary Kates; The French Revolution: Recent Debates & New Controversies; Routledge, 1997; ISBN 0-415-14490-6
  3. Simon Schama; Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution; Vintage Books, 1990 (Reprint ed. of Knopf orig); ISBN 0-679-72610-1

All three are paperback.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 427. Magic, Religion, and Science in Early Modern England.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael P MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is about the "first three minutes" of the modern mental universe in actuality, about three centuries of historical time (1500-1800). It concentrates on how the "big bang" of the Protestant Reformation blasted apart a world view and a culture that had slowly developed over a thousand years. The explosive force of that strangely contingent event, renewed by subsequent eruptions of religious conflict and civil war, divided the English people culturally as never before. Magic declined, miracles and malevolent witches disappeared, the prestige of the ancient sciences of astrology and alchemy eroded. New and powerful philosophical ideas about human understanding and physical reality flourished; scientific explanations for a vast array of celestial, earthly, and mental phenomena proliferated and were embraced by laypersons as the basis of a new faith, the faith in (someone else's) reason. The world view that dominates modern English (and Western) culture emerged from almost three hundred years of charged conflict and began rapidly to evolve into contemporary scientism. And yet the shattering effect of the events that powered cultural change also made it impossible for secularization and rational religion fully to triumph. The hold of rational religion and secularism on the minds of the majority of ordinary men and women remained less complete than on the minds of the educated, governing classes. The result finally was a cultural and social realignment. The elite fashioned a "superculture" that is dominated by religious rationalism and scientistic faith; the dissenting sects, the lower classes and marginalized groups have sustained and created subcultures that are characterized by supernatural wonder and sudden infusions of spiritual and emotional energy. Much has changed since 1800 when this process was more or less completed, but these cultural and class divisions have not disappeared, and they have complicated ethnic relations as well as politics. In sum, this course is finally a meditation on how England lost its medieval mind and found its modern, divided sensibility. Principal readings will include all or part of Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars; Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic; James Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England, 1550-1800; Peter French, John Dee: The Life of a Renaissance Magus; and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution. A course pack of articles and original sources will also be required. Students will be asked to write three short (five page) papers on the readings for class; an in-class, midterm examination and a two-hour final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 430. History of the Balkans from the Sixth Century to 1878.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course treats the region now comprising Bulgaria, ex-Yugoslavia, Greece, and Albania from the Slavic migrations (6th and 7th century) to roughly 1878. It treats demographic changes, the creation of medieval states (Bulgaria, Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia), Christianization, Balkan heresies, relations with Byzantium, the Ottoman conquest, Balkans under Ottoman rule, and the 19th century independence movements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 442 / AAPTIS 461. The First Millennium of the Islamic Near East.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael David Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 451. Japan Since 1700.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the history of Japan from the dissolution of a semi-feudal system in the 18th and early 19th centuries to Japan's rise as a world economic power in the latter half of the 20th century. We will address both the major historical themes during these two centuries of radical transformation and the issues at stake in historical interpretation. The course covers: (1) the decline of official power during the Tokugawa era and the rise of a new plebeian public sphere; (2) Japan's coerced entry into the world market; (3) the consolidation of a modern nation-state, industrialization, and the beginnings of Japanese imperialism in Asia; (4) the rise of social protest and mass culture; (5) political reaction and militarism; (6) defeat in the Pacific War and the U.S. Occupation; (7) postwar recovery and the contested emergence of a conservative hegemony; (8) myths and realities of Japan's new affluent "information society." Class sessions will combine lecture, discussion and audio-visual. Assignments: brief critical summaries of readings, discussion panels, in-class midterm, final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 466. The United States, 1901-1933.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas Guglielmo (guglielm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore how different Americans and their institutions came to terms with industrial capitalism and the changes, crises, and inequalities it, in part, produced. The course will focus most extensively on the developing relationship between the state and society, between the federal government and various social groups workers and capitalists, women and men, immigrants and native-born Americans, the "white" and "colored" "races," colonizers and colonized who, through their struggles for order, justice, and dignity, made modern America.

Course requirements include a research paper, several short response papers, and a take-home midterm and final. History 466 is a lecture/discussion class. Undergraduates electing this course must register for Section 001 and one discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 001 Mid-Century America Through Film: Power and Persuasion on the Big Screen.

Instructor(s): Robert O Self

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course approaches film as one of the most important and influential cultural media of mid-century America, a powerful and persuasive entertainment space in which Americans told, watched, and invented stories about themselves and others. As such, film is an extraordinary, though not uncomplicated or transparent, historical source. How did American films of mid-century (1935-1955) deal with the major social and cultural issues of these decades? Gender and sexual politics? Race and pluralism? Class and wealth? War and neo-imperialism? The anxiety of modernity? How did films' narrative structure appear to resolve dilemmas over complex social questions? Did films teach Americans to think and understand themselves in conventional ways, or could viewers read against their messages? These are the kinds of questions we will ask as we explore mid-century American culture and society through film. This course is above all a critical study of society, culture, and media, an exploration of the complicated historical contexts in which images and stories are produced, circulated, and debated.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 002 American Indians & Film. (3 Credits). Meets With American Culture 496.002

Instructor(s): Liza E Black

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See American Culture 496.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 003 Early American Cultural History to 1865.

Instructor(s): Jay Cook

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines major themes and problems in U.S. cultural history through the Civil War. Possible topics include: images of European colonization and conquest; the refinement of American architecture, material culture, and manners; African-American culture and resistance under slavery; the development of American museums from Peale to Barnum; the blackface minstrel show and racialization; Emancipation Day balls, parades, and festivals in the antebellum North; urban sketch writing in the new metropolis; the fiction of Poe, Melville, Delany, and Stowe; and the Civil War in American visual culture. Course requirements include a midterm paper, a comprehensive final exam, regular quizzes, and above all, active participation in our discussions.

Required readings are as follows and are in paperback. -Richard Bushman, "The Refinement of America", (Vintage)
-Graham and Shane White, "Stylin," (Cornell U. Press)
-David Roediger, "The Wages of Whitness," Revised Edition, 1999 (Verso)
-Mary Ryan, "Women in Public," (Johns Hopkins Press)
-George G. Foster, "New York by Gaslight," (University of California)
-James W. Cook, "The Arts of Deception," (Harvard University Press)
-Harriet Beecher Stowe, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," (Penguin Classics)
-Course Reader (instructions for purchase will be announced in class)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

U.S. History

Section 005 Modern American Presidency. Meets with History 774.001.

Instructor(s): Douglas Raymond Brinkley

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the evolution of the office of the American presidency from Theodore Roosevelt to George W. Bush. Through a multitude of sources, students will study the changing role of presidents through the past hundred years. Of particular importance will be the subjects of Party Politics, the invention of radio, the advent of television, the changing role of the media, and questions of privacy. Questions to consider will be, how much should the public know about the private lives of its leaders? How have these changes influenced the way presidents handle their job? How do public expectations of the president differ from what they were a century ago? How have the powers of the president, in relation to Congress, shifted?

Students will be required to read biographies of such Commanders-in-Chief as Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry Truman, and Ronald Reagan. Differing concepts of leadership will be examined, from Woodrow Wilson's diplomacy and the U.S. entry into World War I to FDR's New Deal and America's role in the Second World War. The aim of the course is to have students come to a better understanding of political leadership and how it is employed in the highest office in the land.

This course will be cross-listed as an undergraduate course in History and a graduate course in the Ford School. Undergraduates will meet once a week with a GSI; graduate students will meet at least every other week with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor B Lieberman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines Burma, now known as Myanmar, and adjacent areas of western mainland Southeast Asia from earliest times until the present day. Although Burma itself, a country roughly the size of Texas with a population of some 45,000,000 people, is hardly a major world power, the patterns of precolonial history, colonialism, military rule, ethnic conflict, and the current struggle for economic development are broadly representative of much of Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. In this sense Burma offers a rewarding case study of a "Third World" society, and provides answers to such basic questions as: Why did Asia and Europe develop differently in the premodern era? What evidence do we find of economic dynamism outside Europe? Why is democracy fragile and unsuccessful in much of Asia? What role do non-Christian religions play in promoting trauma? Beyond the value that mmay derive from consideration of these sort of general problems, Burma's unique Buddihist civilization is extraordinarily intriguing and worthy of study in its own right.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 473 / KOREAN 473 / ASIAN 473. Modern Korea.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry H Em

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Korean 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America: mestizaje and Nation. Meets With Cultural Anthropology 458.003 & LACS 400.001

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 002 Colonial Latin America.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 001 Life on Homefront 2nd WW.

Instructor(s): Sonya O Rose (sorose@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the social, cultural, and political lives of people who lived in the warring countries of Europe in the late 1930s and 1940s. War is waged not just by soldiers and on battlefields, and increasingly it is being realized how crucial the home front is to the battle front although it is often portrayed as a secondary sphere of activity. Especially in the Second World War, with the massive bombing of populated cities, the occupation of villages and hamlets by foreign soldiers, not to mention the Nazi program to exterminate the Jews, the line separating the battlefield from the sanctity of the home was thin at best. The course will focus in particular on Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. Our comparative focus will allow for an exploration of how different political regimes represented themselves to their citizens, and how those regimes dealt with issues of gender, class, and ethnic/racial difference.

Limit of 30 and keep a waitlist.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 002 Nazi Rule and German Society.

Instructor(s): Ulricke Weckel

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the ways in which the Nazi-party first gained millions of followers among German citizens, and how it subsequently came to power, established a dictatorship and organized the deprivation and terror against the politically or "racially" unwanted. The primary focus of this course will be on the ways in which specific groups responded to Nazi ideology and policy. For example, could the NSDAP win the working class? What fascinated young people who joined the youth movement? Were women really reduced to the role of housewives and bearers of "arian" children? In which ways did the everyday life of German jews change before they were deported? Through consideration of these various milieus it is possible to examine the relevance of categories as race, class, gender, and generation for the development of stances of complicity or resistance. Building upon this primary material, we will look at the steps taken by the so-called "Third Reich" towards war and the extermination of the European jews. Prominent debates on such topics as the motives of the perpetrators or the part that Hitler played in the radicalization of persecution will be read and discussed in this context.

Required Readings:
Detlef J. K. Peukert, Inside Nazi-Germany: Conformity, Opposition, and Racism in Everyday Life, (New Haven/London: Yale University Press, 1987)
Ian Kershaw, The Nazi Dictatorship: Problems and Perspectives of Interpretation
Michael R. Marrus, The Holocaust in History
Christopher Browning, Ordinary Men: Reserve Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland
Anna Seghers, The Seventh Cross

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 491 / ECON 491. The History of the American Economy.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren C Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/econ/491/001.nsf

See Economics 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 543 / AAPTIS 464. Perso-Islamic Civilization in the Eastern Caliphate and India, 900-1350.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 464.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America: mestizaje and Nation. Meets With Cultural Anthropology 458.003 & History 478.001.

Instructor(s): Julie A Skurski

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 590. History Topics Mini-course.

Section 001 Historical Perspectives on Japanese Architecture and Space. (1 credit). Meets with Asian Studies 491.001. Mini-course (5 weeks) 10/15, 10/17, 10/22, 10/24, 10/29, 10/31, 11/5, 11/7, 11/12, 11/14. (Drop/Add deadline=October 19).

Instructor(s): Jordan Sand

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (Excl).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Asian Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 592. Topics in Asian History.

Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

Section 001 Social Protest in Japan. Meets with History 392.001.

Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores histories of social conflict, protest, and rebellion in early-modern and modern Japan through a combination of primary sources and secondary literature as well as select pieces on theoretical and methodological issues. Our focus on peasant protests, urban uprisings, "world-renewal" movements, and restorationist activisim of the Tokugawa period; on the Popular Rights Movement, labor and tenancy struggles, revolutionary activism (both Left and Right), and citizens' and environmental movements in post-Meiji period, will raise issues about the nature and transformation of social relations and political culture in Japan from the 17th century to the present. In an endeavor to situate these movements in their social and spatial settings, we will experiment with two sets of coordinates (1) urban and rural; (2) local, national and transnational.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


Page


This page was created at 6:56 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2001 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.