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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 6:57 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in History of Art
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art.

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History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 101. Art and Agency in a Pre-Modern World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the disciplinary practices and goals of art history via encounters with great monuments of the visual cultures of Europe, Egypt, and western Asia from the Stone Age through the Middle Ages. The course develops thematically around these strategically selected and thought-provoking creations of pre-modern times with the project of framing notions of cultural identity as a major axis of interpretive interest in the history of art. Art & Agency emphasizes that art productions and deployments in the pre-modern world of the Greater Mediterranean were charged with sets of efficaciousness and response that crystallize provocatively around issues of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender identity, and class. The socially charged nature of the art explored in this class (from the cave paintings and fertility figurines of the Stone Age, to the royal arts of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia and Iran, to the Parthenon of Athens, to the cloisters and cathedrals of medieval times) enables us to consider the cultures of pre-modern times in terms of special contemporary relevance as well as extraordinary historical importance. Course requirements include a midterm and a final exam, two written assignments, and participation in Sections at the Kelsey Museum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 108 / CAAS 108. Introduction to African Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dana Rush (danarush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a one-term introductory survey of the arts of Africa. Sculpture, pottery, textiles, architecture, body adornment, and performance will be examined and discussed on the basis of aesthetic, religious, political, and social contexts. Although the main emphasis of the course will be on "traditional art," we will discuss many changes and continuities within African artistic traditions as evidenced in late twentieth-century African art. The course is arranged geographically from western through central to eastern and southern Africa, and will conclude across the Atlantic Ocean with a brief investigation of African visual traditions in the Caribbean and the Americas. Weekly discussion sections, movies and videos, and museum visits will complement the lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 113 / ARTDES 113. Introduction to the Visual Arts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael R Kapetan (nbva@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is for non-art majors only. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.mikekapetan.com//teacher/art113.htm

Purpose: To encourage students to make independent critical evaluations of all aspects of the visual culture: art, architecture, craft, and design.

Scope: To examine the visual arts as a universal pan-cultural human activity from three points of view:

  1. Perceptual: The elements of the language of form.
  2. Technical: Materials and processes of image making.
  3. Contextual: Themes and purposes of images.

Visual arts are a part of the human experience in all cultures and all time periods. The ability to appreciate, to understand, and to assess the quality of visual art can enrich a person's life and broaden one's thinking. This course will introduce students having no formal art or art historical background to the major forms of visual expression through human history from the Stone Age to the present. We will examine works of art in various media such as painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, architecture, graphics, and industrial design. Students will learn how artists use the language of form to communicate information, to express emotion, and to explore the world of nature and the world of the mind. Students will learn the basic techniques of the various media. Students will learn how the art of a time and place defines and expands the boundaries of that culture. Assigned readings and visits to museums and galleries will help students become critical consumers of the visual culture as they learn to see, appreciate, and assess art forms. Requirements include periodic quizzes, a final exam, and a term paper. Students will also make some ungraded drawings and paintings as analytical tools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 Artemisia Gentileschi Woman Painter in 17th-Century Italy and the Art of Art History.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Easily one of the most memorable creative personalities of the Baroque, and arguably the most powerfully expressive and influential woman painter ever, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1652) has become the central figure in the long overdue recovery of the history of art produced by women. With Artemisia's pictorially aggressive and emotional compelling pictures providing the focus, this limited-enrollment course proposes to stand as a case study of how historians of art operate in attempting to understand works of art within the complex sociocultural and personal contexts in which they were produced. Formal analysis, iconography, patronage, feminism, and psychoanalysis will be among the many area of inquiry. Original works of art, the eye of the investigator, primary source material, library holdings, and scientific data will be among the tools, as through a combination of assigned reading discussion, research, and oral and written reports students will sharpen their visual sensitivity, their ability to think critically and to recognize quality in art, their awareness of diversity, their communication skills and in all their appreciation of the demands and rewards of intellectual inquiry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 The Trojan War: Archaeology of a Myth. Meets with Classical Civilization 120.001.

Instructor(s): Susanne Ebbinghaus

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Civilization 120.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 203 / ASIAN 203. Chinese Art and Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the arts and religions of China, as well as an introduction to the technique of visual analysis in historical studies. It examines the three major religions in China Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism from the perspective of visual representation and religious practice. Religious traditions of minorities such as Lamaism in Tibet, Shamanism in Manchu, Muslim in the northwest, ghost beliefs in the southwest, and the Mazu (sea goddess) cult in the coastal regions (including Taiwan) will also be introduced. Course requirements include: Attendance at lectures / Two short papers (3 pages each) / Midterm and Final Exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 214 / CAAS 214. Introduction to African-American Art.

Section 001 Twentieth Century African-American Art.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover much of this century's history of African-American painting, sculpture, photography, and mixed media practices. Moving through the material chronologically, we will discuss a variety of stylistic strategies and the artists' staked-out positions regarding race, gender, sexual class, and nation. We will also consider audience reception, namely, audiences responses to the art and to the artists themselves.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTART 221 / CLARCH 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 221.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 250 / MEMS 250. Italian Renaissance Art, I.

Section 001 The Art of Florence and Northern Italy.

Instructor(s): Julia Perlman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the works of Giotto, Donatello, Masaccio, Mantegna, and Leonardo come to be regarded as so important in the history of western art? Why, even within the artists' lifetimes, was their art regarded as signaling a "rebirth" of painting and sculpture? To what extent was their legendary reputation seen to serve other social and political interests? This course aims at an understanding of early Renaissance art by seeing it in relation to broader transformations in the culture of the Italian city in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. The city will be viewed as the site of divergent uses of art by different communities and interests, who employed images for the expression of identity and status and as a strategic means of producing consensus or exploiting social division. Lectures and sections will be organized around the exploration of particular genres of visual media the altarpiece, mural painting, the multimedia chapel, portraiture, and monumental public sculpture. All of these forms are explored as modes of argument and as points of interaction among networks of clients, artists, social groups and institutions (guilds, family associations, courts, confraternities), and figures of authority (saints, mystics, Popes, rulers). From this multiplicity of uses and responses emerged highly varied conceptions of the nature of the image and the role of the artist, which in turn influenced artistic performance. The course requirements include: readings, midterm test(s), final exam, written exercises and *required attendance and participation at all class meetings and sections.*

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 271. Origins of Modernism: Art and Culture in Nineteenth Century France.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Howard Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines a series of remarkable episodes in modern French painting, from the establishment of an official, State-sponsored form of Classicism to the succession of movements Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Neo-Impressionism that emerged in opposition to official art. The Nineteenth Century is the period during which modern art developed its characteristic strategies and behavioral patterns: an insistence on innovation, originality, and individuality; a contentious involvement with tradition; a critical relationship with both institutional and commercial culture; and a somewhat strained allegiance with radical politics and alternative subcultures. It is also the period that witnessed a thorough-going reassessment of visual representation, and a parallel concern with the possibilities and limitations of the medium of painting. The course is designed to encourage close readings of images (by David, Gericault, Manet, Degas, Seurat, Cézanne, et al.) within the parameters of their historical contexts and of recent critical debate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 285. Introduction to the Art and Architecture of the Islamic World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys Islamic art and architecture from Spain to India and from the advent of Islam in the 7th century to the rise of Colonialism. What were the processes through which this new venture gave shape to particular Islamic idioms? Architecture (mosques, mausoleums, palaces, garden ensembles and urban environments), the luxury objects of utility (ceramics, metalwork, glass, textiles, etc.), painting and the arts of the book will be explored as manifestations and visual representations of the production of Islam, enunciating its spiritual and intellectual values, and the socioeconomic parameters that contributed to the formation and development of its distinctive cultural system. Special attention will be given to the interaction between the new faith and pre-Islamic traditions of the conquered through the dynamic interplay between indigenous and Quranic cultures. The problematics in interpreting vastly diverse cultural systems as an unchanging, monolithic phenomenon will be emphasized. Interactive class discussions relating the visual with the discursive, a midterm, a final exam, a paper, and a museum visit are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 292. Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Chance

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Hist. of Art 495. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the history of Japanese culture. The class will survey Japan from ancient time through the twentieth century. Specific units will cover such topics as pre-literate Japan before the introduction of continental culture and early Buddhist architecture, painting and sculpture of the 7th-Century monastery, Horyuji. We will discuss life in the imperial court at its height, as represented by the Illustrated Tale of Genji. One segment will concentrate on the arts of the Tea ceremony, and another on the urban life of the 18th-Century Edo (Tokyo) as reflected in its literature and wood block prints.

The course will conclude with the treatment of tradition in the graphic arts and architecture of recent decades. Brief quizzes, three writing exercises, and a take-home final exam will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 344 / MEMS 344. Early Medieval Kingdoms and Cultures: European Art 400-1000.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth L Sears (esears@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lecture course concerns a fascinating period in European history, when, after the fall of Rome, waves of invading "barbarians" occupied the lands of the former empire and, as a product of dynamic interchange between cultures, new forms of art and architecture emerged. We will focus on places and times in which distinctive artistic cultures flourished: Britain in the "age of saints," Ostrogothic and Lombard Italy, Visigothic Spain before and after the coming of Islam, Carolingian Europe under Charlemagne and his heirs, Anglo-Saxon England, Mozarabic Spain, and Ottonian Germany. We will consider the function of imagery in specific historical contexts, studying magnificently decorated churches and palaces, elaborately embellished manuscripts, and sumptuous objects produced for patrons with a taste for gold, ivory, and gemstones. Overarching themes include early medieval attitudes toward the classical past, European perceptions of Byzantium and Islam, the political use of imagery in early medieval courts, the cult of relics, art in liturgy, and theories of the religious image.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 360 / CAAS 380. Special Topics in African Art.

Section 001 Introduction to African Diaspora Arts in the Americas.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 108 or 214, and upperclass standing; AAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using interdisciplinary methods, we will investigate cultural production generally set outside the category of "the fine arts," such as "folk art," pre-Lenten Carnival costume design and performances, sacred spaces, and multi-media religious objects made in Brazil, Canada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and the U.S. Objects and artistic practices will be our first concerns. In addition, we will scrutinize the status of African Diaspora art in the discipline of Art History and its influences on Modernist and post-Modernist artists in the West. Readings will be drawn from modern anthropology and ethnography, art histories and criticism, and history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 Chinese Art and Religion.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course has been changed to History of Art 203.001 for the Fall Academic Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 Representations of Lesbianism in Early Modern Western Art. Meets with Women's Studies 347.001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, prints, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and twentieth century ones, we will investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 Representations of Family.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/histart/394/003.nsf

This seminar aims to explore the ways in which "family" as a social unit was represented in early modern China (Song through Ming) with comparative forays into early modern European art and culture (16th through 18th centuries). Some areas of interest will be:

  1. relations between parents and children;
  2. spousal relations;
  3. extramarital relations;
  4. how gender differences were represented among different age groups;
  5. how ideals of childhood were represented.

Helped along by secondary studies of Chinese society and culture, class discussion will focus on how to "problematize" and draw historical inferences from primary materials, including paintings, ceramic wares, or poems and essays in translation. These studies will prepare us to produce units for a web-based resource for teaching high school students about Chinese family relations in early modern times. Students will choose from a list of topic areas and will be responsible for assembling the unit on that topic. The unit must include primary materials including materials from local museums if possible as well as questions, study aids, historical background, and comparative material. No previous background in Chinese art or culture is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 396. Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/haprograms/honorsprogram.html

The Honors Thesis writing course is a unit of independent study which will normally be under the direction of the student's principal thesis advisor. At the beginning of their senior year, students will register for the Honors Thesis writing course, History of Art 396. This is a four-credit, two-semester course, to be taken over Fall and Winter Terms (with a Y grade given at the end of the Fall Term). A student must have two faculty advisors for the Honors thesis. The "first reader" will be a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies. It will be his/her role to oversee the student's research and guide the direction taken by the thesis. The "second reader" is often equally involved with the thesis; but at a minimum that faculty member will read the first draft in order to suggest improvements and will read the finished product in order to evaluate it. The student is responsible for clarifying with both his/her readers exactly what their expectations are.

An Honors student pursuing a double major may write a single interdisciplinary thesis supervised by advisors from both departments of concentration.

The Honors thesis will vary in length depending upon the nature of the topic. It generally comprises thirty to fifty double-spaced type-written pages of text. It must conform to a traditional scholarly format sturdily bound in a thesis spring-binder or the like, with footnotes, bibliography, a list of illustrations, and illustrations adequate in number and quality to support the arguments of the paper. These illustrations may be in the form of drawings, photographs, or high quality photocopies. Application for a competitive grant of up to $200 may be submitted to The Honors Council Office of LS&A to help defray costs such as research travel, photography, and xeroxing. Forms are available from the Honors advisor. Evaluation of the Honors Work: A grade is awarded for the thesis course (HA 396) only if the thesis is presented. When the thesis is completed, the two readers together with the Departmental Honors advisor evaluate the paper to determine its eligibility as Honors work. If the thesis meets Honors expectations, the readers and the honor's advisor will then determine whether the quality of the student's overall performance in the concentration, including on the thesis, merits Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors. The appropriate designation will appear on the student's final transcript.

Timetable for the Honors Thesis:

  1. October 15 of Senior Year: Prospectus Form for the Honors Thesis, signed by first and second readers, must be submitted to the Honors advisor.
  2. January 30 of Senior Year: First draft of the Honors thesis must be submitted to the first and second readers for their comments. Additional drafts may be required at the discretion of either reader.
  3. April 10 of Senior Year: Deadline for submission of the thesis in its final form to the first and second readers simultaneously.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Section 011 Object, Body and Installation in later 20th Century Sculpture. (1 credit). Meets with History of Art 600.011. Meets 09/06 to 09/27. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s): Alex Potts

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the new conceptions of sculpture which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s with the breakdown of a modernist painterly aesthetic and the shift to creating objects and installations. It focuses on three dimensional work by artists such as Carl Andre, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, Louise Bourgeois and Rachel Whiteread. Their "specific objects" (Donald Judd) take a number of different forms, ranging from Minimalist abstractions to biomorphic things evoking body parts, to environmental creations. We shall discuss the particular importance given to the siting and staging of these objects and explore the new kinds of physical and psychological interaction set up between viewer and work. We shall also focus on issues thrown up as a consequence of the work engaging the viewer at a more immediately physical, bodily level than painting or two dimensional imagery. Also important is how this increasingly self-conscious staging of sculpture brought out a tension between a viewer's one to one communion with a work, and the situating of her or his experience in the public arena of a gallery. Course requirements include short papers from students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, please contact Larry in Student Services 647-5602 for enrollmentpermission

HISTART 422 / CLARCH 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Etruscans are among the earliest identifiable peoples of the region of modern Tuscany and surrounding Italian provinces (Latium, Umbria, Emilia-Romagna), and their civilization has left numerous traces still evident today. Apart from the rich archaeological sites and museums that house works of Etruscan art, certain persistent architectural features and construction techniques common to the region have roots in the Etruscan past. This course will follow the developments of Etruscan civilization from the 7th to the 1st century B.C. and consider their influence on later periods and people in Italy. Works of art, archaeological artifacts, and architectural remains form the basis for discussing Etruscan artistic developments, socioeconomic and political conditions, religious and burial practices, gender issues, and historical events. Within each period of Etruscan history comparisons among the various Etruscan territories will highlight the individual characteristics of each locale and illustrate the influences of one upon another. Slide-illustrated lectures and class discussions will be complimented by field trips to the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology and, if possible, the Toledo Museum of Art and the Detroit Institute of Arts. There will be a midterm and a final examination consisting of slide attributions and essay questions. Short writing assignments will focus on Etruscan objects in the Kelsey Museum. Students enrolled for graduate credit must also write a substantial research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Class readings may include selections from Brendel, Etruscan Art; Pallottino, The Etruscan; Bonfante, Etruscan Life and Afterlife; Scullard, The Etruscan Cities and Rome; and a variety of monographs and journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 435 / CLARCH 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John G Pedley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 435.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 471. Investigations of Recent Art.

Section 001 Conceptual Issues In Recent Art (1990-Present).

Instructor(s): Joseph C Grigely (jgrigely@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 272. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the period since Robert Smithson's death in 1973, the movement of the contemporary art scene (as defined by a subset of galleries in NYC, LA, and western Europe, and by surveys such as Documenta, and the Whitney and Venice Biennials) might be characterized by the presence a certain self-consciousness of both aesthetic history and contemporary critical practices. This self-consciouness has, as a consequence, meant that historical and conceptual issues have affected both the making and the exhibition of art in both public and private institutions even to the point where cultural institutions themselves become media for artists, such as in Fred Wilson's reconfigured galleries, Andrea Fraser's pseudo-docent tours, and Christian Boltanski's 'discovered' archives.

In this course we will explore conceptual issues like these, emphasizing, in particular, work produced during the past ten years. Many of the questions posed in the class will not have immediate or straight forward answers, but instead will function in such a way as to expose tensions, aporias, and issues that seem particularly salient at this moment in cultural history. These issues will include social interaction as a performance text (Rirkrit Tiravanija, Sophie Calle, Andrea Fraser), the 'problem' of 'Public' art (Curtis Mitchell, John Ahearn, Richard Serra), body criticism in relation to the editing of bodies (Damien Hirst, Dinos & Jake Chapman, Orlan), painting as a conceptual practice (Gerhard Richter, Sue Williams, Bob Ross), and the recent controversy generated by the publication of Dave Hickey's manifesto on aesthetics in the 1990s, The Invisible Dragon: Four Essays on Beauty. Our discussions will also explore conceptual issues relating to exhibitions: contemporary exhibition prosthetics (wall labels, press releases, statements, flowers), the rhetoric of exhibition catalogues, virtual exhibitions, and how table manners and chain saw safety relate to what the curator Jeffrey Deitch calls "the sociology of the art world."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 499 / AMCULT 499. The Arts in American Life.

Section 001 Detroit, A History of Art and Culture in the Motor City.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in History of Art or American Culture or American history; and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The embodiment of "modern Times' was the assembly line, and Detroit, dubbed "the capital of the Twentieth Century," played an important symbolic role for modern aratists. Yet while Detroit's industry has been depicted as an abstract emblem of twentieth century progress, Detroit itself has a complicated labor, racial, and political history that makes the city and its art different from that of any other place.

This class will examine how Detroit has been depicted in modern art, and the role that the arts and architecture have played in the city from the 1880s to the present. We will consider both works produced in Detroit that defined tehnology and urban culture for the world, and those that have particular local histories from the efforts to bring "civilization" to the motor city via art collecting and symphony orchestras to the creation of the Motown sound; from the sleek Ford factories that heralded modern architecture in America to the artificial past that Henry Ford assembled at Greenfield Village, from the heroic worker figures of Diego Rivera's murals to the controversies surrounding the Joe Louis monument and the Heidelberg Project.

The class will function as a seminar that combines lectures with discussion of challenging readings on aspects of twentieth century culture that have been present in Detroit, and group reports based on research in local archives and libraries. Several field trips and guest lectures will be scheduled.

Open to all juniors, seniors, and graduate students with a prerequisite of any one prior course in History of Art OR American Culture OR American History AND permission to enroll. Please e-mail the instructor requesting permission to enroll. This course is part of the Detroit 300 Theme Semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 531 / CLARCH 531 / ANTHRCUL 587. Aegean Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 531.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 555. Renaissance Architecture in Italy.

Section 001 Meets With Architecture 518.

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/arch/518/001.nsf

A survey of selected Italian buildings from Brunelleschi to Palladio, this course endeavors to explain the formal nature of Renaissance, classical architecture and to relate it to the historical context of the city-state and the papacy. The theory and practice of Alberti, Bramante, and Michelangelo are explored in some detail. Lectures and discussions are supplemented by a textbook and varied shorter reading assignments. The requirements for the course, for UG and grad students, are: midterm exam/final exam/term paper/participation in discussions based on assigned readings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 562. Baroque Sculpture in Italy and Spain.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with introductory lectures on 16th-century sculptural traditions and on the stirrings of a new way of seeing and working, the course will pass to an intensive investigation of the art of Gianlorenzo Bernini. Bernini's sculpture will be studied both for what it reveals of the master's artistic genius and of the changing sociopolitical/religious climate in Papal Rome. The influence of Bernini's vision and the alternative to the Berninian manner that of Baroque Classicism will then be discussed. This will be followed by a unit on the extraordinary sculpture of 17th-Century Spain. The course will end with suggestions as to the constants that is, the peculiarly Baroque features within so much astonishing diversity. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 582. Later Islamic Architecture: 1500-Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 285. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Readings and discussions of a wide range of material render this course as much a study of palatine architecture and urban development as an exploration of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the three great Muslim imperial states in the Early Modern period (16th-17th centuries). In a network of framing intentions and significations, the palace and its representational plentitude from architecture and landscaping to ceremonials and their accoutrements, from spectacle and spectatorship to gendered zones of access will be analyzed as carefully orchestrated manifestations of the cultural production of urbanized empires. We shall seek to trace the ways in which each imperial state formulated its distinctive rhetoric of sovereignty through experiencing the city and its palaces. Throughout, we shall weave together the "canonical" with the marginal in an effort to help us nuance the cohesive elements that bind these cultures together, highlighting commonalities of the iconography of power within eastern Islamdom and beyond. Active class participation, papers, presentations and museum visits are required. (PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of instructor

HISTART 600. Independent Study.

Section 011 Object, Body and Installation in later 20th Century Sculpture. (1 credit). Meets with History of Art 399.011. Meets 09/06 to 09/27. (Drop/Add deadline=September 25).

Instructor(s): Alex Potts

Prerequisites & Distribution: (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the new conceptions of sculpture which emerged in the 1960s and 1970s with the breakdown of a modernist painterly aesthetic and the shift to creating objects and installations. It focuses on three dimensional work by artists such as Carl Andre, Claes Oldenburg, Eva Hesse, Bruce Nauman, Louise Bourgeois and Rachel Whiteread. Their "specific objects" (Donald Judd) take a number of different forms, ranging from Minimalist abstractions to biomorphic things evoking body parts, to environmental creations. We shall discuss the particular importance given to the siting and staging of these objects and explore the new kinds of physical and psychological interaction set up between viewer and work. We shall also focus on issues thrown up as a consequence of the work engaging the viewer at a more immediately physical, bodily level than painting or two dimensional imagery. Also important is how this increasingly self-conscious staging of sculpture brought out a tension between a viewer's one to one communion with a work, and the situating of her or his experience in the public arena of a gallery. Course requirements include short papers from students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, please contact Larry in Student Services 647-5602 for enrollmentpermission

Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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