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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 7:03 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Psychology
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Wolverine Access Subject listing for PSYCH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Psychology.

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PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Colleen Seifert (seifert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/111/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of psychology. As a discipline, Psychology is concerned with questions that make up the very fabric of our existence. From the mundane (e.g., Why can't I remember the names of people I meet?) to the profound (e.g., How do we know what behavior is "normal"?). There are three major goals for the course: (1) Introduce you to the ways that psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior. One of the main themes of the course is that different kinds of psychologists (e.g., biological, cognitive, social, clinical, etc.) approach psychology from different, but complementary, perspectives. (2) Introduce you to the body of knowledge, research findings, and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) Stimulate you to think about how the material we cover in class applies to your daily life. Psychology offers a unique perspective on many of the questions and social issues that confront us.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Dan Horn (danhorn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/111/030.nsf

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the field of psychology. As such, there are three major goals of the course: (1) Introduce you to the ways that different kinds of psychologists think about and approach questions of mind and behavior. One of the main themes of the course is that different kinds of psychologists (e.g., biological, cognitive, social, clinical, etc.) approach psychology from different, but complementary, perspectives. (2) Introduce you to the body of knowledge, research findings, and underlying principles that currently exist in the field. (3) Stimulate you to think about how the material we cover in class applies to your daily lives. As a discipline, Psychology is concerned with questions that make up the very fabric of our existence. From the mundane (e.g., Why does the moon look big when it's low on the horizon? Why can't I remember a phone number for more than a few seconds?) to the profound (e.g., Why do people sometimes kill each other? What is considered "normal" behavior? Does free will exist?). Psychology offers a unique perspective on many of the questions and social issues that confront us.

General Grading Policy: Your final grade will be determined by four factors: your grade on the first exam, your grade on the second exam, your discussion section grade, and your grade on the final exam. MAKE-UP, EARLY OR LATE EXAMS WILL NOT BE GIVEN UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE!! All exams will be multiple-choice format and will only cover material presented since the previous exam. The exams will be designed to cover the material presented in the lecture, textbook, and in sections. You are responsible for knowing about any announcements (including policy changes) that are made in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 060.

Instructor(s): Ann Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/111/060.nsf

This course will survey a wide range of topics to give students a basic introduction to Psychology. Topics will include the brain, human development, social interaction, psychopathology, dreams, personality, motivation and many more! This section of Psychology 111 is a lecture only section. This means there are no small graduate student led sections. Students must have a very independent learning style to succeed in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 070.

Instructor(s): Shelly Gail-Zeff Schreier (schreier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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PSYCH 112. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Mind And Brain.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for both Psych. 112 and 113; no credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 114, 115, or 116. (4). (NS). (BS). Psych. 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/112/001.nsf

The course provides an overview of the field of psychology from a natural science perspective, with emphasis on the connection between brain mechanism and behavior. The topics covered by the course are: Brain and Nervous System, Neuron and Neurotransmission, Perception, Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Development, Aphasia and Amnesia, Sleep and Hypnosis, EEG, Emotion, Conditioning, Reinforcement, and Motivation, Attachment, Personality, and Defense Mechanisms, Mental Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. It is hoped that the student will become more understanding of the beliefs and desire of himself/herself as an individual and the society as a whole. Students are evaluated based on grades on two two-hour exams, three reaction papers, possibly several short quizzes, and activities in the discussion session. Discussion sessions will meet AFTER the first lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles G Morris

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover such topics as physiology and behavior, sensory and perceptual processes, states of consciousness, learning and memory, thinking, intelligence, motivation and emotion, development across the life-span, personality, stress and adjustment, abnormal behavior and psychotherapy, and social psychology. The text for the course is Psychology: An Introduction (10th ed.); there is also an optional course pack. Grades are based primarily on three exams and an oral presentation, though consideration is also given to attendance at and participation in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Marita Rosch Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychology covers a tremendous variety of topics and that the approaches to studying these topics are equally numerous. In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics: Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods). In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely on a biological level (the brain, evolution and the biological basis of behavior, behavioral genetics), a "basic processes" level (exploring research on perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), on a level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally on a "social" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and intergroup processes).

In Part 3, we will look at one specific problem, namely the student's transition from high school to college, and how this problem can be approached on a biological level (stress and infectious diseases), on a basic process level, on a level of looking at one person (the personality characteristics that might make an adjustment to a transition easier) and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to transitions in our life?).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Psychology and Law.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Loran Bobbitt) as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's "A Time to Kill" ) with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of legal issues as the insanity defense, and battered wife syndrome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 Racism Underground: Hidden and Not-So-Hidden Prejudice in America.

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Public opinion surveys suggest that prejudice and racism have declined dramatically since the 1940s. Has racism really declined, or simply gone underground? In this seminar we will learn about such "hidden" or covert forms of prejudice, as well as some not-so-hidden, more overt forms of prejudice. The seminar will focus primarily on Black-white intergroup relations, but issues involving other ethnic groups (e.g., Asian-Americans, Jewish Americans, Native Americans, Latino/a Americans) and people of different sexual orientations will be included as well. The class will use a course pack available at "Grade A Notes."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 006 Late Life Potential.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/120/006.nsf

This first-year seminar will focus on late life potential. Late life usually is considered a time of inevitable loss. However, there is growing evidence about ways to limit these losses, and also possible promote gains and in late life. Over the term we will examine theory and research on development and aging, as well as read biographical material on late life greatness, study examples of late life accomplishments, and talk with vital old people. By the end of the term, students should understand the nature of late life potential, as well as some of the conditions that facilitate it. From this understanding we will also consider appropriate roles for the elders of our society. The seminar will mainly involve discussion. Students will be evaluated by weekly assignments and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 007 Psychology and Culture of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Motherhood.

Instructor(s): Ann Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/120/007.nsf

This course will explore psychological issues surrounding women's transition to motherhood. Cultural attitudes towards pregnancy, childbirth, breastfeeding, and related topics will be contrasted. In addition, the impact of technology on fertility and pregnancy will be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 008 The Future of Work and Your Work Future.

Instructor(s): Richard H Price (ricprice@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to help students explore their future career goals and, at the same time, reflect on the future of work. Our emphasis will be on active learning and exploration. We will read, discuss, conduct small research projects, and work both individually and in teams. In the first part of the course, we learn what writers, psychologists, and experts on work and careers have to say about the psychological meaning of work, how you will cope with challenges, shape your future self, and choose your future work.

Next, we look to the future where emerging technology, rapid globalization, and cultural differences will play a major role in shaping working life. The authors we read ask whether work as we know it will disappear, how it will cross national boundaries, and if we can bridge the gap between dramatically different cultures in the global work of the future.

Then we ask how these global, technological, and cultural forces will actually shape future work. What is likely to happen to jobs and careers, and to the work organizations of the future? How will we experience the work itself, and how will the growing diversity of the workforce influence work and organizations?

Finally, how will the new work influence our values, our sense of family, and our sense of community? In the last part of the course, students will work in teams on small research projects that explore a topic of their own choosing on the future of work. This class will use a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 009 Who am I? Who are we together? Identity Development and Intergroup Relations in American Society

Instructor(s): Kelly Maxwell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory seminar course will examine identity development and intergroup relations as we challenge ourselves to think critically about our social identities and worldviews. Social or group identities include for example, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. These identities are predicated upon a social structural system that advantages some groups and disadvantages others. As such, this course will also explore how inequities in our multicultural and multiethnic American society impact identity development and relationships between groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Psychology and Non-Ordinary Experience.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions.

However, it is only recently that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. Lastly, we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 011 I, too, sing America: A Psychology of Race and Racism.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this first-year seminar will explore the psychology of cultural differences and intergroup relations in the United States. We will emphasize the study of race and racism, and we will also consider gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, social class, and other social identities. Examples of topics include intergroup stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am... I, too, am America"?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 012, 013 Leadership: Theory and Practice.

Instructor(s): Charles G Morris

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a multidisciplinary seminar for first-year students that explores the questions: What is leadership? What are some styles of leadership and traits of effective leaders? What essential tasks must leaders perform? We will examine both classical and contemporary views of leadership. This is not a "how to do it" course in leadership, though students will learn a great deal about how to be an effective leader. Core readings consist of Gardner On Leadership, and McFarland et al. 21st Century Leadership.

Each student will lead at least one class discussion on a chapter from the readings. Small groups of students will also prepare an oral and written report on one outstanding leader of their choice. The course requires a great deal of writing and active participation in class. Course grades will be based on attendance and participation in class discussions, a reading log or journal, position papers for the class discussions, an end-of-class essay, and the oral and written leader reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 014 Health & Healing Mind & Body.

Instructor(s): Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore conceptions of health and healing within a broad range of traditions, from conventional allopathic medicine to shamanism. We will study the mind/body relation within these traditions as well as consider current scientific studies that elucidate how the mind-body connection impacts on health. This seminar will encourage a broadening of our conception of health to include physical, mental as well as spiritual well-being. Students will examine their personal beliefs and understanding of health as well as study the influence of culture on medical practices.

Other topics will include stress, pain, addiction, and depression. Grades will be based on short written assignments, class participation, and a small self-designed project. There will be some choice in determining the basis for the grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 015 The Psychology of Children and Violence.

Instructor(s): Sandra A Graham-Bermann

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This first-year seminar presents an introduction to understanding violence in the lives of children. Methods of instruction are varied and include reading novels, reports of research findings, films, lectures, and the presentation of clinical case material.

The course begins with an articulation of the prevalence and incidence of seven kinds of violence against children, moves on to present a number of theoretical models that have been used to explain violence against children, and reviews the specific effects of various kinds of violence on children's adjustment. The course concludes with a discussion of prevention programs and interventions designed to help children in the wake of violence exposure.

There are required weekly reaction papers (short essays) and a final paper (approximately 10-12 pages). Grades are based on the quality of the reaction papers and the final paper as well as class participation and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Consciousness.

Instructor(s): William J Gehring (wgehring@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/121/001.nsf

Consciousness is perhaps the greatest challenge still facing science. In this course we shall examine some of the most influential thinking about consciousness and the findings from neuroscience and psychology that shed light on it. In doing this, we shall ask a number of questions: Just what is consciousness? Can brain scans and studies of the effects of brain injuries tell us where in the brain consciousness is located? Can computers (or animals) be conscious? How can you know whether someone else is conscious? What happens to consciousness in dreams, hypnosis, meditation, and drug-altered mental states? Does mental telepathy really exist? What about near-death experiences? Is the mind distinct from the body?

Reading assignments, discussions, written exercises, and other in-class activities will help you to consider, challenge, and possibly change your own perspective on consciousness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 002 The Evolution of Consciousness and Cognition.

Instructor(s): David E Meyer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the nature of conscious and unconscious mental processes in various types of human cognition and action, including perception, memory, thinking, and behavior broadly construed. We will take an eclectic approach in our exploration, encompassing points of view found in disciplines such as psychology, neurophysiology, artificial intelligence, philosophy, and medical practice. Both normal and altered states of consciousness (e.g., sleep, dreaming, meditation, hypnosis, and hallucination) will be considered from these perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

In a multicultural society, discussion about issues of conflict and community are needed to facilitate understanding between social groups. In this intergroup dialogue, students will participate in semi-structured face-to-face meetings with students from other social identity groups. They will discuss relevant reading material and they will explore their own and the other group's experiences in various social and institutional contexts. Participants will examine narratives and historical, psychological and sociological materials that address each group's experience within a U.S. context. Students will participate in exercises that will be debriefed in class. They will learn about pertinent issues facing the participating groups on campus and in society. The goal is to create a setting in which students engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration concerning issues of intergroup relations, conflict and community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 204. Individual Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the faculty. Students are provided with the proper section number by the faculty member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course after receiving instructor permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 206. Tutorial Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the faculty. Students are provided with the proper section number by the faculty member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course after receiving instructor permission.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Outreach includes approximately 45 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children in day care settings, schools in the community, adolescents in school and after-school programs, physically ill adults and children, and persons legally confined to criminal institutions. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, readings, papers; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Undergraduate Office at 1044 East Hall beginning November 15, 2000 to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Fall Term 2001. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 001 Working with Preschool Children. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Students will work at a placement with infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children. The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. This course will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 002 Big Sibs: Community and Opportunity. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age from four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor Community as you and your little sib participate in free to low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 003 Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 004 International Friends (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Establish a meaningful relationship with a family from another country. Learn about cross-cultural issues of Psychology. Help introduce an international family to the UM campus, Southeastern Michigan, and American Culture. Practice language skills. Explore a country you might like to visit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 005 Health Illness and Society. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 211. Outreach.

Section 006 Exploring Careers. (2 Credits).

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and (2) practice job or internship search strategies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 302. Special Problems Lab in Psychology/Natural Science.

Section 001 Lab In Cognitive Neuroscience. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330 or 340. (3-4). (Excl). (BS). May be used as a lab in the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration with advisor approval. May be repeated for a total of six credit.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This computer-based laboratory course focuses on several research paradigms in biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience. With the help of computer-based simulations, students will be introduced to neuronal electrophysiology, neural network modeling, simple learing paradigms and behavioral psychology. Through hands-on experience with these topics, students will gain practical knowledge about research design and methodology, data analysis, and the written preparation of research findings. Grading will be based upon in-class laboratory exercises as well as written lab reports, research papers, and examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ellen Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001, 002 Michigan Mentorship Program. (3-4 Credits). Admission By Application And Interview. Contact equart@umich.edu For Rgistration Information.

Instructor(s): Ellen J Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor

No Description Provided.

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PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 003 Practicum in Child Development and Child Care. (2-4 credits). Prerequisite: Psychology 350. Course requires practicum hours at pound house children's center. Contact Carolyn Tyson at 998-8399

Instructor(s): Brenda Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Practicum in Child Development and Child Care. (2-4 credits). Prerequisite: Psychology 350. This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as write papers integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. For more information, contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House, 998-8399.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 004 Women in Prison. (3 credits). Meets With Women's Studies 342.001.

Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 342.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 005 Tutoring Children in Schools. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Scott Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This practicum allows undergraduates to work with children in elementary schools who are learning to read. Students will work in K-4 classrooms, tutor children, and assess their reading progress. The class will meet as a seminar biweekly to discuss observations of children, instructional approaches to teaching reading, and indicators of literacy development. Requirements include a class presentation, case studies of children, and weekly journals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In the Community Setting, II. (3 credits). Call 615-6060 For Registration Information.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Division of Substance Abuse and its research arm, the University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c)a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, Psych. 211, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Section 001 Working with Children At U-M Children's Center. For Registration Information Call 998-8070.

Instructor(s): Karey L Leach (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (3-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 7 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.childrenscenters.umich.edu

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with 2-6 year old children in the UM Children's Centers laboratory preschool programs. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations). Together the teaching staff and university students work as a team in each classroom. This is an excellent opportunity for hands-on work with young children with the support of professional teachers. A seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites are required; this course meets required laboratory credits. It also introduces students to children in a setting specifically designed for observation, participation, and research, while providing young children with an exemplary preschool experience. The Children's Centers are open to the public. Please call 998-8070 for further information regarding availability.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 Admission Is By Application Which Can Be Picked Up In 1044 EH. Applications Are Due By March 28, 2001.

Instructor(s): Maria L Slowiaczek (mls@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through Psych. 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising/counseling. Students are selected by application (available in the Peer Advising office, 1044 East Hall, and due on March 28, 2001) and applicants will be interviewed.

Required training in peer facilitation and Psychology concentration requirements is scheduled on Sunday, September 9 and Sunday, September 16, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. A two-hour, faculty-supervised weekly class meets Wednesdays, 4-6 and is required. Other course requirements include weekly reaction papers and a final paper.

In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The class is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum. The text book used for this course is "Peer Programs on the College Campus," by Sherry Hatcher and a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 Requires two mandatory retreats. Dates to be announced. For registration information go to 3000 Michigan Union, 936-1875, or email igrcc@umich.edu

Instructor(s): Ruby L Beale (rubeale@umich.edu), Mark Chesler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. This course will focus on content and process issues in an academic and applied setting. The topics of this course include social identity group development, prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; power and privilege; culture, cultural cues and judgments, basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural settings. This is a highly interactive and intensive course which includes group projects in and outside of class. It also includes 2 mandatory weekend retreats.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 002 Requires two mandatory retreats. Dates to be announced. For registration information go to 3000 Michigan Union, 936-1875, or email igrcc@umich.edu

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu), Charles Behling

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. This course will focus on content and process issues in an academic and applied setting. The topics of this course include social identity group development, prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments, basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural settings. This is a highly interactive and intensive course which includes group projects in and outside of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 311 / SOC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kelly Maxwell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


PSYCH 315 / CAAS 327. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

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PSYCH 315 / CAAS 327. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Section 001 Social Psychology of the African Family.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 327.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 316 / CAAS 331. The World of the Black Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vonnie C McLoyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 331.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 319. Empowering Families and Communities.

Section 001 Students In 319.001 Must Also Enroll In 320.001. Meets With Amercian Culture 309.001

Instructor(s): Laura P Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 320. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of community psychology by focusing around the themes of empowerment and prevention. The influences of social context, racism, culture, and inequality in shaping behavior and attitudes in community settings are emphasized. Through readings, lectures, and simulations, students will deepen their understanding of how families and communities function and how communities can be involved in program development and delivery. Students must enroll concurrently in Psychology 320: Laboratory in Community Intervention. The course will meet once a week for three hours. Each class section will involve both lecture and discussion. Readings will consist of two books and four to six additional readings each week. Students will complete a journal that is a synthesis and integration of the readings, an in-class midterm, and a group research paper. Students will present their research paper in a poster session. The course is designed for third- and fourth-year students in psychology and other social sciences. The class will use a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 320. Laboratory in Community Intervention.

Section 001 Students In 320.001 Must Also Enroll In 319.001. Meets With American Culture 309.002

Instructor(s): Laura P Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 319. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This experiential lab involves one visit per week to an African American, Arab American, or Latino community in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well being of children and families. Projects involve such activities as tutoring, developing outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects. Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Students must be enrolled concurrently in Psychology 319: Empowering Families and Communities. This type of direct experience will provide for a better understanding of course concepts and more in-depth learning. This lab requires attendance at training sessions or community participation three hours a week.

Students will turn in weekly attendance sheets that document their work. Transportation will be provided. An experiential journal, readings, and group project reflecting this experience will be completed for Psychology 319. This class will use a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 330. Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Seema Bhatnagar (bhatnags@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/330/001.nsf

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology. It introduces the kinds of questions traditionally addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is the study of how psychological processes relate to the brain and evolution. A major focus is on how brain processes cause psychological events and behavior, and how psychological events are encoded in the brain (physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience). Another focus is on how psychological processes (e.g., perception, cognition) differ across different species, and on how psychological processes have been shaped by evolutionary pressures (comparative or evolutionary psychology). Topics will include: principles of behavioral evolution; the anatomy and operation of brain systems relevant to mind and behavior, and their relation to psychoactive drugs; neural mechanisms of normal action, perception, motivation, learning, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and for one discussion/practicum section.

NOTE: This course is intended primarily for sophomores and second-term first-year students who have ALREADY taken a course in introductory psychology. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

The text book for the course is "Biological Psychology"; by Rosenzweig et al.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William J Gehring (wgehring@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/331/001.nsf

The purpose of this course is three-fold: (1) It provides students with opportunities to gain practical laboratory experience by assisting an individual faculty member in the biopsychology program with his/her on-going research. (2) It introduces students to selected general methods used in the field of biopsychology (brain and behavior and animal behavior). (3) It provides practical knowledge about research design, quantification of behavior, scientific writing, the use of animals in research, and miscellaneous techniques used by biopsychologists in laboratory research.

Students must register in two sections; a general lecture section (001) and an individual faculty member's section (faculty identification number). To be admitted, students must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab. Specific instructions and an application form (which must be completed) are available in the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1044 East Hall) or the Biopsychology Program Office (4029 East Hall). Students concentrating in 'Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences' will receive priority.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 335. Introduction to Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren G Holmes

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology or Biol. 162. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/335/001.nsf

This course presents a broad introduction to animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology (sociobiology). The class is open to sophomores and is well suited for any student interested in animal behavior, biological psychology, or the relationship between Darwinian evolution and social behavior. Introductory lectures present the basic principles of organic evolution so that all students have a common knowledge foundation from which other course topics can be examined. Course topics include, among others, the relationship between genes and behavior, inclusive-fitness thinking and social interactions between close genetic relatives (e.g., parent-offspring, siblings), the evolution of sex differences, mating systems and their ecological correlates, and sexual selection (male-male competition and mate choice by females). Terms such as nepotism, altruism, aggression, and reproductive behavior are considered in light of how they have evolved by natural selection and how they contribute to daily survival and reproductive success. Examples from a wide variety of animal groups are used (e.g. primates, rodents, fishes, insects) to help emphasize various points and some time is devoted to human behavior. A lecture format is used, and students are encouraged to question and comment during class sessions. Grading is based on a multiple-choice quiz, two in-class essay exams, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 338(437) / ANTHRBIO 368. Primate Social Behavior I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Mitani (mitani@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrbio/368/001.nsf

See Biological Anthropology 368.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 340. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001 Evening exams Tue Oct 16 & Nov 13, 6:00-8:00pm.

Instructor(s): Thad A Polk (tpolk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/340/001.nsf

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation.

Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises. The textbook for this course is Sternberg, R.J. (1999); Cognitive Psychology (2nd Ed.), Fort Worth: Harcourt Brace.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Sections 001, 002, 003 may be elected to satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research.

The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 345. Introduction to Human Neuropsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeff Hutsler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Psych. 634. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/345/001.nsf

Human neuropsychology seeks to understand human cognition and brain organization. It utilizes similar methods as cognitive psychology to analyze behavior in brain-damaged patient groups as well as normal subjects. This course will give an overview of human brain organization through the use of case studies and experimental research in patient populations. Topics to be covered include visual function, language, memory, and executive functions.

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PSYCH 348(447). Psychology of Thinking.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Priti R Shah (priti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/348/001.nsf

This course reviews our knowledge about higher-level cognition, including thinking, reasoning, decision-making, and problem solving. Multiple approaches to these topics will be considered, including laboratory research, computational models, and developmental, individual differences, and cross-cultural perspectives. Readings will include a textbook as well as original research reports. The course will involve a combination of lectures, discussions, and some hands-on activities including conducting mini in-class experiments and developing computational models. The class will involve regular homework assignments (either problem-solving activities or writing assignments), a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 350. Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brenda Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Psych. 255. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/350/001.nsf

This course provides an introduction to the milestones of human development from conception to death. We describe physical, cognitive, and social growth of normal children with special attention to various cultural contexts of development and the rich diversity of individuals. The content is primarily drawn from research and theories in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. In addition, we will discuss implications for child-rearing, education, and social policy-making so that you can apply the knowledge to meaningful problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stats. 350 (or 402) and Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. The class meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 353(453). Socialization of the Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lucretia M Ward

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/353/001.nsf

This course examines the social and emotional development of children from infancy through adolescence. Over the course of the term we will discuss research findings describing several aspects of socialization, such as prosocial and antisocial behavior, gender role development, attachment, and academic achievement, and will examine key theories explaining their paths and outcomes. We will also examine the numerous forces that help shape and socialize children, including the family, peers, schools, and the media. Completion of Psychology 350 is strongly recommended.

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PSYCH 355(455). Cognitive Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry M Wellman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/355/001.nsf

How do children think, remember, and learn? What do they know about the world of objects, of people, of TV? Are thinking and learning fundamentally different for babies in comparison to children and in comparison to adults? This course tackles these questions, examining children's thinking and intellectual growth from infancy to adulthood.

Topics covered include: concepts, memory, language, math and number, literacy, problem solving, and childrens' understanding of the social world (social cognition). We will consider different theories of how mental abilities develop, and pay particular attention to recent psychological research (experimental, observational, and even cross-cultural) on these topics. The course includes lectures, but since enrollment is limited to 30 or fewer it also includes considerable in-class discussion in a seminar format. Students will be evaluated by exams and one term paper.

The textbook that the class will use is "Children's Thinking" (3rd edition); Course pack is from Grade A Notes INC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 359(459). Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/359/001.nsf

This undergraduate course is designed to familiarize students with current knowledge about the constancies and changes that occur across adulthood, as well as with conceptual and research issues relevant to understanding the future of aging. Discussions will focus on plasticity of the aging process, and likely causes of age differences and age change. Our goal will be to understand the implications of age patterns for individuals, as well as for societies. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the typical, as well as range of possible, trajectories of adult development and aging. They should gain insights about the changes they can expect as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain understanding of the needs of older persons, as well as an appreciation of the tremendous potential resource they offer.

The course will cover theory, methods, data, and controversies relevant to age in adulthood. We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S. today, including discussions of attitudes about aging, and demographics of it. Then we will consider theories about aging, and methods of studying it. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be covered include changes in: physical capacities, health, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, creativity, wisdom, personality, emotion, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address societal issues, including gender, ethnic, cultural, and historical diversity in aging, services, policies, and careers relevant to the old.

A class web site will be integral to the course. Students will be expected to participate actively in both class and web site discussions, as well as to keep up with daily reading and written assignments. In addition, there will be several short reports, group projects, exams, and a final exam. The number of points accumulated on these various options will determine final grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 360. Introduction to Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fiona Lee (fionalee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/360/001.nsf

Organizational psychology is the subfield of psychology devoted to understanding human behavior in organizations. This course uses two perspectives: bottom-up analysis that focuses on individuals in organizations, and a top-down analysis that focuses on social systems in organizations. Topics include motivation, communication, social influence, leadership, group dynamics, intergroup conflict, and organizational culture. The course includes a combination of lecture, discussion, and group work.

Required Materials:
1. N&M: Nahavandi, A., & Malekzadeh, A. (1999). Organizational Behavior: The Person Organization Fit . New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
2. LCP: Lee Course pack available at Dollar Bill Copying (611 Church Street).

Course requirements:

  1. 3 in-class exams (15% each): Exams consist of multiple choice and short essays. "Cumulative" exam (15%): One multiple choice question will be given out at the end of each lecture relating to the lecture material. These scores will be aggregated.
  2. Group Project (25%): The group project requires you to observe and analyze the interpersonal relations within an organization of your choice. There is a separate handout for details. The project is broken down into the following smaller assignments: Project proposal: 5% Midpoint report: 5% Final report: 15%
  3. Section participation (15%): This includes attending and participating in section, and completing assignments from section. This will be further explained by your GSI.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Sections 001 and 002 may be elected to satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience, (2) to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g. field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research), and (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing. Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, the class we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/370/001.nsf

This is a lecture-only version of Psychology 370. We will examine how psychopathology is defined, classified, explained, and treated. Grades will be based primarily on in-class exams, with some short writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Ed Chang (changec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Abnormal psychology entails the scientific study of aberrant behaviors, broadly defined. However, there is no universal consensus on the definition, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. As we shall quickly see, what is deemed abnormal and how it develops or is treated will partly depend on the particular perspective taken. Hence, a key goal of this course is to guide students toward a broad and critical understanding of "abnormal behavior" from a number of different perspectives. We will accomplish this by exploring, evaluating, and discussing various strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives for understanding psychology based on the theoretical and empirical literature. Films may be used to illustrate some of the important concepts mentioned in the lectures and in the readings. Your final grade will be based on the total number of points you obtain from lecture-based quizzes (a total of 10 quizzes, each quiz is worth a maximum of 20 points) given at the start of each lecture class, and from a midterm and final exam (each exam is worth a maximum of 100 points) and a maximum of 400 points determined by your discussion section leader from participation, attendance, papers, and quizzes. Accordingly, 50% of your grade will be based on your performance in the lecture section and 50% of your grade will be based on your performance in the discussion section. Note, it is the student's responsibility to be in attendance for all lecture and discussion section classes. Lecture-based quizzes, which cannot be made up for any reason, will begin by the second lecture class. Students who are late for lectures risk missing lecture-based quizzes which will be given only during the very start of each lecture class. Hence, students should anticipate making it to each lecture class by no later than 8am to ensure that opportunities to earn points from lecture-based quizzes are not lost due to lateness. Missing quizzes will have a direct impact on your final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 002-007only satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Nnamdi Pole

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stats. 350 (or 402)) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/372/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on psychopathology. Lectures will cover research design, current studies in clinical psychology, methods of assessing psychiatric symptoms and disorders, and research tools for evaluating psychotherapy outcomes. Lab sessions will encourage students to pursue an area of interest while learning how to design assessments, collect and analyze data, and report findings in a written report that meets APA guidelines. Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended.

The textbook that the class will use is "Research Methods in Clinical and Counselling Psychology."; Barker, C., Pistrang, N., & Elliott, R. (1994).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In Community Settings. Call 615-6060 For Registration Information.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stats. 350 (or 402)) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Division of Substance Abuse and its research arm, the University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; (c)a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families, (d) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 380. Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/380/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such topics as: social inference, schemas, attribution, conformity and obedience, altruism, emotions, stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, and attitudes and persuasion.

Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through short papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stats. 350 (or 402) and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/381/001.nsf

Students explore many aspects of social psychology research methods in this hands-on course. In the first half, issues around research methods are discussed in depth, utilizing survey data students collect to illustrate concepts. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Required Textbook:

  • Stangor, C. (1998). Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin. *in Undergraduate Library # BF 76.5 .S661.
  • Required Coursepack: Accu-copy, 518 East William. $10.50
  • Optional Textbook: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th ed), (1994).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

    Section 002.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Stats. 350 (or 402) and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/381/002.nsf

    Students explore many aspects of social psychology research methods in this hands-on course. In the first half, issues around research methods are discussed in depth, utilizing survey data students collect to illustrate concepts. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

    Required Textbook:

  • Stangor, C. (1998). Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences. Boston: Houghton-Mifflin. *in Undergraduate Library # BF 76.5 .S661.
  • Required Coursepack: Accu-copy, 518 East William. $10.50
  • Optional Textbook: Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th ed), (1994).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 390. Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Oliver C Schultheiss (oschult@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/390/001.nsf

    This 4-credit course is intended to be a general overview of the contemporary study of personality and its theoretical background. Emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with current research and theory on specific personality topics. Examples of some of the topics covered in this course are: personality research methods and assessment; cybernetic and neurobiological approaches to personality; motivation and emotion; learning theory; units of personality (traits, motives, and cognitions); personality development; personality and health; and sociocultural context and personality.

    Examinations: Three equally weighted one-hour exams will be given during regular class time. Each exam will cover lectures and assigned readings (textbook and course pack) for the period prior to the exam. Format for the exams will be a combination of multiple-choice and short-essay questions.

    Other requirements: Students will be required to write a 10-15 page term paper in which they apply major theoretical perspectives and concepts of personality psychology to the description and analysis of a real person. Students are also expected to attend lectures and sections on a regular basis since this will in part determine their final grade. Required texts:
    Winter, D. G. (1996). Personality: Analysis and interpretation of lives.
    New York: McGraw-Hill. Keller, H. (1903/1988). The Story of My Life. New American Library.
    A course pack reader.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

    Section 001 and 002 only satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Instructor(s): Susan Nolen-Hoeksema (nolen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Stats. 350 (or 402), and prior or concurrent enrollment in Psych. 390. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/391/001.nsf

    This lab course aims at making students familiar with the process of research in personality psychology. Groups of students will read the literature on one of several optional topics in personality research formulate hypotheses, collect data, analyze these data using statistical methods, write an APA style research report, peer-review the research reports written by other students, and present their research in the form of a short talk in class. Students will be introduced to experimental, survey, and archival strategies of data collection and hypothesis testing, diverse instruments for the assessment of personality, and statistical approaches to analyzing data that involves measures of personality. Grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written research reports, and performance on a statistics test. Psychology 391 will use a course pack.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 393(490). Political Psychology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): David Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/393/001.nsf

    This course surveys the ways that psychological factors affect politics, and vice versa. After an initial analysis of psychology, gender, and politics, we consider leadership and war-versus-peace as two important topics involving both psychology and politics. We consider how to measure psychological characteristics of leaders and groups, who must be studied "at a distance" rather than directly. We then consider some psychological-political processes: political socialization and "generations;" political cognition; old and new ideologies; and voting and other links between the personal and the political. We conclude with political breakdowns (rebellion, terrorism, nationalism) and restoration (negotiation and mediation). Evaluation by exams and a paper. Lectures with discussion sections. A prior course or interest in history or political science is useful, though not required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 400. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

    Section 001 Introduction to Functional MRI.

    Instructor(s): John Jonides (jjonides@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be elected for a total of 12 credits.

    Credits: (2-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This is an introductory course concerned with functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging, particularly as it applies to our understanding of the neural basis of behavior. In this course, students will read empirical journal articles and selected book chapters that will provide them background to current research in the field, including basic experimental designs and data analyses used in fMRI. This will provide students with an overview of the functions of different brain areas, as well as ensure that students be able to read, understand and think critically about fMRI experiments.

    This course is intended for students who are research assistants in labs doing functional neuroimaging. It is one credit hour per semester, two-semester course which will run concurrently with the fMRI speaker series through Fall 2001 and Winter 2002. The class will meet approximately 3 times a month: we will attend the talks (2hours), and meet the week before and after each talk (1hour each). Short assignments will be required throughout the year.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 404. Field Practicum.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (1-12).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 405. Field Practicum.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (1-12).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 405. Field Practicum.

    Section 002 Mentoring, Gender, and Technology. Meets with Women's Studies 483.007.

    Instructor(s): Abigail Stewart

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (1-12).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course provides students with supervised opportunities to integrate theory and practice by combining readings on mentoring, gender, and technology and adolescent girl's development with online observations and interactions with adolescent girls who are users of the <SmartGirl.org website. Students must be willing to serve as participant observers on the Smartgirl.org project. This class will meet once a week to discuss observations and course readings. Written requirement will be a weekly reflective journal. Instruction and supervision by Abigail Stewart (Psychology and Women's Studies) and Tiffany Marra (Project Manager for SmartGirl at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender).

    Students can register for either Psychology 405.002 or Women's studies 483.007 (this section will meet the WS practice requirement, but not the WS special topics requirement).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5; permission of instructor

    PSYCH 408. Field Practicum in Research Techniques/Natural Science.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits do not count for the concentration, but the course may be used for an experiential lab if taken for three credits. (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psych. 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for Psych. 211, 404, 405, 408 and 409. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This field practicum course offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process. Students may obtain a list of faculty sponsors offering research experience in the Undergraduate Office, 1044 East Hall. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 409. Field Practicum in Research Techniques.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psych. 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of Psych. 211, 404, 405, 408, and 409. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This field practicum course offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process. Students may obtain a list of faculty sponsors offering research experience in the Undergraduate Office, 1044 East Hall. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Nancy J Quay (nquay@umich.edu) , Lara N Zador (zadorl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Women's Studies 419.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 414(574). Clinical Psychology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Rosario Ceballo (rosarioc@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 or 114. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/414/001.nsf

    The goal of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of the spectrum of academic and clinical activities in the field of clinical psychology. Topics that will be addressed include the history of clinical psychology as a profession, issues in diagnosis and the classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, theoretical approaches to therapeutic interventions, and issues relating to ethics, training, research, and professionalism in clinical psychology. In addition, the roles of culture and gender within each of these areas will be explored, and specialty areas within the field, like child clinical work, community-based psychology, and health psychology will also be examined.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

    PSYCH 415 / ANTHRCUL 329. The Anthropology of Childhood: Growing Up in Culture.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Lawrence A Hirschfeld

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (Excl).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/anthrcul/329/001.nsf

    See Cultural Anthropology 329.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rdmann/

    This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are: (1) the spiritual seeker's experience of "little death," the mode of apparent discontinuity when the "old life" is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living; (2) times of crisis, adaptation, and "the dark night". and (3) the experience of "physical death," as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

    By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Jung, Hillesum, Feild, Lessing, Soygal Rimpoche, Wilber, and others will form the basis of three short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 436. Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): J. Klebaur, S. Flagel

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. Biol. 162 and chemistry are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will survey recent findings concerning the mechanisms of action and the behavioral effects and side effects of psychoactive drugs, primarily those used in psychiatry and neurology. It will also cover drug and alcohol abuse. Lectures will deal with the major issues that are of concern to psychologists. As the various types of drugs are discussed (anti-depressants, anti-schizophrenia drugs, anti-Parkinson drugs, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cocaine and amphetamine, sedative-hypnotics, alcohol, opioids, hallucinogenics), the relevant details of brain cell synaptic function and transmitter pathways will be highlighted as needed for an integrated view of drug mechanisms and the neurochemical basis of psychiatric disorders and substance abuse. The course is geared primarily for upper division students in psychology and related areas who have had a limited academic background in neurochemistry or biopsychology.

    The text book used for this course is Feldman; Principles of Neuropsychophamarcology.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5; Permission of instructor

    PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/442/

    The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

    While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

    The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 40% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 60% of the grade). Questions concerning this class can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

    Readings

  • Neisser, U. The processes of vision. Scientific American, September, 1968.
  • Hastorf, A. H. and Cantril, H. " They saw a game: A case study." Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology., 1954, 129-134. (CP)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Monique A Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/psych/464/001.nsf

    The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, discussion) with skill development through participation in group exercises. The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on class participation, group projects, and peer ratings. The course pack that you will be using is from Accu-Copy.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 488 / SOC 465. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Andre Modigliani (modigli@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    See Sociology 465.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

    Section 001 Big Questions Small PlanetIntro To Environmental Studies. (4 Credits). Meets with Environmental Studies 240.001.

    Instructor(s): Barbara Boardman Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu), Catherine E Badgley

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (2-4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/envrnstd/240/001.nsf

    This course is an introduction to the environmental crises and challenges of our time, from the perspectives of the natural and social sciences. The natural-science perspective will be presented through a survey of geological, ecological, and evolutionary processes which support the earth's natural resources. The social science perspective will be presented through an evolutionary and behavioral approach to the customs, attitudes, and behaviors toward nature, resources, and the quality of life in contemporary western and non-western cultures. These perspectives will be integrated to demonstrate that we have substantially different choices about how to live, with different consequences in terms of ecological and social impact, as well as in personal satisfaction. Linking these viewpoints is the outlook for a sustainable future, in terms of the quality of life for the global human population, for ecosystems, and for the integrity of physical systems.

    Sections involve discussions, several field trips to local natural areas and businesses, exercises in common property resources, and a campus-sustainability project. Students write several essays, prepare several quantitative reports, keep a journal, and conduct a group project.

    Charles Southwick, GLOBAL ECOLOGY IN HUMAN PERSPECTIVE (will be available at Shaman Drum). Other chapters and articles will be available on the University Reserves class website.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

    Section 004 Sleep Neurobiology. (3 credits). Meets with Neuroscience 520.001.

    Instructor(s): Ralph Lydic (rlydic@umich.edu), Helen Baghdoyan

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (2-4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/neurosci/520/001.nsf

    The objective of this course is to give students the most up-to-the-date information on the biological, personal, and societal relevance of sleep. Personal relevance is emphasized by the fact that the single best predictor of daytime performance is the quality of the previous night's sleep. The brain actively generates sleep, and the first third of the course will overview the neurobiological basis of sleep cycle control.

    Sleep will be used as a vehicle for teaching basic neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological principles. This information will provide a cellular-level understanding of how sleep deprivation, jet lag, and substances such as alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine alter sleep and wakefulness. It is now clear that sleep significantly alters physiology.

    The second third of the class will cover sleep-dependent changes in physiology and sleep disorders medicine. Particular emphasis will be placed on disorders of excessive sleepiness, insomnia, and sleep-dependent changes in autonomic control. Chronic sleep deprivation impairs immune function and promotes obesity. Deaths due to all causes are most frequent between 4 and 6 A.M., and the second portion of the class will highlight the relevance of sleep for preventive medicine.

    The societal relevance of sleep will be considered in the final portion of the class. In an increasingly complex and technologically oriented society, operator-error by one individual can have a disastrous negative impact on public health and safety. Fatigue-related performance errors contributed to the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power plant failures and to the Exxon Valdez Alaskan oil spill. The personal relevance of fatigue-related performance errors will be considered by reviewing recent data showing that in the U.S. more people die from medical mistakes each year than from highway accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS.

    Fulfillment of course objectives will be quantified by pre- versus post-class informational self-evaluation. In-class arousal levels will be facilitated by seminar participation.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

    Section 005 Life Goals, Evolution, & Mood . (3 CREDITS.) MEETS WITH SOC 895.004 and Psychiatry 700.

    Instructor(s): Randolph Nesse

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (2-4).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/500/005.nsf

    Mood is clearly influenced by success or failure in goal pursuit, but its adaptive significance in regulating patterns of effort allocation has only recently become a major topic in psychology. Behavioral ecology offers sophisticated methods that allow careful description and prediction of how organisms allocate their effort, but the goals of animals are very simple compared to those of humans. Neuroscience offers new insights into the mechanisms that regulate goal pursuit. Sociology offers extensive studies of how people form, chose, pursue, and give up on goals in different cultural contexts. A powerful synergy may be possible if emotions and moods related to the pursuit of human ideographic goals can be understood in the nomothetic framework of evolved brain mechanisms that regulate effort allocation. This interdisciplinary course will bring these parallel areas of research together in order to better understand the evolutionary functions of mood and the etiology of depression, in the special context of complex human societies where people pursue large long term goals. In particular, it will consider ways to test the hypothesis that depression often arises when low mood fails to disengage a commitment to an unreachable goal, and the hypothesis that depression is more common in social settings that encourage the pursuit of large goals with uncertain payoffs and few alternatives. The course will meet Tuesdays from 2:30-4:00 for discussion, and then will continue from 4:00-5:30 with an outside speaker on this topic in the EHAP lecture series. When feasible, researchers from two different disciplines will give joint presentations. The 2:30 discussion will usually include the speaker, and will be based on one of his or her publications, but on weeks without speakers, the class will meet to systematically review literature on the topic. One paper will be required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

    Section 001 Learning and Study Skills

    Instructor(s): John W Hagen (jwhagen@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

    PSYCH 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psych. 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (1-6).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the Undergraduate office. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course after completing an application and receiving permission to register.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

    PSYCH 510. Senior Honors Research, I.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Albert C Cain

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 312 and permission of the Psychology Honors concentration advisor. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The primary focus in Senior Honors is implementation of your research design culminating in your final, acceptable thesis and poster preparation for our year-end poster session. (Previously summarized as Get thee to your mentor, Progress steadily, and Conclude well). The goal is a thesis that makes one justifiably proud, and enhanced grounded understanding of research methods. Early on, each student will present the scholarly background and specific research design of their study to the class, and we will sporadically return to brief design and implementation presentations by each student. Drafts of segments of ongoing work that can later be incorporated into the final thesis are to be submitted periodically.

    Other class session topics will include: special current issues and models of research, e.g., meta-analyses, integration of quantitative and qualitative data, evaluation research, etc. Our primary focus, again, will be the conduct and successful completion of your thesis and the enrichment of your research competence.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

    PSYCH 531. Advanced Topics in Biopsychology.

    Section 001 Fundamental Questions on Emotions: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY & BIOPSYCHOLOGY PERSPECTIVES. Meets With Psych 831.001

    Instructor(s): Phoebe C Ellsworth , Kent C Berridge (berridge@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/531/001.nsf

    This course will be an interdisciplinary seminar suitable for advanced undergraduates (who have taken biopsychology and social psychology courses) and graduate students. It aims to combine perspectives on emotion from affective neuroscience and from social/personality psychology. Each week will be led jointly by Phoebe Ellsworth and Kent Berridge. There will be considerable readings from original research articles, based on studies of humans and of other animals. Topics will include: the nature and expression of emotion; role of cognitive appraisal; conscious versus non-conscious emotion; brain mechanisms of emotion; etc. Grades will be based on class participation in discussion of readings and on a paper.

    Graduate students may enroll themselves. Undergraduates may also enroll but should obtain permission of one of the instructors: either Phoebe Ellsworth (pce@umich.edu) or Kent Berridge (berridge@umich.edu). This class will use a course pack.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 541. Advanced Topics in Cognition and Perception.

    Section 474 Cognitive Aging and Cognitive

    Instructor(s): Denise C Park (denise@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 340. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 542. Decision Processes.

    Section 001 Meets With Psych 722.001.

    Instructor(s): J Frank Yates (jfyates@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in statistics is recommended but not required. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/542/001.nsf

    Consider the following:

    • Should I take Psychology 542 or Art History 477?
    • I'm not really good at chemistry and things like that; my grades in those courses stink. So should I give up on my dream of becoming a doctor?
    • Other companies, especially Chrysler, are making tons of money selling sport utility vehicles. But they seem to have the business locked up. Should we enter that market anyway?
    • My client, Mr. Thomas, thinks that Consolidated is responsible for his injuries and thus he wants to sue them. Should I advise that he go through with that plan?
    • Floyd and I have been going together for several years, and now he wants to get married. Should I give in and do that, despite my misgivings??
    • As alderman for the fifth ward, should I vote for this legislation that would change the zoning rules for the city?

    Questions like these illustrate the kinds of decision problems people confront all the time, in their personal and professional lives. They provide the ultimate focus of Psychology 542, "Decision Processes." Specifically, my primary aims in this course are to help the student do two things: (a) achieve an understanding of how people individually and collectively actually solve decision problems; and (b) develop an understanding of how people including the student him- or herself could decide better than they would be inclined to decide naturally.

    Should you elect Psychology 542? One consideration you should take into account is whether the aims described above fit with your interests. That is, do the aims excite you? Another consideration pertains to your future plans. Psychology 542 would be good preparation if your plans include either:

    • scholarship (e.g., in graduate school and thereafter) on basic processes in cognitive, social psychology, or organizational psychology, or related areas, e.g., political science, economics, marketing
    or
    • professional practice (either immediately after college or after professional school) in areas where decision making is critical, e.g., business, law, health care, counseling, operations engineering.

    How is Psychology 542 organized? What happens in a typical day in the course? What would you be required to do as a student in Psychology 542? These remarks provide answers to such questions:

    Psychology 542 is built around what I call the "cardinal issue perspective" on decision making. This is a way of thinking about decision problems which focuses on things like: what decisions really are, what it ought to mean to say that a decision is "good" or "bad," and the kinds of questions that must be answered for virtually any decision problem that arises. The specific topics we will address are organized according to the categories distinguished in the cardinal issue perspective. And one of my major goals is to have you develop a deep appreciation for the perspective, since it can help you think through the problems you will face as a student of decision making and as a decision maker.

    Our treatment of a given topic typically proceeds as follows: First, students do the reading for the given topic. Then the key questions surrounding the topic are illustrated through demonstrations or exercises. We next have structured discussions of the readings, demonstrations, and exercises where everyone in the class participates actively. Finally, I, as the instructor, offer a class-interactive presentation in which I (a) introduce essential ideas not covered in the readings, demonstrations, and exercises, (b) highlight key points that were covered, and (c) try to integrate everything we considered, to help students make sense of it all. Normally, our treatment of a broad topic spans 2-3 class sessions.

    The requirements of the course include:

    1. attendance and active participation in class;
    2. exercises;
    3. small quizzes; and
    4. a final, integrative examination.
    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 551. Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology.

    Section 002 Fam Relationships & Child Dev : INVESTIGATING THE EMOTIONAL LIVES OF FAMILIES.

    Instructor(s): Ann M Shields (shieldsa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 551. Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology.

    Section 244.

    Instructor(s): Marilyn J Shatz (mshatz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 558. Psychology of Adolescence.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kai Schnabel

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/558/001.nsf

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

    Section 002 Schools as Organizations.

    Instructor(s): Tabbye M Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/561/

    The present course is designed to provide a forum for examining issues of conceptualizing, measuring, and evaluating the impact of educational settings and the current state of research in these areas. The class will consider the theory and research that pertains both to what is experienced by "most" members of the settings and to important individual differences in their experience. Both theory and research as it pertains to normative processes will be considered from both a developmental and an ecological perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interaction between the individual and her/his educational context. Also, other contexts within and outside the educational setting that may interact with educational contexts will be touched upon (i.e., school, peer groups, neighborhood, family structures). A survey of some of the specific problems and contemporary issues of concern related to the impact of schools will be discussed within these contexts (e.g., school adjustment and achievement). In addition the course will highlight issues of culture and ethnicity. Though attention will be given to specific problems such as the aforementioned issues, this course cannot offer a comprehensive coverage of those fields. The premise here is that one can best understand the impact of school settings only after one has an understanding of the complexities in defining and measuring what makes-up the settings and how those different components may be related to different outcomes for different individuals and groups.

    The main objectives of the course are to: (1) strengthen and broaden the student's knowledge base of research and theory in the organization and functioning of schools; (2) encourage the student to think critically about theory and research; (3) consider contemporary issues and concerns of the field; (4) consider the practical implications of current research and policy; and (5) provide an arena for the student to explore, crystallize, and express his or her own views concerning the field.

    Course readings include selections from various texts as well as a combination of theoretical and review articles on the topics and empirical articles from the psychological and educational literature. There will be discussion questions provided each week to focus and guide reading of the articles. Readings will stress the theoretical and empirical work and our discussion will focus on the analysis and synthesis of the different theories and research findings.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 571. Advanced Topics in Clinical Psychology.

    Section 370.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

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    PSYCH 573. Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Albert C Cain

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350 or 390, and Psych. 370. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

    Section 001 Seminar on Judgment and Decision Making.

    Instructor(s): Richard Gonzalez (gonzo@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/581/001.nsf

    This seminar will focus on recent research in the area of judgment and decision making, in particualr on issues relevant to social psychology.

    Seminar Goals: 1. Expose students to recent research in judgment and decision making 2. Introduce students to the seminar format of learning

    Prerequisites: An introductory course in social psychology is required; an introductory course in judgment and decision making is recommended.

    Seminar Requirements: 1. Attend seminar and come prepared to each session by having completed the readings 2. Participate in the class discussion 3. One research paper submitted no later than Dec 14th (more details later)

    The final grade will be computed using the following weights: 60% final research paper (#3 above), 30% participation, and 10% attendance. If weekly papers are warranted, they will contribute toward the 30% participation.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

    Section 002 Social Cognition: Thinking, Judging, and Communicating.

    Instructor(s): Norbert W Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/psych/581/002.nsf

    This course addresses how we form judgments about others, ourselves, or social problems. What determines which information we consider or ignore? How do we make sense of ambiguous or inconsistent information? Which heuristics do we employ in social judgment and when do they lead us astray? What is the role of moods and emotions in reasoning? How are our thought processes influenced by the social and communicative context in which we do much of our thinking? Each topic will be introduced with an overview lecture, followed by in-depth discussion of selected research articles.

    Students are expected to read 2 or 3 articles each week; to prepare for class discussion on the basis of questions that invite the application of what has been learned; and to write a term paper on a topic of their choice. The estimated work load per week, in addition to class participation, is about 4 to 5 hours. Grading is based on class participation, the short quizzes, and the term paper. Participation, the quizzes, and the term paper each count one third.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    PSYCH 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

    Section 490.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    No Description Provided.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    PSYCH 591. Advanced Topics in Personality Psychology.

    Section 001 Psychological Perspectives on Culture and Ethnicity

    Instructor(s): Veronica Benet-Martinez (veronica@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 390. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This seminar will examine a wide range of basic social/personality processes (e.g., social cognition, emotion, self-concept, personality traits) from a cultural perspective by drawing on a wide range of cultural and cross-cultural studies. The seminar will also deal with other more general topics of relevance to the study of individuals in their cultural contexts (e.g., cross-cultural research methods, acculturation, biculturalism, ethnic identity).

    An important goal of this course is to help you gain a better appreciation for the ways in which culture and human psyche mutually constitute each other, and to enhance your ability to deal with and understand variations in human behavior across cultures and ethnic groups.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

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