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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in University Courses


This page was created at 7:06 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

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UC 102. The Student in the University.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Penny A Pasque (pasque@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/102/001.nsf

This course will provide students with an opportunity to critically review their role in the university and as a Michigan Community Scholars Program participant. It will allow students to consider the expectations of their university experience within a framework of theoretical perspectives. It is hoped that students will develop a broad understanding of what their university experience can include and how they can shape it to realize their academic potential and intellectual development. The course will focus on the transition from high school to college, access to faculty, identity issues, critical thinking, social justice, and community service learning. The issues and challenges of living and working in a multicultural society will be examined. The large group discussions will focus on student perceptions, relevant research and university resources. The small group discussions will focus on the readings and areas of practical concern. This course is open only to students in the Michigan Community Scholars Program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 104. Introduction to Research.

ENROLLMENT RESTRICTED TO PARTICIPANTS IN UROP IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM.

Instructor(s): Sandra Gregerman (sgreger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Participant in UROP-in-Residence Program. (1). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/104/001.nsf

This course will provide students with an overview of important topics related to research. This course is designed to help students: (1) understand the history of the research university; (2) explore different questions and modes of inquiry researchers use in different academic disciplines; (3) learn about ethical issues in research including the responsible conduct of research, the use of animals in research, data ownership and interpretation; (4) explore issues of creativity, risk-taking, and critical thinking in research, (5) discover the importance of multiculturalism in research across academic disciplines and some of the controversy of braking new ground; and (6) develop a student's research skills through workshops. Researchers will visit the class and share their perspectives on research; their educational/professional pathways and research interests; and related topics. Librarians will conduct workshops for the class on advanced library searchers, Internet exploration, and research as a process. Students will be asked to: (1) keep a research journal to include both reflections on their own research projects and reactions to assigned readings; (2) read an article on one of the proposed topics and write a critical review; and (3) give a 15-minute presentation on their own research project. Evaluation will be based on class attendance and participation in and completion of all tasks including a research journal, article review, and presentation about their research. A course pack of reading related to the topics listed above will serve as the required text for the course. Lecture and discussion.

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UC 105. Perspectives on Health and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle O'Grady (mmidwif@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Restricted to students enrolled in the Health Sciences Scholars Program. (2). (Excl).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/105/001.nsf

This course will provide an overview of major current health and healthcare issues. Students will exchange ideas and experiences with faculty from a broad spectrum of health-related fields. Faculty will engage the students in consideration of the cultural, political, socioeconomic, and personal dimensions of health as well as the options and issues facing those who manage, provide, and evaluate healthcare. This is the core course for students in the Health Sciences Scholars Program and is open only to students in HSSP.

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UC 110 / GEOSCI 171 / BIOLOGY 110 / NRE 110 / AOSS 171. Introduction to Global Change I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): B van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/gc1_frameset.html

Introduction to Global Change I is co-taught by:

Have you ever considered the future consequences of current stresses being put on Earth's environment by humankind's consumption and pollution patterns? Are you interested in discussing critical issues relating to the role of international business, resource economics, human development, and the individual person's responsibility in global change? Funded by grants from NASA and The National Science Foundation, Introduction to Global Change I is an interdisciplinary team-taught introduction to the evolution of the physical Earth and the evolution of life and the human species on our planet. You'll gain state-of-the-art knowledge from some of America's foremost scholars in space physics, biology, geology and Earth ecology. The Web-based course curriculum provides unparalleled opportunities to conduct on-line Internet research. In fact, you will create your own web-based poster. The interactive laboratory exercises provide you the opportunity to use computers to examine how natural systems function as well as develop projections of the future consequences of the stresses being put on the environment. You will use multi-media tools for graphing and computer researching. And, perhaps most important of all, you will have ample time for discussion of the critical issues in human development and how they relate to the international business community, society as a whole and the individual in global change. All topics are developed in a manner that students will find both accessible and enjoyable. The course grade is based on two midterm exams, a final exam, completion of laboratory modules, and a course poster project based on some aspect of global change. There are no prerequisites for the course and no science background is assumed. The course is appropriate for all undergraduate students, irrespective of intended concentration, and is the first of a series of courses that can be taken as part of the Global Change minor.

You will discuss...

  • The Role of the Individual as a Citizen of the Planet
  • Case Studies of Regional and Global Change Issues
  • The Historical Context for Current and Projected Global Change

You will create...

  • Models of Interacting Systems that Give Insight into the Collision Between Natural and Societal Processes
  • A Web-based Poster on a Related Topic of Your Choice

Below are some of the topics that are covered in the class ......

The Universe:

  • Big Bang Theory
  • Birth and Death of Stars
  • Radiation Laws
  • Origin of the Elements

Our Planetary System:

  • The Age of the Earth
  • Primitive Atmospheres
  • Natural Hazards
  • Plate Tectonics
  • Chemical & Biological Evolution
  • The Building Blocks for Life

Earth's Atmospheric & Oceanic Evolution:

  • Life Processes and Earth Systems
  • The Great Ice Ages
  • Atmospheric Circulation
  • Climate and Paleoclimate
  • Greenhouse Gases and Global Warming
  • Sea Level Changes
  • El Niño

The Tree of Life:

  • Emergence of Complex Life
  • Extinction and Radiation
  • The Five Kingdoms
  • Natural Selection
  • Respiration and Photosynthesis
  • Ecosystems

Projected Ecological Consequences:

  • Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels
  • Environmental Pollutants
  • Ozone Depletion
  • Likelihood of Global Climatic Change
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001 Fictional World of Ernest Hemingway

Instructor(s): Edward M Shafter Jr (eshafter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"All stories, if continued long enough, end in death, and he is no true storyteller who would keep that from you." This stark observation by Ernest Hemingway pinpoints his basic pessimism regarding the human condition. For him, the harsh realities of that condition are violence, suffering, absurdity, disorder and, finally, death. Nevertheless, despite its tragic nature, life still can often be a delight love and friends are especially rewarding. You will enter this compelling Hemingway world through the reading and discussion of short stories such as "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," "The Killers," and "Big, Two-Hearted River" plus such longer works as The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms. There will be several short papers plus a longer final paper, but no tests or exams.

The texts for the course are Scribner's paperbacks: The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway (the first 49); The Sun Also Rises; A Farewell to Arms; For Whom the Bell Tolls; The Garden of Eden; The Old Man and the Sea; and A Moveable Feast.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 Greater Than the Sum of Its Parts: Literary Magic in North America Fiction

Instructor(s): Lyall Powers (lhpowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A tradition as old as Geoffrey Chaucer, Canterbury Tales flourished again in the middle of the 20th century in North America. Chaucer combined a number of tales, each quite satisfactory in itself, into a whole that made those individual pieces even more enjoyable as though each gained in value by being gathered together. A similar achievement appears in such works as Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio (1919), Jean Toomer's Cane (1923), Hemingway's In Our Time (1925), Faulkner's Go Down, Moses (1940), and Margaret Laurence's A Bird in the House (1970). In each case, pieces of the book were originally published as separate, self-contained items. Writers often gather up pieces already published into a collection to be thus republished. Yet the books listed above have an extra quality that distinguishes them from those mere collections. These books 'look' like collections the pieces retain their "self-contained" appearance and each has its own title but the books affect the reader as though they were novels. The value of the several pieces has been remarkable enhanced by the gathering together; the resultant whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Magic? Yes, literary magic or artistry what athletic coaches mean by "team effort." That is what we will try to understand in this seminar. Meanwhile, it's all good reading: two of these writers are winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature, another is the winner of two (Canadian) governor General's Awards for fiction, and Toomer is a real "sleeper."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 Crouching Dragon: Chinese Transnationalism in Theatre & Film

Instructor(s): Claire Conceison (claireco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is an unprecedented transnational product whose writer, producer, director, composer, and actors embody a range of relationships between China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Hollywood. While the 2000 film has notched rave reviews, the 1998-1999 controversy over the Lincoln Center Festival stage production of Peony Pavilion shows just how volatile issues of transnationalism can become in the cultural arena.

Recently, Asian and Asian American artists have explored transnational identities (those transcending national boundaries) in provocative ways, including exploring the mutual impact of Chinese and American culture in constructions of gender, family, and personal history. In this course, we will examine selected plays, films, and intercultural productions and write about how they involve multiple national affiliations in both content and creative process and how this transnationalism is shaped by Sino-American cultural and political relations.

Course materials will include plays "Golden Child" by David Henry Hwang and "China Doll" by Elizabeth Wong, two productions of Peony Pavilion (directed by Peter Sellars and Chen Shizheng), and films The Joy Luck Club, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and Romeo Must Die. Some of the topics addressed in these sources are Chinese marriage customs, foot-binding, the impact of Western missionaries in China, the life of Chinese American actress Anna Mae Wong, and the feuding of Chinese and African American crime syndicates. In light of this material, we will reflect on issues such as intergenerational family bonds among Asian Americans, the influx of the Hong Kong martial arts film genre (and other Chinese aesthetic influences) to the U.S., and Hollywood's perpetuation of racial and gender stereotypes of Chinese and African Americans.

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UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 004 Music in Our Lives

Instructor(s): Louis B Nagel (julou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will focus on how people listen to music and music's impact on communities of people who listen to it. In the first weeks of the course students will learn how to listen to music and explore the interaction of different elements of music, such as rhythm, melody, harmony, etc. As we begin to listen to a wider range of music, we will explore the impact of music in cases such as the Paris riot of 1913 following the performance of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" or the reaction of King George to the "Hallelujah Chorus" at the conclusion of Handel's "Messiah." We will consider the impact of popular music, religious music, and the band as examples of how music has reached out into all types of communities. Students will attend three musical events and write reviews of each based on concepts explored in class. The professor will present and perform numerous examples of music on the piano, there will be invited soloists and chamber ensembles, and students who wish may share their musical talents in class.

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UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 005 Creativity in Science

Instructor(s): Kenneth J Pienta (kpienta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The DNA of a chimpanzee and of a human are 99% similar, and yet one species can design a spaceship while the other can use a simple stick to find ants. Why? What are the origins of human creativity? Can we teach ourselves to be more creative? This seminar will introduce students to the process of creative thought through examination of major discoveries in the history of the physical and biological sciences. We will examine the traits of creative individuals and how the environment and culture of their time influenced them. Specific individuals to be examined include Copernicus, Da Vinci, Einstein, Watson and Crick, and Edison.

Each student will present a major scientific discovery of their choosing, evaluating the thought processes leading to the discovery and discussing why it was creative and how it built on and differed from pre-existing paradigms. Students will be required to submit a paper as well as do an oral presentation to the seminar group. They also will be required to submit brief written responses to the week's reading assignment prior to class discussion.

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UC 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 008 Words and Their Uses: Studying Vocabulary in Time, Space and Social Life

Instructor(s): James R D Milroy (jmilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the origin and history of words in languages, with special reference to the vocabulary of English. We will look at the sources of our vocabulary in early forms of English and in other languages (such as French and Latin) and at the differences between American and British usage. We also will consider the relation of words in language to what they stand for in the real world (semantics), the range of meanings that a single word may have, and the changes of meaning that lead up to present day usage. We will then move on to study various aspects of the use of words by speakers, such as "jargon," metaphor, poetic usage, and the use of language by politicians and journalists. Amongst other things, we will consider the effects of feminism and "political correctness" on current usage. Later in the course we will consider the activities of language "mavens" and the effect of notions of correctness on the use of words. Students will be expected to possess a good etymological dictionary and should preferably have access to a thesaurus, such as a recent edition of Roget's Thesaurus.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 Virtual Community: Exploring Home Identity & Place

Instructor(s): Maurita Holland (mholland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the possibilities for using the World Wide Web for documenting, celebrating, and sharing a sense of place. We will begin with an examination of physical place as ecology, as a community of shared values or perspective, and as a culture. Is there a global community in natural systems that transcend human communities? In a world where people move frequently and freely, how is community created? Can human cultures be maintained as national boundaries blur? The course will proceed to a consideration of Web-based community. Can "place" be virtual space? Is a community bounded by physical geography? Can individuals live in multiple communities?

Through reading, discussion, and written assignments, students will develop their own sense of place. The course will culminate in individual, place-based projects. Students will use information technology, including digital cameras, Web authoring tools, and display technology to write, photograph, publish, and report orally their individual work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks and Other Minorities 1863-1954 and Beyond: An Historical and Legal Perspective

Instructor(s): Warren G Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be placed on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered around one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 Environment, Sustainability & Social Change. Meets with NR&E 139.019.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand at both the global and local levels, the emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will address the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community-based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Over the course of the academic term, seminar members will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and will utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be primarily individual, but some will involve groups.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 004 Human Sexuality & Gender Issues

Instructor(s): Frances Mayes (frnmayes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/151/004.nsf

Issues of human sexuality and gender are explored from many perspectives including historical, cross-cultural, religious, and physiological. All people are sexual throughout their lives, although the expression of our sex and gender is one of the most diverse and controversial areas in personal and public arenas. The diversities of biological sex, gender identity, gender roles, sexual orientation, sexual identity, and sexual behavior and the interplay among them are presented and reinforced through readings, exercises, videos, guest speakers, and weekly written assignments. We will discuss sexual difficulties such as infertility, STDs, sexual dysfunction, and sexual victimization along with prevention and treatment strategies. We will examine social and political issues such as civil rights for sexual minorities, sex and the law, date rape, pornography, the impact of AIDS, public and private morality, etc. Issues especially relevant for students are explored, including choice of sexual partners and behaviors, the influence of drugs, alcohol, and smoking on sexual function and sexual decision-making, sexual values and religious attitudes toward sex, and the wide range of possible lifestyles from celibacy to polyamory to paraphilias. The course requires access to the Internet, and uses a variety of Web-based resources and communication modes, as well as a textbook and readings from various journals. Weekly short papers and a semester project are required. Opportunities for help with developing presentation skills are available.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 Science and the Practice of Dentistry in the 21st Century.

Instructor(s): Russell Taichman (rtaich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will examine the development of dentistry from its origins to its present status as a scientifically-driven health care discipline. Students will critically evaluate how science has influenced the development of dentistry as a discipline for the past century and explore how emerging scientific disciplines are likely to change the practice of dentistry in the next millennium.

Please attend every session if possible. If you are unable to attend a class, please email me before hand. This is not a lecture course with a final written exam. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions, ask questions and offer opinions.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 The Social Psychology of the University Experience

Instructor(s): Martin Gold (mgold@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participants in this seminar will learn to apply social psychological analysis to their own and other students' experiences at the University of Michigan. The University is a stimulating and potentially powerful social environment that influences its students psychologically, sometimes profoundly. Sometimes students actually change the University significantly. In this seminar, you will begin to learn how to use social psychological theory and research to describe what these changes are and explain how they happen.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 009 Schools, Community, & Power: Service-Learning in Urban Educational Settings

Instructor(s): Stella L Raudenbush (stellarl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

UC 151 is a service-learning course that integrates traditional academic course work with personal reflection and community involvement. The goal of the course is to explore the dynamics of informal education in urban settings. This course will help students increase their awareness of the complex issues that educators face in urban areas, particularly with respect to race and class.

Students will work within the public school systems to develop practical service-learning models. Assisting educators in implementing these developed programs will give students the opportunity to put into practice the theory of service-learning while expanding their knowledge of how race, class, and gender issues create a unique and challenging learning environment in urban settings.

During the first part of the course, students will read about service learning pedagogy and the history of urbanization as well as the problems it has created. Students will be required to write weekly journal assignments that integrate their reading and document progress at site. This section of the course concludes with a midterm paper, in which students will document the progress of their service learning model and identify obstacles created by their setting.

During the second part of the course, students will read about the politics of urban schools and begin working with their educator on implementing their service-learning model. Student's final paper will be both a documentation of their progress as well as a reflection on their work as it related to issues they have studied.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 010 Injury, Alcohol, Drugs: A Modern Epidemic

Instructor(s): Ronald F Maio (ronmaio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/151/010.nsf

Injury is a leading cause of death in our society, and is responsible for more years of productive life lost than cancer and heart disease. The use of alcohol and drugs is frequently associated with injury. This course addresses the problem of alcohol, drugs, and injury through a broad-based approach that includes the medical, behavioral, social, and engineering sciences. Students are presented with basic anatomy and physiology and basic epidemiology on injury and alcohol- and drug-related injuries. Medical, behavioral, social, and engineering approaches to controlling injuries are discussed. Students are encouraged to discuss their own experiences with injury in relationship to the causes and possible prevention of those injuries.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 011 Medicine & the Media from Hippocrates Through ER

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs (rhobbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern, and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., St. Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

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UC 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 012 Identity, Alienation, & Freedom

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar will be to explore the concepts of identity, alienation, and freedom as psychological and philosophical concepts. However, the orientation will be specific and applied to the normal situations and predicaments that college students experience. Questions to be considered: surviving as an individual in a large and often impersonal university; living up to and/or dealing with the expectations of parents and teachers; questioning authority in the context of the classroom; trading-off career pressures and personal goals in setting educational priorities. Of special importance will be the examination of the sometimes frightening loss of a sense of identity that often accompanies significant alterations in lifestyle, such as that experienced by students in the transition from high school to college, or later, in the transition from college to the "real world." In addition to regular class meetings, each student will meet individually with the instructor every third week to develop and discuss individual reading and writing assignments. Grades will be determined by the quantity and quality of this reading and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 152. First-Year Natural Science Seminar.

Section 001 Clinical Psychobiology

Instructor(s): Oliver G Cameron (ocameron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Mental disorders are far more common in the general population than is usually appreciated, and often produce as much or more disability than do most medical disorders. The nature of these disorders is poorly understood by individuals who are not trained in the mental health fields. While mental disorders are usually defined simply on the basis of symptoms and behavioral manifestations, a great deal more is known about them, including many of the biological and behavioral processes underlying them. This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of mental health and mental disorders, and describe the basic natural and social science areas related to understanding brain function and mental disorders, with an emphasis on the biological processes. The course would be appropriate for anyone interested in neuroscience or mental processes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 152. First-Year Natural Science Seminar.

Section 002 Applied Environmental Geology

Instructor(s): Donald H Gray (dhgray@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Applied environmental geology is the application of geological data, techniques, and principles to the study and interpretation of materials and land forms comprising the earth's surface. The main goal of the seminar is to introduce students to some of these principles and techniques and to discuss the relevance of engineering geology in environmental issues and concerns. Topics covered in the seminar include: geologic origin and properties of rocks and soil; geologic processes (with emphasis on glacial land form development, seismic activity, subsidence, surficial erosion, and mass wasting); geologic structures and their engineering significance; interpretation of geologic, soil, and topographic maps; terrain analysis; identification and evaluation of geologic hazards; geologic considerations affecting facility siting; and engineering geology aspects of waste disposal in the ground. Students will have hands-on opportunities to conduct terrain analyses using air photos, topographic maps, and geologic maps; to conduct a geological field reconnaissance of different areas of campus; to prepare engineering geology use suitability maps for proposed land uses; and to visit USGS and other selected Web sites to obtain specific geological information.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 190. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 History of German Cinema

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen Von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A section taught in a second language and counting towards certification in "advanced second-language competence" may be added to any LSA course. An additional hour meeting in a classroom setting and associated out-of-class work, both involving a language other than English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 201 / AERO 201. U.S. Aviation History & Its Development into Air Power.

Instructor(s): John F Gaughan II (jgaughan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the development of aviation from the 18th century a time of balloons and dirigibles to the present, and examines how technology has affected the growth and development of air power. In addition, this course traces the use and development of air power through World War I and World War II, the Korean and Vietnamese conflicts, employment in relief missions and civic action programs in the late 1960s, and employment in military actions concluding with Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zorn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in a health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 21st century: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medical care and prescription drugs, and the effects on the uninsured (43 million plus people) and the underinsured. We discuss issues related to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films. A course pack containing the syllabus and W;T (yes, that is spelled correctly) by Margaret Edson are the text materials required. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and participation in discussions and the completion of all reading and writing assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor or a CSP counselor at CSP, G155 Angell to receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Road, Ann Arbor. Dorset Road is about a mile from campus. A map showing the location of will be available at CSP. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term. Student who will have conflicts with the Thursday evening meeting should not enroll in the class for the work we do on Thursday evening is essential to the successful completion of the course work and is not available in a text book.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 212. Introduction to Global Change III: Studies of Global Sustainability.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Kling (gwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: UC 110 and 111. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/gc3_frameset.html

Instructors:

  • George Kling, Associate Professor, Biology (Course Coordinator)
  • David Allan, Professor, SNRE
  • Paul N Edwards, Associate Professor, Residential College & School of Information
  • Gayl D Ness, Professor Emeritus/A, Sociology
  • Ben van der Pluijm, Professor, Geological Sciences
  • Mark L Wilson, Associate Chair, Biology

Every day, human and natural activities alter the planet on which we live. Over the past century, through our ever-increasing population and mastery of technology, we have been changing the global environment at a pace unknown to Earth's history. This course builds on the foundation laid by the first two Global Change courses, through in-depth examination of case studies integrating natural and human aspects inherent in Global Change issues. Students will integrate previously learned materials with new lecture material and discussions, and modern simulation tools. Expert faculty in the topic of each module (from NRE, LSA, Public Health, Engineering, Information) will guide students' exploration of each case in a discussion format. The topics covered will include human health impacts of global change, water resources, implications of land settlement, and the Framework Convention on Climate Change. In order to register for Global Change 3, a student must have completed both Global Change 1 and 2 or have completed one and be registered for the other.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 260. Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas H Steneck (nsteneck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three years of high school science. Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nsteneck/Courses/260/260syl.html

Instructors:

  • Nicholas Steneck, Professor, History (Course Coordinator)
  • Brian Coppola, Associate Professor, Chemistry
  • Edward Goldman, Attorney, Office of the General Counsel
  • Sofia Merajver, Associate Professor, Internal Medicine
  • Elizabeth Petty, Assistant Professor, Internal Medicine

This course will explore legal and ethical issues that emerge from ongoing developments in the life sciences, and introduce students to basic life science principles, methods, and content. The specific goals of the course will be:

  • to provide a general introduction to the content and methods of the life sciences;
  • to explore legal and ethical issues that emerge from ongoing developments in the life sciences;
  • to interest students in learning more about the life sciences; and
  • to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary course that bridges the sciences, law, and the humanities.

The course is designed to utilize students' interest in legal and ethical issues to improve their scientific understanding of the life sciences, and, at the same time, to use other students' interest in the life sciences to expose them to the legal and ethical ramifications of these sciences. First- and second-year undergraduates. 2.5 hpw lecture; 4 hpw lab, recitation, and discussion. 1 midterm exam, 2 final exams, 6-8 lab reports, 1 group term project, class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 261. Brain, Learning, and Memory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen A Maren (maren@umich.edu), John Jonides (jjonides@umich.edu), Hylan C Moises (moises @umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment is restricted to first- and second year students. (4). (NS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/uc/261/001.nsf

This course will survey integrative and cellular aspects of neuroscience with a focus on the neural mechanisms of learning and memory. It will include both a lecture and laboratory component. Topics will include nonassociative learning (habituation and sensitization) in invertebrates, associative conditioning of motor and emotional responses in vertebrates, genetics of learning and memory, synaptic plasticity and learning, molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in learning and memory, quantitative and computation models of synaptic plasticity and learning, cognitive neuroimaging of human learning and memory, and clinical neuropathology of learning and memory in humans. The topics of the course will span many levels of biological organization from behavior to genomic regulation. The intent of the module is to present an integrative picture of the organization and function of learning and memory systems in both simple and complex nervous systems. First- and second-year undergraduates. 3 hpw lecture; 3 hpw lab.

Readings will be assigned from Memory: From Mind to Molecules (Squire and Kandel), and a course pack. Grades will be based on three examinations and six laboratory reports.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 280. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: First or second year standing, and permission of instructor. A maximum of eight credits may be elected through lower-division UROP research courses (UCourses 280, 281, Engineering 280, Movement Science 280, Sports Management 280, and Physical Education 280). (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). A maximum of eight credits of UC 280 may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~urop/Home.html

This course provides academic credit for students engaged in research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP). To receive credit, the student must be working on a research project under the supervision of a University of Michigan faculty member. Students may elect the course for 1-4 hours of credit. For each hour of credit, it is expected that the student will work three hours per week. The grade for the course will be based on a final project report evaluated by the faculty sponsor and on participation in other required UROP sponsored activities, including bimonthly research group meetings, and submission of a journal chronicling the research experience. Students will receive a letter grade for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 300. College Practicum.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


UC 312. Community Projects in the Arts and Humanities I.

Section 001 Community Projects in the Arts and Humanities I

Instructor(s): David M Scobey (scobey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

UC 312 is a project-based, experiential learning course in the arts, humanities and design in which students work in teams with community partners in Ann Arbor and Detroit to create history exhibits, community-based drama, websites, curricula, and other cultural resources. UC 312 is designed to be interdisciplinary and to include undergraduates at all levels. No previous expertise is required, only an interest in using the arts and humanities to enrich public life. Students may elect UC 312 for either 3 or 4 credits. While the nature of the work will vary according to the project, they will be expected to commit a total of 3 hours per week (whether in class, in the field, or in homework) for each credit-hour offered.

Weekly work will typically integrate a variety of tasks, including research, meeting with community partners and UM team members, writing-up results, and teaching or mentoring of K-12 students. Students will be expected to move fluidly between multiple roles organized to further the completion of the project and the building of collaborative relationships. Each team will work under the supervision of a faculty Principal Investigator and a Project Coordinator, with the concrete goal of bringing some component of their project to completion over the course of the term.

UC 312 entails two 90-minute seminar sessions each week, one for project meetings and one for general discussion. Students will study the dynamics of relationship-building with community partners, as well as assess progress and problems in actual projects. Additional readings provide occasions for students to reflect upon the role of public cultural practice in civic and community life, thus broadening their learning beyond involvement in specific community projects. Topics include cultural analysis, the role of the arts and humanities in theories of democratic citizenship, and public art and community-design initiatives such as Detroit's Heidelberg Project and Ann Spirn's West Philadelphia Landscape Project.

UC 312 will require a student to do sustained work on a single project, including training and the completion of a final product, all of which will require significant use of research skills and writing. In addition to the creation of "public goods" for their projects, students will be asked to write reflectively and analytically on the implications of their community work in terms of the issues raised in the class readings. Course expectations also include regularly attending class, doing the required reading, participating in class discussions, and completing writing assignments for both the project team and class meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 375. University Courses Special Topics.

Section 001 Detroit: Past, Present, Future

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated twice for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course serves as an anchor for the Detroit 300 theme semester during the Fall Term, 2001; it is open to all students without prerequisites and will encourage interactions among peers from Detroit and from elsewhere. Its purpose is to introduce students to the city and its history and to make visible to students the many ways that people at the UM and in Detroit communities are collaborating to address problems and promote a renewed urban promise. The course will be built around several interlocking themes to do with the political economy of the auto industry and its successors; the evolving nature and activities of Detroit's residential communities; the interplay of race and ethnicity in urban politics; the cultural expressions of a city of migrants and workers; and the provision over time of city services (public schools, public health, police, etc). In taking up these themes, we will be concerned with historical dimensions, focusing especially on the period since World War II, and with the current situation, drawing upon visitors with expertise from around campus and in Detroit. The class will make full use of the many symposia and cultural events that will take place on campus as part of the theme semester a fair number of which will be required and there will be opportunities for students to go into Detroit, both as a class and in smaller groups, and to do service work in the city. The format will be lectures, with break out groups for discussion, and occasional films and organized excursions. Assigned reading will include historical texts and materials provided by our guests. There will be three assigned essays. Because the course will proceed a on a number of levels at once, regular attendance will be mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UC 390. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 Latin America: The Colonial Period

Instructor(s): David Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

* LAC SECTION restricted to students concurrently enrolled in History 347/AnthroCul 346.004, Latin America: The Colonial Period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

UC 424 / UP 424. Cities and International Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hemalata Dandekar (hema@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hema/up424/

Students will gain a conceptual understanding of the physical, socio-economic-cultural structure of cities. The objective is to evoke in students an enthusiasm and excitement or discovery about the physical fabric of city space. Multimedia presentations and multidisciplinary guest lectures will be used to bring to the classroom the sights, sounds, and the texture city life.

The course is based on the premise that cities such as Bombay, Shanghai, Sao Paulo, Lagos, London, Cairo, Mexico City, Los Angeles, Beijing, Delhi, Tokyo, Singapore, Hong Kong, Detroit, Johannesburg, Calcutta and Toronto have important parallels as well as differences in their historical evolution and in their emerging roles in a globalized world. These will be explored.

Understanding cities is a task that involves comprehending in three and four dimensions. Students will: learn the history of city development; study maps and architecture of the city to read the impact of social, political, and demographic forces on city evolution; analyze the spatial evolution of cities in industrializing to postindustrial societies; and learn how cities of the future are currently imagined and shaped, in societies throughout the world. Cross-cultural, cross-national, historical assessment of the changing role of cities and their regions will be key in this analysis.

Objectives: UP 424 has three objectives:

  • to understand the history of city development around the world and become familiar with the theories that seek to explain the functions of cities.
  • to assess the demographic, technological and socio-political changes that have influenced city form and function
  • to become familiar with the emerging role of cities and the attempts to direct and shape city growth and change.

Audience: This course is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. No prerequisites are needed. It is designed to be useful to students interested in sustainable development, architecture, city planning, urban politics and sociology.

Text and Coursepack: The text for the course is Hemalata C. Dandekar, ed., City, Space and Globalization, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, The University of Michigan: 1998. This book is available at a discounted rate of $11.00 at the copy center in the art and architecture building north campus. A course pack of readings is available at Ulrichs Book Store.

Structure: This is a lecture course taught primarily by the instructor. It will feature guest presentations by faculty from departments across campus. The course is divided into three parts as follows:

  1. Part I: City Origins. An examination of the evolution of cities historically as market towns, as religious centers, as administrative centers, and as centers for military and administrative control.
  2. Part II: Colonial to Industrial City. An exploration of city transformation from the European colonial period to the development decades following World War II as colonial capitals, as port cities involved in international trade and commerce, as centers of the newly industrializing regions of the world, as new towns and utopian communities. The efforts to provide shelter and housing, for meeting basic needs of city people from all socioeconomic strata will be discussed.
  3. Part III: The Post-Industrial City and City Today and Tomorrow. An assessment of current challenges of city living and those anticipated to emerge in the next century as cities become centers of global interlinked markets and financial networks, as world cities in their role in supra-national regions, as cities of the future imagined and shaped by creative innovations in societies throughout the world. The concepts of economic rationality, technical rationality, financial efficacy, sustainability of environment and resources will be investigated from differing cultural and aesthetic perspectives of what constitutes the "good city."

Notes on slides used in lectures by the instructure will be made available to students. They may be downloaded from the Web site for this course.

Grades and Assignments: Class grades are based on two mini assignments (25% of the grade each) and a final term paper (50% of the grade). The two mini assignments will involve collection of information which can be incorporated into the final paper.

Analysis is to be in four dimensions involving the tracing of the physical fabric of cities over time. In addition to academic writings students will utilize the tangible evidence of city layouts and architecture to illustrate the impact of social, political and demographic forces which influence city evolution. In-class examination of the students' research on cities will help reveal similarities and differences in city role and development around the world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for UC.


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