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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 7:09 PM on Wed, Oct 10, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in RC Humanities
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Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.

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RCHUMS 214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Growing Up Near The Great Lakes

Instructor(s): Elizabeth N Goodenough (lizgoode@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How have human beings from the Great Lakes chosen to present themselves and the stories of their lives? What motivates a person to write about "the third coast"? This course examines a variety of short narratives and novels from classic works of the great outdoors and the motor city to historical sagas of frontier life and such popular forms as mysteries, romances, folktales and children's fables. Looking at storytelling as a reflection of social values and as a mode of seeing, we will examine the particular images and patterns of thinking and becoming which populate fictional works set in Michigan and environs. What stage of development of or type or experience is formative and which provide the most useful lens from which to view diversity in the peninsula state? What is the impact of gender, nationality and race on this region's constructions of selfhood? How do writers from the Great Lakes invent the impossible and make up stories about stories within stories? How do we decide what these stories mean? Authors include Harriet Arnow, Charles Baxter, Joan Blos, Christopher Paul Curtis, Marguerite De Angeli, Sharon Dilworth,, Jeffery Eugenides, Hannah Green, Judith Guest, Jim, Harrison, Ernest Hemingway, Phillip Levine, Alice Munro, Zibby Oneal, Robert Traver.

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RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001 Narration

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

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RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

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RCHUMS 222. Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individualized instruction, group discussion, and readings aim at the development of original story ideas and the perfection of narrative techniques relevant to the authorship of children's books. Preliminary assignments picture book, folklore-narrative, and media prepare each student for a self-directed final project.

No prerequisites necessary. However, a thorough reading background in children's books or the willingness to compensate for its lack is presumed. Please do not take this course expecting "lectures" about children's books or child development. This is a writing course emphasizing story-writing skills and aesthetics.

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RCHUMS 236 / FILMVID 236. The Art of the Film.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Students Are Required To Attend Film Viewing On Tuesday 7-11 P M, With An Alternate Screening On Thursday 7-11 p.m.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 236.001.

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001 Chamber Music. (1 credit).

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom-Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Audition only for placement in ensembles. ALL students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must register for 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two hours of credit, students must participate in a large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal and coaching for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar and voice. This is not a mini-course!

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 002 Chamber Music. (2 credits).

Instructor(s): Virginia Weckstrom-Kantor (vwk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 250.001.

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RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 POPULAR MUSIC AND CULTURE IN SOUTH AFRICA.

Instructor(s): Michal Rahfaldt (mrahfald@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is primarily designed to give students a familiarity with popular music and culture in 20th-century South Africa. Key musical figures, institutions and events in the history of South African popular music are discussed in relation to their historical, social and political spheres of production. In addition to developing an understanding of different musical styles, we will use popular music as a lens through which we can view South African society in the 20th century.

The first half of the academic term focuses on music making from the early 1900's until the official dismantling of apartheid in the early 1990's. Beginning with the turn-of-the-century minstrel show and working up through the intercultural musical collaborations of the late 1980's, we will trace stylistic developments while highlighting the close relationships between political/social structure, ethnic identity, urban spaces, and musical production and consumption. During the second half of the academic term we will examine the status of popular music post-apartheid. Shifts in political power and changing social climates are impacting the music scene and drastically redefining musicians creative resources. Here we discuss these recent musical developments in relation to the new South African democracy and the quickly changing urban landscape. Specific themes to be explored throughout the course include:

  • Music in South African political life
  • Music, media, and the formation of black musical institutions
  • Popular music, township dramas, and other public performances
  • The interaction of global musical forms and sensibilities
  • South African musical icons and the artistic diaspora
  • Cultural boycotts and "world music"
  • Urban music in the 21st century
  • The music industry, radio and government regulations
  • Popular music HIV/AIDS, and community development
Listening to music is a central component of this course. Students will have the opportunity to engage with and respond to a wide range of musics. From the internationally acclaimed recordings of Miriam Makeba and Hugh Masekela in the 1950s and 1960s to the recent lesser-known hip-hop releases (Braase Vannie Kaap, Spex, and Mizchif), the material will reflect the diversity of African popular musical expression. Course materials also consist of scholarly writings, popular novels, poetry, activist writing, political cartoons, films and videos, and Internet-based resources. No knowledge of music or South African history is required; all students with an interest in the subject are encouraged to enroll.

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RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 002 Introduction to Ngoma: the Drumming Traditions of Central Africa

Instructor(s): Titos Sompa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The term "ngoma" is a common concept in Central, South, and East Africa., meaning "drum-dance-celebratory event." in essence, it means the "celebration of life."

In this beginning course, students will learn the basic rhythms of various repertory of the Kongo people of Central Africa. Students will also learn the importance of breathing, relaxing, and feeling that are crucial to produce the proper tones and timbres in Kongolese playing styles, and they will learn the importance of listening. Students will be expected to sing and dance because the drummer in Kongolese traditions is also a dancer and singer.

The course will primarily be performance related, and students will be required to participate in an end-of-term performance. The instructor will also give lectures and bring in guest speakers, as appropriate. Reading and writing assignments will also be involved, at the discretion of the instructor.

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RCHUMS 252. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 Studying And Playing SE Asian Music

Instructor(s): Susan P Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian, and animist traditions.

This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC. This course meets the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance, and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion, and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact has Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand? How do Indonesian youth transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present, and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma, and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings, and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as the Javanese do, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cycles are evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

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RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 Residential College Singers.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RCHUMS 254. The Human Voice as An Acoustical Instrument.

Music

Section 001 Basic Technique For Singers And Actors And The Alexander Technique. Meets the RC Arts Practicum requirement.

Instructor(s): Jane R Heirich (jheirich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to students who want to develop their voices for speaking and singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed singing, to sing more comfortably, and to maintain vocal health. The course is directed towards singers (with or without previous vocal training), speech and acting students, and those who want to find out if they can sing. Most voices are undeveloped or under-developed; and we can learn how to develop our vocal equipment for whatever our own purpose. Because our voices are housed within us, we must consider the whole voice-body-mind as the subject of our study.

Ms. Heirich is a STAT and AmSAT certified teacher of the Alexander Technique, and this work will inform all that we do in the course. The class meets together on Mondays and Fridays from 1-3 P.M. Your schedules should TEMPORARILY remain flexible between 12-6 on Wednesdays for scheduling of small group sessions. This scheduling will be completed by the end of the first class meeting Friday, September 7.

There will be one required text, some optional readings, daily preparation, and an individual or team project required. LS&A guidelines for 4-credit courses expect 3 hours of work per credit hour, hence, you should be prepared accordingly. With more than 4 hours in "class" (a weekly average of 6.25 hours, which includes the small group and individual lessons), there will be proportionally less expected of you outside of class. The required reading will be Miracles Usually Can't Be Learned, a basic vocal text by Jane Heirich, available as a course pack.

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RCHUMS 260 / DANCE 220. The Art of Dance: An Introduction to American and European Dance History, Aesthetics, and Criticism.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of dance history, criticism and aesthetics. What is dance? How can we analyze it in terms of form and "content"? What is the role of the dancer and choreographer? How can we distinguish different styles of dance? This introductory course is a basic survey of American and European dance concentrating on nineteenth- and twentieth-century dance forms including French and Russian classical ballet, American and European modern dance, African American jazz forms, and dance on film.

Choreographers and dancers considered will include Coralli and Perrot, Marius Petipa, Mikhail Fokine, Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava Nijinska, George Balanchine, Frederick Ashton, Isadora Duncan, Martha Graham, Doris Humphrey, Katherine Dunham, Merce Cunningham, Fred Astaire, Bill Robinson, John Bubbles, Gene Kelly, Twyla Tharp, and Mark Morris.

Texts will include Selma Jeanne Cohen's Dance as a Theatre Art, Deborah Jowitt's Time and the Dancing Image and Susan Au's Dance and Ballet and we will also read some dance critics including Gautier, Levinson, Martin, and Croce. No prerequisites.

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RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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RCHUMS 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 Image of the American Family

Instructor(s): Mendeloff

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This text based performance course will focus on one of the central themes in American Drama the relationship of the family. In doing so we will not only look at some of the major plays of the century by writers like Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Eugene and O'Neill, but we will also go on to look at more contemporary playwrights and more current issues in American playwriting the perspectives of women writers, African American, Asian and Hispanic writers, writers from the Gay and Lesbian community. The emphasis will be on the exploration of these texts through extensive scene study. No prerequisite is required but previous active experience is recommended.

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RCHUMS 291. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Nineteenth Century.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The nineteenth century was marked not only by revolutionary changes in society but by artistic revolution. By the beginning of the twentieth century the conventions of style and subject matter of virtually every major art form painting, music, dance, and literature had been radically altered and the role of the artist in society had been radically redefined. This interdisciplinary course will examine some of these changes and offer an introduction to major movements in European art and cultural history of the nineteenth century Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Symbolism by analyzing and comparing representative works of literature, dance, music, and the visual arts. Among possible works studied will be paintings by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Van Gogh, novels by Zola, Brontë, and Flaubert, music of Berlioz and Debussy, and ballets of Perrot and Bournonville.

We'll be asking some of the following kinds of questions: What is the revolution of style and subject matter brought about by Romantic art? How do Coralli and Perrot's ballet Giselle and the Symphonie Fantastique of Berlioz reflect these changes and the new attitude of the artist towards himself and his art? Can we find similar aims in certain realist novels of Zola and the realist painting of Courbet and Manet? Can we compare the revolution in the structure and subject matter of painting brought about by the Impressionist and Symbolist painters to the revolution in form brought to music by Debussy? What can we learn about the evolving view of women's place in society by comparing the portrayal of women in paintings by Berthe Morisot and Edouard Manet and the portrayal of women in literature by Ibsen and Edith Wharton? These and other questions will be considered by Beth Genné and class.

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RCHUMS 313 / SLAVIC 313. Russian Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Slavic Linguistics, Literary Theory, Film, and Surveys 313.001.

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RCHUMS 314 / MEMS 314. The Figure of Rome in Shakespeare and 16th Century Painting.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read a selection of Shakespeare's Roman plays, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, in the light of their ancient sources, especially Ovid, Livy, Plutarch, Caesar, and Augustine. We will ask what the figure of "Rome" means in the context of each play, and how that historical reference point is used to frame problems of contemporary import in Shakespeare's own time. As comparison and contrast, we will also examine the reclamation of Rome by artists of the Renaissance and the Counter-reformation, especially Mantegna, Titian, and Caravaggio, in order to make arguments concerning antiquity and memory; martyrdom and authority; and the status of the image. We will complete our study by inquiring how (and why) Renaissance artists, historians, and antiquarians began to construct a pre-Roman paganism. What sources did they use? Was there a political or cultural motive behind this construction?

  1. I. Blood Cries out: Martyrdom and Authority. Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus; Ovid, selections from the Metamorphoses; Livy, selections from the Early History of Rome; Augustine, selections from The City of God; Caravaggio paintings.
  2. II. The Lion and the Fox: Strategies of Power. Plutarch, Lives of Julius Caesar and Brutus; Shakespeare, Julius Caesar; Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince; Mantegna paintings.
  3. III. The Snare of Love. Plutarch, Life of Anthony; Shakespeare, Anthony and Cleopatra; Titian paintings.
  4. IV. Inventing British Paganism. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Gallic War (Selections); Shakespeare, Cymbeline
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RCHUMS 321. Advanced Poetry Writing.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 221 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced poetry writing workshop. Students must be willing to read their poems in class and actively participate in the critical evaluation of other students' work. A finished manuscript of 25-30 poems is a course requirement. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rchums/325/005.nsf

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 326.003.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rchums/325/005.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.005.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 Weimar Culture

Instructor(s): Matthew Nicholas Biro

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Weimar Republic, Germany's first experiment in democracy, lasted between 1918/19 and 1933. It began with the fall of the German monarchy at the end of World War I and ended a little more than fourteen years later when the National Socialist Party assumed power through a mixture of legal and illegal means. Although brief, the Weimar Republic witnessed a rich and diverse array of "high" and "popular" culture; including visual art, performance, sculpture, film, theater, literature, posters, illustrated books and magazines. Empowered by the breakdown of the established order, and with the firm belief that not only society but also the individual had to be remade from the ground up, the creators of Weimar culture engaged all the means at their disposal to visualize a new world and a new consciousness to go with it. This course will examine various competing visions of the new individual and new society as they are presented in Weimar Culture, and how fascist, socialist and democratic forces battled to define the modern individual and society.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 002 Michelangelo's Figurative Language

Instructor(s): Thomas C Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers a context for intensive study of verbal and visual artistic production in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature of humanistic philosophy and cultural theory. We will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention as a means of grasping the substratum of rhetorical "figures" or "tropes" that inform Michelangelo's art whether his rough-hewn sonnets or his highly polished marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist "thinking out loud," as it were, in sketches and fragments of verse. Related topics include Michelangelo's self-fashioning as genius, his theories of inspiration and his sometimes agonized religious introspection. In the course of the academic term we will study a considerable portion of his work in sculpture, painting, and architecture while observing his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Florence and Rome. Several short papers will be assigned and there will be one or two examinations with slides.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 347(451) / RUSSIAN 347. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Xavier Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is presupposed. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Russian 347.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 389. The Modern Theatre.

Drama

Section 001 Modern Drama: "Tony Kushner's 'Angels in America'"

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An in-depth study of Tony Kushner's "Angels in America" through research and performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 390. Special Period and Place Drama.

Drama

Section 001 Postcolonial English Language Drama

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A study of representative modern plays all originally written and performed in English, by non Anglo-Saxons, belonging to nations formerly or currently members of the British Empire. These works examine, in one form or another, the problems of colonialism, racism, and Third World or minority self-identity. Guest background lectures by experts in particular areas will supplement extensive stage-oriented exploration of the plays and evaluation of their particular contributions to contemporary drama. Short critical papers, individual research into other relevant playwrights, and participation in a culminating performance project are the principal requirements. Among the areas, and playwrights, and plays to be covered are: Ireland Colonialism Begins at Home : Brian Friel's Translations.

Africa: two or three major works of Wole Soyinka Death and the King's Horseman,< Lion and the Jewel, etc. and Athol Fugard Siswe Banzi is Dead, Boesman and Lena, Statements After an Arrest, etc..

Caribbean: two major plays of Derek Wolcott Dream on Monkey Mountain, Pantomime, The Last Carnival, etc. and Earl Lovelace's Jestina's Calypso.

Indian Subcontinent: Tagore's Post Office with vodeo of Hanif Kureishi's My Beautiful Laundrette.

Australian Aboriginal: Jack Davis' Kullark, with video of Utu, New Zealand film on a Maori uprising.

Native Canada and U.S.: Tomson Highway's Rez Sisters; Diane Glancy's Stick Horse, Daniel David Moses' Brebuef's Ghost, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 Psychoanalysis and the Modern Novel.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

First, this course will offer a basic introduction to the Freudian and Jungian theory of human psychology and psychopathology; the nature of the personal and collective unconscious; theories of the instincts and their transformation; the development and function of the ego; the mechanisms of defense and repair, and theories and methods for the interpretation of dreams and works of art. Second, this course will conclude with two studies in applied psychoanalysis. (1) Kafka and Freud: Kafka's childhood and his relationship to his father will be examined in light of the trauma of the bourgeois nuclear family as described by Freud. Also, the Freudian theory of dream interpretation will be applied as a technique for the analysis of Kafka's literary fantasies of guilt, punishment, and suicide. Texts: Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams; Kafka's short stories and The Trial. (2) Hesse and Jung: "the search for identity" of Hesse's protagonists will be examined in the perspective of Jung's individuation process, the persona, the shadow, archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, and man's quest for mystical illumination. Texts: selections from The Portable Jung; Hesse's Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. Kafka's and Hesse's lives will also be analyzed from the perspective of theories of neurosis and artistic creativity. Midterm and final exams, and term paper required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rchums/325/005.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn F Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura K Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/fall/rchums/325/005.nsf

See RC Humanities 325.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 484. Seminar in Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 Pontiac, Tecumseh and Detroit: History and Dramatic Representations.

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, Hums. 280, and three 300- or 400-level drama courses. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Two of the most important early figures of Native American resistance to White expansion focussed their activities on Detroit. In 1763, in the aftermath of the French and Indian War, the Ottawa chieftain gave his name to a "conspiracy" or "uprising" which nearly drove the British from the Upper Great Lakes. Some half a century later the Shawnee leader Tecumseh also fought his major engagements it the Detroit River area. Tecumseh was instrumental to the British capture of Detroit in 1812, but lost his life in October of the following year in the battle of the Thames during the British withdrawal. This course will examine both the history of these two major resistance movements (Peckham's Pontiac and the Indian Uprising, Sugden's Tecumseh: a Life, key articles in the recently developed field of Ethnohistory, etc.) as well as the artistic representation of these famous war chiefs from the 18th century to the present. The focus will be primarily on dramatic works from Col. Robert Rogers' Ponteach (1766) to Alan Eckart's Outdoor drama Tecumseh! (1974) still performed every summer in Chillicothe, Ohio. Reflections in the visual arts and poetry, as well as the burgeoning Tecumseh "industry" in the recent historical novel will be examined. Particular attention will be paid to the changing images of the careers and personalities of these major Native figures in the evolving ideology of White America. A field trip to the outdoor drama Tecumseh! is planned for the first week in September. Students will be able to participate of a "docu-drama" from the records of the court-martial of Gen. William Hull who surrendered Detroit to Brock and Tecumseh in 1812.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for RCHUMS.


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