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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Buddhist Studies

This page was created at 2:11 PM on Sat, Mar 17, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Buddhist Studies
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for BUDDHST

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Buddhist Studies.

What's New This Week in Buddhist Studies.

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BUDDHST 230 / Asian Studies 230 / Phil. 230 / Rel. 230. Introduction to Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald Lopez (dlopez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to some of the major themes in Buddhist thought and practice. Beginning with the early teachings associated with the historical Buddha, the course will go on to consider the development of the tradition in India, China, Japan, and Tibet. Readings will consist of primary texts in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BUDDHST 480 / Asian Studies 480 / Phil. 457 / Rel. 480. Topics in Buddhism.

Section 001 Theories and Practices of Buddhist Meditation.

Instructor(s): Luis O. Gomez (lgomez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Buddhist Studies 230. (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the history and polemical settings of Buddhist theories of meditation, this course includes a discussion of sample, and representative, practices spanning a variety of periods and schools. Traditions of meditation discussed include Chan/Zen, Theravada, Tibetan (Karmapa/Brugpa and Geluk). Sources (all in English translation) include ideal and mythical descriptions from the canonical traditions of South Asian and East Asian schools, prescriptive descriptions from classical and contemporary meditation manuals, and contemporary accounts and prescriptions. The course focuses on a historical and psychological understanding of the techniques, ideals, and polemics of this important aspect of the elite traditions of Buddhism. But we will also explore various uses of these techniques as vehicles for authority claims or instruments of legitimatization. We will discuss the way these theories appear in the actual practices of living Buddhists as well as a number of so-called "popular" perceptions of the meaning and power of meditation. Course requirements are a midterm, a final, and two short (5 page) papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BUDDHST 489 / Asian Studies 489 / Korean 489. Korean Buddhism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eun-Su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Buddhist Studies 220, or any introductory course on Buddhism. (3). (Excl).

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the development of Buddhism in Korea from the third century to the present. Prior knowledge of Korean history is not a prerequisite rather than approaching Korean Buddhism as history, the course will focus more on central topics and themes within the Korean Buddhist tradition. Five themes will be presented throughout the academic term: (1) the transmission and assimilation of Buddhism; (2) sectarian development; (3) rituals and national Buddhism; (4) syncretic interpretations instigated by Confucianism; and (5) eminent monks of Korea, with a focus on Wonhyo and the making of Korean Buddhist identity, and Chinul and the Korean Zen Buddhist tradition. We will conclude the course by evaluating the status of Buddhism in contemporary Korea against the contradictory backdrops of the revival of Buddhism in nationalistic fervor, and the destruction and abuse of the religion by other religious groups in Korea.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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