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Fall Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Fall Academic Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Archaeology

This page was created at 2:12 PM on Sat, Mar 17, 2001.

Fall Academic Term, 2001 (September 5 December 21)

Open courses in Classical Archaeology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for CLARCH

Fall Term '01 Time Schedule for Classical Archaeology.

What's New This Week in Classical Archaeology.

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CLARCH 221 / Hist. of Art 221. Introduction to Greek Archaeology.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The ancient Greeks are always with us, in high places and low, from the halls of our democratic institutions to the pages of the *Sports Illustrated* swimsuit edition. How can we explain their ubiquitous presence in our lives? Why won't they go away? This course explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece, beginning in the Bronze Age (the famous Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations) through to Hellenistic times (the age of Alexander the Great). We will explore all aspects of Greek life as reflected in the materials they left behind, objects that range from mighty marble temples such as the Parthenon, to discarded drinking vessels from their parties, from cities to theaters, from houses to palaces. Such artistic and archaeological evidence allows us to consider how Greek society worked, and how they understood the relations of humans and gods, men and women, Greeks and barbarians. Having taken this course, you will understand far better just why the Greeks are so hard to forget.

Requirements for the course will include attendance at lectures and weekly section meetings. Sections will be designed to stimulate discussion of particular themes and topics; for example, we will explore the nature of archaeological evidence and fieldwork techniques. We will also work with actual ancient objects from the holdings of the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 323. Introduction to Field Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan E Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Admit it you wanted to be an archaeologist when you grew up, and you enjoy Indiana Jones movies. This course is designed to build on these enthusiasms while also expanding your notions about just what archaeology is and just what archaeologists do. If archaeologists, to put it most simply, "study the past", what is left for them to study? Is digging the only way to find things? Who pays for archaeological work, and who owns the objects discovered? What can we learn about people in the past? What did they eat? What killed them off? Are only "real men" capable of discovering the truth about all this? Who owns the right to talk about the past? To examine these and other questions, archaeological case studies will be drawn from all over the world, with an emphasis on the ancient Greek and Roman Mediterranean. The course is lecture-based, with sections designed to explore particular topics in detail; fieldtrips, for example to various university museums, are also planned. The text book is C. Renfrew and P. Bahn, Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Practice, together with a supplemental course pack. Requirements include a midterm, final, and one project, which offers the chance to experiment with some "real" (and responsible) archaeology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 422 / Hist. of Art 422. Etruscan Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine K Gazda

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Class. Arch. 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History of Art 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 435 / Hist. of Art 435. The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John G Pedley (jpedley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine the art and archaeology of the Lydians, Greeks, and Romans (and, to some degree, that of their predecessors) in Asia Minor. Town planning, urbanization, architecture, sculpture, and vase painting will be followed, with attention to origin, distribution, and social and political use of types and styles. The process of Hellenization will be one focus of attention, and Romanization will be another. An hour exam at midterm, and a 10-20 page paper will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLARCH 499. Supervised Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CLARCH 531 / Hist. of Art 531 / Anthro. 587. Aegean Art and Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John F Cherry (jcherry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Class. Arch. 221 or 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The scope of this lecture course is the prehistoric art and archaeology of mainland Greece, Crete and the Aegean islands, seen in their wider Mediterranean and Near Eastern context, from earliest human settlement down through the end of the Bronze Age at about 1100 B.C. Although a wide range of sites, artifacts, and works of art will be surveyed, the emphasis is on understanding when, how and why regional states controlled from palace centers the first outside the Near East emerged in the Aegean early in the second millennium B.C. and collapsed near its end. This will entail examination of a variety of related issues such as the origins of farming, metal-working, writing, trade, etc., as well as considering the evidence of language and mythology, and the special problems posed by the iconography of prehistoric cultures. There will be a midterm, a final, and one paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 3

CLARCH 599. Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Regular reports and conferences required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for CLARCH.


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